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Dear researchers. If we want to publish a paper in a hybrid-type journal and choose the non-open access option (for subscribers only), is it literally free, or is there still a possibility of paying a less charge than APC in their open access option? How can we identify it?
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Thanks for the interesting paper with examples in astronomy. Indeed, the examples mentioned are exactly the exceptions I meant. Journals that are effectively open access after an embargo period. These journals use so to speak an open access model ‘avant la lettre’. See for example: https://iopscience.iop.org/journal/1538-3873 you can scroll to the issues of the past year and only the open access papers are freely accessible. However, if you open August 2021 issue all papers are freely accessible (effectively ‘open access’).
So Muhammad Habiburrahman , if you think about a journal, you do not really know and find it is a subscription based journal you can check for example Google Scholar and see if 1-2 year old papers are freely accessible (which is normally not the case for subscription based published papers) then most likely the journal charge an APC. See for example JBC, PNAS and the examples mentioned by Wolfgang R. Dick . They can charge an APC and the logic is that only for a few years the subscription fee/license will cover the costs and the loss of revenue by making the papers freely accessible needs to be covered by an (lower) APC. But ‘normally’ (and unfortunately) papers in subscription-based journals remain behind a paywall (basically forever…) and then the logic is no APC since costs are covered by subscription fee/license.
Best regards.
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With the advances in community review and Web3 on the horizon, I've been starting to wonder if the way in which traditional peer-review works is outdated. Have y'all found any systems out there that feel like the future of peer-review?
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That is the matter of reality. We have to face it. In recent years the number of retractions in journals, even top journals has increased.
Even when an article had been retracted many years ago, other authors were or are still citing them as a part of their literature review. For example lets have a look at this paper:
  • "Regression of human metastatic renal cell carcinoma after vaccination with tumor cell–dendritic cell hybrids" published in: Nature Medicine volume 6, pages332–336 (2000).
But in this URL we find the retraction note
Retraction date is sept 2003.
But a Google Scholar search shows, it has been cited 59 times, by different researchers, from 2018 up to now. Now let's ask ourselves where were/are peer reviewers? (in such a case)
After start of Covid 19 a "Paper Rush" began, every one wanted to be the first or among the first ones to have it in his field of teaching, expertise. So now there are a huge number of retracted papers just on Covid 19.
The problem so tense, some researchers addressed it in this article with a term "PAPERDEMIC" to attract concerns
  • "COVID-19 research: pandemic versus “paperdemic”, integrity, values and risks of the “speed science”" DOI 10.1080/20961790.2020.1767754
and then among too many other articles about the problems with peer review, these two articles by the New York Times:
  • "Two Huge Covid-19 Studies Are Retracted After Scientists Sound Alarms"
and this one
"The Pandemic Claims New Victims: Prestigious Medical Journals: Two major study retractions in one month have left researchers wondering if the peer review process is broken"
  • When we follow the cases of retractions in different journals, the role of whistleblowers is great. Now they have become gatekeepers of science . So it is a kind of "Post peer review" that is of great help. I firmly believe peer review in scientific research is gatekeeper of our health, life, nature, future and other good things, but we need new methods, as far as I have been thinking about and testing, post peer review could be a valuable option. Let me quote a sentence from the above mentioned article. "The truth is that the “scientific research has changed the world” but now, and more than ever, “it needs to change itself” (Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveira, 2020) DOI: 10.1080/20961790.2020.1767754
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Research chemists continue in their slow uptake of preprints. I've lately suggested one key reason for this unique behaviour of scholars in the basic sciences in two OA studies, one published by Publications:
and another by Insights:
What is your opinion on the origin of this delay? Has your team recently embraced preprint publishing? What are your favorite preprint repositories?
Thank you in advance for your insight.
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Dear Prof. Mario Pagliaro, Preprints are defined as an author’s version of a research manuscript prior to formal peer review at a journal, which is deposited on a public server. ResearchGate (RG) said about "Preprints": early-stage research. On the other side, RG is not a publisher and, in turn, uploaded unpublished text is not regarded as a publication. Hence, a preprint is an author's own original or draft version of their paper before any peer review has taken place and before it is published.
Before answering this valuable question, please let me give my own opinion about the preprint dilemma (مُعضلة ما قبل الطباعة):
I have a different perspective on uploading any preprint anywhere before it has been published. Why do you let others know about your insights and methodologies before publication? You should avoid telling the other researchers about the details of any one of your papers until it has been published and seeing your name by yourself. You may say that I am somewhat old-fashioned, but I have a different perspective on uploading any preprint anywhere before it has been published by your name. My advice is not to put your research anywhere until it is published. It is a security issue:
  • Your manuscript may be copied and then published by others before you can do that. This stealing of your paper might be happening. So, you must wait until the paper is accepted and then published in that journal. Then, upload that research item on any platform you wish.
  • A journal may have automated plagiarism software to check the paper before admitting it to the reviewing process. There are chances that your paper can get a rejection at any point. Thus, to avoid this problem. Publish the preprint after you got the paper as "ACCEPTED".
  • There may be a "cold war" between the professors of a given department. They do not like to discuss ideas as others will "steal" them and publish an article on them without giving credit to the one from whom they got the idea. My suggestion is to keep your work "private" and share it only with those who are really interested.
  • Academic publishing remains a competitive process. If someone else has recently published a paper very similar to mine, mine is less likely to be accepted. So although I may share my topic, I prefer to keep my methodology, findings, and discussion private, until published in a peer-reviewed journal. So. there is a high chance that someone may claim your idea as theirs!
  • Preprint gives a false feeling of security. Personally, I would always wait until the paper is accepted by the editor of a journal. After that, I can post it as a regular research item on any platform you wish.
Finally, for the coming future, do not upload any paper anywhere until it is published with your name. Even if it is a "preprint"! For the time being, If you had done something like that as a "preprint", for instance, I advise you to delete the preprint from any elsewhere and wait for two months before sending the paper to any journal.
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Dear community,
let me preface by saying my field is functional morphology (of the dentition), in both biological and paleontological contexts. Through my current position in a multidisciplinary institute, and on a highly diverse campus, I have made many friends from different disciplines. Amongst them a lot of physicists, and naturally we talk about work and the subject of publishing papers of course comes up, too.
I noted a striking difference: they often say "we just published this paper" and mean, they have just uploaded on arXiv.org. Moreover, first uploading to pre-print archives, and seeking publication much later, is totally accepted, it even seems encouraged and just the norm.
I feel in my field, we are still thinking of pre-prints as being "no real publications", and will seek peer-reviewed publication first - only uploading to pre-print servers if the journal permits to upload the submitted version.
My question is, what is he perception in your field? Are we robbing ourselves of opportunities by not engaging with pre-print archives more? Should this change?And where do these different publication practices in the different sciences come from?
I am interested in your insight.
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One of my friends was accused of plagiarism; do you know why?
After about three months, his research paper was rejected because of plagiarism. When he checked the journal report, he found that his paper was accused of plagiarism with a 61% percentage. The reason is that his manuscript was previously uploaded as a preprint. It took him another two months to solve the problem and remove the manuscript from the database of the preprint.
So, in order to solve this type of issue, it may take several months of following up to remove the manuscript from the database of the preprint. Anyhow, If there were accusations of plagiarism, it is not well for any researcher's reputation, in any meaning.
Needless to say that if you are using your own words, there should be no plagiarism issue.
Another important related issue, be careful if you have other co-authors with you. For this reason, I only trust just my own words.
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I recently discovered that many open access advocates are publishing their work on open access in paid journals. Is it justified or fair enough that a researcher working on open access and advocating its immediate application across the globe is publishing their own open access research in pay-walled journals? What is your opinion in this regard?
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Thanks Sir for your precious feedback. Many principles like Mathew's Effect or Pareto's Principle that were not directly related to scholarly communications, show similar results in this field as well. Recently, I applied Pareto Principle on Productivity of journals and found 20 of journals produce almost 80 of articles. These principles are helpful in understanding the knowledge domains to great extent.
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I'm helping set up a new journal, and I'm trying to avoid building Word/LaTeX templates from scratch. There are a ton of templates out there for existing journals, of course! I would love to simply reuse any of them, perhaps tweaking them slightly for our own journal. But I haven't found a template that explicitly allows for modification and reuse. Does anyone have any suggestion where to look or if you have one you are willing to share?
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Hi, there is an option in Endnote offering journals templates. So if you're paper is ready give it a go!
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Recently all Peer-Reviewed (SCI) Journals are consistently supporting open access publishing practices. My concern is that, it will not be very arduous for researchers from poor country to publish articles in such journals?. Most of researchers from different countries who cannot afford that much money due to lack of research grants including funds crisis etc.. Is this really a good move in scientific academia?. It is like benefiting the same rich sections and it seem like scientific business rather than good freely quilty research? Now the house is open for enlightened thought in this regard.
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Your worries are valid and I am with you on this one. However, I believe that researchers from poor countries can choose to partner with foreign institutions to get their papers funded. Like any other industry, it is always the fittest that gets served. Football, for instance, does not consider that some poor countries might not have the resources toward the best coaches and players. It has become an it-is-what-it-is world.
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One of my research papers was rejected without being sent for peer review but I have just found a highly similar paper published by the same journal. Now can I request for an explanation from the journal for this double standard policy?
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Dear 情熱的 研究者
Say hello for another journal.
Good luck
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I recently got an invitation as a potential reviewer from "info@peer-review.net", In the email (see below), there was no mention of the group to which the journal belonged and the email has not been mentioned on the website of the journal.
Have you had any encounters with The Open Civil Engineering Journal yet? What do you think of them? Or do you think it is a fake email?
Thank you very much to you all for your valuable contributions which will benefit us all.
Here is the email in question:
March 3, 2022
Dr. AB Alsamawi
Univ Tlemcen
Fac Technol
Dept Civil Engn
EOLE Res Lab, BP 230, Tilimsen
ALGERIA
Dear Dr. Alsamawi,
In view of your work in the field, your name has been recommended, as a potential reviewer, for the manuscript entitled “...........” that has been submitted for publication in the journal “The Open Civil Engineering Journal”. Please review the abstract below, to see if it comes in your direct field of expertise, and provide us a confirmation of your willingness to review the complete manuscript. I hope that you will be able to help us.
Title: .......
Abstract: Aims: ........... Background: .......... Objective: ........ Results: ............
I would appreciate it if you could kindly respond to this message at your earliest. Since we are endeavoring to provide an efficient review process for our authors, we would request that you send your comments and recommendations, if any, back to us as soon as possible.
In addition to carrying out this review, we would also like to propose your name, as a reviewer, to be included in the Reviewer Panel of this journals, and possibly others relevant to your field. Our Reviewer Portal will also offer its reviewers the following benefits and discounts on other Bentham services:
•         A free eBook of their Choice, on completion of two reviews
•         A 50% Fee Waiver on Quick Track rates on completion of 3 reviews
•         A 40% discount on Open Access Plus rates on completion of 4 reviews
As a member of our Reviewer panel, you would be expected to review a maximum of 3 articles every year. Please also note that to expedite the review, this request has been sent to several qualified researchers and once we get the first three commitments to review, we will not entertain any further acceptances.
Thank you for your consideration.
Regards,
Ayesha Chaudary
Editorial Manager
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The journal is part of Bentham Open, a publisher fully dedicated to open access publishing. There are a number of discussions here on RG about this issue:
My conclusion: It is fake.
According to their own website they state: “The full manuscript has to be submitted online via Bentham's Manuscript Processing System (MPS) at (https://bentham.manuscriptpoint.com/). The link “Submit Manuscript Online” leads you directly to the submission system of that specific journal.”
You can ask confirmation here: info@benthamopen.net
Best regards.
PS. So far, I’ve seen the following suspicious addresses discussed on ResearchGate:
@editorial-peer-review.net
@specialissueeditors.net
@currentmedicinalchemistry.org
@currentsmartmaterials.net
@editorialboard-office.net
I asked the people behind this publisher to confirm my suspension that these mail addresses have nothing to do with Bentham Science? And that all official contacts always end with ...@benthamscience.net or …@benthamopen.net ?
Thanking you in advance.
I suspect that there is a third-party company active here that promises (for a fee of course) a successful application to an indexed journal (in this case a Bentham journal) and by this way they try to collect genuine peer review reports to make it all look more ‘real’.
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Journal of Industrial & Management Optimization (JIMO) is an open access journal. You pay a substantial amount to publish a paper. When you go to the website of its publisher, American Institute of Mathematical Sciences (AIMS Press), it seems that it is not really based in the United States. I am not sure if it is a legitimate professional organization or if it is a predatory publisher. They have a large number of open access journals. On the other hand, their handling of papers is terrible: extremely slow and low-tech, which is not typical for predatory journals. It may take 13 months to get an editorial rejection, for instance. Furthermore, they don't have an online submission system with user profiles on it, you just submit the paper on a website, and they give you a URL to check your paper's status, which makes your submission open to anyone who has the URL. It has an impact factor of 1.3, which makes me puzzled. Any comments on this organization and the journal will be appreciated.
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Norbert Tihanyi one little warning, if you look whether a particular journal is mentioned in the Beall’s list you should not only check the journal title in the stand-alone journal list (https://beallslist.net/standalone-journals/) but also the publisher behind it (if any). In this case the publisher is not mentioned in the Beall’s list (https://beallslist.net/). Anis Hamza I suppose you mean ISSN number, this journal with ISSN 1547-5816 and/or E-ISSN:1553-166X is mentioned in Scopus (https://www.scopus.com/sources.uri?zone=TopNavBar&origin=searchbasic) and Clarivate’s Master journal list (https://mjl.clarivate.com/home).
Back to your question, it is somewhat diffuse. There are signs that you are dealing with a questionable organization:
-Contact info renders in Google a nice residence but does not seem to correspond to an office and I quote “The American Institute of Mathematical Sciences is an international organization for the advancement and dissemination of mathematical and applied sciences.” https://www.aimsciences.org/common_news/column/aboutaims
-Both websites https://www.aimsciences.org/and http://www.aimspress.com/ function more or less okay but not flawless
-The journal “Journal of Industrial & Management Optimization (JIMO)“ is somewhat vague about the APC. It positions itself as hybrid (with an APC of 1800 USD), but all papers I checked can be read as open access (although not all have a CC etc. license). It mentions something like open access for free when an agreement is signed with your institution but how much this cost is unclear
-No problem by itself but the majority of authors are from China, makes you wonder about American Institute…
-Editing is well…sober
On the other hand it looks like and I quote “AIMS is a science organization with two independent operations: AIMS Press (www.aimspress.com) and the American Institute of Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) (www.aimsciences.org ).” AIMS Press is focused on Open Access journals while the journals published by AIMS (www.aimsciences.org) are/used to be subscription-based journals. Pretty much like Springer has there BioMed Central (BMC) journal portfolio and Bentham has their Bentham Open division.
Facts are:
-AIMS ( www.aimsciences.org ), more than 20 of their journals are indexed in SCIE and indexed in Scopus as well (under the publisher’s name: American Institute of Mathematical Sciences)
-AIMS Press (www.aimspress.com ), four journals are indexed in SCIE and thus have an impact factor and 14 journals are indexed in Clarivate’s ESCI. 7 journals are indexed in Scopus.
-AIMS Press, 20 of their journals are a member of DOAJ
-Journal of Industrial & Management Optimization (JIMO) https://www.aimsciences.org/journal/1547-5816 is indexed in Clarivate’s SCIE (impact factor 1.801, see enclosed file for latest JCR Report) and Scopus indexed CiteScore 1.8 https://www.scopus.com/sourceid/12900154727.
-For the papers I checked the time between received and accepted varies between 6 and 9 months and an additional 3-4 months before publication (it is well… not fast but not unusual)
So, overall, I think that the publisher has quite some credibility and it might be worthwhile to consider.
Best regards.
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The problem is that I can not recognize what is predatory publisher and what is not. Why? Because some superiors (often professors or groups with certain interests) claim that this or that publisher is bad, with predatory traits.
This negative campaign is being run against publishers whose journals are indexed in the Web of Science or Scopus databases.
Do you think it's perfectly okay to publish in journals indexed in WoS / Scopus? Or can these databases index stacks of predatory publishing journals?
Of course, there can be some mistakes in the order of units..
Please help share this including your opinions, thanks.
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Beyond what you ask, I have found many of these journals are even indexed in Pubmed and it is even harder to detect to start with!
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A journal has accepted my paper which has multiple indexing including google scholar and is open access. But it ain't scopus indexed. Does that make the journal less desirable or credible?
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Google scholar is (just) a search engine dedicated to scholarly/academic article, however, it is not an indexing criteria/authority. It can index any journal type regardless if the articles are peer-reviewed or quality of article or journal as a whole.
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It is the link of a beneficial Q&A page with more than 320 answer by RG colleagues.
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Journals are not needed anymore, this is an old concept.
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In order to achieve more views and downloads for my open access papers, is posting them in SSRN can be a good idea?
Is SSRN a similar website like Research Gate?
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SSRN (Social Science Research Network) is a platform that serves as a repository for preprints, working papers in social sciences and humanities. It is currently owned by Elsevier (and in fact Elsevier journals propose to upload submitted papers as pre-prints in SSRN). While pre-prints on SSRN can receive some visibility, please consider that they are not peer-reviewed (and thus barely cited). For most academic journals, posting preprints on SSRN is not considered prior publication, but some journals require to delete pre-prints after acceeptance.
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Does anyone have experience with Columbus Publishers?
trustworthy or predatory journals?
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This publisher is new (and certainly too new to be mentioned in for example the Beall’s list (if they turn out to be predatory). I do see some red flags:
-Location is suspect, Google the address and you end up with some pretty nice-looking real estate but a highly unlikely location for an office
-I noticed in literally the first paper that this publisher is not sharp in copyright permissions of images, this is a red flag for the lack of proper peer review and use of well-established scientific standards
-The photo used on their homepage is probably not original since it is already used here https://professionals.hartstichting.nl/samenwerking-en-financiering/samenwerking/talentontwikkeling
-They are new so consequently non-established but still they a membership with ridiculous prices https://www.columbuspublishers.com/membership
-The APC’s are way too high for a basically non-indexed journal https://www.columbuspublishers.com/journal/research-journal-of-gastroenterology-and-hepatology?submenu=article-process-feefor a research/review article they charge 1499 USD
-The journals I checked are empty (no papers and no board members…)
Even if this might turn out to be a genuine and legit initiative I would go for another journal. Looking at your publication list you found way better one’s than this new player.
Best regards.
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The Publishing Industry is a robber of knowledge democracy, especially for us who live in the Global South. The Publishing Industry, of late, has been asking for a mandatory so-called Article Processing Fee (APC). In my opinion, this is pure theft. These publishers are increasing limiting options to choose from when submitting a manuscript. They will not, for example, give you a choice to NOT PAY A FEE, or ASK FOR A WAIVER. The only option you are given is: I AM WILLING TO PAY THE APC upon acceptance of my paper. This is daylight robbery.
For knowledge democracy and decolonization of knowledge, works from the Global South should be published open access and with APCs waived. It is encouraging to see that MDPI and Hindawi are learning that and doing it very quickly. The "Western" Publishing Industry should copy what MDPI and Hindawi are doing and set researchers in the Global South free.
You are welcome to continue this discussion.
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It seems to me that the main problem is that publishing scientific papers and books is mainly a commercial market. A large part of science is funded by governmental money, but with some exceptions to publication of the results is by privat enterprises. However, a commercial market cannot be ruled by democratic principles. - There have been many discussions before on the problem of APC, see, e.g.:
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I'm interested in repositories like zenodo, figshare, etc., where open-access papers (previously published) can be uploaded in order to improve the visibility of papers. Thanks a lot for your suggestions!
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Agreed with Dr. Wolfgang R. Dick Precisely, ResearchGate and Academia.edu are commercial sites, whereas most open access repositories are non-profits. These academic social networking sites have each raised large amounts of initial funding: $17.8 million for Academia.edu, and $35 million for ResearchGate.
Nevertheless, there are two main routes to open access are: Self-archiving / 'green' open access – the author, or a representative, archives (deposits) the published article or the final peer-reviewed manuscript in an online repository before, at the same time as, or after publication.
Best Regards
Dr. Fatemeh Khozaei
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I have just published a book with a big international science publisher (CRC Press, a branch of Taylor and Francis). The multi-author edited book is nice and hopefully useful for many (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321016401_Grasslands_of_the_world_diversity_management_and_conservation), but the experiences with the publisher were so disappointing that some co-authors and I decided to start a public discussion on writing scientific books in the age of greedy publishers.
Here are some key facts of our collaboration with CRC/Francis and Taylor:
· The communication with the publisher was very unreliable and inefficient: e.g. did we receive various requests multiple times and the publisher “forgot” about previous written agreements.
· The typesetting as the only service provided by the publisher was very poor: about 90% of the changes made by the publisher introduced errors into previously correct text or tables and it was very time-consuming for us to find all these errors and remove them again.
· Instead of paying the authors a honorarium for their work, the publisher forced us to pay for the colour figures in our articles.
· The publisher refused to give the authors a complimentary print copy of their book (only the editors got one).
· First the publisher wanted to provide an electronic version of the chapter/book only to each corresponding author, not to all authors, and only after serious negotiations they accepted to provide e-books to all authors. We assumed that these would be functional pdf’s, but instead they received the books in a very weird e-book format with a display in an ugly and hardly readable layout (e.g. all text in bold), not allowing proper printing nor sharing parts of the content (e.g. single pages or figures) with others. This means that the authors did not receive any printed or electronic copy of that exactly corresponds to the published version of their own work.
I am extremely frustrated about the behaviour of CRC/Francis and Taylor and consider the last point as being at the edge of unethical. My feeling is that CRC might only reflect the strategy of most international science publishers to maximise profit by pressing money out of both authors and readers/libraries, while at the same time minimising the service they provide. On the other hand my gut feeling tells me that nowadays with cheap print-on-demand technology and the possibility to distribute printed or open access e-books without the need to involve a big marketing/distribution machinery should allow for other solutions.
Therefore, I would like to ask you two questions:
· Did you make similar experiences with other science publishers, or are they better or even worse?
· Do you see ways how those among us who would like to continue to write nice and useful books can do this without sacrificing themselves to profit-maximisation strategy of the big international science publishers?
Looking forward to your responses and hoping for a lively debate,
Prof. Dr. Jürgen Dengler
(ZHAW, Wädenswil, Switzerland)
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I had a positive experience with Springer. I was involved in two book chapters; the publisher sent me a hard copy of the book.
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I have enjoyed listening to podcasts to learn about scientific communication, research methodology, peer review, open access, preprints, scientometrics, and other topics. I am interested if anyone has a podcast they like that discusses any of these topics. Here are some that I have listened to so far:
The Scholarly Kitchen Podcast
InformED (ISMPP)
Everything Hertz
Science Communication Journal Club Podcast
Thank you,
Rob
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Author expresses polite request to recommend a journal in Comparative Literature which accepts:
i. submissions discussing semi-forgotten poets of Russian fin-de-siecle i.i.submissions discussing a single cycle in enitre ouvre of such figure,
ii. submissions from seemingly unremarkable graduate students
iii. submissions analyzing literature from aesthetical standpoint, with minimal relevance to burning social issues and their solutions, however defined.
[Prehistory: I'm a promising, and so far not much more, graduate student, who managed to not publish anything so far. I have no regrets though, both because world needs more reading and less writing, and simply for looking at my old drafts.]
I'm finishing an article about Nikolay Gumilyov (Николай Гумилёв, Gumilyev, Gumil'ev) - who, surprisingly for several Scopus-listed journals, is not the same person as his son, Lev Gumilyov, and whom I find shockingly understudied and underappreciated. Never particularly popular in the West, today, with interests shifting... well, away from Russian aristocratic aesthetes, he seems to be almost forgotten. Similarly in Central Europe, or at least in Poland, where I come from: before perestroika Gumilyov was "unpublishable" in Soviet Union, so it was difficult to get acquainted with his poetry when knowledge of Russian was fairly widespread, and today hardly anyone knows the language or has much interest in such topics (understandably, yet sadly). In Russia, on the other hand, he has his place in the canon secured, but it comes with a price of being incorporated into the lore of state ideology.
Fortunately, here I am with my article on his Italian Poems. While I think the article is very decent, it's not the most en vogue topic. On top of that, nolens volens, I end up arguing with almost every critic I refer to. And still, I need to publish it to face my supervisor with my head high, and also because turning this great poet into a misspelled footnote to Akhmatova and Mandelsham, or a banner woven from misinterpretations, is un-for-giv-a-ble.
Which leads to my point, as I can no longer ignore the burning question where I'm planning to submit my untimely meditations, composed in English. To make things worse, while I do offer some original input, there is no grand synthesis, the thing is quite specific. Too specific for a generalist journal, I guess, but I could try something on Modernism, or Decadence, or correspondence of arts, or Italy/Italianism. I will be grateful for any suggestions, or at least warnings!
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Obviously, it would be good if our work would be open for access by anyone. Publishing open access, however, is expensive especially for most researchers in developing countries. Would you mind sharing insights on how you promote your work?
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Create your own accounts in a trusted academic platform(s).
Add your publication and taking into account publishing copyrights.
Present your comments and feedback.
Regards,
Emad
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How much does the quality of articles vary when the Open Access publishing model is used?
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Hi Dr Ziyauddin Seikh . I think there is no relationship between open access journals and quality of articles.
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I would like to ask you to share your experience for publishing in MDPI special issues:
1- It seems they are getting benefit from Invited Guest Editors to write and present a short proposal about a specific topic. This is purely an honorary position and after this step, the staff of MDPI (who are not from the academy) will proceed with everything. They receive manuscripts from authors and send the manuscript for revision. In many cases, if the article is accepted with a major revision, only 5 days will be given by the assistant editor to revise the manuscript!!!
2- High publishing cost (almost 2000 CHF) is another negative point.
3- It seems 100 CHF gift for reviewers is attractive enough for many people who voluntarily work as a reviewer without having enough experience in that topic. The reviewers only ask for modifying graphs and tables and suggesting their article as a reference!!!
4- I personally prefer to submit to a journal with a professional academic editor who is really familiar with the topic and after acceptance to pay for open access.
5- The impact factor of special issues is high, but i think this is neither related to the quality of the articles nor the journal. This is mainly due to the open acces of journals that articles can receive more citations!
6- The positive point from my side is that they are quite fast and within one month you will receive the result, either accepted or rejected!
They know how to play the game and get advantages from the name and position of guest editors by offering discounts!
My main point is if you have high-quality work submit it to a high-quality journal and if you are interested to make your work more visible, just pay for open access.
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Whilst the mainstream here is appealing against publishing in MDPI. I would like to raise another reason for people to publishing there, which is "TIME".
Traditional journals nowadays take really long time to review, while MDPI can guarantee the speed. Many reviewers of traditional journals agree to review but do not deliver ON TIME. Using myself as an example, I know that the journals I chose give 30 days for reviewers but my experience shows that it is quite usual for reviewers to just put the manuscript aside and return after 3-4 months. This is just one round - usually the overall process results in that a paper being delayed in publishing for around one year.
One year delay can be very bad regarding research outputs, as a large project is normally 2-3 years, PhD in the UK is 3-4 years - we really want our research to be seen before we submit the final report...Thinking about the potential delay, it would be sometimes risky to submit a manuscript to traditional journals, thus people logically choose MDPI which normally can publish in one month.
Therefore, alongside this forum, I would say we could also create a thread to suggest the reviewers, who kindly agreed to contribute, can also be as ON TIME as possible...
Note - I am not a fan or opponent of MDPI - just saying my opinion.
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This discussion is precipitated by a discussion in a list serve that I am subscribed to concerning predatory publishing and the issue of working with and publishing in MDPI journals.
In my experience, when the subject of MDPI journals is put forward, this tends to raise polarizing discourses and opinions.
My question: What has been your experience in dealing with MDPI journals either as guest editor, author or reviewer?
Recently, researchers in Poland published this study that goes some way to addressing this polemic.
See: Krawczyk, F., & Kulczycki, E. (2021). How is open access accused of being predatory? The impact of Beall's lists of predatory journals on academic publishing. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 47(2), 102271. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0099133320301622
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Actually, here is my last article.
This was posted in a special issue. And I am very happy about that. Everything went without delay.
Regards, Sergey
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Choosing a journal for the publication of research articles is becoming increasingly difficult and a source of concern. Most often, the researcher struggles to determine the article's weight and is rejected. So, how should we go about choosing a journal? Do you have any suggestions that you find useful? I'd be extremely grateful.
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Yes, that's right, choosing a journal for a research paper is not an easy matter. Journals with a high level of recognition in the scientific world and included in the Scopus and / or Web of Science lists usually require high fees for publishing an article. Journals that do not require fees, have simplified editorial procedures, are usually much less known, and articles published in these journals are less frequently cited. But there are journals that do not require a fee to publish an article, and the articles included in these journals are also posted on many different indexing databases of articles, journals and research papers when published. In this situation, the possibility of citation and recognition of the published article also increases. This is particularly important when the entire text of the published article is posted in the OA formula in various indexing databases of articles, journals and research papers and on various internet research portals.
Below I propose good scientific journals published every six months (semi-annuals), which, after publishing their articles, place all articles in many databases of indexing scientific publications in the open access formula. Articles for publication are accepted free of charge and are also published free of charge. You can publish for free in these magazines. Articles published in these journals are entered in many indexing databases of scientific journals. These magazines are published electronically in PDF and also in printed version.
Below are the websites of three scientific journals that meet these criteria:
- "International Journal of Innovation in Social Sciences and Engineering" (ISSN 2543-7089):
Social sciences, various humanities and exact sciences, also taking into account social, sociological, economic and other aspects:
- "International Journal of Legal Studies" (ISSN 2543-7097):
Legal sciences, normative aspects of various issues, various issues described in normative terms:
- "International Journal of Innovation in Social Sciences and Engineering" (ISSN 2543-7089):
Humanities and exact sciences, various fields of science, various types of issues including new technologies, various fields of innovation applications, determinants of innovation development, etc.
Have a nice day, Stay healthy! Best wishes,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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I plan to post a research pre-print in arXiv.org of a paper that I already submitted for publication in a journal.
If the pre-print gets cited, I wonder if the citations can be attributed to its corresponding journal article once it gets published.
I hope those with experience on this can provide some insights below.
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Mª Angeles Zorrilla Lopez-Perea
Arxiv is not a journal, but the most popular collection of preprints in the world, in which articles are mostly pre-published before they are sent to journals. Arxiv has nothing to do with logs. Articles published in Arxiv are not indexed in world databases such as WoS, Scopus.
I'm sorry if I didn't answer what you asked
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Recently, some of the reputable open access journals have attracted great attention from researchers around the world. This raises many questions about the continued credibility and scientific impact of these journals in the next years.
Kind Regards
Dr. HLG
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A number of research publications have indicated that open access articles are viewed and cited more frequently than ones solely available to subscribers. Open access publications in hybrid journals receive more downloads, citations, and attention than those published behind a paywall.
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There are common terms pointing to unapproved publishing journals, like fake, predatory, phishing ... etc. Can someone help clarifying the differences between these terms?
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Different terms are used for the same meaning.
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It is well known of the importance of statistics in research to support your answers. Please define
any statistical test, what does it do and where to apply them.
Please explain the difference between test and statistical test.
The tests such as chi square are they normal tests or are statistical? Please give examples of both and explain as much as possible.
(the blood and urine tests are completely different tests and should be considered separately. In the same way as biochemical assays. Is there anything to add to the tests explained, tests, "as chi square" and statistical tests?)
Any kind of contribution will be welcome. I will from time to time add some tests to explain/complete or set names. I think it is an important question.
In the publications how many different kinds of journals/publications are there and please give an explaination to them. I could start by saying predatory, sleeping beauties and what was the name for a "common journal"? If there is another name I can find I will add it in. I would like to make a document with all your answers and load it to the question.
Maybe I will exclude if they are redundant. I might add threads of more questions related to the subject.
Thank you very much
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Thank you. I would like to give it a citation. I would read it.
Try this resource:
Bruin, J. 2006. newtest: command to compute new test. UCLA:
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Given your experience, which repository would you recommend to share current research results with other researchers?
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Most, if not all, publishers approach the acquisition of original work through the transfer of publication rights of the author to those of the publisher. Hence, the copyright is given to the publisher vs. the author. I propose that instead of lessening the value of published works through Open Access, publishers should offer authors the opportunity to benefit more from their own work. My interest is to create a publishing house who LEASES original works while guaranteeing copyright to the author. Of course, individual agreements would include a negotiated percentage of compensation above publishing costs, length of lease, marketing responsibilities, etc. When you answer, please tell me if you are new to publishing, have published in journals, or have published books. It would also be nice to know how many estimated items in journals and/or book publications. Thank you!
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Yes, your proposal is quite promising so I would recommend your model.
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The Beall's web site scholarly-oa.com does not host the Beall's list of predatory journals and publishers anymore.
I have recenly found a web site https://predatoryjournals.com/ which claims to build on it and expand this list (see https://predatoryjournals.com/about/ ).
What do you think of it?
Update [August 1, 2019]: The question was originally posted on December 26, 2017 but now it looks like the site in question remains dormant and was not updated since 2017, which makes the question somewhat moot.
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Dear Michael John McAleer , we have already discussed on some other thread about definition of predatory publishing.
Leading scholars and publishers from ten countries have agreed a definition of predatory publishing that can protect scholarship. It took 12 hours of discussion, 18 questions and 3 rounds to reach. Leading scholars and publishers from ten countries have agreed a definition of predatory publishing that can protect scholarship. It took 12 hours of discussion, 18 questions and 3 rounds to reach...
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Both strategies: High Impact Factor or established journal - have different functions, other positive aspects and other limitations are not fully comparable.
Which strategies are considered to be more appropriate depends on the privities who the researcher writing the scientific papers deems more important. In the context of this issue an important question arises: Do you publish in scientific journals with a high Impact Factor but representing related or other fields of knowledge against the scientific specialty of the researcher who sends his scientific texts for publication?
Do you, however, publish in journals with a lower Impact Factor, which represent the field of knowledge in which the researcher specializes and writes his scientific texts? Which strategy is chosen by individual researchers, scientists and research and teaching staff of the university depends on whether the prime points are collected IF for the institution, which the researcher affirms, or more important is the citation of written texts in a given field, but more important is the issue of publishing in magazines whose titles are closely correlated with the problems of scientific texts written by the researcher.
Do you agree with me on the above matter?
In the context of the above issues, the following question is valid:
What are the key priorities for you when choosing a scientific journal for publishing scientific texts?
Please reply
I invite you to the discussion
Thank you very much
Best wishes
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At first, I check if it has a good indexing, and in my case, if it has a good index in the MIAR page. If I see that it has certain guarantees of quality, then I read the guidelines and instructions. What I don't like is that journals show as a great merit the high percentage of rejections. It is one thing to guarantee quality, it is another thing to reject as a way of understanding quality.
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I founded an open-access academic journal titled Journal of Emerging Computer Technologies (JECT) that will start publishing in 2021 and it has no processing, publishing, open-access or any other charges for authors. http://ject.izmiracademy.com
Would you like to contribute by sending an article to a newly established journal?
What are your thoughts on newly established journals?
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does this journal provide a DOI for the papers?
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It starts with some background
The China/Asia On Demand (CAOD) site (https://caod.oriprobe.com/index.htm) uses the name “International Journal of Pharmaceutical Research” with ISSN 1674-0440. A real Chinese subscription-based journal https://caod.oriprobe.com/journals/gwyx-yxfc/INTERNATIONAL_JOURNAL_OF_PHARMACEUTICAL_RESEARCH.htm
However, the ISSN nr. 1674-0440 uses “Guoji yaoxue yanjiu zazhi” https://portal.issn.org/resource/ISSN/1674-0440 and is linked to the same Chinese subscription-based journal but now uses the name “Journal of International Pharmaceutical Research” (http://202.38.153.236:81/Jweb_jipr/EN/article/showOldVolumn.do does not seem to work well but indicate its true existence). See also enclosed pictures (bit poor resolution but the best I was able to pick up).
If you ‘Google’ for example the paper with the title “Alliin and related active components:research advances” you see both titles popping up so indeed both are the same. The “Journal of International Pharmaceutical Research” ISSN 1674-0440 is Scopus indexed: https://www.scopus.com/sourceid/21100881509 which seems to correspond to the above mentioned genuine Chinese subscription-based journal.
Then the deception starts...
However, this journal is hijacked by “Journal of International Pharmaceutical Research” using the same ISSN nr. 1674-0440: http://ijprjournals.com/ with contact: ijprjournals@gmail.com
Since 2009 there is a journal with the similar name as the genuine Chinese one “International Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (IJPR)”, but with a different ISSN 0975-2366 that seems to be indexed in Scopus: https://www.scopus.com/sourceid/19700174645 This journal “International Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (IJPR)” with ISSN 0975-2366 (http://ijpronline.com/Default.aspx ) presents itself as a subscription-based journal though all papers can be found on RG and/or Academia.edu and once submitting https://www.ejmanager.com/my/ijpr/ it appears you have to pay fee which is misleading and dubious. They use a SCImago link (with a picture of the wrong journal “Journal of international pharmaceutical research”): https://www.scimagojr.com/journalsearch.php?q=19700174645&tip=sid&exact=no
I predict that this journal will be discontinued soon, since last year they ‘all of a sudden’ published 690 papers in 2019 and 2488 papers in 2020 (while it ‘normally’ was round 50 or so).
So:
http://ijprjournals.com/ fake and hijacked version of the real one with ISSN 1674-0440
http://ijpronline.com/Default.aspx predatory and one better stay away from (presumably they will lose their Scopus indexing).
Best regards.
PS. Both the IJPRonline site and SCImago make a mess out of it since they depict the image of “Journal of International Pharmaceutical Research” ISSN 1674-0440: https://www.scopus.com/sourceid/21100881509 while they talk about “International Journal of Pharmaceutical Research”.
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The people at Scopus should hire me 😊 In the recent update of the list of discontinued titles in Scopus (see enclosed file) the journal “International Journal of Pharmaceutical Research” (https://www.scopus.com/sourceid/19700174645 ) is now discontinued.
PS. Unfortunately, Scopus is not that fast in correcting/updating the Scopus sources site (but will happen soon).
Best regards.
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We are preparing to submit a manuscript in field of Computational Chemistry (Computer aided-drug design). However. due to our current budget we won't be able to afford the cost of the processing fees charged by most open access journals.
Is there any available free-to-publish journal(s) that can publish our work - either open access or "society" journals?
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International Journal of Advanced Chemistry
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In peer review,
Does the innovative of idea in article is besed on methodolgy , or study area, or the used dataset or all of them?
How editors and reviewers evaluate the innovative idea of article ?
Thanks in advance
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(1) Number of articles available in one specific field of research. Few papers in a field may hint an innovative idea.
(2) If the reference section cites old articles, the innovative idea may not be there.
(3) If the article repeats well established phenomenon presented in text books, innovative idea is missing.
(4) A generalized conclusion section which is well known to the particular community of researchers.
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There are several journals with varying impact factors. Still we find journals having no impact factor. I want to know whether the impact or importance of a researcher becomes less to a scientific community when he/she publishes a paper in a journal with low impact factor or no impact factor?
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Dear All, I may be old-fashioned, but in my personal opinion publishing in high-ranked and high-IF journal is the best way to make your valuable research visible to exopert colleagues in your field of research. Please see in this context this closely related RG thread entitled "How do you increase the visibility of published article?"
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I like a lot this one - http://www.doaj.org
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Google scholar.
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While APCs (fees for publication costs or fees for open access) vary, some of them are quite high as 1000-2000 CHF. Although some publishers have schemes for waiving APCs for researchers from underdeveloped and developing countries, the amount is still quite high for the authors.
I was wondering about the practices of different institutions and countries:
- What is the current policy of your university/research institute/country on APCs?
- Where do the funds come from for APCs? and,
- Who is eligible for the funds?
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As private scholar, I am inclined to say: from the taxpayer.
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Dear all,
I am a neuroscientist with a focus on imaging analyses in stroke populations.
My first scientific works were decently well received and were published in journals like Human Brain Mapping, Neuroimage or Neuroimage Clinical. The first two journals - both leading journals in the field of brain imaging - recently transitioned from subscription to full gold open access journals, the latter was established as an gold OA journal that I paid ~1.500€ for in 2016.
Today, publishing in these journals requires a fee betwen 2.900€ and 3.200€. Due to the Wiley DEAL with German universities, the fee for HBM is actually slightly lower, at ~2.400€. The same price range applies to many other OA journals.
At my university in Germany, we can pay OA publications thanks to a publication fund of the German Research Foundation, that pays OA fees up to 2.000€. However, this fund does not support publications at all that exceed 2.000€. A fee of 2.001€ has to be fully paid by the authors.
This is a fee that I cannot pay in any legal way. Even if I had a full research project grant of 3 years (worth a few hundred thousand €) by the German Research Foundation, this would only include 2.250€ support for publication fees - for a whole 3 year project that often yields multiple publications.
Note that I am aware that I don't need to publish in these journals, because more reasonably priced alternatives exist, as well as classic subscription journals. I could just publish everything in PlosONE. However, I am not an important, well-known or powerful scientist. We do not need to pretend that we only judge scientific works after reading them, but in fact quite much by the journal they were published in. And even if YOU don't do so, the next reviewer of my grant proposal might do so, judging a large body of low-impact journal papers as bad, while preferring the grant proposal of another researcher who published a large body of medium to high impact, expensive journal papers.
My question to you: How do you handle this situation? How do you pay the fees?
I also wonder if I am just too much of a novice in science, so that I eventually missed common strategies that nobody talks about. Some colleagues - with other PIs - told me that they just submit papers without considering the fees at all, because the PIs are willing and able to pay for impact.
Or is it just normal to include the department head as a co-author in some common, but shady agreement so that the department pays for it? If yes, how does this work? Can I be open about this or do I rather have to pretend I need feedback or similar 'scientific' input first to not be considered rude?
Or is it just my PI who might be unwilling to support my research output, because it is anyway a common practice to illeagly misapplicate funding bodies for such fees?
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This is not an answer, just a rant:
The fact that many scientists (including those with substantial power over the careers of others) often judge the quality of work largely based on their personal perceptions of the journals that published said work is a fundamental problem in how science and scientists are currently appraised. Subjective impressions of author and/or journal prestige should never factor into the assessment of scientific work; the very worst papers that I have ever reviewed have been for "high-tier" journals (e.g. Brain) and come from "prestigious" research groups. These have also been the groups that were most resistant to requested revisions.
One major root of this problem is scientific publishing companies themselves.
I cannot see them as anything other than parasites that have thoroughly infiltrated academic science and made themselves central to how scientific works (and scientists) are perceived and evaluated, despite the arguable fact that they contribute little-to-nothing of value to the work itself (other than copy-editing and web-hosting). I find it infuriating that I get paid a flat, taxpayer-funded salary (that is much less than my market value outside of academia) on a short-term contract to perform highly skilled technical labor (i.e. experiments, analyses, etc.) and produce high-quality media content (i.e. scientific papers), which I then either:
(1) give to a massive and highly profitable publisher for free so that a (probably unpaid) editor can recruit (via e-mail) unpaid reviewers (that I often must suggest and provide contact information for myself) to curate the content before the publisher accepts it (or rejects it), makes some formatting changes, slaps their branding on it, hosts it on the internet, and then sells it back to the authors, reviewers, and all of the other taxpayer-funded content creators/curators at extremely high profit margins,
or
(2) pay several thousand tax-payer dollars to a massive and highly profitable publisher publisher so that the publisher can do basically the same thing with the exception that instead of selling the final product back to everyone involved in its creation/curation, the publisher posts it on an open-access online repository that differs minimally from institutional repositories or pre-print servers.
In either case, the final product is likely to differ only superficially from the version that I posted (for free) on a pre-print server or here on RG.
The knowledge that the primary entities that tangibly benefit from my taxpayer-funded labor are...for-profit publishing companies that obtain their content for free (or are PAID to receive the content), have it edited and curated for free, and then sell it at ridiculous margins (or were paid ridiculous margins to put their branding on it) back to the people who actually created it, along with the knowledge that many scientists either don't realize or don't care that journals are essentially ALL predatory 3rd-party profit-generation-machines that contribute significantly to many of the problems with how science/scientists are evaluated, how studies are done/reported, and what scientists prioritize in their work (e.g. clean seemingly simple results with nice stories and methods online only), legitimately makes me want to leave science altogether. I truly, deeply, hate the research culture that has been built by previous generations, with scientific publishing being culprit #1 (culprit #2 being the fundamentally exploitative nature of post-graduate academic research positions such as post-docs).
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Colleagues,
I am looking for advice regarding some of the low-cost but high impact journals for Business, Management, Leadership, Organizations & Entrepreneurship?
These could be open access or otherwise.
kindly advise, share links if possible.
Regards,
Chilumba.
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You can look into newly launched journals of good publishers such as Emerald Publishing, SAGE, Wiley, and Taylor & Francis.
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How reputed is IntechOpen? A publisher of Open Access books. Anyone has experience?
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Highly reputed and the publications also cited in many reputed indexed journals
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Is MDPI a predatory journal publisher from China?
More info>
MDPI was included on Jeffrey Beall's list of predatory open access publishing companies in 2014.
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Very close to it, unfortunately.
Me and my fellow researchers made very bad experiences with MDPI journals. Several critical reviews of very able and respected reviewers have been ignored just to get the money from publishing the paper. Often, they advertise with being from Switzerland (e.g. Geosciences [Switzerland]). I am Swiss, but the MDPI journals are from China.
If I have to select scientific staff and the candidates published a lot in MDPI journals, this is a reason for me not to select them. Furthermore, me and my colleagues do not publish or review papers in MDPI journals anymore.
The science community has to stand together to prevent such publishers from destroying the scientific system. This is particularly important for the young scientists!
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In case my article is accepted in an open access journal (e.g. MDPI group) and I have to pay article processing charges (APC) to support open access but I do not have enough funds in my account then what are the options to pay APC.
Looking for funding agencies that can only support regarding APC and/or any individual from plant sciences (Plant Breeding and Genetics) who provides financial support on certain terms and conditions.
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Following
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Dear friends, I am working on several research projects related to food waste but I don't know where to publish them. If I can get someone to suggest
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You can try springe publication
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Alternative models to measure the quality of research are the personal citation indexes (H-index). Is that true?
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It's my impression that Google Scholar provides a rather complete list of one's publications-articles, books, book chapters. Of course, it does not really address the quality of publications.
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My colleagues and I issue a journal "Social Phenomena". It is an nonprofit independent platform for scholars who support the open science movement and wish to share their knowledge with others. The mission of our journal is to help authors share their ideas with the Russian-speaking scientific audience. We translate all articles into Russian and publish them for free in open access. We also do not charge authors any fees because we believe that there is no place for commerce in science.
The theme of the next issue is "Giftedness: the conditions and factors". We welcome all authors from various branches of science who are interested in this topic and want to make their research open to fellow Russian scholars.
The additional info is in the attached file and here http://journal.socialphenomena.org/en/
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Very interesting
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Now a days almost all the publishers are encouraging to do open access publications. However, many academicians says that open access or online publications are not good and publishers are compromising with the quality of research publication due to publication fee.
What is your opinion? Kindly let me know.
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When it comes to open access it is very important to distinguish between predatory journals (and publishers behind those journals) and genuine and legit ones.
Open access provides multiple advantages including obviously access for free to anyone interested in your work (instead of being disappointed once you found a potentially interesting paper which you cannot access because it is (still even after decades) behind a paywall.
After a pioneering period nowadays the open access movement is a serious and well-established publication model. Basically, all publishers have journals dedicated to open access publishing with a well-established reputation, like for example:
Springer Nature:
-Nature Communications (impact factor: 12.121)
-Scientific Reports (impact factor: 3.998)
Elsevier:
-Cell reports (impact factor: 8.109)
-iScience (impact factor: 4.447)
Royal Society of Chemistry:
-Chemical Science (impact factor: 9.346), for free!
Furthermore, there are now well-established publishers fully dedicated to open access, like:
MDPI:
-International Journal of Molecular Sciences (impact factor: 4.556)
Frontiers:
-Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology (impact factor: 5.201)
So, the assumption or even assertion that open access is, by definition, declining scientific quality is simply not true. Sure there are issues (like the accessibility of open access due to high APC’s and the mentioned predatory menace) but stating that open access is a danger to science and subscription based publishing is flawless is a lacking the necessary nuance needed in this discussion.
Best regards.
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Is the information published by BEALL'S LIST about Potential predatory scholarly open‑access publishers available in the following link accurate and reliable?
The Last updated of this page was on June 09, 2020.
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The suggested sites by Sumaia Mohammed Al-Ghuribi are indeed good resources for older cases, however I have reasons to believe that they are not well updated. For example:
“TEST Engineering & Management” in list of stand-alone journals
“GIAP journals” in list of publishers
Are mentioned in the Beall’s list and not in the predatoryjournals.com lists. So, the Beall’s list sites you indicated are the best available.
Having said this indeed the list is:
-Not fully up to date. According to the changelog (https://beallslist.net/changelog/ ) the last update was on 13th of June. Some new players being presumably predatory are not included (yet), see for example:
-The list is not flawless since there is also criticism on the inclusion of certain journals and publishers in the list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beall%27s_List For example and I quote: “The list's 82% accuracy rate in the Who's Afraid of Peer Review? sting operation led Phil Davis to state that "Beall is falsely accusing nearly one in five as being a 'potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open access publisher' on appearances alone."[15]” [15] Davis, Phil (October 4, 2013). "Open Access "Sting" Reveals Deception, Missed Opportunities". The Scholarly Kitchen.
Personally I think that 20% being wrongfully included is somewhat high, but for example Bentham Open (https://benthamopen.com/ ) and Frontiers (https://www.frontiersin.org/ ) are the best examples of the fact that the Beall’s list is not flawless. These publishers do not belong in the list for sure. Still I use the Beall’s list anytime I come across a for me unknown journal or publisher and let’s say in 9 out of 10 times I have to agree: there is something wrong here and the suspicion of being predatory is most likely true.
So yes, most of the times a great tool in identification of a predatory journal, but one need to keep thinking for yourself and make your own judgement. In order to check whether you are dealing with a predatory journal (or publisher, be aware that quite often not the individual journal but the publisher behind it is mentioned) looking at the Beall’s list is basically the first step. If mentioned, the checking for yourself starts, I recommend the workflow as mentioned in:
Laine, C., & Winker, M. A. (2017). Identifying predatory or pseudo-journals. Biochemia medica: Biochemia medica, 27(2), 285-291.
Article Identifying Predatory or Pseudo-Journals
Best regards.
PS. See for a report on some aspects of the Beall’s list and how to deal with it:
Method Predatory journals and publishers: a menace to science and s...
The list of hijacked journals (an if possible, even worse phenomenon than predatory) is pretty accurate: https://beallslist.net/hijacked-journals/ and for the more recent not included (yet) ones I keep up my own list:
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Many journal publishers are opening their COVID-19 researches for free to the public. Among them which are the most useful? Is more famous one the better one?
If you got a research on COVID-19 on hand, which one of the following will you submit to ?
Which one is easiest to accept your publication?
Please vote as you like!
Other than those common opened platform below, you can also suggest any new ones you think is useful for COVID-19 research.
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Good question
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COVID-19 is putting a huge impact on the society by the isolation measures it brings. People are now working from home office, and every walks of life are pausing their usual work and life.
How about the booming exponential rise in COVID-19 researches? But a shut downed administrative team of the publishing office? And the loss of manpower towards battle over the. COVID-19 frontline?
With the limited journal space, will timely researches be delayed in publication? Which may miss out important messages towards the public!
Peer Review: Publishing in the time of COVID-19
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.57162
What's your view?
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Yes, I expect a delay in the publishing process under COVID-19.
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The book I have edited with my colleagues is now published open access. This is the link to the publication https://helda.helsinki.fi/handle/10138/311959. How to add this to the publication because it is not a file, it is a link?
Thank you!
Maritta Törrönen
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Step 1. Download your book using the following link:
Step 2. Upload your book to your RG profile. Your book is in PDF format, so you shouldn't have a problem with it.
I hope my comments will be useful.
Best regards,
Dr. Vardan Atoyan
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If one has a (maybe transient) link to an open access version of a paper, how can we post it? Of course one can upload the unedited manuscript, but we all know that the edited one is much nicer to read...
We published one apper and I got a link, but dont know where to post it:
I can't post it as supplement (file needed), nor anywhere on the article page and there is no format which can be used to created a new contribution...
I found a similar question but without a usable idea (besides building a document including the link)
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Best way to link your article by giving DOI info.
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What is the main aspect you take into account when you plan to publish a good journal paper?
a) Journal impact factor, b) Journal reputation in the field, c) Publication speed, d) acceptance/rejection rate, e) Open access fees, f) Other aspects (please say)
You may choose one option only or re-order the options as you think more important.
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Abdelrahman Zaky All are important and to me, no hierachichal order. It is equally important to know that I like to pay attention to author guidelines. Sometime, some journals are "toxic" against giving giving room to comfortably submit an article. These journals may limit number of authors, they may precisely stict against the number of words, among other inconveniencies to settle with them. All in all, what you have stated remain pry concerns to consider.
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This question is only one of several questions posed in our recently published open access paper at https://www.mdpi.com/2073-8994/11/12/1430/pdf
1. What is the minimal number of degrees of freedom needed to describe the electromagnetic field of a single moving source? Same question for a gravitational field. Same question for any field propagating with the speed of light.
2. Is it possible to capture all of the information about such a field in one scalar, complex-valued pre-potential?
3. Can such a pre-potential be defined invariantly with respect to the Lorentz group? the conformal group?
4. Can the Lienard-Wiechert potential be derived without assuming an inverse-square law?
5. Must the electromagnetic field of a single moving source be either self-dual or anti-self-dual?
For (most of) the answers, see our recently published open access paper at
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I'm sorry, I'm not sure how you answered questions 1 - 5. Could you please explain or point to specific pages in your pdf files?
Thank you,
Tzvi
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Nowadays, while submitting articles for publishing in impact factor journals, there is an option to submit and publish traditionally without cost or submit/publish for open access with the cost. I would like to know what is the effect on the speed of review and possibilities of publication in case of selecting either of the ways?
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Thanks, Alhuseen Omar Alsayed for a detailed answer.
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Dear Colleagues,
I just wanted to share some interesting insight from an "experiment" with open access. Recently I published a paper about Blockchain and SCM with Emerald Publishing. The paper was online for several weeks and I had roughly 15 downloads a day:
Fortunately, the publisher offered me to make the paper open access (I do not have any specific funding for that):
After that, the downloads tripled with roughly 40-50 downloads a day. Of course, this does not say anything about how often the paper will get cited, but it clearly shows that OA fills a need. It might also widen the gap between those institutions who can afford to pay for it and those who can not. In other words: research from affluent institutions might also get cited more, since it is simply easier to access it.
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This will not only uplift the paper and the authors but will definitely raise the impact factor of the journal. I think they should have considered your APC waived or rather they are formally expecting your official request, please do this with a reasonable excuse, possibly accompanied with a letter from your institution giving reasons why you cannot shoulder the cost. Many people always say those reputable journals do not charge, but I disagree with this standpoint, even though some give a long time embargo before being openly made accessible. The cost of publication, following huge expenses on researches for researchers, is huge especially without grant or other sponsorships.
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I am sharing the information about the list of hijacked and predatory journals. It is very very important for scientists across the globe particularly for young scientists who have little knowledge about the journals.
I am also attaching real journals' list for your information.
This is a list of journals that appear to have been hijacked, meaning that their websites or branding have been co-opted by a predatory journal or publisher. List of Hijacked Journals: https://predatoryjournals.com/hijacked/
Potential predatory scholarly open‑access publishers, BEALL'S LIST OF PREDATORY
JOURNALS AND PUBLISHERS: https://beallslist.weebly.com/
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Many thanks
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My current affiliation doesn't provide funding for open-access publishing. Are there any organizations that provide funding for open-access publishing, given that the topic is valuable enough? Or are there open-access journals that waive the article processing charges (APCs) for researchers in third-world countries?
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If your institution is not providing any funding then there is definitely not any other way to get funded however, you can consider open choice journals that do not charge any fee and have comparatively more significance than an open access journal
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Concerning Beall’s list of Predatory Journals and Publishers
First, let me state that Jeffry Beall compiled the predatory list. Jeffrey Beall was librarian at University of Colorado. He famously knew for his criticism of open access publishing and the creation of the list of predatory journals. Please read more about Jeffrey Beall on Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeffrey_Beall
To respond to your question, let me start by inviting you to read about Academic Journals at: http://www.academicjournals.org/about_us. Kindly pay specific attention to the section on “Inclusion in Jeffrey Beall’s List.” In this section, we transparently and clearly provide information about the inclusion of Academic Journals in the list and raised questions about the criteria, sincerity, and true intentions of Jeffry Beall. Kindly note that the Jeffrey Beall’s list is published in his personal blog and does not have any institutional backing. Therefore, the list is the opinion of an individual and not an institution. The personal opinion of Jeffrey Beall.
Several other commentators, institutions, and publishers have also raised questions about the list. One common question that kept re-occurring was, “why is the list targeting only open access publishers?” Except for a very few open access publishers like PLOS and BMC, it seems that every other open access publisher was included in the list. Additionally, even fewer were removed from the list after initial inclusion.
While the list is the personal opinion of Jeffrey Beall, an article authored by Jeffrey Beall provides us with an insight into his thinking and perhaps the rationale for the list. Please take some time to read the article by Jeffrey Beall. The article is also attached
Open-Access Movement is Not Really about Open Access
The Jeffrey Beall’s list is questionable at the least and seems to target open access publishers like Academic Journals. While there was some wisdom to the intentions of the list, the lack of clear criteria for inclusion or exclusion from the list were however, questionable. The criteria listed were vague and unscientific. More importantly, the wholesome inclusion of reputable publishers like MDPI, Clute Institute, Hindawi, Academic Journals, etc without verification was worrisome. Please read more about criticism of Jeffrey Beall’s criteria for inclusion in the list https://www.scholarlyoa.net/beall_criteria.htm. Additionally, Jeffrey Beall shut down his blog (http://scholarlyoa.com/) and the list without any warning. Thus, raising even more questions.
Below are some commentaries about the Jeffrey Beall’s list
(1) Princeton University Blog - Anti-OA and the Rhetoric of Reaction
(2) Parting Company with Jeffrey Beall
Parting Company with Jeffrey Beall;
Although Jeffrey Beall has done us all a good service by coming up with his list of predatory publishers, his arguments against open access publishing have become shrill and reveal that he is expressing a political viewpoint that obscures the
(3) Cameo Replies to Beall's List of Howlers
(4) Beall’s Litter
Beall’s Litter - Michael Eisen
Jeffrey Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado Denver, has come to some fame in science publication circles for highlighting the growing number of “predatory” open access publishers and curating a list of them. His work has provided a useful service to people seeking to navigate the sometimes-confusing array of new journals – many legitimate, many scammers – that have popped...
(5) Beall’s Bile
(6) Below is an email from The Clute Institute regarding the Jeffrey Beall’s list
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Peter Breuer , you are right, of course, I agree with you. My argument is that, at present, ALL publishers are predatory at least to some extent, some of the majors even to a large extent. Some years ago I have signed up for an Elsevier boycot (it is stiil on the net, but I will not link to it). They behaved most unethically with a friend of mine (a senior Elsevier editor) even while behaving most unethically with would be authors like me, asking us to give up ANY and ALL rigts to our work. I do not see any difference between them and the most predatory of predatory Publishers, and let them sue me if they want.
But yes, my argument indeed is nihilistic, in the sense that I do not see how things can be made ethically more acceptable.
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I was looking for a thread on Bentham Science Publishers on RG but could not find any.
I recently got an invitation fro the Current Environmental Engineering journal to act as a guest editor. In the email (see below), there was no mention of the group to which the journal belonged. I had to search the Internet for quite a while to eventually find it belonged to Bentham Science Publishers. This publisher appears to be quite questionable and Jeffrey Beall listed it as a potential predatory publisher.
Have you had any encounter with Current Environmental Engineering or Bentham Science Publishers yet? What do you think of them?
Thank you very much to you all for your valuable contributions which will benefit to us all.
Here is the email in question:
Current Environmental Engineering
23 August 2019
Dr. M. Ertz
LaboNFC
Universit du Qubec Chicoutimi
555
Boulevard de l\Universit
Canada
Dear Dr. Ertz,
Current Environmental Engineering (CEE), is in the process of appointing Executive Guest Editors. This journal publishes in all areas of environmental sustainability, disaster risk reduction and management, decision and policy making. We would like to propose your name for the position of Executive Guest Editor of Current Environmental Engineering.
Executive Guest Editors are appointed for a period of three years and are expected to submit a proposal for the first thematic issue in a hot and emerging field within 3 months. They are also expected to submit one thematic issue each subsequent year.
The peer review of the articles may be arranged by the guest editor, provided that the list of referees for each article is pre-approved by us. The reviewers should be neutral experts with H-index of above 15. The guest editor would be expected to provide us with at least two referee reports of each article. Publication of thematic issue would be facilitated by the use of our state- of- the- art, article processing system.
The Executive Guest Editors will be entitled to the following benefits:
  1. A brief CV and photograph of the Executive Guest Editor will be displayed on the journal’s website.
  2. Executive Guest Editors will be entitled to a waiver of the Open Access fee for any article authored by him/her in their thematic issue (Open Access publishing provides wide accessibility of the article and is normally a paid service. To view some of the Open access articles in the journal, please visit the journal website).
  3. The Executive Guest Editor will receive a free online access to the journal for the calendar year in which their thematic issue is published.
  4. The Executive Guest Editor will be given free online access to any 3 books of his/her choice from the Bentham list of E Books.
  5. The Executive Guest Editor will receive a hard copy of the published thematic issue for personal use.
If this position is of interest to you, please let us know. If you are interested, then kindly send us your brief CV and a list of your recent publications. Kindly also indicate the field of the journal relevant to your area of research.
In case you are not interested in the position of Executive Guest Editor, then you are welcome to submit a general article that fits in to the Aims and Scope of the journal.
We look forward to hearing from you in this regard.
Sincerely,
M. Alam
Director (Publications)
[If you prefer not to receive any further emails, please send us an email with the subject line “UNSUBSCRIBE”]
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Bentham Science Publishers is a company that publishes journals and e-books and is based at Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates, with numerous operating units in for example the United States, Japan and the Netherlands. Numerous Bentham Science journals have received JCR impact factors.
However they started an exclusively open-access branch: Bentham Open. This ‘Bentham’ has received criticism and was/is listed as a "potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publisher" in Jeffrey Beall's list of Predatory Publishers.
Bentham (Open) has become notorious of spamming scientists with invitations to become members of the editorial boards of its journals. Especially their relative young and not yet established journals use this ‘tactic’ of sending emails to researchers regardless whether their expertise corresponds to the scope of that particular journal.
Having said all this. New journals and publishers need to their very best to get noticed, attract researchers to publish and gradually establish a name (and reputation). One cannot blame those who choose the more aggressive (marketing) strategy, similar like commercials (we all notice that companies either choose the well though, sometimes even funny or moving ones or they go for the annoying, often insulting our intelligence kind of commercials like those for washing powders and so on).
No matter whether you like their approach or not, Bentham Science Publishers seems to manage to get a substantial part of their journal in the right indexes (ESCI, SCI, Scopus, PubMed), although mostly moderate impact factors, and have been able to attract a number of well-established names to publish their work in their journals. Bentham Open is starting to get a number of their journals in serious indexes as well (ESCI, Scopus, PubMed).
So it hard to say whether it is good thing to get involved with this publisher or not. The ‘world’ is in need of more platforms/venues/services besides the big players like Elsevier and Springer Nature. Nowadays publishers of exclusively Open Access journals like MDPI, Plos and Hindawi are more and more established and it would not surprise me that at some point in time Bentham will be part of this as well.
Best regards.
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What do you think about GROWING SCIENCE PUBLISHER .It is a Canadian online publisher of open access academic without any article processing charges (APCs) and with a short time for reviewing.
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The publisher is mentioned in Beall’s list of predatory publishers:
That is a sign but more importantly it is something to check for yourself.
On the other hand they claim to ask for no fee which is a-typical for a predatory publisher, however you might wonder how they earn some money on this (all I can find is a subscription fee system, but why should you pay for a subscription if you access everything for free I wonder).
What argues against the potential predatory is:
-They’ve managed to get a number of their journals in Scopus and one in the journals in ESCI (Clarivate Analytics).
-A number of their journals are indexed in DOAJ so that all seems valid.
-Papers seems to have a legitimate DOI and can be found in Google Scholar.
Hard to say whether this publisher indeed belongs on the list of potential predatory or not. I tend to say no but strongly advice anyone who want to publish in one of their journals to check the relevant journal in your field and check a number of papers published earlier.
Best regards.
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JCR released impact factor list 2017 for journals. About 66 percent of the journals with an increased Journal Impact Factor and Quarterly journal of economics has Highest Journal Impact Factor Percentile Score This Year i.e. 99.856. PLoS One published about 22,077 articles and ranked 5th for total citations and ranked at 2,498 by Average Journal Impact Factor Percentile
Link of 2017 Journal Citation Reports:
How to get list of journals with new impact factor, specifically journals in social sciences
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Journal Impact Factor list should be available for free so that people can report errors, if any. Making use of this list will automatically benefit WoS Clarivate.
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Does anybody know of any initiatives, other than Publons that gives credit to peer-reviewers, that lobbies for free open access publishing? It would be great if peer-reviewers got publication discounts from open access publishers. Paid open access seems to discriminates against 'poor' universities & researchers who cannot pay out of their own pocket and for those researchers that publish a lot. It does not seem ethical to pay for own publications - the richest will publish the most, especially considering all the predatory journals that would publish any poor quality materials for money, Scholars are doing their peer-reviews for free and publishers get paid for publishing their work...
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Unpaid peer review has long between a tradition in subscription-based journals, but it has become more controversial with journals that charge for submissions. Indeed, some of the journals that charge submission fees do offer discounts on those fees and other rewards for reviewing (for example, Elsevier offers temporary access to SCOPUS). If you want to be compensated for reviewing, then limit your reviewing to journals that offer those kinds of rewards.
Otherwise, consider the non-monetary rewards: a chance to read pre-publication work in your field, a chance to influence the direction of your field, a chance to build relationships with editors, and a chance to build your CV by showing that other professionals value your judgments. Plus, there is a chance to multiple all of those effects by being invited onto an editorial board, etc.
At least in the social sciences, we get the opportunity to read the other reviews, and to see how the editors used their suggestions along with our own to reach a decision. I personally feel like I have learned a lot from that process -- both as a reviewer and as an author.
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Are we, as a scoentofoc community, get into a situation where where we compromise against the quality of the reaserch paper when the same is published in a journal by paying for each publication? The journals also might not view very stringently on the quality compared to the journals which are subscription-based.
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