Science topics: MedicineOncology
Science topic

Oncology - Science topic

Oncology is concerned with the diagnosis of any cancer in a person; cancer therapy; follow-up of cancer patients after successful treatment; palliative care of patients with terminal malignancies; ethical questions surrounding cancer care; as well as screening efforts of populations, or of the relatives of patients (in types of cancer that are thought to have a hereditary basis, such as breast cancer).
Questions related to Oncology
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
8 answers
A patient with desminopathy (mutation Thr341Pro DES in a heterozygous state) with the progression of the disease has a decrease in taste and smell, immunosuppression, and an increase in IgA in the blood.
Oddly enough, but all this is characteristic of infections, including viral ones. For example, it is known that if the hepatitis C virus is not treated, then death will occur in 20 years.
In the identified case of late onset desminopathy, muscle weakness manifests itself at the age of 30, and death occurs 20 years after the onset of the disease.
Could the desmin mutation in myofibrillar myopathy be caused by an infection?
Perhaps the infection contributes to the progression of desminopathy?
Relevant answer
Answer
A patient with desminopathy survived Covid-19 six months ago without pneumonia, but with a temporary loss of smell and taste. After Covid-19, we note an accelerated progression of desminopathy, penetration accelerates, new muscles are quickly involved in the pathological process, muscle mass decreases, and heart function worsens. Perhaps the infection or its consequences are somehow connected with the mechanism of progression of desminopathy?
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
9 answers
We need your expertise & opinion!
Please fill in this questionnaire:
Relevant answer
Answer
Is best to prevention also to treatment.
The best test option for screening of CRC is FIT test and consecutively colonoscopy.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
All tumors have DNA mutations, and a predictive understanding of those mutations could inform clinical treatments. However, 40% of the mutations are variants of unknown significance (VUS). So the challenge is to objectively predict whether a VUS is pathogenic and supports the tumor or whether it is benign. We are working on this problem and would welcome feedback on our efforts (see doi: 10.3389/fmolb.2021.791792 ) and also alternative ideas and insight.
Relevant answer
Answer
I am very interested in this because of the multiple mutations in Papillary Ca of Thyroid which are VUS and how best to discern if they are more likely to be pathogenic. So far I look at Clin Var and a few other sources so I will take a look at your paper- thank you!
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
7 answers
Updated Dec 26th 2021 as I know have some publications of relevance to Lenalidomide. Top of my list are [1] and [2] at the moment they are most recent publications I have found.
[1] BLOOD SPOTLIGHT| NOVEMBER 19, 2015
The novel mechanism of lenalidomide activity
Blood (2015) 126 (21): 2366–2369.
" Given lenalidomide’s mechanism of action, it is intriguing that IMiDs and proteasome inhibitors are synergistic in the treatment of multiple myeloma.(24) Recent evidence suggests that this synergy may result from the pharmacokinetic properties and dosing schedules of these drugs. Although treatment with proteasome inhibitors can block lenalidomide induced degradation of IKZF1 and IKZF3 in vitro,(14) this effect depends on both the order of administration and the dose. When the drugs are administered at the same time, lenalidomide-induced degradation occurs before the onset of proteasomal blockade. (25) " excerpt from [1] above.
First published: 13 February 2017
[2] Lenalidomide use in myelodysplastic syndromes: Insights into the biologic mechanisms and clinical applications
Maximilian Stahl MD,Amer M. Zeidan MBBS, MHS https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.30585
" In this article, we review the recently recognized mechanisms of action of lenalidomide and discuss the most recent clinical data regarding its use in patients with both 5q− MDS as well as non-5q− MDS. " excerpt from [2] above.
Some additional references for background. Core Concept: Emerging science of chronotherapy offers big opportunities to optimize drug delivery https://lnkd.in/gpAz-28v
Optimizing circadian drug infusion schedules towards personalized cancer chronotherapy
Hill RJW, Innominato PF, Le´vi F, Ballesta A (2020) PLoS Comput Biol 16(1): e1007218. https://lnkd.in/gnCAAzk5 https://lnkd.in/g4sY-NDv
Temporal regulation of tumor growth in nocturnal mammals: In vivo studies and chemotherapeutical potential
The FASEB Journal. 2021;35:e21231.First published: 11 January 2021 https://lnkd.in/gm9mr6z
Paula M. Wagner,César G. Prucca,Fabiola N. Velazquez,Lucas G. Sosa Alderete,Beatriz L. Caputto,Mario E. Guido
Harnessing the predictive power of preclinical models for oncology drug development. 
Honkala, A., Malhotra, S.V., Kummar, S. et al. Nat Rev Drug Discov (2021). https://lnkd.in/gYnT7VtF
Relevant answer
Answer
I have treated 600 cancer patients with thalidomide and celecoxib, using thalidomide 200mg before sleep, because it has the activity to let the patients somnolent. Celecoxib was able to give an effective therapeutic effect at 400 mg twice a day. As a result, the usage would have been effective.
I expect thalidomide and celecoxib to be marketed worldwide as anti-cancer agents and as a useful drug for the treatment of COVID-19 infections.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
Metabolic rewiring and epigenetic remodeling, which are closely linked and reciprocally regulate each other, are among the well-known cancer hallmarks. Studies have reported use of Onco-metabolites to metabolically reprogram the epigenetic of cancer. I was wondering what might be major limitations of such techniques?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello. This topic is not exactly my field, so I cannot give you a satisfactory answer. I will be happy to follow all the news and discussions in this field.
Regards, Zlata Felc.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
7 answers
For example AI can automate processes in the initial interpretation of images and shift the clinical workflow of radiographic detection, management decisions. But what are the clinical challenges for its application?
#AI #cancer #clinical #oncology #biomedical
Relevant answer
Answer
The first is the sample size issue, a predictive model are trained and built with limited imaging data from a particular hospital or region; this has to face bias caused by various factors when dealing with a wider range of diagnoses; it may not be adaptable when making diagnostic decisions for images from other regions.
The second is the inability to balance the patient's treatment intentions, the patient's financial situation, and different regional customs when making treatment decisions.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
9 answers
HI All,
I'm doing a survey as part of an Audacious program (https://www.startupdunedin.nz/audacious), which essentially is a StartUp initiative at Otago University. I'm curious to understand what level of programming do biologists these days need during their day to day research.
For all the biologists out there here are some questions to start the discussion on this topic:
1) Have you done any programming till date? If so which language did you use and for what purpose?
2) How have to overcome programming limitations? For example, did you get the work done through bioinformaticians, or sought help from your programming friend, etc?
3) Have you used online biological databases for your research? If so, which one?
4) How much of artificial intelligence have you used in your research? Do you see AI potential in your current work?
If you have anything else to add, please feel free.
Relevant answer
Answer
Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with collaboration with University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
15 answers
Greetings all,
What do you think is the best programming language for cancer informatics for a beginner?
I have found some recommendations for Python, R, MySql, PHP, and Perl, yet as a novice in informatics I couldn't reach a clear conclusion.
Relevant answer
Answer
R Programming and Python.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
3 answers
I have obtained the mean for each of 10 domains for the CarGoQol scale as instructed. Then I calculated an Index score by summing the mean of of all 10 domains and dividing it by 10. The scoring procedure outlines I now need to linearly transform and standardize the domain and index scores on a scale of 0 to 100. How do I do that? Please help!
Relevant answer
Answer
x is the untransformed dimension score for each dimension (ie mean of item score)
in the case of dimensions (domains)
for the index x is the untransformed index score (mean of domain scores)
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
I have 3 group populations.
Group A has marked nuclear pleomorphism (change in nuclear shape and size), like 1 um, 4um, 2 um, 4um, 6um, 1um, 3um. etc
Group B has also nuclear pleomorphism but not as wide of change as group A
Group C the control group has consistent nuclear size of say 1um for example
I would like to use a stat test to evaluate
1. how significantly different are the groups based on rate of differences
Here are my ideas:
T test probably wont help
I can use clustering analysis
I can do regression analysis
Confidence intervals to show spread of values?
Would ANOVA work?
I just want to visualize and get a P value that these three groups can be different based on variance/change.
Goal is to establish diagnostic criteria based on nuclear size cut offs of either length, width, and circumference of nuclei.
end goal is like 1um - 4um = Grade 1 , 4 - 5um = Grade 2, >6 um = grade 3 and to correlate it to progression free survival.
Relevant answer
Answer
One way ANOVA might work but you would need to test its assumptions first, especially homogeneity of variance. Please see my study guide for more information: and the additional material study guide.
If it isn't suitable, apart from Kruskal-Wallis, you can also try Jonckhere-Terpstra which looks for a tend between your groups, which seems to be what you are suggesting.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
I’m conducting a meta analysis for my dissertation and have issues running my data. It utilises median overall survival (months) and does not have usable controls. I’m counteracting that by using a second treatment method fir comparison. I’ve noticed some studies use historic controls, and form hazard ratios from them. Is it possible to treat the secondary treatment as a historic control and form hazard ratios across studies?
Otherwise single arm survival studies are awful to try and run analysis on. (Oncology is a pain).
Relevant answer
Answer
Mathematically, nothing should stop you from doing so. Methodologically and clinically, however, I think that such a move can bring about more questions than answers in your analyses.
First and foremost, you have to justify convincingly that your uncontrolled sample and the historical comparator you are planning to benchmark it against are sufficiently similar in clinical context. However, that may even not be enough in light of unknown/unconsidered confounding.
If it is an option, perhaps a systematic review without meta-analysis, rather than with meta-analysis, may be a safer bet to synthesize the evidence.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
6 answers
Please find attached the full medical file of our patient and all biological reseaults included.
We are seeking to explain how can she produce such levels of immunoglobulins with no B cells expression.
NB ! : * The patient ddidn't recieve any immunoglobulins injection.
* We made another dosage for immunoglobulins levels after 01 moth of the first one and we had the same resault ( high levels ).
Best regards
Msc, Abdelwahab
Relevant answer
Answer
First thing i would like to comment on it that you may change the clone of CD20, check CD19 as well if they are even few?
Secondary, The absence B cells might be the drug effect (Like: Rituximab or any alternative/traditional medicine).
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
7 answers
Possibily not an open access journal which does not add any publishing costs once being accepted. Thank you in advance
Relevant answer
Answer
British Journal of Neurosurgery
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
6 answers
Hello,
SV40 is not considered an oncogenic virus in this review:
Why is SV40 not considered an oncogenic virus when it produces the large T antigen, which is used to immortalize mammalian cell lines?
Additionally, SV40 proteins have been found in human tumors.
Could this lack of coverage possibly have something to do with the fact that the polio vaccine introduced SV40 into the human population in the late 1950’s? How many people are actually positive for SV40 proteins? How many of these people develop cancer? Why are SV40 proteins not tested for regularly, given that they are an indicator of cancer?
Thanks!
Relevant answer
Answer
Please have a look at the following RG link.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
3 answers
For any no-relapse cancer gene therapy, all cancer cells need to be transfected. Is it possible? Will repeated administration be able to reach all cancer cells? I know different serotypes viral vectors must be used for repeated administration to evade antibody response, but let's not focus on little details. I want to know if its fundamentally possible? Cancer cells have mutated antigens that viruses use to get in, so there can be resistance. Perhaps repeated non-viral transfection in-vivo? What do you think? If not, then why can't repeated transfection reach every cancer cell? It seems to me that due to minuscule size of vectors, spatial availability in-vivo isn't the issue. What do you think?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi John Schloendorn , Thanks a lot for your reply. I might have phrased my question in a wrong manner. 100% transfection efficiency is impossible, let's say it is 20% efficient. Is it possible to still transfect all cancer cells in a patient with repeated administrations each with 20% efficiency, given that the treatment is selective and non-toxic? It seems like non-viral transfection is more stochastic, in a sense that it in principle can transfect any cell, it just happens that it doesn't, so with enough repeated administration it should be able in principle to transfect all cells, right? Thank you very much for your time. Your experience is invaluable on this matter. I am asking for a research proposal I have made, where this issues now stands out.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
8 answers
without allowing our study be reduced to just rubber stamping of other people's findings. How do we ensure critical rather a mere descriptive discourse ?
What are the tips to highlight the originality of the research project?
Relevant answer
Answer
I totally agree with Dr. M. D.H. Prodhan and Dr. Abdelhameed Ibrahim. Really they hit the target.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
6 answers
Global spotlight is on 2020 Nobel prizes which is slated to commence today, Monday October 5, 2020. Many researchers have been mentioned and nominated in various capacities for their discoveries such as;
1. American Mary-Claire King, who discovered the BRCA1 gene responsible for a hereditary form of breast cancer.
2. The duo of Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer Doudna of the US, for their gene-editing technique, the CRISPR-Cas9 DNA snipping tool, a type of genetic “scissors” in cutting mutated gene, and for insertion of a corrected manipulated one.
3. Dennis Slamon, American oncologist for research on breast cancer and the drug treatment Herceptin.
4. Leroy Hood, US gene sequencing pioneer.
5. And host of others.
Not only limited to medicine, in any field, who do you have in mind for his/her discovery roles in the past few years?
Relevant answer
Answer
There are real doctors who treat any kind of infection including Covid 19 Covid 2099 also.
In many corner of the world. Health and Education should be completely at Free of cost for each and every Citizens and By the way healthcare corruption will get into an end for ever. No private involvement of anybody in health care Management.
Nobel Price For Medicine should goes to Dr.B.M.Hegde,MBBS.,MD.,DM. FCCP. BadhmaPhushan award winner.
Nobel Price Trust should take strict legal action on Xi and his allies who are the responsible person for Pandemic and By the way such mistakes will not repeat.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
20 answers
A study by Peeters et al. (2017) suggests that sugar traps cancer in a 'vicious cycle' which make it more aggressive and harder to treat (1). On the question-and-answer site Quora, Ray Schilling, MD, concludes: "there is a connection between the consumption of sugar and starchy foods and various cancers in man. Animal experiments are useful in suggesting these connections, but many clinical trials including the Women’s Health Initiative have shown that these findings are also true in humans. It is insulin resistance due to sugar and starch overconsumption that is causing cancer" (2).
References
1. Peeters K, Van Leemputte F, Fischer B, Bonini BM, Quezada H, Tsytlonok M, Haesen D, Vanthienen W, Bernardes N, Gonzalez-Blas CB, Janssens V, Tompa P, Versées W, Thevelein JM. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate couples glycolytic flux to activation of Ras. Nat Commun 2017; 8: 922. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-01019-z. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-01019-z.pdf
2. Schilling R. Why isn't sugar portrayed as bad like cigarettes? https://www.quora.com/Why-isnt-sugar-portrayed-as-bad-like-cigarettes
Relevant answer
Answer
The fact that cancer cells use more sugar than non-cancer cells, known as the Warburg effect, appears to form the basis of the current question. Nevertheless, it is not yet known if this effect is merely a symptom of cancer or whether it is the cause of cells becoming cancerous. Evidence indicating the way cancer cells metabolize sugar is not conclusive, either. Considering refined or added sugar, the bulk of the available evidence indicates that sugar is not a carcinogen. There is no evidence that eating sugar causes cancer or speeds up its growth. There is also no evidence that eliminating dietary sugar causes cancer to shrink or disappear. However, it is known that eating excess sugar, especially added sugars, can contribute to many chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, which are potential risk factors for several types of cancer.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
8 answers
Dear Researcher,
I am investigating new therapeutic approaches to treat Glioblastoma. By testing my approach, I found that in one mouse model the data are promising. However, I am looking for validating my data. I would like to re-do the experiment using a different mouse model for the same disease.
I know that the best is to test the treatment approaches on two different mouse models (two independent experiments each) However, due to running out from the funding and time I must choose between two options.
Either using one mouse model (two independent experiments) or two mouse models (one independent experiment each).
Let me know what do you think?
Thanks a lot
Relevant answer
Answer
I think it would also depend on the variability of the results so far. You may need to increase the number of animals, dosage range etc.
if you have statistically significant results already in one model then extension to another model would be valuable.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
35 answers
COVID-19 has pull people apart from each other. Social distancing is the main way to prevent spreading of infection. Tele-medicine, once used for rural area remote healthcare model, is the emerging new way of practice under COVID-19.
Different specialties have different practicing needs, what difficulties do you encounter on applying tele-medicine under COVID-19 in your specialty? Will tele-medicine totally uproot the usual face-to-face room consultation of medical practitioners? And becoming the new service model?
What is your view?
Some references:
Virtually Perfect? Telemedicine for Covid-19
NEJM
DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp2003539
Covid-19 and Health Care’s Digital Revolution
NEJM
DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp2005835
Telemedicine in the Era of COVID-19
The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaip.2020.03.008
Keep Calm and Log On: Telemedicine for COVID-19 Pandemic Response.
DOI: 10.12788/jhm.3419
‘Healing at a distance’—telemedicine and COVID-19
Public Money & Management
DOI: 10.1080/09540962.2020.1748855
The Role of Telehealth in Reducing the Mental Health Burden from COVID-19
Telemedicine and e-Health
DOI: 10.1089/tmj.2020.0068
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello, in Portugal, during Covid there was a huge increase of tele consultation. Still some barriers were found:
- older people have more difficulties in using digital tools.
- 3G and 4G coverage is still low in some rural areas.
- Lack of good tele consultation tools available to be used, some physicians then still want to do the face to face consultation.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
11 answers
COVID- 19
Respiratory infections can be transmitted through droplets of different sizes: when the droplet particles are >5-10 μm in diameter they are referred to as respiratory droplets, and when then are <5μm in diameter, they are referred to as droplet nuclei. According to current evidence, COVID-19 virus is primarily transmitted between people through respiratory droplets and contact routes.2-7 In an analysis of 75,465 COVID-19 cases in China, airborne transmission was not reported.
Droplet transmission occurs when a person is in in close contact (within 1 m) with someone who has respiratory symptoms (e.g., coughing or sneezing) and is therefore at risk of having his/her mucosae (mouth and nose) or conjunctiva (eyes) exposed to potentially infective respiratory droplets. Transmission may also occur through fomites in the immediate environment around the infected person. Therefore, transmission of the COVID-19 virus can occur by direct contact with infected people and indirect contact with surfaces in the immediate environment or with objects used on the infected person (e.g., stethoscope or thermometer). 
Airborne transmission is different from droplet transmission as it refers to the presence of microbes within droplet nuclei, which are generally considered to be particles <5μm in diameter, can remain in the air for long periods of time and be transmitted to others over distances greater than 1 m. 
In the context of COVID-19, airborne transmission may be possible in specific circumstances and settings in which procedures or support treatments that generate aerosols are performed; i.e., endotracheal intubation, bronchoscopy, open suctioning, administration of nebulized treatment, manual ventilation before intubation, turning the patient to the prone position, disconnecting the patient from the ventilator, non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation, tracheostomy, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 
There is some evidence that COVID-19 infection may lead to intestinal infection and be present in faeces. However, to date only one study has cultured the COVID-19 virus from a single stool specimen.  There have been no reports of faecal−oral transmission of the COVID-19 virus to date.
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
2 answers
Nowadays, where there is a lot of new information and studies on immunotherapy in Hematology and Oncology every day, are there news about Haemophagocytosis and Immuntherapy, such as Antibody against PD-L1 AS Exemple?.
Relevant answer
Answer
More than 2 Years sinnce my Quastion about it in 2018 😀 ...
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
A 60y/o woman with stage IV breast cancer (OSS, PER), ER / PR +, Her2 -, previous illnesses: HTN, devlops a recurrent ascites under the Treatment with letrozole + palbociclib, additionally to arterial hypotension, sleightly elevated creatinine 1.3 mg / ml, hyperkalemia up to 7 mmol / l, hyponatremia up to 118 mmol / l, compensated metabolic acidosis with BE of -7 und a hypoalbuminemia of 18 g / l. SIADH and hypocortisolism are excluded. What could be the cause for this clinical and laboratorypicture?
Relevant answer
Answer
Most women with stage 4 breast cancer experience tumour lysis syndrome following the administration of chemotherapy. It is important to monitor the blood parameters and carefully manage co- morbidities to prevent further complications.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
8 answers
Oncology is a branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. A medical professional who practices oncology is an oncologist. The name's etymological origin is the Greek word ὄγκος (óngkos), meaning 1. "burden, volume, mass" and 2. "barb", and the Greek word λόγος (logos), meaning "study".
Cancer survival has improved due to three main components: improved prevention efforts to reduce exposure to risk factors (e.g., tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption), improved screening of several cancers (allowing for earlier diagnosis), and improvements in treatment.
Relevant answer
Answer
Lauren Pecorino
Molecular Biology of Cancer: Mechanisms, Targets, and Therapeutics
3rd Edición
ISBN-13: 978-0199577170, ISBN-10: 019957717X
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
Metformin's anti-cancerous properties have been demonstrated in various cancer cells in vitro, such as lung, pancreatic, colon, ovarian, breast, prostate, renal cancer cells, melanoma, and even in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. 
It was suggested that the tumoral  microenvironment is associated with long-term outcome in primary and metastatic tumors.Metformin reduces inflammatory microenvironment Is regulated microenvironment with metformin reprogramme malignant cancer Cells toward a benign phenotype.
Relevant answer
Answer
Epigenetic therapy inhibits metastases by disrupting premetastatic niches
  • Zhihao Lu,
  • Jianling Zou,
  • […]
  • Malcolm V. Brock
Nature volume 579, pages284–290(2020
Abstract
Cancer recurrence after surgery remains an unresolved clinical problem1,2,3. Myeloid cells derived from bone marrow contribute to the formation of the premetastatic microenvironment, which is required for disseminating tumour cells to engraft distant sites4,5,6. There are currently no effective interventions that prevent the formation of the premetastatic microenvironment6,7. Here we show that, after surgical removal of primary lung, breast and oesophageal cancers, low-dose adjuvant epigenetic therapy disrupts the premetastatic microenvironment and inhibits both the formation and growth of lung metastases through its selective effect on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In mouse models of pulmonary metastases, MDSCs are key factors in the formation of the premetastatic microenvironment after resection of primary tumours. Adjuvant epigenetic therapy that uses low-dose DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase inhibitors, 5-azacytidine and entinostat, disrupts the premetastatic niche by inhibiting the trafficking of MDSCs through the downregulation of CCR2 and CXCR2, and by promoting MDSC differentiation into a more-interstitial macrophage-like phenotype. A decreased accumulation of MDSCs in the premetastatic lung produces longer periods of disease-free survival and increased overall survival, compared with chemotherapy. Our data demonstrate that, even after removal of the primary tumour, MDSCs contribute to the development of premetastatic niches and settlement of residual tumour cells. A combination of low-dose adjuvant epigenetic modifiers that disrupts this premetastatic microenvironment and inhibits metastases may permit an adjuvant approach to cancer therapy.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
14 answers
Is there a proven relationship between vehicle emission and cancer diseases?
Relevant answer
Answer
Research indicates that nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide have an effect on increasing the risk of cancer.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
47 answers
"In conclusion, high-dose intravenous ascorbate represents a promising and inexpensive anticancer therapeutic option that should be further explored in clinical trials. Given its low toxicity and low financial cost, ascorbate could become an important weapon in our arsenal against cancer, either acting as a single agent with predictive biomarkers or used in combination as an adjuvant therapy."
Targeting cancer vulnerabilities with high-dose vitamin C
Bryan Ngo, Justin M. Van Riper, Lewis C. Cantley & Jihye Yun
Nature Reviews Cancer volume 19, pages 271–282 (April 2019)
Invitation: Start a clinical trial.
There are currently 15 clinical trials. See details of those trials here: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41568-019-0135-7/tables/1
Relevant answer
Answer
Joe Graymer
Gamal Abdul Hamid Luis Rodrigo Wolfgang Doerr , check this out:
Alessandro Magrì et al. High-dose vitamin C enhances cancer immunotherapy, Science Translational Medicine (2020)
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
20 answers
I would like to know the mechanisms by which the bacteria induce cancer?
Relevant answer
Answer
Please take a look at the following RG links.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
7 answers
I am in search of high standard International upcoming conferences on Oncology. Kindly do suggest me some conferences. Suggest me the standard of the conference organized by International Association of Oncology
Relevant answer
Answer
I have heard about the International Association of Oncology. They are organizing high standard International conferences regarding Oncology, Cancer. I can suggest the association link too, there you can find the conferences.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
10 answers
Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are being diagnosed with increasing frequency. IPMNs comprise a histologic group that ranges from adenoma to invasive carcinoma with different degrees of aggressiveness (borderline tumor). Actually, it is not known whether all IPMNs have this malignant potential or what is the best treatment of IPMNs. The'identify the right time of surgical treatment or follow-up is the great dilemma .
Relevant answer
Answer
clinical trail for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
Hi everyone! I need your advice.
I have been working with Truven MarketScan® Commercial Claims and Encounters Database and the Medicare Supplemental and Coordination of Benefits (COB) Database in the past, and most recently with the SEER-Medicare data.
The oncology medicines I am working with are either injectable ( antibodies or targeted treatment) or chemo ( I guess it can be both orally taken or given infusion in an out-patient setting). I want to pull out all the claim information about the medicines. Should I just use J-code to pull them out from the in-patient (part A in Medicare) and out-patient (part B in Medicare) database? These medicines also show up as NDC# in the pharmacy database ( Medicare part D). Should I include the pharmacy claims in my analysis? All the medicines are reimbursed by Part B in Medicare. I don't understand why they show up in the pharmacy claims (part D). The patients wouldn't go to a pharmacy to pick up an oncology drug right?
Thank you so much for your advice!
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you so much for your answer, James. Apologies for my late reply. I agree with you. The actual cost has little relation to ASP. I am only looking for medication costs, so it could be more straightforward. Overall, I found that understanding the real-world medical practice and reimbursement rules, as well as the data structure, are important to figure out the cost source and where they will show up in the data files. For example, infused oncology medicines are in part B while oral medications are in part D. There are also some specific rules in exception for particular medicines. The commercial databases can be different from the CMS ones because the reimbursement rules are different. Interesting and complicated.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
10 answers
Their is need to understand the safety and efficacy of exercise therapy on cancer treatment–induced cardiovascular toxicity and tumor progression and metastasis in oncology practice, this can be achieved by having a fundamental knowledge of exercise prescription, dosing and personalization with regards to cancer treatment and according to global best practices.
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
18 answers
I want to know whether tumor cells share their information by time passing. I were wondering if anybody could answer my question and introduce some good resources in this regard?
Relevant answer
Answer
The answer is "Yes". Please see the following PDF attachments.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
32 answers
I once had a colleague in a university, he was a professor of postgrad studies. About three years ago he suffered a bladder cancer, see for example: http://www.cancer.org/cancer/bladdercancer/. Then he took a surgery abroad, but it seemed that the cancer was spreading. So he decided to take herbal remedies besides taking chemotherapy.
I am not sure what happened then, except the fact that two years ago he passed away. I dont know exactly if his condition worsened because of cancer grew or not. But this story makes me ask about the safety and effectiveness of herbal remedies. Some people think that herbal remedies have better credibility over other alternative medicines.
So do you agree that herbal remedies are safe for cancer treatment? Do you have experience. Thank you.
Relevant answer
Answer
Kindly see the following PDF attachments.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
5 answers
I am looking at tumor cells + surrounding immune cells and their expression of IL-6 in B-cell derived cancer. In some samples I can recognize comet-like plasma cells, and their cytoplasm is very clearly stained for the IL-6 antibody. Can plasma cells express IL-6, and if not, what might (in theory) activate the expression of this gene?
Relevant answer
Answer
the plasma cell are dendritic cells that stained may be with the IL-6 antibody.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
5 answers
I want to find out the sex of the cell line.
Relevant answer
Answer
The cell lines has the transcripts from Y chromosome.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
18 answers
Mack et al studied subtypes of three ependymoma(same histopathology) brain tumors and found that one subtype carries an intrachromosomal translocation that creates a new tumor-driving gene, another lacks tumor-driving mutations but has aberrant epigenetic modifications, and a third shows neither gene mutations nor epigenetic aberrations. There were three genotype but one cancer phenotype. Similarly Martincorena and colleagues found thousands of mutations in cancer-relevant genes, including cancer-driver genes, in normal eyelid epidermis .(multiple cancer genotypes but no cancer phenotype).
In disparate classes of biological systems, there are more genotypes than phenotypes. Where sufficient information exists to enumerate these phenotypes, there are exponentially more genotypes than phenotypes, as a function of the number of system parts. This means that any one phenotype typically has many genotypes that form it.
In a brief, cancer is the decision of the cell to choose the innovative/adaptive phenotype and understanding the genotype does not mean understanding cancer.
References
1. Mack, S. C., Witt, H., Piro, R. M., Gu, L., Zuyderduyn, S., Stütz, A. M., et al. (2014). Epigenomic alterations define lethal CIMP-positive ependymomas of infancy. Nature 506, 445–450.
2. Martincorena, I., Roshan, A., Gerstung, M., Ellis, P., Van Loo, P., McLaren, S., et al. (2015). High burden and pervasive positive selection of somatic mutations in normal human skin. Science 348, 880–886.
Relevant answer
Answer
Answer of the question
Cancer is name of the a kind phenotype not genotype
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
1 answer
We are looking for a patient monitering camera that is not degraded by radiation interactions. We need extended zoom capabibilitees so we can also do our HDR positioning QA in the morning. The current cameras we use last for about 2 years before they get radiation damage and become spoted.
Any advice?
Relevant answer
Answer
Our MegaRAD3 camera product line have been used by OEM suppliers of LINAC’s for over 20 years, and there literally are thousands of them currently in use around the world for patient monitoring, and even within some MLC’s for beam alignment, possibly even at your facility now.
While many End Users utilize our MegaRAD3 camera product line for imaging in their radiation environments, in some low radiation level Hot Cells, or Oncology applications where multiple cameras are used, these version cameras may be an expensive alternative when compared to “disposable” CCD or CMOS cameras, plus they had to be mounted onto bulky 3rd party pan/tilt platforms, and coupled with a lens to be useful as a remote controlled monitoring tool.
That’s why we’ve put years into the development of the KiloRAD PTZ camera. While it has lower radiation total dose capabilities when compared to our MegaRAD3 version cameras, the affordable KiloRAD PTZ cameras have much higher radiation resistance when compared to CCD or CMOS cameras.
As a “turn-key solution”, they are an ideal fit for a patient / room monitoring cameras for Oncology applications.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
3 answers
JMML is well known for its non responsiveness to existing treatment options including HSCT, which has only shown to be the only curative option to provide for these patients. Even with HSCT prognosis is not so good. Does any centre in India have experience with HSCT in JMML ? Is there a specific recommendation/ guideline as to who all needs HSCT and whom to palliate ?
Relevant answer
Answer
There are very few data indeed Dr. Gopakumar.. See following articles regarding HSCT for jCMML:
I hope that it might help...!!!
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
8 answers
Is it indicated to make use of a totally implanted venous access device in the Emergency Department?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi James,
Unfortunately, there is no "one size fits all" answer. It really depends on the specific patient and the specific emergency department. If peripheral access is easily and quickly obtained, then accessing the IVAD should not be performed. However, most patients with IVADs generally have poor peripheral access. In this case, it would be appropriate to access the IVAD only if the staff is adequately trained in doing so. The department should have a policy for accessing these devices along with a good training program so that they are accessed safely and sterile.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
11 answers
We are brainstorming about research involving the fields of genetics and oncology. We were wondering if chemotherapy could interfere with the results of the DNA isolation and Genetic results. Would it be possible to get blood samples during chemotherapy or is it best to do this between chemotherapy sessions?
Thanks in advance,
Roel
Relevant answer
Answer
I think the answer depends on what you intent to measure and what the details are. Chemotherapy can induce somatic DNA alterations and potentially predispose to acquired aberrant clonal expansions (https://www.nature.com/articles/gim2017196). Are you plannig to get blood samples for germline DNA testing? Hematologic malignancy testing? Cell free DNA?
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
38 answers
To fight the disease effectively, researchers from across the scientific spectrum and beyond must join forces.
Relevant answer
Answer
Yes
  • asked a question related to Oncology
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
22 answers
Is there any study with significant scientific value proving that sunscreen can directly or indirectly cause skin cancer?
I do believe that they protect the skin from the UVA and UVB thus reducing the risk of cancer.
Oxybenzone is being mentioned as a sunscreen chemical with high risk of causing cancer. Retinyl Palmitate is mentioned to be increasing the speed of development of malignant cells. However, after analysis of the ingredients of several sunscreen creams and lotions (Nivea, Garnier Ambre Solaire and Eucerin Sun Protection) I didn't find any of these compounds.
Relevant answer
Answer
May be you can useful from the following article
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
25 answers
Although cancer immunotherapy can be quite effective, it has a variety of drawbacks.
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
Dear Researchers,
I am working with a PDCL cancer cells and I want to transfect GFP in the cells. I am using lipofectamine 2000 and I incubated it with the cells for 6 hour and seems to be good but after 6 hours they start to show some death due to Lipofectamine toxicity.
So I only incubated cells with the Lipofactamine and the vectors for 6 hours and then changed the medium to the normal medium that I am using for the cells.
I used in this experiment 10.000 cells and they showed some positive cells after 72 hour however they all died when I tranfered them to a larger T25 Flask,
Any suggestions ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Sandra,
Thank you very much for your valuable input and looking forward to using Viromer in our cell line setups
Best Regards,
Mohammed.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
16 answers
In our routine clinical practice, we are trying to kill mosquitoes (cancer cells) to cure cancer. sometimes we are using smart medications ( molecular-targeted therapies-it is look like, targeting the wings of mosquitoes ), I think that we must dry the swamp to cure cancer(fix the corrupted microenvironment)
Relevant answer
Answer
Fully agree. But it is not only the swamp. It is the mosquito and the swamp.
Because in the case of cancer it is the mosquito who creates the swamp.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
7 answers
I was planning to simulate hypoxia chemically in cancer cells using dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), desferrioxamine (DFO), ciclopirox olamine (CPX) or cobalt chloride (CoCl2), due to lack of a hypoxia chamber. However, I was also wondering if the results obtained from this form of hypoxia induction comparable to hypoxic simulation in a chamber, but I only found one article for this proof related to mesenchymal stem cells:
I have yet to find an article noting a difference between the two in cancer cells. Has anyone tried both cases and noticed a significant difference, or are they comparable? Similarly, does the agent type also affects results? I can't find any article comparing the effect of each agent in cancer cells as well. Thanks!
Relevant answer
Answer
It's also important to keep in mind that chemical hypoxia (cobalt, DMOG..), inhibits "specifically" PHD and promotes HIFa stabilization. However, real hypoxia induces several changes independently of HIF (for example, ER stress and UPR response, diminution of ATP, AMPK activation and inhibition of mTOR, and ROS production changes). Thus, it's necessary to distinguish the role of hypoxia and the role of HIFa stabilization.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
In reviewing methodology of a manuscript, I found out that CA125 levels in ovarian cyst fluids were measured using an ELISA kit. In the kit manual, it says that this kit is used for measuring CA125 in serum or plasma. Is this CA125 measurement valid?
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks
Very helpful
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
7 answers
Three questions:
- Would it help to linearize the plasmid before transfecting the suspension cells using Lipofectamine 2000 or 3000?
- Does it make a difference if the DNA is added in TE buffer or H2O (to OptiMEM)?
- Could I also use RNA for Lipofectamine transfection using the exact same protocol?
Relevant answer
Answer
Electroporation is the way to go for suspension cell lines. You can get up to 80% efficiency for siRNA knockouts with electroporation tailored to specific cell lines (for example Raji: https://altogen.com/product/raji-electroporation-kit-burkitts-lymphoma-cells-ccl-86/). Other methods can work, it's just that electroporation is particularly effective for suspension cell lines.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
37 answers
We are using lipofectamine for transfecting synthetic miRNA mimics for the miRNA functional analyses and miRNA target site validation experiments that we are developing with human cancer cell lines. However I would like to know if in your experience those experiments work as well with jet-PEY or similar reagents, which seems to be more cost effective. Thank you, Inma
Relevant answer
Answer
It all depends on the cell line, and the transfection reagent for it as well. Given the similarities between miRNA and siRNA, if you find reagents that work well for siRNA delivery it's likely they'll work for miRNA delivery as well. See this catalog (https://altogen.com/products-index/) and you'll see that different cell lines have different efficiencies, even for optimized reagents. Generics will work, but they won't be stellar. Look through previous studies to see what reagents they used for given cell lines, and you should be set for getting the empirical values for efficiency as well.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
30 answers
According to a 2004 report by Morgan, Ward, and Barton: "The contribution of cytotoxic chemotherapy to 5-year survival in adult malignancies. ... survival in adults was estimated to be 2.3% in Australia and 2.1% in the USA." See http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15630849, or https://www.burtongoldberg.com/home/burtongoldberg/contribution-of-chemotherapy-to-five-year-survival-rate-morgan.pdf
Although such conditions may vary for different types of cancer, it is commonly held that 80% of oncologists will not take chemotherapy if they suffer from cancer themselves.
Another possible approach is perhaps herbal chemotherapy, which according to another report may yield an 85% success rate. See http://breastcancerconqueror.com/85-success-rate-with-herbal-chemo/
So why is the success rate of chemotherapy very low? And is it possible to improve that?
Relevant answer
Answer
I am not a doctor, but I have spoken with countless individuals who have survived cancer through natural means (diet, colonics and supplements) to boost their immune systems and detoxify their bodies. I have had a natural health store for more than twenty-five years and have read many books and articles as well as heard testimonials on this process.
What is ironic is that now the "breakthrough" method of cancer treatment that is touted by the medical establishment is the use of the individual's own immune system. Of course they say that the immune system must be "enhanced" by their drugs in order to work. They call it CAR-T cell therapy and they will provide it for one-half million dollars with the disclaimer that the boosted immune system might attack other organs. (TIME Mag. 12/25/2017).
Here's an idea - let people keep their one-half million dollars and use a small portion of it to buy organic vegetables and supplements, and maybe pay a practitioner to monitor their progress. Their naturally tuned-up immune systems will love all of their organs rather than attack them.
How gullible do we have to be to believe that we should pay the medical community one-half million dollars to use our own system that is in place naturally?
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
2 answers
Hello everyone,
EGCG and sulforaphane are attributed intriguing pharmacological effect in a wide variety of fields. Recent research also investigates the synergistic effects of those two compounds (e.g.
Epigallocatechin gallate and sulforaphane combination treatment induce apoptosis in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells through hTERT and Bcl-2 down-regulation (Chen et al. 2013)) with astonishing results compared to the isolated application of the compounds.
Although, there is one in vivo study in mice that investigated the combined effect (Nair et al. 2010, Regulation of Nrf2- and AP-1-mediated gene expression by epigallocatechin-3-gallate and sulforaphane in prostate of Nrf2-knockout or C57BL/6J mice and PC-3 AP-1 human prostate cancer cells), I doubt that these results can be simply transferred to humans, as I came across this study
Inhibitory effects of green tea and grape juice on the phenol sulfotransferase activity of mouse intestines and human colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2. (Tamura, Matsui, 2000)
It occurs to me, that the co-administration of EGCG and sulforaphane might actually counteract what was intended. From what I understand, sulfotransferase responsible for the uptake of sulfones (like sulphorafane). Therefore, inhibiting that enzyme might prevent the uptake of sulphorafane at all.
Am I right with that conclusion or am I mistaken?
Best regards,
Christian
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi dear Christian Neumann
i think the following paper can help you
best and kind regard
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
7 answers
I know how to calculate the MU time but not sure how to get the cumulative dose. I have gone through the Radiation Physics book by Faiz. However no clear cut approach is shown for getting the cumulative dose? So my question is 1) Is there any approach by which cumulative dose can be calculated? or it is prescribed by the radiologist? 2) Do we need to optimize the dose distribution for telecobalt therapy?
Relevant answer
Answer
Francisco is correct in his comments. I will add a few as well.
Calculating MU/time and calculating dose are the inverse of one another. You need to be given MU to calculate dose, or you need prescribed dose to calculate MU. Typically one is tasked with calculating MU or time after the dose is prescribed by the Radiation Oncologist. In simple calculations the dose would be prescribed to a point in the body and the field apertures shaped to conform to the local anatomy, followed by normalizing to an isodose line that covers the desired area. All of this goes into the calculation of MU or time needed to get the prescribed dose. Modern techiniques involve the use of inverse planning utilizing arcs, dynamic MLC's, etc. It is always important to optimize the dose distribution, whether in linac based therapy or cobalt teletherapy. The ability to optimize the dose distribution is tied to the imaging available (2D, 3D, 4D, PET, MRI, etc.) the technology contained in the treatment planning system, and the skill of the planner.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
7 answers
I greatly appreciate your input
Relevant answer
Answer
I'm sure you realize that with MCF7 cells you are generating a metastasis model, not a carcinogenesis model, right?
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
According to Kuhn, a paradigm change in science, that means an epistemological change, requests the agreement of the scientific community, like it is arrived with the institution of quantum physics. In medicine a new paradigm of Medical Science has been proposed and applied in Medical Education in 1998 at the Milan School of Medicine , with the introduction of Person Centered Clinical Method and after the presentation of the new person centered interactionist and teleological health paradigm in 2005 ,presented at WHO (by invitation) in 2011 along with Person Centered Medicine, Medical Education change the paradigm change has been formalized on 13-14-15 October in Milan along with the presentation of “La Charte Mondiale de la Santé-the World Health Charter”.
The person-centered paradigm change of Medicine,Health, Medical Education and research corresponds to re-birth of clinics like a discipline addressed to discover the individuality of the patient in a disease and not the opposite, reducing him/her to an abstract theory. To date it is impossible because the same basic sciences , neurobiology, physiology, psycho-neuro- immune-endocrinology (PNEI) , already at experimental level, evidenced the end of a mechanistic , deterministic paradigm in Medical Science and the birth o f a person centered one (Person Centered Medicine) , that discriminates biological reactions, whose variability is determined by the person’s existential choices (life style and quality) from biological constants , responsible of biological life, according the Relativity Theory of Biological Reactions (1996)
I invite you to read the e-book “ Medical Science and Health Paradigm Change” and to give your “YES or NOT” about this paradigm change determinant for the destiny of Medicine , Medical Science and Medical Education, reformulating in a new way the epistemological principles of medicine, clinical method and clinical supervision
You can download the e-book from Research Gate:
And , if you agree ,to fulfill the agreement form or download it from www.healthparadigmchange.it sending it to secretariat@healthparadigmchange.it
And to read some other info on Person Centered Medicine on www.unambro.it
Thank you
Giuseppe R.Brera
Relevant answer
In the 21st century a revision needs on our medical science. A medical research cursory attention by either device or molecule is ultimately wrong and being violated the medical ethics.
A 20 years after the real medical research negligence and its consequences may affect to the innocent patients. They buried their valued life by the wrong medical treatment. We must follow basic science, but what is basic science?. Can we retrieve one ampule injection once used from the blood?.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
Would 2 biosimilars, that have separately demonstrated interchangeability with the reference product, through adequate clinical designs (phase III trials with 2 arms, and at least three changes in the switching arm, as proposed by the FDA draft), be also interchangeable with each other?
Relevant answer
Answer
Thans Igor
As I see it the main issue is to demonstrate similarity in
quality, safety and efficacy. I would think that, just taking safety, you cannot go from preclinical stidues in animals to a phaase III trial in humans
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
11 answers
Relevant answer
Answer
Probably this will be the future. In the meantime we are overlooking very simple non taylored treatments that are less toxic and almost as effective that the sofisticated ones.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
9 answers
The venom contains MP1 molecule.
MP1 molecule and lipid membrane.
The potential of MP1 molecule as cancer drug.
Combination therapies.
Relevant answer
Answer
Ya its very true Polybia-MP1 (MP1 extracted from the venom of Brazilian wasp Polybia paulista) have anticancer potential I have also published this in review article recently.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
3 answers
Nature Webcast
The potential applications of single cell genomics include biomarker discovery, clinical trials, therapy selection, and disease monitoring.  
What is the importance of single-cell biology to understand how clonal diversity in cancer impacts response, resistance, and relapse?
How single-cell DNA analysis overcomes the limitations of bulk sequencing to understand clonal architecture and mutation co-occurrence which impacts hematological malignancies?
Relevant answer
Answer
I believe that single DNA-analysis in liquid biopsy would realize the precision medicine in cancer treatment because we can understand the heterogeneity of the tumor population and the dynamic tumor evolution!!
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
I have been looking for information about this but I still can't find a reliable answer. I have contacted Cancer Treatment Centers of America, The National Cancer Institute, American Society of Clinical
Oncology as well as the US National Library of Medicine but still no exact answer.
Anyone with reliable answer and evidence will be mentioned in my project as source of information.
Relevant answer
Answer
There is a well documented radiation application by the dermatologist Leopold Freund in Vienna, Austria, who treated a 5 year old grl suffering from Naevus pigmentosus piliferus in 1897.
Source: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift: "Ein mit Röntgen-Strahlen behandelter Fall von Naevus pigmentosus piliferus" (in German).
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
from
Theoretically, the Quorum Sensing (QS) mechanism may be disrupted by any condition which prevents a faithful "count" of SC neighbors. This can be either due to reduced sensitivity of the SC itself, e.g., shortage of adequate receptors for environmental signals, or due to reduced "clarity" in the environment, concealing extracellular signals from the SC. The result in both cases is weakened ability to sense the "true" number of SCs in the micro-environment and, as a consequence, incessant proliferation and elusion of normal homeostatic tissue control. These two properties can be integrated into one parameter, the magnitude of intercellular communication sensed by a SC, which is expected to be the critical determinant of the tissue's steady-state production of end cells.
Agur Z, Kogan Y, Levi L, et al. Disruption of a Quorum Sensing mechanism triggers tumorigenesis: a simple discrete model corroborated by experiments in mammary cancer stem cells. Biology Direct. 2010;5:20. doi:10.1186/1745-6150-5-20.
Relevant answer
Answer
Even, ıt is not an answer. please look my reference
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
6 answers
Reviewers have often questioned whether peer review is a thankless job or a duty to the academic community for the lack of adequate recognition or compensation for their contribution.
Publons, which was launched in the year 2013, currently has over 28, 931 reviewers.
Relevant answer
Answer
Great question. A small correction, Publons has more than 300,000 reviewers. To date, nearly 400,000 reviews have been published. I like Publons because it offers a platform for recognition for peer reviewers. Above all, Publons offers training for reviewers through its Publons Academy.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
1 answer
Inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production after central nervous system injury. What about the cancer?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi,
You could check this article
It seems that, after apoptosis, ROS can be mediated by caspases to promote a regeneration process.
Regards
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
12 answers
oncologists and kickbacks on chemo
Relevant answer
Answer
Sorry Ladislaus but besides the salary and in spite of regulations, kickbacks are there all the time...and mainly from big pharma.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
5 answers
Any feedback, ideas, suggestions
Relevant answer
Answer
Interesting question and looking forward to read answers
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
4 answers
NGS data provides information on variant allele frequency which is to be used for calculating copies of total cf-DNA, variant copies of cf-DNA per ml.
I have used the method described in
Annals of Oncology 27: 862–867, 2016
Detection of ubiquitous and heterogeneous mutations in cell-free DNA from patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer
authors in this paper, based on the assumption that there are 3.3 pg DNA per haploid copy of genome, have calculated the total cf-DNA, variant copies of cf-DNA per ml.
Is there any other method available for calculating copies of ct-DNA?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Wang,
Thank you for reading and answering my query.
I already have idea about calculating copy number of cf-DNA.
I am looking for calculating variant copies of cf-DNA per ml, which basically gives information on presences of mutated gene in the cf-DNA. I hope my query is more clear to you now. please revert back if you come across such papers.
Thanks once again.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
7 answers
I would like to understand the current landscape of patterns in the diagnosis/ treatment and outcome measure of current therapeutic interventions that are available in LMICs for cancer.
Relevant answer
Answer
Cancer pattern and outcomes in low-middle income greatly differs from that of high income countries. It will also vary between countries within the low-middle income groups. Mostly, cancers of the esophagus, stomach, mouth, lungs, and pharynx in men, and uterine cervix, breast, ovary, stomach, esophagus, and mouth in women are commonly seen in India. Next, is the stage at diagnosis. Most or around 80% of all cancer patients are diagnosed in advanced stages (Stage III and IV). Thus, the outcomes to conventional treatments are relatively poor in comparison. The late diagnosis results due to lack of specialized services in the rural or under develop areas, low level of cancer awareness , and virtual absence of population-based cancer screening contributes to the late diagnosis of cancer in low-middle income countries. In India for example, more than 70% of our population resides in rural areas, however, almost every cancer diagnostic and treatment centers are located either in urban or semi-urban regions. This also contributes to drop-out during the course of treatment leading to incomplete or sub-optimal treatment, and thus poor outcomes. There are many gaps that needs to be addressed in low-middle income countries to fight cancer, given its socio-economic impact in these countries. I hope this would be useful .
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
18 answers
First, I'm using Ficoll Histopaque centrifugation to obtain mononuclear cells. Then, I'm doing RBC lysis. I observe a drastic loss of CD138+ cells after that (as checked using FACS and two separate validated CD138 antibodies). E.g. a sample that contains 18% plasmocytes, has practically no plasmocytes left after Histopaque isolation.
I want to use MACS CD138+ Microbeads but they fail since the Histpaque-isolated cells are devoid of plasmocytes.
Does anyone have such problems? What would you recommend? I've read about autoMACS Pro being good for such cases, but I don't have access to this device.
Relevant answer
Answer
We do at first Ficoll to obtain the MNCs but without Erythrocte lysis and then go for CD138+ beads for purification from Miltenyi. We do this manually with a magnet from Miltenyi and the respective column which is working as good as automated system, only requires some person to do it. The number of CD138+ cells strongly depends from the patient, often we get either nothing (everything below 50.000 cells is considered in our lab as nothing), or in between 100.000 and 200.000 cells from 20 ml of bone marrow. In rare cases we obtain more than 1 mio cells (up to approx. 10 mio cells was the maximum I got), this is strongly associated with disease progress. Try to get patients history and cases with disease progress for method establishment as this can only be successful when you have a proper amount of cells inside. And also do not hesitate to contact Miltenyi that they should come and help you, my experience in the past was that they did this and also gave free kit samples for testing purpose or borrowed even a magnet for 4 weeks for testing.
  • asked a question related to Oncology
Question
9 answers
It's about metastatic Insulinomas of the pancreas
Relevant answer