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I am a PhD student at the Free University of Amsterdam. My provisional research topic is "An Analysis of Bokyi Discourse Narrative and its Implications for translating the story of the call of Abraham in Genesis 12.
I want to find out how an understanding of Bokyi (my language) narratives can help in translating the story of the call of Abraham in a way that would be natural, clear, accurate, and acceptable to Bokyi people.
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I suggest you start with a theoretical framework to analyze the narrative construction of the texts you choose to examine. Think of Robert E. Longacre’s Text Generation and Text Analysis or his taxonomy regarding plot structure. Once you decide on a theoretical framework, you can then adapt it to examine patriarchal narratives or any other type. By the way, Longacre studies biblical discourses extensively and published papers as well as a book on the Joseph narrative.
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In view of modern science, I realize that Adam could not have been the first human being. But was there still a historical Adam who served as the first theologically significant human being (i.e., the first one to represent the human race before God)? Or is Adam a purely literary character?
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Interesting
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I have done my doctorate in comparative religions i.e. comparison of old testament books in the light of Islamic teachings. I need a fellow friend help
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Try searching on Scholarship.com or check for vacancies on the research page of particular universities of your choice.
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The Canaanites were a sophisticated, learned people with their own literature and art (some, but not much). They, like other ancient peoples, had a view of world based on choas and the necessity for balance. This involved, as in Egypt, how well you treated others.
Israel, probably originally employed to designate the hilly country above the Palestine plains not a people, appears, by referencing Biblical texts, to have been immensely jealous of their wealthy, urban neighbours.
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Not aware of religious belief:
Ian, there is considerable knowledge of Canaanite religion, more so since the discovery of the Ugarit texts (Ulf Oldenburg: The Conflict Between El and Ba'al in Canaanite Religion. Leiden. E.J.Brill. 1969). There are more recent examples too.
The discovered texts talk of a pantheon ruled by El, with Ba'al, the son of Hadad/Dagan an Amorite intruder. As El is also called 'Ancient of Days' and resembles the god since portrayed as YHWH, and as Samuel (Sha'al), Saul, Elijah, Yishmael, Elishah, Ezekiel, Israel both begin or end with the appellative (with countless others, plus continuous references to el in the Bible) I, in Ancient Fiction, available here, and many, many others regard him as the original Hebrew deity along with his wife/consort Astarte or Asherah. As I've explained elsewhere, Israel was a personal name in Canaan and probably referenced the land not the people, and also YHWH can be seen as a personal name, mainly in Syria.
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If so, how? If not, why not?
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Zoroastrianism either began in the 1200s BCE or the 500s BCE. Although I realize that Israelite religion began in the 1800s BCE, various doctrines of Judaism, such as general resurrection, messiah, and Satan as a cosmic villain, seem to make their first appearance in Hebrew literature after Zoroastrianism began. So I'm not asking about the origin of Judaism, but about those aspects of Judaism that seemingly did not exist in the time of Abraham or Moses and which are shared by Zoroastrians and Jews.
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The 9th-century pandect BNF MS lat. 9380, produced under Theodulf's supervision, features rubricated chapter-numbers in the margins throughout. These marginal numbers are from the original scribe(s). But the prophetic books of the Old Testament seem to be the exception: no marginal chapter-numbers are evident there. Does anyone know why this manuscript would exclude the prophetic books from such marginal numbering?
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Thanks, Neil Ian Parker/ Yes it is beautiful. This link should give you access to the whole MS in order to answer your question directly from the source: http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b8452776m
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In the Old Testament, sometimes when a person is in a painful situation, he tears his clothes. Is there any work on this practice?
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As a survivor of my Mothers traumatic death, I was asked to be a speaker for a bereavement course and to integrate some of the things I had learned through my grief journey with a group psychology students. During this time, I integrated some of my insights from having been a researcher on a suicide / traumatic death study as well as my insights from a Christian faith perspective that aided in my journey. I am uploading you a document I created for myself  which outlines some of the scriptures that relate to the ritual of tearing / rendering clothes as an expression of grief in the Old Testament as well as a New Testament perspective (taken from a pastoral website) of the temple veil being rended as an expression of Gods grief after the death of Yeshua (Jesus).  I hope this gives you some place to start in understanding the ritual of rending clothes as an expression of grief. The insights certainly helped me on many levels and I do believe that such traditions and practices are helpful for the mourning process.
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I am currently heading a team of researchers into the security issues confronting the oil producing communities of Rivers State, and lots of these has been traced to ecological and environmental abuses of oil producing communities by multinational oil companies - Total, Shell, and Chevron to name a few.  Bringing a Biblical perspective to the purpose of creation and nature helps us appreciate the depth of the deviation from the norm attributable to the oil explorers, exploiters and exporters.  It arms the host communities to take adequate ethical and theological measures to restore sanity to the area while at the same time ensuring that oil production follows internationally acceptable environmental impact standards.
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thanks Amadi
I recommend the Earth Bible series with Norm Habel: we have an early career academic on faculty Dr Anthony Rees who has made some contributions in the area, with specific reference to the OT and environmental concerns.  There is also a Tongan OT scholar Rev Dr Jione Havea, who is very interested in this area. These academics are specifically interested in your question
Gerard
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The apologetic character of OT theologies came to my mind when I read G.L. Bauer's Theologie des ATs, Leipzig in 1796 and realized the context of it. It definitely is a reaction to the Enlightenment, there was not a single OT theology in the Middle ages. What is the agenda of OT theologies of today?
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I would like to make a suggestion so long as there seems to be consideration of who has influenced who. The most important source for the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic understanding of the world, theology, and philosophy would have to be the Zoroastrians. The dramatic shift in Judaism with the return from exile in Babylon cannot be mistaken, nor should it be ignored.
It was the contact with the Persians over a 70-year period that changed many things in the way the Jewish scriptures would be written, understood, and applied. Most of the Jewish scriptures were not written down until after the return from exile. One should note that the reading of the first 5 books of the Jewish scriptures was presented to mostly ignorant non-literate and non-practicing members of the community in Israel. There is no doubt that the influence on Christianity and eventually Islam was tremendous. When the Jewish royalty returned from exile they brought with them the concepts of monotheism, life after death, the resurrection, heaven and hell, final judgment, the devil, and the cataclysmic end of the world. That is influence! It does seem to me that attempting to show a backwards influence of Christianity and Islam on the Jewish scriptures is somewhat misplaced. However, I do think that no religion grows in a vacuum, and all neighboring faith communities have influenced each other to some degree. There seems to be a migration of religious thought to help accommodate events that do not fit the paradigm of the religion.
Please know my thoughts are submitted in humility and no offense is intended.