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Hello, I am interested converting word numerals to numbers task, e.g
- 'twenty two' -> 22
- 'hundred five fifteen eleven' -> 105 1511 etc.
And the problem I can't understand at all currently is for a number 1234567890 there are many ways we can write this number in words:
=> 12-34-56-78-90 is 'twelve thirty four fifty six seventy eight ninety'
=> 12-34-576-890 is 'twelve thirty four five hundred seventy six eight hundred ninety'
=> 123-456-78-90 is '(one)hundred twenty three four hundred fifty six seventy eight ninety'
=> 12-345-768-90 is 'twelve three hundred forty five seven hundred sixty eight ninety'
and so on (Here I'm using dash for indicating that 1234567890 is said in a few parts).
Hence, all of the above words should be converted into 1234567890.
I am reading following papers in the hopes of tackling this task:
But so far I still can't understand how would one go about solving this task.
Thank you
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I'm helping a friend out who's research is on Examining Numeracy Competency of Students and the Sustainability in Fiji: A case study of secondary school.
Other questions include: Variables to measure Numeracy Competency? and the Methodology and Sampling?
Just needs some input on these questions. Thanks
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Actually ... I agree with previous answers.
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Adult learners are those who missed a chance to complete school in formal education. They leave school pre-maturely at primary (elementary) level due to different problems. Some just fail to make it to secondary school, others manage to pass but fail to complete secondary school. With their own interest or a push from someone else, they come to learn and would want to bridge this gap later in their life.
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Defines 21st-century skills as “the ability to collect and retrieve information, organize and manage information, evaluate the quality, relevance and usefulness of information and finally generate accurate information through the use of existing resources”.
Emerging 21st-century content-areas include – but are not limited to – global awareness, environmental literacy, health literacy, visual literacy, information literacy, financial literacy, civic literacy, and entrepreneurship literacy. These areas, in turn, address a set of learning skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving, communication, digital and media literacy, creativity, collaboration, and leadership. Other life and career skills proposed include social and cross-cultural skills, productivity and accountability, initiative and self-direction. The list is long, since they may constitute the basic expertise students need to acquire in order to function effectively in today’s world.
The official guidelines identified the key skills and competencies that students need to develop:
The ability to think through critical, creative, and analytical thinking, systems thinking and problem-solving.
The ability to make informed decisions.
Transferring the English language learning to other learning contexts and situations.
Developing communication skills.
Working effectively in groups.
Make connections with the community.
Being aware of their responsibilities and rights as citizens and acting accordingly.
Contributing to the aesthetic and cultural life of their community in any way they can.
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I have performed an experiment and unsure which statistical test to use. I randomly assign participants to 1 of 3 conditions, a score was measured. I also tested the participants numeracy score before the experiment. Which would be the best statistical test to run to find out the impact of the numeracy score on the score, per condition. Ie. see if there is an 'optimum' condition depending on what they scored on the numeracy test.
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The type of data must be clarified in order to choose the appropriate statistical analysis
I wish you success
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Dear Researchers and Friends
My name is Kamyar Azimi, an Educational Psychology PhD student, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran.
As you might be in the know that there are many sanctions being held against Iran, I do not have access to preschool or kindergarten early numeracy skills screeners or early numeracy scale tools which are pivotal to my PhD dissertation.
I would highly appreciate it if you can give me a hand in providing me with a copy of these and other valuable information in the tools and measurement section.
I will forever be grateful your kindness, help, and response which is of tremendous help in the development of this project.
Respectfully
Azimi, K
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I am happy to know that it it worked for you.
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My research thesis relates to 'Caregivers' intervention on readiness of preschoolers transitioning from kindergarten to primary school in the area of
1) Social-emotional readiness (learning to share, care and avoid aggression)
2) Cognitive readiness (critical thinking, literacy and numeracy)
3) School outcome (attitudes to learning, motivation, and persistence)
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I feel irrespective of the changes that have taken place in the family and social aspects of today compared to past situations the care givers should first be fully aware that the children at KG level are all innocent and full of inquisitiveness as their natural tendency hence the care giver has to be very careful in observing the natural likes and dislikes and bent of mind of the child rather than regimented teaching and schooling pattern.Listening to their innocent voices and responding appropriately their observation and respecting their innocent moves with compassion and care and diligently and meticulously draw their attention to normal behaviors which are rewarded and tend develop good attitudes and team work and tolerance.once the child becomes receptive and is attracted to such moderasions only then they should be exposed to rhythmic involved discipline focused learning schedules.
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I coordinate HIPPY program (hippyaustralia.bsl.org.au) in Launceston. It's a literacy and numeracy based school-readiness program to promote positive teaching and learning at home. I am interested in your project and would like to be a part of it, if possible.
Thanks, Aparna
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Great question
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I have an Independent Variable - 'scenario'. This variable is 2x2 (2 different message formats and 2 different message periods), respondents were distributed randomly to one of these. I want to test possible moderators: Age, Gender, Previous Experience, Numeracy and Graph Literacy on a Dependent variable (Likert, 7-schales). I have been trying to do it (using SPSS) but there are too many variables to make it work. 
Do I need to create 3 (of 4) different groups for 'scenario', where 3 times a different scenario is 1 and the rest 0. And after this, for all moderating variables, create a new variable. For example gender: 'gender*Scenario1' gender*Scenario2' 'gender*Scenario3' and do this as well for the other 4 moderators, or is there a simpler answer?
Also, my dependent variable is not normality distributed, does this create extra problems?
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Is there a reason you are not doing a two-way (or even three or four-way) ANOVA?  Your predictor is categorical, your potential moderators are categorical or can be made so, and ANOVA estimates the significance of the interactions automatically.  If/when you find one, you can then follow up with more involved analysis using regression, but for exploration, I would be using ANOVA
In SPSS lingo, General Linear Model -> Univariate, with your predictor and your potential moderator in Fixed Effects to start.  Or, if you read syntax, I have called your outcome "outcome," your predictor "predictor" and your moderator to test "moderator":
UNIANOVA outcome BY predictor moderator
  /METHOD=SSTYPE(3)
  /INTERCEPT=INCLUDE
  /PLOT=PROFILE(predictor*moderator)
  /EMMEANS=TABLES(predictor)
  /EMMEANS=TABLES(moderator)
  /EMMEANS=TABLES(predictor*moderator)
  /PRINT=DESCRIPTIVE
  /CRITERIA=ALPHA(.05)
  /DESIGN=predictor moderator predictor*moderator.
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I need this measurements to use them quantitatively for my research. 
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It all depends how you define "fluency" and "literacy" (and of course, "digital"). In my understanding, literacy is a more encompassing term, i.e., it includes fluency.
Perhaps my masters thesis helps, see attachment. It is on information literacy.
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to create a summary of developments within literacy/numeracy in Australian HE post the Bradley report and in relation to increasingly diverse cohorts with a wide variety of literacy levels.
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Hi Harshvardhan
Thank you so much for your responses, your suggestions have been interesting and helpful!
Kind regards
Catherine
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Has anyone come across current research on using mathematical literature to enhance numeracy in primary? specifically k-2
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Hi Marie,
I am presuming here that you mean using literature (e.g Counting on Frank) to facilitate mathematical learning. If so, I encourage you to contact a colleague of mine Natthapoj Trakulphadetkrai - at the University of Reading - who is conducting an international study on this topic. I am in early stages of data collection in relation to the Australian context - but Nathan will have findings from other international sites. 
Regards, Kevin.
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I would be interested in studies from any discipline.
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There is a dearth of research on specific interventions and their effect on learning of numeracy. I would love some direction to articles, videos, infographics etc.
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We've looked at the idea that oral teaching is good. Oral plus visuals is better, oral teaching plus visuals plus kinaesthetic could be amazing. Who is using kinaesthetic learning for numeracy concepts and how?
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I beg to differ that teaching math to young children is as simple as "teaching mathematics mathematically." First of all, what does that mean, exactly?
Secondly, children from birth to ages 8-10 learn best through concrete/kinesthetic interactions with didactic learning objects rather than through abstract thought alone. Most of these researchers (such as those you mention above) do not differentiate correctly between 5 year-olds and 15 year-olds.
I have been observing this difference for 20 years. There are countless others who work with children in Montessori schools across the globe who will support this observation. Montessori wrote about it in detail as well as at the turn of the last century. The whole idea of math "manipulatives" is taken directly from the materials developed by Maria Montessori and her son, Mario, without the proper and rightful attribution to their work. 
Thirdly, humans are not born with mathematical thinking fully developed. It comes with the ability to think abstractly somewhere between 8-11 years of age. Otherwise, there is nothing but rote memorization rather than true understanding for most children. 
Even if your premise that mathematical thinking focuses mainly on mathematics were true, it does not lead to the conclusion that there are no other valid types of thinking for human beings. Intuitive creativity is not mathematical. Even Einstein agreed with that. Being gifted at basketball does not require mathematical giftedness. Otherwise, every gifted basketball player would also be working at CERN.
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Many students in urban classrooms have mathematics difficulties. In particular many have very poor basic numeracy skills. I am currently writing my dissertation in this area. The approach will be to do a supplementary intervention to improve automaticity and to study how students performance in the classroom is impacted by improved levels of fluency. This will hopefully free up working memory thus allowing students to engage in the actual mathematics and not be bogged down with the underlying numeracy calculations and facts.
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I am not an expert in this area, but two thoughts occur to me from reading this discussion. i hope they have some relevance
Firstly, as the supplement to the question implies, there is no single, easily defined thing called mathematics that we all must master. Mathematics involves concepts and skills, ranging from the very basic to very complex. Only some of us need the very complex, so what do we need? Context also is important. I had school students who seemed to have difficulty in Biology lessons with  both the concepts and skills of adding, subtracting,multiplication and division but showed no problems with these when working on a market stall at the weekend. They could do these (I suppose we see them as basic) skills well in one context and not the other. Creating meaningful (for the students, not the teacher) and engaging classroom contexts introducing mathematical concepts and skills that can also be seen by the students as being meaningful and (potentially) useful has to be part of the solution for both more basic and more complex mathematics, or so I imagine. The right meaningful and supportive context might free up working memory for the more complex mathematical processes. So good luck Martin 
Second, and this may be related to the first, how meaningful are the mathematical problems that we present to our students from their perspective? Why might they think being able to maximise the area of a rectangle is important and not some mysterious thing that they are asked to do for reasons they cannot quite see? Some (perhaps those from backgrounds where  it is a given that whatever education  throws at you must be useful somehow) accept this on trust. Others might need more convincing. 
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I have been searching and my best options for individual assessment, so far, are the Test of Early Numeracy and the Number Sense Brief. I would really like to use a group administered test.
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HI Erin - 
My colleagues and I modified two early numeracy CBMs to fit a group administered format for K and 1st grade students. The measures tap into two number sense proficiencies: quantity discrimination and missing number (i.e., strategic counting). Following CBM logic, both measures are fluency-based (1 min) and are administered with standardized directions. We've begun to gather some technical adequacy information on the measures, and so far things look quite acceptable. If you'd like additional information, please feel free to contact me at: cdoabler@uoregon.edu or my work number is 541-346-8358. 
Best, 
Chris
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I am designing a research questionnaire on the experiences of adults learning numeracy. To assess the reliability and validity of my questionnaire I woul like to see a copy of a similar instrument that has been used successfully in a similar inquiry. Or a relevant source or literature.
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Hi Norman,
In qualitative research, where the questionnaires are either semi-structured or unstructured, we don't usually test tools for reliability and validity - as we do for structured quantitative questionnaires. Qualitative questionnaires are often 'unique' and not designed to be generalisable to other studies. Therefore - it is unlikely that you would want to directly 'copy' another qualitative questionnaire. Qualitative researchers may certainly employ pilot or member-checking procedures to seek objective opinion as to how questions could be made easier to understand, avoid bias or leading questions and/or avoid any potential ambiguity. This is more related to the study's overall 'trustworthiness' though - and not its validity of reliability. 
Qualitative 'trustworthiness', as would your eventual questionnaire, can take on many different positions - such as the following - taken from a qualitative research chapter of mine. Perhaps the first position is most in line with your current thinking: 
Position 1 — using the criteria of quantitative research - This position argues that the process of quantitative reliability and validity remain appropriate concepts for ensuring rigour in qualitative research. It emphasises procedural precision and the use of ‘verification strategies integral and self-correcting during the conduct of inquiry itself’ (Morse et al. 2002 p 1). To a certain extent, meta-synthesis suits this position.
Position 2 — parallel methodological criteria - This position argues that qualitative research requires a different set of criteria for evaluating trustworthiness. Commonly cited are those of Guba and Lincoln (1989) who developed criteria which have a parallel relationship to those used in quantitative research. These are: ‘credibility with internal validity’, ‘auditability (dependability) with reliability’, ‘fittingness (transferability) with external validity’ and ‘confirmability with objectivity’.
Position 3 — multiple criteria - This position argues one list of criteria per qualitative research approach. For example, it has been proposed that the trustworthiness of an ethnographic report can be evaluated by the application of three criteria: veracity, objectivity and perspicacity (Stewart 1998). In grounded theory various forms have been suggested. McCann and Clark (2003) highlight the differences between the criteria proposed by Glaser of ‘fit’, ‘work’, ‘relevance’ and ‘modifiability’ with other grounded theorists e.g. Strauss and Corbin (1998).
Position 4 — fresh and universal criteria - There are unique ‘general’ criteria for evaluating the rigour of qualitative research (all approaches). These criteria are yet to be identified and agreed on, although there have been numerous suggestions as to what the criteria should be. For instance, Morse and Richards (2002) suggest generic criteria grouped under the headings of: ‘asking the right question’, ‘ensuring an appropriate design’, ‘making trustworthy data’, ‘verification or completion’ and ‘solid theory- building’, if that is an aim.
Position 5 — each study develops suitable, justifiable criteria - Growing in popularity is the flexibility for researchers to develop their own list of criteria for trustworthiness of a study. The choice is justified because of the qualitative research approach used and also on other grounds, such as philosophical, ethical and political reasons.  
Position 6 — no criteria is necessary There is also a post-modern position that rejects the need for criteria to be selected or stated by a researcher in regard to trustworthiness of a qualitative research study or its product. Part of the rationale for this position is that the findings in qualitative research are ‘both a process and a product in which the researcher is deeply and unavoidably implicated’ (Sandelowski & Barroso 2002). The findings are therefore a subjective construction in which the knowledge, beliefs and activities of the researcher’s play a significant role. The findings are ‘unique social interactions’ and, for this reason, qualitative research can never be truly ‘generalisable’. The research and its reported product are accepted or rejected by the reader of the report or user of the product according to their own subjective criteria.