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Nanocomposites - Science topic

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I am preparing nanocomposite of PEDOT:PSS and MnO nanocomposite. so please tell me how to prepare nanocomposite of PS and Mno nanoparticles and the expected outcomes?
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For synthesis of PEDOT:PSS and MnO nanocomposite . You should try hydrothermal and sol gel route.
First prepare MnO nanoparticles via sol gel route
than.. for nanocoposite .. Mixed the polymer's chemical and MnO nanparticle in 1:1 ration in DI water. and transfer this in autoclave (using teflone lined cup) and keep in oven at 100 degree for 12hrs.
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I am using boron nitride and Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for nanocomposites fabrication by sintering and compression molding process. However, they are comparatively brittle than our requirements. What could be the possible ways of increasing flexibility? Adding some elastomer might help but would like to see if there is any chemical modifications that might be helpful. Thanks!
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Dear Fellows,
I have conducted Probe ultra-sonication of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) to disperse in the solvent. After drying, Raman spectroscopy was performed to study quality of dispersed GNPs. As a result, ID/IG value of as received GNPs (0.195) reduced to 0.055 for dispersed GNPs. However, it should increase after sonication treatment as reported in the literature due to defect evolution. So, can anybody brief about the possible reason of ID/IG value reduction?
Thanks  
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This could be due to the following reasons:
1. Removal of surface defects when agitated in the solvent at higher frequencies.
2. A further exfoliation of the graphene layers that made it more pristine.
I hope this helps.
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I want to make blend of chitosan and PHB but PHB is hydrophobic polymer. I have tried vigorous stirring, temperature, without temperature, adding tween and PEG. But when it dries down the surface is granular. Is it the PHB that precipitate out?
Thanks in advance for your help.
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I have a nanocomposite where metal nanoparticles are dispersed in polymer matrix. Which XRD should I use if I need to find out the lattice structure of the metal nanoparticles?
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Elbright Dillu Sir, XRD with elemental mapping is available at Lovely professional university, jalandhar, INDIA
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I want to know or determine BET of Fe3O4/ZnO mixture nanocomposite at what temperature degassing is good? I already dry at 60 oC FOR 24 h?
Thanks
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Dear Hirpo, In specific surface area analyses, the degassing step is essential so you really have to do it. If there are any organic compounds in the system (dispersant molecules or residues from the synthesis), it would be important to carry out a thermogravimetric analysis beforehand to know at what temperature these compounds decompose. This decomposition can affect the SSA result and even damage the equipment. If there are no organics, another concern is hydroxides and hydroxycarbonates that can decompose at temperatures as low as 200°C, completely changing the SSA of the particles. Again, thermogravimetric analysis should provide this answer. If your system is composed only of stable oxides (as seems to be the case), the typical default degassing condition is 300°C for 3 h, counted after stabilization of the temperature of the analysis cell. Pre-drying at 60ºC is not enough and there will certainly be free water in the system. I hope this answer is helpful. Good luck! Rafael
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I have to prepare zno nano rods and I want to reduce silver nano particles on it using NaBH4. Is it going to be effective or not as sodborohydrate works in ice conditions?
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The addition of silver nitrate and sodium borohydride will lower the freezing point of the solution. Therefore, you can reduce silver ions on zinc oxide wire at 0 degrees Celsius. Only the reduction reaction rate will be reduced compared to room temperature.
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Hi all,
I often get confused with the amount of material that we have to select after the preparation of nanoparticles. I refer to a number of general, they just mention the quantity and no explanation about the selection of the quantity. it will be a great help if someone suggests to me how to proceed further. Like how we will know this much quantity is enough for binding. so that we don't have to waste chemicals in the first place.
Thank you all in advance.
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Hi there,
The quantity of the coating material depends on the amount of material that is going to encapsulate. It should be higher in ratios; such as drug: polymer ratio be like 1:2; 1:3; 1:5; 1:10 etc. After a trial once or two it should be finalised after the characterization with DLS.
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Can anyone help me how to disperse graphene oxide in polymer/solvent?
I first ultrasonically disperse the graphene oxide in the solvent and then add it to the polymer/solvent mixture and stir it with a stirrer for 2-3 hours.
Does anyone know of a better way to guide me?
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It depends on the solvent and polymer but sometimes it helps to add a little bit of the polymer to the graphene oxide/solvent then make the dispersion by ultrasonication and then mix the dispersion with the polymer/solvent solution.
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I have made a polymer nanofiber nanocomposite in which I have added graphene oxide. I can't see the graphene oxide in my SEM and TEM photos. To make sure that there is graphene oxide in the composition, I used the FTIR test, where the peaks related to graphene oxide were observed. Can anyone help me with what is the way to visually see the graphene oxide?
thanks in advance
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Through the EDAX and FESEM it can be observed. UV spectrum, shifting of peak can be observed
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I have EDAX spectra of my Cu nanocomposite. I want to interpret it to know the oxidation states of Cu in the sample.
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Elbright Dillu I think you need XPS for oxidation states.
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I am preparing blend of chitosan and PHB but one polymer is hydrophilic and other is hydrophobic. Does the addition of surfactant like tween or PEG increase the miscibility of two polymers? Or do I need to graft functional groups or use solvent exchange method?
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Dear Noor Ul Ain, there are many studies where this couple of blend is prepared without any extra additives or further chemical modification of any of the two components forming the blend. Please have a look at the following sample document. My Regards
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Hi dears,
I received my raw XRD data and plot it in origin. the graph is attached. but emerged peaks are totally different from all pvdf XRD graphs I in other works and articles. so I cant find the corresponding phases. II would appreciate every one help me how to interpret my graph and where and how find corresponding peaks.
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@Emma Hill
Thanks for your contribution
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I'm working on nanocomposites produced using UV-curing of monomers. I want to know if there would be a significant difference between monomers Ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate in their processability and resulting properties? I aim to use these with a photo-initiator.
When purchasing these two monomers I am finding Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate to be cheaper than the other acrylate monomer.
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Dear Edwin Harvey, these two monomers are usually used as crosslinkers for other monomers to provide gels. But they may be polymerized to croslinked matrix. The difference is in the crosslink 'bridge' length, which will consequently affect all properties, Ethylene glycol dimethacrylate will make the matrix more rigid and tough, less swelable, higher density, and the opposite is for the triethylene glycol dimethacrylate. My Regards
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Hi, I read 5-6 papers on ZnOAg nanocomposite, ZnoAg nano hybrid and zno@Ag.
In one paper they mentioned calcination but did not mention temperature 🌡️.
In others 2 they only dired product on 60 degree and 100degree.
In one paper they mentioned to dry on about 200degrees.
I am confused about this material as silver is involved and silver agglomerates at high temperatures.!
I need opinion from experts that I'm interested in ZnoAg nano hybrid, should we dry it only? Or we need to do a proper calcination?
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@ Yasir, yes you have to do the calcination step in ZnO NPs synthesis but when you are preparing ZnO-Ag nanohybrid , I think it is better to dry it as Ag agglomerates at high temperature.
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Are there any problems in Dental Science especially in the field of Dental Composites and Nanocomposites or Dental materials in general that a Mechanical Engineer or Material Science researcher can solve or research upon ?
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As Dental practice requires a large inventory, all materials, instruments and equipments can be innovated, improved and tested using principles of Mechanical engineering and material science researchers. The discussion about new restorative material is visible in this group. However we should also think of newer materials for root canals which can match ideal requisites as well as are easy to manipulate. 3D imaging, impressions, printing, milling methods, its properties, stress distribution during function, longevity, fatigue etc can be done. There is whole world of possibilities with Finite Element Analysis.
Moreover designing new instruments with minimal likelihood of discomfort to patients and can help in best manoeuvring the oral tissues as well as materials being used in oral cavity. New designs of tongue, cheek and lip retractors which enable holding of suction tips as well as help in keeping mouth open and stabilising the head. So new retractors for use during soft tissue laser procedures. New materials which can be quickly disinfected/ sterilised? New equipments like design of dental chair lights for better visibility. Lights can be integrated in instruments/ retractors for better visibility.
The list is endless with out of box thinking for dental chairs design, operatory design, placement of operating tray near patient's mouth.
We may even design new autoclaves with specific modifications for sensitive dental instruments.
We can turn our directions into having environment friendly dental materials and consumables. The disposables used in dentistry are largely made of plastics and non recyclable materials as on now. There is a need to think about environment friendly alternates etc.
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I am currently working on chitosan zincoxide nanoparticles (nanocomposites) synthesis by ionic gelation method. Regarding that I have some queries:
  1. Can anyone please share a protocol for chitosan nanoparticles synthesis?
  2. What will be source of zinc to prepare metal ion?
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For the synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles you can rely on the method of Calvo et al. 1997. It is a very noble method and very reproduced in many investigations:
Calvo, P., Remuñàn-Lopez, C., Vila-Jato, J.L. and Alonso, M.J. (1997) Chitosan and Chitosan/Ethylene Oxide-Propylene Oxide Block Copolymer Nanoparticles as Novel Carriers for Proteins and Vaccines. Pharmaceutical Research 14, 1431-1436. http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1012128907225
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I m trying to resuspend or disperse of protein base nanoflower for my further work.. but my particles were goes settled down by passage of time .. I also use 0.1% glycerol but it also not give me a fruitful result... I want to my nanomaterial remain suspended in solution...how i do ?
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Low power ultrasonics is highly effective at establishing and maintaining a suspension. A full ultrasonic cleaner may be more power than you want. And the dip sonicators may also be too much. We have a syringe plunger designed to dispense suspension where the plunger has an ultrasonic probe inside that operates on a low duty cycle at extremely low power, yet is highly effective at establishing nano suspensions and maintaining them even while pumping the material to a test application.
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What is the bandgap of NiO-GO nanocomposites
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please read : Graphene/nickel oxide nanocomposites against isolated ESBL producing bacteria
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Hi everyone!
I am working on different polymers and modifying them chemically and I want to write the chemical reaction. If I want to confirm whether the proposed chemical reaction is right or wrong, is there any software or something?
Thanks for your help!
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You can use the :-
- ChemReaX (is a free web app for modeling and simulating basic chemical reactions)
- Molecular Workbench
Best Wishes...
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I am trying to obtain the PDMS-CNT nanocomposite structure. All of my products have new and correct characteristics. However, when I put PDMS's curing agent into the solution where I normally obtain conductivity, the conductivity disappears and when I cure it over temperature, I cannot observe the conductivity again. I only do the addition by mechanical mixing. As a standardized procedure, conductivity can be observed very easily in a 7 percent PDMS-CNT mixture, but I cannot.
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The following link is also very useful: https://arxiv.org/pdf/2005.11519
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Is there any previous research show that co-doping for TiO2/ZnO nanocomposite photocatalyst is better than single doped?
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Dear Syahmi Basir, other option is the use of 'bimetallic NPs catalysts' (search with this keyword), they are by far more performing than nanocomposites. My Regards
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Dear researchers
I need PDF4/ICDD database file of X'pert Highscore software for XRD analysis of organic materials such as cellulose, cellulose nanofiber (CNF) and cellulose nanocrystal (CNC). I will be deeply thankful if anyone could help me as soon as possible.
Regards
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Is there any one have icdd database pls?
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What characterization required for automotive anti-roll bar applications?
Mechanical, Dynamic mechanical, thermal etc and what is range of vales of these properties
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Dear Karthika P,
Don’t copy paste articles from Google on a subject which you don’t know anything. To understand Automotive Dynamic Systems is beyond your capability.
regards
jasbir s ryait
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Used APS in 1M HCl solution as the oxidant and aniline dissolved in 1M HCL. ZnO was added in different proportion to the aniline solution.
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May be the crystalline phase of your sample loaded below the detective level.
You should have to check it very carefully during experiment, and should try to maintain the crystalline phase load at least above 5%.
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I am trying to prepare bodyfiller nanocomposites using functionalized graphene nanopallets. I am struggling with finding the optimal residence time, rpm, and dispersion techniques. I read somewhere that higher rpm with centrifuging can lead to a lower graphene yield when separating/purifying graphene, I don't know if that is the case with preparing polymer composites but that would explain some of my results.
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Hi, you say too little about how you get/make the graphene and the nanocomposite, or what matrix you have. Generally, the two most common ways to ensure a good dispersion are ultrasonication with high-energy probes or using a twin-screw extruder. The former would be good for liquid curable resins such as epoxy, the latter would be my choice for thermoplastics.
Dispersion stability may be an issue. You need a matrix with the right affinity to the filler. See our study on this topic:
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If you are adding nanoparticle to a fiber based epoxy composite, what is the right way of deciding the weight percentage of the nanoparticle ? If you select with respect to the composite, then when you increase the fiber content, the fraction of nanoparticle in resin keeps on increasing which will have negative effect countering the effect of increase in fiber content. Say you increase fiber from 30 to 50 wt%, if you keep nanoparticle wt% with respect to composite as 1. In case of 50% fiber, since there is lesser resin, the dispersion becomes difficult. So best thing to do is select nanoclay with respect to the epoxy system. Which way is correct ? I believe I am correct.
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Please try to give possible answers as soon as possible.
How the non-linear parameters β and χ⁽³⁾ correlate with the observation in FTIR shift present in the aromatic C=C stretching ?
FTIR shift present in the aromatic C=C stretching of PS/Ag nanocomposite foils.
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Not necessarily associated with FTIR, but there has been some work previously discussing correlations of nonlinear optical properties and vibrational spectra of conjugated molecules - the literature can be traced from here:
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Anyone Can suggest me Lignin Bio-polymer application and its uses or any research which is currently happening in Lignin Nano-particles or lignin nano-composites materials in human welfare and in drug delivery.
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The cyclic voltammogram of Si/rGO nanocomposite based anode for Li-ion batteries contains 2 oxidation peaks at around 0.3 and 0.5 V while only a single reduction peak is obtained at around 0.19V.The reduction peak at 0.19V corresponds to the lithiation of Si to LixSi phases.The oxidation peaks are attributed to the transformation of LixSi phases to Si. Why the reduction of Si to LixSi phases occurs at a single voltage while transformation of LixSi phases back to Si takes place at two different voltages?
Thanks
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If you want to identify different redox peak for Si, you might want to use dQ/dV curve (measured under a low C-rate) instead of cyclic voltammogram. Electrochemical kinetics of Si is relatively slow, those reduction peaks cannot be well-resolved in CV. If you really want a nice CV, try using an extremely low areal loading of Si as well as a low scan rate.
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what is wax peaks on EDS?? ?
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Are you trying to tell which wax is present? Not sure EDS will work - it is most useful for elemental mapping, and even then it is not great for elements in the first or second row (like the C H and O that are the major elemental components of the wax).
the key difference in the waxes is this: beeswax is all aliphatic while carnauba has an aromatic cinnamic acid component. This might be distinguishable in situ by microscopic IR (looking for the sp2 hybridized C-H stretches at 3100 cm-1) or by a fluorescence microscope (the cinnamates might fluoresce) or by some sort of ablative mass spectrometry - FAB or SIMS or such. You could also wash the wax off with a solvent and run UV-Vis - the cinnamate has a strong absorbance but the beeswax will be much less.
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what should be mass loading fir Pani v2O5 Nanocomposites on Ni foam substrate?
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Amol Marotrao Kale Based on papers it is better to be in the range of 1 to 3 mg/cm2. it would be better to consider that in high amounts of mass loading, the specific capacitance decreases.
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I have prepared a nanocomposite hydrogel by freeze-thaw method and then dried it at 60 degrees Celsius in vacuum oven. What would be the appropriate nomenclature for this gel now? Would it be xerogel or aerogel? Also I have added nanocomposites into it. Can I say it nanogel or nanocomposite gel or porous aerogel?
Your kind suggestions are much appreciated.
Thank you!
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So, it will be either a xerogel nanocomposite or an aerogel nanocomposite, depending on the morphology you will find. The first reference in my last answer deals with this type of composite gels. Best of Luck
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How significant is the FTIR study of mixed metal oxide photocatalysts like WO3-TiO2 nanocomposites?
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Hi Aarif Shah , in gas phase catalysis FTIR can be quite useful to probe the chemistry of the surface. (In water phase, may be not much will be seen because of water interference, you can perhaps do it, who knows)
If you have a pure metal oxide powder. The FTIR spectra (ATR is preferred) of the powder will already give a few important information about the surface. First, the water molecules that may have from the atmosphere. H2O can adsorb both as molecules, but also in the dissociated form: H and OH. H2O will also be present in the condensed form due to capillary condensation. Now, the dissociated H2O is interesting! Because it denotes a catalytic process. In TiO2, the active sites dissociates the water and then the H and OH are sitting on the active sites. On FTIR a small shoulder at 3596 cm-1 denotes dissociated water for TiO2. Same is observed for ZnO. Around 1600 cm-1 adsorption of molecular water is denoted by a peak. Further absorption bands from the metal oxide itself are difficult to interpret. But things can still be improved because data science is developing as well.
Now if you are investigating the photocatalysis with WO3 and TiO2, then you can study degradation of a surface organic molecule with FTIR. The C-H stretches of long chain organic molecules show strong absorption in the 2800 cm-1 to 3000 cm-1 region. This absorption peak you can monitor during the degradation. During degradation, CO2 peaks will also evolve. In this work, we exploited the FTIR analysis for studying TiO2, WO3, ZnO and CuO. You may find this interesting:
What is also interesting is DRIFT (Diffuse reflectance FTIR). So this is FTIR where you probe the diffusely reflected signal from the sample after IR incidence. For catalysis it is particularly interesting because it gives only the surface chemistry due to reflection based probing. DRIFT cells are accessories that can bought along with normal FTIR set-ups. An in-situ DRIFT cells where vacuum can be created or gas phase reaction can be carried out is an inexpensive but powerful set-up!
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We are preparing polymer nanocomposite using homogenizer running at 6000 RPM for 30 minutes. After homogenization, there were lot of air bubbles on top. We kept in a vacuum chamber, that was vacuumed by Vacuum pump to 600 mm Hg. But still the air bubbles were there. Is the vacuum pressure not enough or is it beacuse of devacuuming the chamber in order to open the lid causing the problem ?
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A different reference says 600 T corresponds to 1950 m.
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I am looking to calculate the bandgap by constructing a tauc plot, but I don't know where to obtain the data I need (Absorption and scattering coefficients, Rstandard to to get Rinfinty, etc.). I have synthesized 2 TiO2 nanocomposites doped with Nitrogen, copper, cadmium and cobalt. The absorption data I obtained were from a UV DRS spectroscopy analysis
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I want to study the growth kinetics of bacteria against metal nanoparticles, I have immobilized metal nanoparticles on clay. But I am having difficulty in bacterial growth curve that it is not showing antibacterial properties in the form of nanocomposite. Currently I am using LB and nutrient broth for the study.
Thanks for your help
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Dear Noor
I think you should count the bacterial number. Also you can increase the nanocomposite concentration. Optical density (OD) is not the the right way to measure the antimicrobial effect in your case because increasing the nanocomposite concentration will increase the OD. May be counting of bacteria after treatment with different concentration with time will be the best method to study the growth kinetics in your case.
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Which photocatalysts will be preferred for better efficiency? Metal-doped or Non-metal doped?
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For that please follow these articles
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In order to analyze the effect of moisture absorption on mechanical properties of composites, need to follow ASTM D5229 and immerse in water till the composites saturate with moisture. This consumes time, 2-3 or even 6 months. Is there any other accelerated water absorption process which simulates the normal water absorption but at a different scale ? I cannot increase the water temperature beyond 40 degree celsius because ASTM recommends the water temperature to be 25 degree celsius less than the glass transition temperature.
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Visit also the following useful RG link:
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Is it compulsory that the specimen has to fail exactly at the center or gage length ? In my case out of 12 specimen only 2 fail within the grip area, but remaining fail in the gage length area but not exactly at the center.
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Dear Muralishwara Kakunje
It should fail within the gauge length
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I want to study the wound healing on an animal model using nanocomposite hydrogel. For a wound of 10 mm diameter, how much moisture is created that causes the wound dressing to swell and release the therapeutic agent? Usually in literature moisture content around 60-80% is reported for wound dressing.
I would be grateful for your help.
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That depends upon so many factors! In addition to the dressing type, things like the location of the wound, the wound etiology, the stage of healing, the activity level of the patient, and the biobirden all influence exudate levels.
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Because of degradation phenomena
Method of preparation
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the use of different coagulation bath compositions played a key role in the membrane
fabrication and affected the performance in membrane distillation.
also the type of solvent may be play importannt role in the praperd blend
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I have mixture of nanoclay, acetone and epoxy LY556 kept in vacuum oven. What must be the pressure setting in mm of Hg so that only the acetone and air bubbles escape and not the resin ? Is 460 mm of Hg and oven temperature of 50 degree Celsius is fine ?
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Dear Muralishwara Kakunje,
You have to do your own testing because each vacuum oven could be very different and also your sample volume. What yoi need to do is to various vacuum pressures. Normally it shouldn't be too high. You can set 3 air pressure, 4 air pressure and 5 air pressure and etc to find the optimum performance at a fixed temperature such as 50 degree C.
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I have prepared nanofluids by dispersion of nanocomposite (GO-ZnO) in water.
Could anyone help me in determining the density and molecular weight of nanofluids
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DM your contact number
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Is there any particular criteria for selection of materials (especially I want for Nanocomposites)? Can anyone suggest me textbooks, papers, information regarding the same
Thank you
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Porosity and functional groups play a vital role in sensing, it enhances the specific surface area which leads to more adsorption/desorption sites for the analyte. So you can decide the materials on the basis of the previously reported literature.
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I have prepared graphene oxide - zinc oxide nanocompsites. Could anyone help me in determining the molecular mass ?
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I agree with
Muhammad Sohail
Of course, ICP analysis is a versatile tool to detect and analyse the metals, non-metals and even biomolecules quantitatively. However, the access of instrument is lacking in our circumstance. Is it possible to determine the concentration of prepared nanocomposite by using UV-Visible spectrophotometer via Beer-Lamberts law
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I have synthesized TiO2-rGO nanocomposite by Hydrothermal method. The final product is washed with deionized water. In order to remove moisture, whether vacuum drying is must?
What will happen if we dry the TiO2-rGO nanocomposite in ambient conditions?
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If your drying process involves heat, an ambient pressure drying may result in irreproducible surface terminations on your material since edge moieties will react with whatever flies around at the moment. That is prevented by vacuum. Side note: if you don't have a suitable vacuum chamber, you could also consider doing it under Argon, that should give similar results.
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I am going to make thin film involving a TiO2 nanocomposite But i had some questions that a RG search couldn't help me with. I wanted to pick between tritonx-100 or PEG
1) I have no idea how much of the powder or triton will i use to make the paste, and should I use PEG or triton?
2) I can't find the recommended temperature for heat treatment after the thin film is made
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In [1], the article contains practical procedure for obtaining the function of addition different percents of PEG or triton in terms of their impacts on the TiO2 film properties. Hope it helpful to start with it.
Best regards
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Dear Yugesh
Are you sure that your V2O5 is crystalline our like PANI it has amorphous phase?
Can you give some more details about your method osynthesizing of this composite?
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Please help me out with better explanation.
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Metals with high oxidation states form volatile oxides of Mo, W, Nb, Ta, Re. If you had hydroxides of these metals in the sol / gel method, then the oxides formed could turn into volatile oxides. Match your composite with volatile oxides.
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I have prepared some activated carbon/iron oxide nanocomposites by calcination process. Some of the nanocomposites have metal oxides in both spherical and rod shape. 
So I eagerly waiting for your valuable answers/suggestions
Regards
Dr. V. Ranjithkumar
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I have encountered many papers, where NaOH is added to precipitate a nanocomposite, whether it is a sulfide or an oxide nanocomposite. I want to know the principle behind adding it.
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Basically on the addition of NaOH we are precipitating out the metal hydroxide. This metal hydroxide is then heat treated to finally yield metal oxides.
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I have seen many research papers where researchers are using plant extract to synthesize nanocomposites. Can anyone tell me the main reason for using plant extract?
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Dear Sourav,
The main reason is that the plant extract has some metal content in it naturally.
And, they can act as a surfactant/ capping agent.
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Some data points are above 100 whereas most of them are between 95-99%. I have two questions.
1) How can transmittance percentage go above 100 ? either 0, between 0-100 or 100. How above 100 ?
2) Why in most cases it is just below 100. Why does the sample absorb that much. does it make sense. The samples here are in powder form in SHIMADZU ATR type. Is it okay ? If not how can I solve this problem ?
By the way the sample is epoxy based nanocomposite which was powdered before FTIR analysis.
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@Bongisiwe Zozo No.
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Please explain it
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Dear Shankar
We have been making various PANI composites and in all of them PANI forms amorphous phase. Therefore, it is possible to get the d-spacing for PANI from HRTEM or XRD analysis.
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I have synthesised several sol-gel and i dried eacht sample at 100 C temperature untill it completely dried with no set time. However, whenever I try to calcinate a small portion of the dried gel it is usually immediately scorched. The gels i have now aren't really white lump paste. It is more like really dry small pebbles. Did i do something wrong with the drying?
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I think you can go ahead to finish the calcination process for your sample then check its XRD. If the calcined nanocomposites are matched to the reference sample, it will be ok. otherwise, you should reprepare your sample again carefully and follow definite protocol.
Best wishes
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I have made gCN nanocomposites in which the nanocomposites showed better antibacterial activity than gCN. But in PL spectra at exc 325 nm the emission peak at around 440 nm for gCN only is having less intensity than nanocomposite's peak showing recombination rate is more in nanocomposites. Kindly suggest the probable reasons for it with reference
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Dear Aishwarya,
Possibly, a study with different scavengers would yield more information about what is happening in your samples.
Best,
Fran
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Currently I am having matrix material in granular form and i want to add nano-filler in order to get the nano-composite. So initially i will dissolve the matrix material in a solvent and subsequently add nano-fillers in the same solvent to make solution containing solvent, matrix material and nano-filler. After that I will evaporate solvent to get the desired nano-composite. But the question is how to decide the quantity of matrix material and nano-filler to dissolve in solvent? E.g. I want 5 wt% of nano-filler in the nano-composite.
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Jerry P. Czarnecki Sir TGA can be performed after fabrication of the nano-composite. But what if I want to decide weight fraction of the resin and nano-filler before the fabrication?
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There are different theories reported in the literature regarding swelling and porosity of polymer upon addition of clay into the polymer. Its confusing.
I will be thankful for your help.
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Dear Noor Ul Ain, the general behavior is the opposite, i.e., swelling and porosity both increase. Please have a look at the following free access document. My Regards
DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.74478
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What is the difference between reaction mechanism and scheme in synthesis of epoxy clay nanocomposite ? I have been told by reviewer to provide reaction mechanism and scheme. Confused as to what these two are ? I am sure one of them will be the how molecules bond with each other. Most probably this is reaction mechanism. What is scheme then ?
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Dear Muralishwara Kakunje, in short words, scheme is the general path leading to the transformation of reactants to products. On the other hand the mechanism is the details on how reactants under specific conditions (temperature, catalyst, time, ...) will react to produce the results. My Regards
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i am working on photocatalysis. pleases suggest some material to write my thesis. thanks
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Dear Hafiz,
One suggestion is to study dyes from the textile industry, which is by far one of the most polluting. Additionally, the application of photocatalysis to drug degradation processes, especially antibiotics, would be relevant. The presence of antibiotics in the environment is very serious and these processes can be an alternative for the future...
Best,
Fran
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I have prepared and hydrogel via freeze thaw method and then I performed its physical characterization like swelling, water content, moisture retention, gel content etc. Before conducting these experiments first I dried my hydrogels. I want to know it is the right way to perform the analysis? I have read the literature and it is mentioned that for these experiments hydrogels are dried but in few studies they have not mentioned whether they have processed the samples before these experiments.
I would appreciate the response
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Dear Noor,
Typically, the as-prepared hydrogels are dried before characterization (as you did). After the freeze-thaw process, it is also important to purify the hydrogel to remove non-crosslinked chains or other chemicals. The presence of liquid within the swollen hydrogel can lead you to the wrong interpretation of results collected from the experiments mentioned by you (swelling, water retention, etc.). Taking in mind that the drying process used by you (oven, vacuum, lyophilization, etc.) can also affect your results.
Regards, André
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Hi everyone,
I am PhD student and the area of my research work is Biomaterials. I am looking for a supervisor for Erasmus Exchange Scholarship Program for a year.
The main area of my research is preparation of nanocomposite membranes and their applications. Can you please suggest me supervisor from European region with research facilities like cell lines and animal model?
Thank you so much for your response.
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Yousof Farrag for wound healing purpose
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Like to know If I take without doing sample preparation Shall I get clearly images or not? Where I can do sample preparation in Tamil Nadu for taking TEM images with EDX?
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Dear Dinesh Babu, I taken TEM images of polystyrene-Silica nanocomposite without coating. I got good images.
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I would like to know what are the efficient method to prepare composite of conducting polymers with noble metal nanoparticle (Pt,Pd,Au) etc other than electrospinning method. Already the polymer has proved to have good conductivity and synthesized but the metallic nanoparticles has to be incorporated into the polymer.
Expecting valuable suggestions
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It is dependent to polymer and nanoparticle type. For example, Synthesis and Characterization of Process able Conducting polymer (such as Polyaniline or Polyaniline – Polystyrene) – noble metal composite may be performed through aniline polymerization in the presence of noble metal nanoparticle (Pt,Pd,Au)
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Hello! I'm trying to perform an MD Mechanical property calculation for a nanocomposite. Does anyone know how to place a SWNT in the center of a periodic cell in Material Studio?
Thank you!
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It worked! Thank you so much! Serkan Güldal
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I am performing simulations on SWNT-Nylon6 nanocomposites using Material Studio 2017 in order to calculate the mechanical properties of the composite. I have build Single Walled Nanotube (4,4) and Nylon-6. I packed them using the Amorphous Cell module by creating a SuperCell and conolly surface and then packing isosurface enclosed volume. I optimised the geometry using Forcite Module and Then I ran NVT and NPT ensembles and finally Mechanical Properties simulation using Forcite module.
Now, my objective to do the same for nanocomposites packed at different volume fractions. But I cant figure out to pack at varying volume fractions. Kindly share any insights for the same.
I wish to run simulations for following data-
Sr No.-------Volume Fraction--------------------------- Cell Size (Armstrong)
1.-------------- 2 -------------------------------------------------50.01x50.01x54.2
2.--------------4 ------------------------------------------------- 35.36x35.36x54.2
3.--------------8 -------------------------------------------------- 25.05x25.05x54.2
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Hello, I'm trying to do something similar but instead of the mechanical properties I want to find out about the thermal coefficients of the nanocomposite. Can you specify the NVT & NPT parameters of the calculations you made and the criteria you used to pick them?
Now for your question you might try different starting parameters to the supercell containing the SWNT to change the cell volume.
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want to learn all about photocatalysis and degradation of methylene blue
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I am looking for an easy and reliable (and of course available) characterization technique to prove that a coating could capture negative charges.
I appreciate your help.
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Hello Mohammad Amin,
,
I am not an expert in this field, but kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) might be helpful. Depending on the amount of the trapped charge, an electrostatic meter/ digital static field meter also can be useful for measuring the overall charge trap. Both techniques have been used to evaluate the surface potential of the electrospun layers and might be applicable for your purpose.\
Good luck
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After formation of PVA hydrogel through freeze thaw-method. It was dried in vacuum oven. To determine the porosity of the PVA film, ethanol displacement method is used. Does the PVA film dissolve in ethanol?
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Dear Noor Ul Ain, it is not specified whether it is a chemical or physical gel. PVA is slightly soluble in ethanol. Please have a look at the following attached files. My Regards
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I want to find out the porosity of the hydrogel for wound dressing application. I have read different articles, most of them reported the ethanol displacement method. But some mentioned water for determining the porosity. My query is whether water or absolute ethanol or mixture of water and ethanol in certain percentage would be used for porosity.
Thanks in advance for your answers
#hydrogel #wounddressing #scaffold #porosity #liquiddisplacementmethod #physicalproperties
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When the gel was dried, an airgel was obtained, then the porosity was already determined. In your question, instead of hydrogel, you should have written airgel. In this case, why prepare anhydrous alcohol. Its preparation and storage is worth the time, care. Use regular alcohol to determine pores.
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I have determined both ECSA and BET in my work. Although, the values obtained in both the methods are different but the trends of the values are same.
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Dear Nafees Ahmad BET and ECSA are two different methods for probing surface area. BET shows the entire surface area available to N2, which depends on porosity, meso and macropores capacity while ECSA shows electrochemically active area, e.g, active sites, hence, the ECSA value will be lower than BET. The comparison may not be reasonable, as both techniques don't merely rely on morphology. Best
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Our recent article "On the thermogravimetric analysis of polymers: Polyethylene oxide powder and nanofibers" includes a (new) equation that can be used to model the thermal degradation of polymers and eventually to calculate the activation's energy.
You are encouraged to use this equation to fit your experimental data (for example by using Origin Pro). We would like to understand if this equation may be used in a general manner or if the equation has solely a narrow breath.
Please also observe that our previous article on the TGA of iPP-VGCNF nanocomposites contains embedded within its content a simple method to estimate the polymer-nanofiller interface thickness (as order of magnitude)!
We will appreciate your feedback.
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Thanks. The generality of this equation for other polymers need to be tested. Perhaps more detailed study can be made with some representative systems
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Whether increasing or decreasing the thickness of hydrogel effect the antimicrobial properties?
#hydrogel #nanocomposite #wound #wounddressing #woundhealing #nanoparticles #metalnanoparticles
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Dear Noor Ul Ain thanks for sharing this interesting technical question with other RG members. I'm not an expert in this area of research but I assume that the thickness just affects the effective period of a hydrogel, but not its antibacterial properties. For more general information about this topic please have a look at the following relevant literature references which might help you in your analysis:
Antimicrobial hydrogels: promising materials for medical application
Antibacterial Properties and pH Sensitive Swelling of Insitu Formed Silver-Curcumin Nanocomposite Based Chitosan Hydrogel
and
A review on nanocomposite hydrogels and their biomedical applications
Fortunately all three articles have been posted by the authors as public full texts on RG, so that you can freely download all three of them as pdf fiiles.
Good luck with your research and please stay safe and healthy! With best wishes, Frank Edelmann
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Limitations of carbon dot or carbon dot based products for commercialization.
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We have tried to address a few things in this direction in our latest review article.
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Anyone tell the current trend in edible films and coatings? Hydrogel can be used for making films
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Dear Arjun Arulvel, the following chapter deals with the latest progress in this area. My Regards
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For photoelectrochemical applications.
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yes, it is suitable.
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can any one please tell me what solvent can I use to study the UV analysis for my sample (barium hexaferrite nanocomposite) if my sample does not dissolve in water or ethanol?.
Note: my sample is barium hexaferrite- nickel zinc ferrite and barium hexaferrite-cobalt zinc ferrite nanocomposites
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Dear Allwin,
UV/VIS spectroscopy can be used in order to obtain insights into the electronic ground state of your particles and the present optical transition, which I expect to appear in the near IR range. However, for recording UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectra, the particles must be stable in the solvent and should not scatter the incident radiation, which means that the average particle size must be below 100 nm, as already pointed out by Prof Rawle.
Useful solvents for polar particles are the polar acetonitrile, glycol, glycerine and other oligoalcohols. The attached file lists a range of useful solvents and their transparency in the UV range. All the best for your research,
Thomas