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NGOs - Science topic

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Recently the entomological societies of America and Canada both updated their guidelines for insect common names. As a result, and the first ‘victim’, the Asian murder hornet Vespa mandarinia got a new (local) common name, where it is now called Northern giant hornet. https://edition.cnn.com/2022/07/26/world/murder-hornet-new-name-scn/index.html
This has nothing in common with the availability and validity of the accepted Latin species epithet of Vespa mandarinia, but in the future could potentially lead to attempts by some particularly concerned individuals to appeal for changes in scientific names as well (we already have several examples in mind - those connected with attempts to rename hitleri taxa or synonymize all kurdistanica /-us taxa).
The most interesting, however, is not the fact that some of our colleagues apparently have enough time to deal with this problem (just the fact! I am abstaining from judging it), but that some powerful organisations like the aforementioned NGOs nowadays run large database engines available worldwide, interconnected / integrated with other databases and webpages. Therefore introducing (read – changing) common names could probably also cause some inconvenience for users of systems or webpages (for instance, citizen science portals) integrated with these authoritative databases.
It is understandable new common and scientific names to be established based on clear, approved and transparent criteria or recommendations (for scientific names like those accepted by the ICZN, https://www.iczn.org). But what about changing 'old' common names?
Please feel free to express your opinion both on the topic itself (changing ‘unethical’ common names in zoology) and its possible consequences (e.g., causing global changes in integrated systems just by decision of one or two NGOs). And should the popular and scientific papers, including books containing ‘inconvenient’ or ‘unethical’ names now be destroyed as nowadays are some of historical but ‘unethical’ monuments being demolished?
[please do not consider this topic racist, nationalistic or in any aspect oppressing anything or anyone; please be polite and calm when discussing here, thank you]
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Local/common names of animal or plant species have - at least as far as these species are popular or generally known - a high importance for nature understanding and practical nature conservation. They should only be changed if there are very good reasons for doing so. Clearly racist or denigrating elements of such names are very good reasons - and should lead to changes! Otherwise, names should be retained even if, according to current knowledge, they do not match the preferred habitat, for example, do not pick up on the most appropriate characteristics, or - as in the case of the German bird name "Ziegenmelker" [=goat milker], for example - are based on superstitious ideas. The latter is not so serious that one would have to change an introduced name.
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The humanitarian NGOs' missions, objectives, and plans aim to "serve people in need," if we can generalize. However, one of the most challenging for those NGOs is fundraising. The mission and objectives of the NGOs have been noticed slightly amended to a few numbers NGOs. However, similar concepts are promoted.
Do the NGOs need to revisit their mission and objectives? Is it the time for the NGOs to link the fundraising to their tasks and goals? Would it not be better to connect the stakeholders with what NGOs face as a fact challenge? Isn't fundraising the primary variable (or at least one of the main variables) of NGOs' sustainability? Are NGOs confused between the terms non-profit and surplus profits? Are the NGOs cautious of the perception of other stakeholders in including the fundraising in their mission? Do the NGOs prefer to go with the traditional easy concept rather than raising orientation? Isn't it more transparent?
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NGOs are mainly functioning with Policy norms of the respective Government.
What is the objectives of the NGOs coincide with Government rules and policy for further execution.
The obvious objectives of the NGOs are to help the vulnerable people in the community.
Transparency is one the open tool to expose the clarity of the progress of the scheme or project that is essentially required to measure the output.
The stakeholders analysis and the impact of the projects could help to assess the quality and improvement of the programs.
Moreover, what is the current situation of sustaining the development of the NGOs? and how to raise the funds for functioning of the NGOs could be main concern because the Government may not be able to help the vulnerable households on door to door. That is the case that NGOs are playing the vital role of taking care for the disadvantaged section in the community.
How far the NGOs could help the Government in developing countries? How it can be supported by the Government? How the NGOs can sustain with available funds or external donors support from foreign countries or United Nations Organisations etc?
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As a researcher, I am trying to investigate the impact of total quality management on the quality of services provided at NGOs.
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Dear Nour Abu Kheiran, kindly see the attached
Hope this helps and good luck on your research.
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Dear colleagues,
I have the feeling that there's been a boost of conservationist associations in the last 15 years. Oftentimes, their capacity to reach politicians and public opinion is orders of magnitude higher than that of scientists. Emotions are moved easily and, embedded in the frame of 4-year governmental terms, end up in politicians often taking action according to NGOs suggestions. Most suggestions are surely well-intentioned and many may be positive. However, in almost all of them, I detect a lack of scientific basis. Many of you are heavily involved in bridging the gap between science and "emotions", and try that actions on the marine realm aiming at achieving sustainability of resources and resilient oceans are based on sound science. Question is, are you proactive in trying to discuss this message with NGOs/Government (in social media, meetings, etc?) Some outstanding scientists are (S.Cooke, J.Claudet), and some others rely more on their science to speak by itself (e.g. R.Hilborn etc.). I tend to worry only about the scientific aspects of these "public concerns" ...but non-activist positions (I have my ideas, of course) tend to find low support...
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Timely and one of the major driver that is behind many social tensions. We are producing evidence of these patterns, but you need to wait at least the end of the year for reading about it.
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Is there any data base to get the figures of total NGOs operations worldwide? Can you suggest some references?
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This is a very difficult question. There isn't a global registry for the NGOs worldwide. I think that in the more developed countries there are national registries that are organized either for crisis management reasons or for the control of the tax exemptions. The legal status also of the NGOs is different from country to country. You could use as an indicator the database of the CSOnet and DGC.
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I am currently finalizing admission to pursue a PhD. in NGO governance in Tanzania and hence interested in studies that talk about CSOs and NGOs.
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يمكن الاعتماد على تقاير الامم المتحدة انا كتبت عنها في الماستر وجمعت معلومات عن اعدادها من تقاير الامم المتحدة ومؤتمراتها الدولية
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I received a lot of good arguments, information, and literature on my last question about Servant leadership. When studying this information I noticed that Servant Leadership is particularly successful with NGOs, charitable institutions and associations. Not so with industrial companies and service companies.
1. What are the reasons for that?
2. Which barriers do you find?
3. Do you know of successful examples in this type of companies?
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With such examplars as Abraham Lincoln, Mohandas Gandhi, Albert Schweitzer, Martin Luther King, Jr., Mother Teresa, Nelson Mandela, the (14th) Dalai Lama, and of course Jesus and Chanakya before them, it cannot be said that servant leadership does not "translate" globally. And yet, most of us would be hard put to cite other names. Why? Is it because, in rather exhaustively defining the characteristics of servant leaders, proponents such as Spears (2010) have—rather counterproductively in my opinion—set the bar so high than only someone who is imbued with a dozen cardinal virtues can ever be deemed worthy of the title? Why must we always exaggerate quality requirements with binary pronouncements? Is it to communicate certain traits, support a point of view, or (more often than not) just prove something? Besides, who is to say that such qualities as integrity, humility, flexibility, resilience, stewardship, empathy, emotional healing, commitment to the growth of people, etc. must be the exclusive preserve of servant leaders anyway? My experience is that toned-down versions of servant leadership are practiced by many, for example in schools; that it works here and there; but, that more prevalence is hampered in certain sectors and industries by organizational models that are (sometimes maniacally) focused on short-term results, none of which are suited to move servants to the top of hierarchies. (The irony is that Greenleaf, who did so much to formulate the servant leadership style, had to retire from AT&T where he occupied senior positions before he could wax lyrical about it). But, power-centered authoritarian leadership styles may be fine here or there: why should one particular style of leadership, servant leadership in this case, be applied wholesale all over the world? I see the need for ecologies of leadership and management theories in much the same way as I see the need for ecologies of organizations.
Reference
Spears, L. (2010). Character and servant leadership: The ten characteristics of effective, caring leaders. The Journal of Virtues & Leadership, 1(1), 25–30.
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Hello,
My thesis topic is following: The case of Amnesty International Cz in the online fundraising on social media in the Czech republic. The context of my study is to describe the relation between NGO and donors, identify the resources that each side offers to or demands from the other side and investigate how a person’s willingness to donate online modifies after applying online fundraising strategies on social media by NGO. The research will include three employees from the campaign development department of the AI Cz (campaign specialist, campaign coordinator, campaign manager) and two people from the social media management department of the AI Cz (social media manager, digital specialist).
Thank you for your help in advance.
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Fayaz Khan There are a large number of different approaches to qualitative analysis, and I do not know of any source that systematically compares them. I often recommend Braun and Clarke's Thematic Analysis simply because it is so widely used. You can learn more about it at their website:
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Hi,
I coordinate the sending of PAID solidarity corps servants by French government for NGO doing direct action for conservation into the world.
The servant (often with M.Sc in science), are paid (480€/months, during 10-12months, get insurance and stipend for the travel).
The NGO provide accommodation and real mission in conservation.
If you know NGO needing free motivated manpower, please contact me.
CONSERVATION in ACTION! =D
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Hi Dr. Beaune,
Take a look at Oceânica NGO from Brazil > https://oceanica.org.br/
As the Oceânica website is only in the Portuguese version I sent the Annual Report 2019 in the English version. If you are interested please contact: contato@oceanica.org.br
Kind regards!
~Guido
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In this article we pose the dilemmas of international NGOs in terms of whether their influence has been positive or negative in developing countries. While going for the negative side ourselves we would welcome more positive readings. This is an important debate though much neglected.
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Whether international non-governmental organizations are helpful in the context of effectively supplementing the functions of state institutions depends on whether they realistically pursue pro-social statutory goals, or implement the demands of society and people's needs. Public central and local government institutions do not always fully correctly implement specific pro-social goals and functions of the state in the field of providing public goods and services to the society. NGOs operating in the national and international scope can fill the gaps in the effective functioning of public institutions. NGOs operating internationally should also organize and implement medical, food and economic aid for the poorest countries, characterized by weaker economic development and low income of citizens. International NGOs can also support the cross-border transfer of technology and capital to stimulate economic development in poorer countries. In addition, internationally active green NGOs can support the implementation of the ecological transformation of the economy in poorer countries. In this way, the disproportions in the economic and technological development, etc. will be reduced. International disproportions in terms of income, standard of living and the pro-ecological transformation of the economy should be reduced.
Have a nice day, Stay healthy! Best wishes,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
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Hello friends,
I want to get my Ph.D. in social movements and protest politics in Pakistan. Are there authoritative research books/articles written on the history of social movements and protest politics in Pakistan?
After a month of search, I couldn't find a single book, though there are several research articles written on the topic but these are just case studies of some events.
Is there any theoretical work done or going on in the field?
Thanks
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Grassroot or parent company NGO's role in Empowerment and development
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International Red Cross and Caritas are the most important internationally and locally.
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For many in the 1970s the NGOs were progressive agents for social change, part of the 'new' social movements around gender, environmental or peace issues.
Now we are more likely to think of development NGOs in particular as part of the development machine to put it that way.
What has changed? Is that change inevitable? is there a progressive role in the future for NGOs?
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In Venezuela, is clear that they are part of the problem, Dear Prof. Ronaldo Munck.
Unfortunately, NGO became an enterprise for Venezuelan politicians to get easy money, which is intended to help Venezuelans in need (millions, I must add).
Un cordial saludo.
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Dear Colleagues Please find call for chapters for our forthcoming Springer book titled "Pandemic, Lockdown and Digital Transformation: Challenges and Opportunities for Public Administration, NGOs and Businesses " https://www.springer.com/cda/content/document/cda_downloaddocument/PLDT_CFP.pdf?SGWID=0-0-45-1688514-p174317560
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Julius Ofanson Proposal Submission: 30th October 2020 Proposal Acceptance/Rejection: 15th November 2020 Full Chapter Submission: ` 15th January 2021
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I wanted to work using the raw data of a report published by an NGO, but they did not give their consent. So, could I make a scientific research by referring to the report itself?
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we should try to grasp the concept on published articles...but always try to generate our own..
we should always work on self reflections...try to get your own inner strengths and talents///that will sustain for longer period..i think
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Habitat suitability is the initial step during plantation and reforestation drives throughout the globe. In certain developing countries this is not a common practice. Government organizations as well as NGOs must consult expert ecologist of their respective region to get succssful and sustainable results as they conduct a lot of such studies. As an example I would like to mention here that we are doing such studies over the last decade in our regions and these can be found in our research articles. e.g.!
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This is what we have been doing it ,unfortunately such case studies have gone out of context due to climate related changes . And warrant for newer concepts to be roped in imparting afforestation a great success over time...
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Which method could be more appropriate? quantitative or qualitative? or mixed methods?
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Merajsadat Malakouti 汤楚楚 I think you can go for both but I prefer qualitative because you can get more interesting insights, often more revealing than quantitative data but I think it also depends on your skills, your personality and what you want to examine.... Im in to psychology and Quantitative research is for me less rewarding since there are certain things you can not measure or you will struggle to find a method/methodology in order to measure...If I want to know the average height or shoe size of women I probably go for a quantitative study but if Im interested in the deeper questions I would most certainly go for qualitative. Within the research community there are people who are in favour of on or the other but try to find your own voice, your own style and also match it with what you want to examine. Good luck...best wishes :-)
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Dear Colleagues/Friends,
I’m conducting and informal survey on multidisciplinary research. This stems from a keynote paper I delivered at the international conference on advanced multidisciplinary studies (ICAMR). If you have time, your input is extremely valuable and highly appreciated.
The basic questions I pose:
1. Pros/Benefits/Advantages:
2. Cons/Detriments/Disadvantages:
3. Problems/Roadblocks:
4. Recommendations/Solutions:
5. Examples (should you have time):
Personally, I am a very strong advocate of team-based applied multidisciplinary research across hard (natural) sciences, soft (social) sciences, and humanities. I have been involved with a wide spectrum of international multidisciplinary projects for 30 years. I understand tradeoffs while insisting on fair stakeholder identification, engagement, inclusion, and benefits across the board. I firmly believe that’s the ultimate goal for most of us.
Despite lip service claiming to welcome and promote multidisciplinary research, I find many roadblocks remain unnecessarily common, counter-productive and sometimes insurmountable – especially between stove-piped disciplines and their administrations at multiple scales: for example, 1) among practitioners, 2) within institutions (private, public, government, academic, corporate, think tanks, universities, international organizations, NGOs, grass roots organizations, religious institutions, etc.), 3) among multiple institutions, and 4) among multiple countries and their institutions at the international scale. Some are expected and unavoidable. I get it. It’s part of the necessary aspects of the administrative process, etc. However, there must be solutions for many other common issues and ways that many processes can be streamlined. The intention of this survey is to fix problems and provide a qualitative and quantitative study on the benefits and problems with a summary of recommendations and solutions.
Thank you in advance for your considerations and cooperation.
Yours sincerely and best regards,
DKL
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Today's world problems are multifaceted and that require multiple solutions only multidisciplinary would be possible lower cost solution
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Non-governmental organisations have been working in different aspects of human development all over the world. They significantly contributed to the development of society. In the context of the development of the tribals what should be their role?
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NGOs could never represent truly the tribal group's expectations to decide for their own social development. From all my experience with social development, the altruistic approach have harmed more than helped these groups. When NGOs budgets ends it is a disappointment for the tribal groups used to receive their help. Sustainability is a hard concept to deliver but the only way to enhance their livelihoods.
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Is there research on which INGOs / NGOs / CSOs have refused donor funding, with which donors, and for what reasons? If not collected systematically anywhere, could you share examples you know of?
(note: by this, I do not mean governments disallowing NGOs to accept funds from certain donors or foreign funding, but INGOs / NGOs / CSOs making these choices outside of those political directives).
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Thanks Saswatik Tripathy refusal of corporate donations is another good example. Here are a few that I know of:
Others you know of?
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Over the last years the role of non-state actors (NGOs, businesses, corporations, traditional authorities, rebel groups, communities, street gangs, etc.) in the provision of services and the production of social order has grasped the attention of scholars from different fields such as development, security, and peace and conflict studies. In these debates, the concept of governance has been central as it allows to convey the idea that order–making is the result of the interaction of different state and non-state actors. However, when talking about the relations and the twiligh character of the interaction between state/non-state, formal/informal, legal/illegal actors a lot of theoretical ambiguity remains. In this regard, I would like to ask what do you think that the difference between the terms 'hybrid governance' and 'alternative governance' is. In general, both terms are used to designate arrangements in which non-state actors take on functions classically attributed to the state. However, I've seen the concept of 'alternative governance' more often in works that analyze the role of illegal/criminal actors (e.g. Cheng, 2018 or Idler, 2019), while the one of 'hybrid governance' has been used to designated both legal and illegal actors.
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In the United States both systems are present, but not acknowledged officially. Hybrid governance is usually practiced by lobbyists from special interest groups that attempt to influence legislation at the state or federal level. Sometimes the lobbyists even go so far as to write the legislation they want. K street in Washington is infamous for this. There is a very thin line between lobbying and bribery. Alternative government is practiced by street gangs in some of the larger cities. They exact "street tax" from merchants to operate in their neighborhoods. Law enforcement fights this type of crime, but is not always totally effective especially when law enforcement is not being backed up by municipal government or prosecutors.
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The communication system, form and channel we, an Ethiopian, using is adopted from Western communication culture. We are seeing NGOs operating in pastoralists communicating with the immediate community through modern channel. Hence, the observations suggests that any development works are not effectively saturated in the target community.
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The focus on spiritual health and care is definitely paramount, i.e. to respond pastorally to unmet human needs. This requires a sensitivity for values and community by virtual and physical means of communication, i.e. all available channels can be used.
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Hi everyone, I'm currently on my pen-ultimate year of PhD and is currently doubtful on the depth of my research. To provide some background for a better context of understanding, I'm doing a PhD dissertation focusing on beneficiaries of NGOs. Specifically I'll look into the victims of Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) (UXO refers to unexploded bombs) of one particular city in the country of Laos. Beneficiaries of NGOs. My main focused areas include health, education and employment. I was told that a life history approach seems most suitable. Hence, my method of data collection is a semi-structured interviews with 20 participants. A life history approach is essentially very focused and is highly time-consuming and usually done with only one participant. So the question lies within the fact that Ill be exploring the lived experiences of before and after being a beneficiary of an NGO. The benchmarks are education, employment and healthcare. The question lies within the fact that if the discussions surrounding those benchmarks would be sufficient if it won't be too descriptive?
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It is your supervisor and the ethical board that decide if it is enough or not for getting a PhD.
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Hi everyone
I'm doing some research for my (second) Master's Thesis regarding the role of NGOs in Botswana's development, and I would need individuals working in or with Botswana's NGO sector (e.g. NGO staff/volunteers, funders, government officials, researchers) to answer this short questionnaire (ca. 10 minutes).
If you, or anyone in your network meets that criteria, please answer this survey and/or it with others.
All the best!
Louis
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Good luck with your research..I did something similar, but only with secondary data( the role, importance and marketing of non- profit sector in transitional economy; available on RG). This m8ght give you an idea.
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Hi everyone
I'm doing some research on the role of NGOs in Botswana's societal and economic development, and I would need individuals working in or with Botswana's local NGO sector (e.g. individuals involved with NGOs, funders, government, and private sector organisations) to answer this short questionnaire (ca. 15-20 minutes).
If you, or anyone in your network meets that criteria, please feel free to share this with them.
All the best!
Louis
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My 3 or 4 papers are uploaded in RG. Pl. Go through, the content may helpful to your work.
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Hello there. I am writing a paper on the topic "Marketing strategies used by NGOs with special emphasis on Social Marketing". Now we all know that marketing is a way of reaching out to the customers and telling them that our product and/or services are of value to them. Similarly, even NGOs need to reach out to the masses to ensure the success of their social projects, their cause being the product in this case. Various non-profit organizations like Save the children, Amnesty International, etc. are already well established. The NGOs that I am speaking of are the small, unaided ones. Majority of the NGOs in my city don't even have a marketing department. So my question is "How have they sustained so far?". Where do they get their funds from? How do they get their volunteers? How do we measure their credibility? Won't marketing dilute the boundaries between for-profit and non-profit sectors?
I will be grateful if you take some time out to participate in this discussion. Thank you.
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Paul: A non-profit organization (NGO) should only use marketing if there are funds available because the budgets are usually very limited. It also depends on the purpose of the NGO. One purpose of marketing might be to inform customers about the services the NGO offers, but this type of marketing should be focused on the target population. Another purpose might be to encourage possible donors to give money (or other resources) to the NGO. Again, this type of marketing should be focused only on potential donors.
The bottomline is that not all NGO's need to use marketing. It depends on the budget and the purpose.
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Common people have become more engrossed in the role economics plays in our daily life. Economics deals from the property market to the macroeconomics of the household budget. Everything is connected to economics and therefore its interpretation is enthralling. For the upgrading of employability in banking, government sector, NGOs and businesses, attaining a comprehensive understanding of the diverse ways that people scrutinise economics phenomena allows for more compliant and ingenious practice. Development economics can expose exhilarating ideas and elucidations regarding the big concerns of the 21st century such as poverty, inequality, unemployment and globalization. A need is to cultivate international acquaintances to reveal economic propensities. There is a need to introduce a deep understanding of specific countries and issues established on tangible analysis of antiquity, establishments and political economy. It is an opportunity that will undoubtedly instigate economists to rethink their approach to economics. Economics can be used to fight poverty by implementing the right economic policies. The politicians have to translate the research into action from instigating appropriate plug-ins. There is a need to ascertain explicit programmes that can assuage poverty, ranging from low cost medical treatments to innovative education programmes. We need to examine the causes of unemployment, absenteeism in education, social programmes and other issues.
Economic output (GDP) and inflation are two significant features that need to be studied meticulously. The relationship between GDP and inflation, how they interact, how much inflation is good annually, are the factors of interest to any investor. There is supposed to be no profit if the GDP is constant or declining. On the other hand, if the GDP is increasing it may intensify inflation. A minor escalation in percentage of GDP growth per year is rewarding for the economy without any side-effects. This annual GDP may drop the unemployment rate. In order to maximize profits, wages are to be raised, which will in turn result in higher prices. Some economists argue that 0% inflation is ideal for stable prices. On the other hand some argue that a little inflation is a good thing. Global integration and technological progress offer substantial benefits. But these may lead to intensifying inequality and political turmoil. Tightening monetary and fiscal policy may lead to recession. High tariffs on imports increases demand for domestically produced goods and of course domestic workers. In the coming years, economy will provoke serious challenges. The markets are nervy because of the impending of debts. This increases the system vulnerability. It is unlikely that economic performance will be insusceptible to centrifugal and social forces. Operational management of imbalances and more consumption and innovation-driven growth can be expected.
In India 20% of the educated youth are unemployed. The priority should be to create jobs. The economists and the engineers need to brainstorm together to make a proper economic policy. The government need to target the job growth and we should emphasize on the high economic expansion for job-creation. In order to boon the economy we need to be clear about health and education, agriculture and rural development, urban and infrastructure connectivity, manufacturing and exports, and employment. We need an intuitive outlook on several facets of economy and policy-making. Economic growth can be sponsored through innovation, start-up, job-creation, risk taking and ingenious ideas. We should always reassure innovation and entrepreneurship. Those national policies should be tailed that promote innovation to certify that there will be adequate prosperity. We need not to reward unemployed because it only leads to more redundancy. It will only lead to pandemonium if the jobless stay unemployed for longer time. If the jobless contribute to the benefits of the society, they can gain skills, contacts and references which will in turn make them successful in the next job they attain.
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Thank you sir, i pray for u the same.
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Please give your inputs regarding how to go about searching for such grants and scholarships.
Thanks in advance
Regards
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List of Travel Grants (International/National) for Indian Students/Researchers
1. DST International Travel Grant (International Travel Support, ITS)
2. EMBO Practical Courses and EMBO Workshops
3. IBRO Travel Grant: International Travel Grants International Brain Research Organisation (IBRO)
4. ICMR Travel Grant: International Travel by Non-ICMR Scientists ICMR
5. Conference, Travel, Exhibition and Popular Lectures (CTEP) Programme
6. Ratan Tata Trust and Navajbai Ratan Tata Trust Education grant- Travel grants
7. IBM Travel Grant for Resident INDIAN Students and Researchers
8. National Board for Higher Mathematics (NBHM) (DAE)
9. Indian Association for Research in Computing Science (IARCS) Travel Grants
10. Inlaks Research Travel Grants
11. Indian Institute Of Technology Bombay Travel Grants
12. The Association of Scientists, Developers and Faculties Travel Grants
13. Indian Emblem Indian Council of Social Science Research Travel grant
14. Indian Council for Historical Research
15. The World Academy Of Sciences (TWAS) Research Grants
16. Indian Institute of Metals SJEF travel grants
17. Royal Society of Chemistry Travel Grants
18. Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds (BIF) (International)
19. Indian Academy of Neurology Travel Grant
You can visit this page for complete detail. List of Travel Grants for Conferences (https://www.saveandtravel.in/travel-grants-for-conferences/). Good luck.
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I'm looking for case studies about apex organizations, second tier cooperatives, or federated cooperatives in any region (an organization who's members are agricultural cooperatives, not individuals). I'm interested in how NGOs build capacity in these organizations, how the organizations serve their member cooperatives, and what works/doesn't work.
Thank you!
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Dear Anna ,
For your search you can consult Dr.Howard Richards , who is an expert on Social Economy and have many publications.
Also to colombian colleagues at the Cooperative University .
If you need their e-mail addresses let me know.
Good luck and good work!
Professor Alicia Cabezudo
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I haven't been able to find any scholarly sources that explain or even mention this question. However, in the field, I've noticed that the community development organisations I have worked for have preferred to use more traditional evaluation methods. I just want to find a paper that has noticed the same thing!! Please help! Thank you!
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Thank you very much both of you. Jo Barraket I have read your papers! They're great! I'm looking at small NGOs so your paper on small social enterprises was really useful.
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I am working on a research about crisis communication for global NGOs where there is one centralized headquarters and different country offices. I have run into some questions that I hope someone can help me answer.
When formulating key crisis communication messages, how can they ensure that all different offices maintain a consistent voice? How do they ensure neutral messaging that respects different stakeholder needs and cultural/political differences?
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This is such a large topic that it is almost impossible to answer in a short post.
I suggest that you look into the principles of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC). One of the central tenets of IMC is that all messages from an organization must be consistent with each other, but this is not done to having a bottleneck to approve every message. It is done to engaging and including all of the different elements in the company in the process of developing messages and message strategies. I think that the same would be true of IMC in an NGO.
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Hello collegues,I have an assignment related to development projects and concern partnership between NGO and local CSO, I need guidance on what it should include and the structure. I would appreciate if any of you who have a sample of these type of reports and could share it.
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Hi Heba,
I am the President of one organization that operate in the field of community services. I will give you an idea on the structure. Generally, the structure of report contains a section for the presentation of the organization, and in other section for the goal of the organization, the purpose and activities, the budget and lastly the outcome. Thats for both, your organization and your project. After that, maybe a partnership becomes possible.
Good luck.
Guy Despeignes
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It is widely recognized that donor intervention in fragile States circumvents the state systems by delivering aid through non-state actors such as NGOs. Examples include the Democratic Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, South Sudan, among others.
  1. Is it the role of NGOs to provide health care, education, water, sanitation, food (and other services) as part of a permanent (or sustainable) solution to fragility?
  2. Under what conditions can aid strengthen institutional capacities in African fragile states?
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Dear Katoka,
Any development assistant or aid is beneficiary as far as it helps to build sustainable internal capacity and managed properly to address certain gaps. Otherwise, there is no country in the world that developed itself with external assistance , NGO, Governmental, multilateral, or a combination of these, without developing its own political, economic and social institutional apparatus. hence, external assistance apart from its transitional role it cannot bring long lasting solution nor replace own government developmental role.
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  • Stated that, "By 1 January 2020 scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants provided by participating national and European research councils and funding bodies, must be published in compliant OA Journals or on compliant OA Platforms,”
  • Let us suppose, if all the journals are OA then what about the scientists of low-income countries/limited funding/without funding.
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That will be a great service to science.
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Curious about how to determine the choice of journal when submitting a paper to any journal.
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Hi,
I agree with the above said that you should choose a journal in the scope of your research, this is important for not being rejected immediately by the editor. But also, think about collaborating with a senior researcher who is already experienced with publishing in scientific journals. He can advise you about which journal you should choose and how to improve your paper.Collaborative papers receive more citations than those written by a single author.
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In the scope of my master thesis, I want to discover how campaigns and public awareness raising e.g. by NGOs can help to overcome bottlenecks in the development of a European seaweed Industry (mariculture). My idea was to visit different sites in the EU and I was curious where you see an interest in gathering information from different farming operators.
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Maybe you can come to Norway, there are several seaweed industries here. For instance, you can go Akvaplanniva in North of Norway or SES in Trondheim
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Indicators of measuring effectiveness of warning system.
Medias of disseminating early warning messages.
Reasons for not responding evacuation order.
Local cooperation and coordination among public agencies, NGOs, volunteers, Fire service, Law enforcing agencies etc. during cyclone.
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SDGs: who can be held accountable if there's a failure to deliver by 2030?
......Scholars, governments, NGOs, the United nations, who watches over the watchman?
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I have been lucky to direct my institution's Semester on the United Nations for the last 10 years or so. And my students and I have participated in meetings were the SDGs have been the focus of the conversation. Several years ago when the SDGs were being drafted we attended many meetings in the UN HQ that asked whether these goals were achievable. If so, your question of accountability is correct. But, most people in the room - from the NGO community, UN Secretariat staff and some diplomats - knew that the SDGs are very ambitions and it would take a lot of money to actually make the happen. I have seen reports that the international community would have to dedicate anywhere between $1 to $3 trillion to fulfill the goals. This is of course is not going to happen.
The SDGs build on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) experiment. These goals were pretty much decided by UN Secretariat with donor member-states (read richest countries in the world) to re-energize development and to try to reduce extreme poverty (defined as people that live with less than $1.90 per day) by half. The MDGs were not fully met, but progress in the 8 goals were made. Yes, extreme poverty was reduced by half, but the progress took place mostly in India and China, where high economic growth improved living standards. Data from subsaharan Africa, Latin America and so forth were not as positive.
The SDGs were adopted after the UN Secretariat hosted a series of meetings - for close to a year - with civil society, all UN members, the World Bank, IMF, and other donors. It was extensive process. And while we can debate whether 17 goals are better than 8 or whether there are too many subgoals, the international community has embraced these objectives, the UN has put in place mechanisms to measure compliance with these goals, and the family of UN organs, subsidiary bodies, specialized funds and agencies are trying to mobilize resources to fulfill these goals.
Not all countries will be able to meet these goals, but if most due then humanity will be better off.
Another point that is worth noting is that the 8 MDGs were mostly meant for low-income and middle-income countries. The high-income countries were supposed to support the process financially, with technical assistance and so forth. In contrast, the SDGs as conceived due require high-income members to make progress in different areas such as climate change, clean water, food safety, etc...
In reality all UN members are accountable in terms of their commitments to fulfill the 17 goals. And the UN through is different data collection and analysis mechanisms points out areas where members have to do more. And the UN can work with the IMF, World Bank and other donors to target funding to help members achieve the goals. This is a complex processes with many stakeholders. Thus, accountability is spread so thinly that no person, state or organization will be responsible for either the success or failure of the SDGs in 2030.
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What method should I use to test for significance of my result using multiple regression?
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Thanks to Pantaleon Shoki for acknowledging my answer as well as the answers given by Z. A. Al-Hemyari and Marjan Mohammadzadeh.
Best wishes to him.
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In developing countries, in absence of any fixed design standard, different NGOs often provide different types of houses to disaster-victims in a same community. Does this practice lead to developing a new inequalities in the society ? or lead to feeling disadvantaged in case of people who received low-cost houses/low-quality houses in compare to others who received better houses from NGOs
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This is a very important question, and one that we have observed directly on the Ecuadorian coast after the April 2016 earthquake. One year after the earthquake, the national government finished implementing many of its standard housing projects which essentially created new developments and communities, and standardized all housing dimensions and materials (in this case houses are a standard 45 square meters and principally cement-based).
These houses are considered permanent and residents may live there indefinitely, however, many individuals expressed discontent with the way houses were given out. In Ecuador, if you left the standard government-run shelter (which people lived in for almost 1 year after the Earthquake), you typically wouldn't receive a new house. There are also cases of people travelling from other provinces to live in the shelters and later receive a free house, despite the fact that they never lost a house in the first place and are not even from the region. Also, in a number of cases people would have to give up the title of their original property (destroyed from the earthquake) in order to receive a new house; the issue with this was that these people are in certain cases not receiving the titles to their new home, so there's little proof of ownership in many of the new housing developments.
With regard to NGOs, we've observed issues with the reconstruction process that you directly mentioned in your question. Despite the significant work that NGOs have done in Ecuador since the earthquake, many of the houses constructed are ones constructed within a 2-week period and typically last for a maximum of 10 years. They are supposed to be temporary fixes to the emergency, but from what we have observed the residents receiving these new houses do not know this. This could provoke issues in 10-12 years when some houses start deteriorating and residents begin demanding the local and national government help in some way.
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In a post-conflict situation like the one happening/happened in Iraq after ISIS conflict. How can the government, NGOs and International organizations limit the formation/expansion of informal settlements within or near relatively peaceful cities.
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Hi, while I agree with all answers at different levels. I would advance to Kahachi's second question. Government, INGO and even the public know that at the end of any conflict arise informal settlements. Therefore, I suggest that some sort of rules or laws be enshrined into policies and agreed by national and international settings which must specify some specifics such as; plots size by family size, circulation spaces, orientation and minimum openings for the information structure etc. That way, there would be some level of control both for the occupants, their health considerations and at the same reduce the ill feelings amongst the victims themselves. I hope this has given some insights to your question? You may consider an intuitive inquiry with settlers of these informal housing setting. Best wishes.
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When bridging the development gap in the Global South it is of great concern that this development is sustainable. Agreed Sustainable development is... "development which meets the need of the present generation without undermining the ability of future generations to meet their own needs" (Grainger, A., 2004, pp.1). Agreed 'It is the role of many NGOs to teach the population of the Global South about sustainable development and supply them with the tools needed to do so'. Really?
Will that really overcome the development gap caused by colonialism originally?
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Global warming has invariably questioned the sustainability of agriculture , both developing and developed countries . Development of ambitious programme like C-4 rice is a classical example to moderate possible negative impact of global warming on sustainability of agriculture .
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It has been noticed that in the recent time, there has been a significant rise in sexual offences across the world .However ,incidence of such offences is a lot more in some societies than others. Were any studies done on the reasons for this?
All concerned Law Enforcement agenciees and some NGOs have been putting in concerted efforts in multiple directions ( like awareness building , Counseling, punitive measures etc ) to contain these offences. Were any studies conducted on relative effectiveness of such measures?
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? They are not “some “societies=they are obviously patriarchal ,where women are subbordirnative to men on all levels of society functioning –from family settings to parliament or incidents in democratic (as Germany) with intensive immigrants influence from such countries .The only radical measure to stop sexual offences is developing step by step democratic society with equal rights and possibilities for both gender.
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What are the biggest challenges, obstacles, barriers that researchers have faced when attempting to study human trafficking.  The issues of the hidden nature of human trafficking and unreliable data have been covered in the literature, but are there others?  Studying NGOs, studying survivors' experiences, studying perpetrators' experiences, studying donors, studying law enforcement?
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.As so many of you have stated, it is difficult to gain accurate data on the topic. I have pull statistics from a wide range of sources dealing with different aspects of the topic, but in many cases, the numbers reported are fairly broad-based estimates. I have found about the best I can do is establish trends
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sample size calculation
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G*Power is a free, open source program for power analysis and sample size calculations: it is available for both Windows and Mac at http://www.gpower.hhu.de/en.html.
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India is the second largest urban system in the world after China: indeed, the seventy world’s largest urban centers are in India.
Between 2001 and 2011, India had 7933 cities and towns of different population sizes. Unfortunately, by that time, India had reached only 31,16% of its urbanization.
In 2005, JnNURM a ministerial mission, was launched to provide a ‘toolkit’ and a written Reform Agenda with ‘desired goals’. The social and political changing pattern generated by the shift from traditional Congress Party to Bharatiya Janata Party has been a turning point for urbanization in India in the 2010s.
Since 2014, when Narendra Modi, India’s Prime Minister, won the election, the country has faced structural changes at economic and political levels.
´Why does the urban policy fail at central/national level?
´How can the central government of India answer to the international pressure of a National Urban Agenda, when the federal organization of the country settled its urban policies at state level, as per 74h CAA statement?
´If the Urban Agenda is disconnected from national level, what does it reflects in relation to Indian cities?
´The compulsive use of five years plan and the ‘scheme system’ is appropriate and efficient in the creation and implementation of urban policies?
´Who are the key actors in urban planning in India?
´If the decision-making and financing distribution as at State level, to what extent can be involved the civil society, NGOs and/or ULBs in this process?
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Thank you very much for your answer!
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We have some preliminary information on CA and its effect on soil, crop and economics under various cropping systems. Nepal Agricultural Research Council, Agriculture and Forestry University, Nepal and many I/NGOs are working on it. However, the major bottleneck remains on the conventional mindset of policy makers, researchers and development workers. How can we change our mindset ?
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There are different ways of doing this that we have tried fairly successfully.
These include - Community Participatory approaches, Social Mobilization, Demonstration and Incentives & penalties.
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I am interested in knowing about movements' and (I)NGOs' direct involvement in achieving peace and (arguably) justice in the wake of crimes against humanity, war crimes and/or systematic breaches of fundamental human rights.
Thank you!
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Take a look at my book, Importing Democracy: The Role of NGOs in Argentina, South Africa and Tajikistan, available on Researchgate. One of the chapters on Tajikistan has an extensive discussion of the role of civil society in helping end the Tajik Civil War in the 1990s.
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Or...
How a new professional paradigm would look alike?
I fully acknowledged the dogma of forestry education, and I embraced it as a practician. Why? I could not argue with the law and technical standards and norms.
"Too much regulation is not enough" is the motto of our forestry policy, which is still promoted under academy umbrella.
The new kids? They are our forgotten social consciousness of the environment. They don't have much in common with the government, or other social institutions, since they actually are NGOs with good communication skills and crowd funding.
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Who should take charge of changing the "command and control" professional forest paradigm?
This is a great phlosophical question. The answer does depend on the ends. But the ends of who? the people or the leaders! the people like the Amoeba moves toward the demands for the survival and growth. Forest is an example and the people should understand and know the values of forests to avoid any wrong selection of the leaders (guard and managers) of the forest. It is completely depends on the education (Morals, Science and Arts)...leaders with no ethics will destroy that paradigm....
All the best
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I'm investigating strategies audience of NGOs in google, how differ the current search criteria of users with positioning strategies of organizations.
Thank you.
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Am not sure if this answers your question but I did a longitudinal study of web traffic to an NGO (Nelson Mandela Foundation) see as well as an earlier study on how web visitors search and find the website of the particular NGO see
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How NGOs have supported primary education in Uganda?
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Consider framing the questions differently. Ask, how have NGOs interacted with primary education in Uganda? That is a more open question. It will guide you better through the complex phenomenon that you intend to investigate.
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How NGOs have supported primary education in Uganda
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Hi Kawiino.
I'm afraid that I will respond to your question with some questions of my own!
I think that where to start thinking is how you define the term "promote" and how that fits into the context of primary education and specific outcomes. In addition, you would need to know what "promotion" looks like, so that when you see it, you would recognise it. Also, you would need to define what you mean by "NGO", as well, so that your results would be clear.
One way to look at how they have supported education would be through the effect they have had on Primary Education. How would you test this? You can have two groups, essentially. One would be some select schools where there have been no NGO activity at all and the other would be schools that have had NGO activity (or promotion, in the way you had defined it). You would then need to fashion out parameters that explain how you intend to measure the effect of the NGO's on the outcomes you think are measurable. For example, you could look at individual or mean performance dis-aggregated for gender. Remember, you want to compare the effect of NGO activity as a proxy for promotion in primary education. The two groups I mentioned above would be your "Control group" (the group of schools that have had no NGO activity) and the "Experimental group" (the one that has had NGO activity).
This is basically a rough guide to understanding how promotion can be measured but please note that there are other more critical questions that you would need to answer in order to have a robust result that you have "confidence" in.
All the best!
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I want papers pdf about the effect of auditing the financial statements in NGOs on their performance
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Willems, J. Seven trade-offs in measuring nonprofit performance and effectiveness / J. Willems, S. Boenigk, M. Jegers // Voluntas. – 2014. – No. 25. – Pp. 1648–1670.
Delia Corina Mihaltan et al. Analysing the financial effectiveness of the nonprofits. Case study on health nonprofits / Procedia Economics and Finance. – 2015. – No. 26. – Pp. 367 – 374.
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Does anyone have some useful data management tips for qualitative case studies? I have 20 NGOs with staff interviews, observation, and document analysis occurring at each NGO. There is going to be a huge amount of data and I need to be able to cross reference and corroborate different data sets with one another. I will be using nVivo to code the documents and interviews and observations will be linked to organisations and individuals. I also need to keep track of NGO and interviewee demographic details, interview and observation dates/hours/locations etc, and types of documents (formal/informal, audience, author, purpose etc). So much data! I was thinking I might use nVivo for managing most of it as I can link observations and demographics to transcripts and documents. I've just been using excel to keep track of the other data (eg number of times an interviewee has been interviewed/duration/location etc) however I don't know that I've set that spreadsheet up in the best way possible. It would be great if anyone has good ideas! Thanks! 
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Dear Leanne,
I was in your situation 20 years ago with the same number of companies (20) and mixed data (interviews, observations, financial reports and survey results).
There are several major elements to handle the information
1) first, you create a standard SPSS file presenting each interviewee as a separate case (line) and adding some specific variables obtained from interviews and common variables for interviewees from the same companies from observations and documents. In this way, you will have the possibility to run different statistical checks on concordance/disagreement of opinions of interviews on the same topic, and also to include all data about a particular interview (date, time, etc.)
2) to make such a database useful you must create specific variables to present your impressions from observations and general results from interviews  as numerical variables. I made such variables as "SOC" for my impressions from interviews with CEOs on their preoccupation with employees needs, GOV for my impression from interviews with CEOs on their relations with local authorities etc.
3) Equally important is to design specific metrics for particular actions that reflect your general impression on a NGO resulted from the whole set of your data. For this you may look at the enclosed file. 
Success!
Igor Gurkov
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Post-liberal peace theories advocate hybrid forms of security governance, coherence, cooperation. NGOs and military forces represent  (aside local communities and political leadership) main actors in complex emergencies. Despite the roles of these inherently difference actors (difference purposes, different aims and organisational cultures), their functions are complementary. Nonetheless, many NGOs are reluctant to cooperate with armed forces/military (which have more or less a political agenda and most of the times, are active parties in a conflict) on grounds of impartiality, neutrality and security. What theory, approach or understanding could help overcome this deadlock? I would be very thankful for your inputs. 
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@William Sheridan: thank you for your answer! Most of NGOs receive (benchmarked) funding from international donors with own political agendas, so can they be conceived as neutral actors?
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My Focus is on Aid Harmonization and NGO Coordination at local and national level for disaster recovery.
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Hi,
I have developed an indicators based assessment framework for evaluating quality of governance of stakeholder participation in decision-making within development projects, and more broadly.
Please visit my profile, and papers.
you are welcome to contact me,
Tim
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Dear Research Gate scholars, can anybody help me with literature/studies on NGOs-military relations in the fields of conflict resolution/peacebuilding/security governance (in particular in the case of Pakistan)? 
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Go to my RG publications, and you ill find articles related to NGOs /civil society in Pakistan    
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I am looking for curent list of working NGO in peruan region Cusco. Please do you know about any avaible resources ? 
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A curent list of the most important NGOs in Cusco (and the rest of Peru) you can find here: http://www.apci.gob.pe/Registros/directorio.html
However there are many other (smaller) NGOs that are not listed in this register.
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I'm working on a survey of the arguments of NGOs in problems caused by biofuels. How comprehensive are these organizations? Were they able to observe all the risks and benefits?
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Hi Andreia,
I was very much involved in the sustainability debates about biofuels from 2007 to 2013, from with the UK's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and then from within the UN's FAO, including time in the Secretariat of the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP), from where I was coordinating the development of the GBEP sustainability indicators for bioenergy.
In the beginning of course most of the NGOs involved were from Europe and the US: they included nearly all of the big ones, some of which no longer work on the issue. One way of finding out who was involved and saying in the earlier years of biofuel policies would be to look through the consultations run by the European Commission on the biofuels aspects of the Renewable Energy Directive of around 2007 to 2008 (particularly the sustainability criteria). You will observe that most of the debate was about the environmental issues (WWF, RSPB, Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth...), though some NGOs (such as Oxfam and ActionAid) were also talking about social issues such as food security and land tenure and gender aspects. The bias towards the environmental issues was partly because biofuels were proposed as an environmental good, but also because it was generally understood that WTO trade rules made it much harder, if not impossible, to incentivise biofuels differently on the basis of social criteria.
Also look at consultations run by the UK government on its biofuel policy (Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation) from 2006 to 2007 and the Gallagher Review of the indirect effects of biofuels, of 2008. Likewise, I suggest looking at consultation of the US Renewable Fuel Standard from around 2008 onwards, and the same for the Californian version, which was a little earlier.
Then more NGOs from developing countries got involved. NGOs in Brazil and Argentina, were drawn into debates for obvious reasons. But NGOs in Africa and Asia were also brought into the debates, perhaps to a large degree by Northern researchers and NGOs. I remember an initiative called COMPETE, in which Imperial College was involved, which gathered many African NGOs along with researchers and other actors.  As the debate expanded from liquid and transport biofuels to all forms of bioenergy, different kinds of NGOs entered the discussions, such as local development NGOs for whom solid bioenergy and biogas were very interesting options.
Other means of identifying which NGOs were involved include looking at membership of the roundtables like the Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels (now Biomaterials - though their current membership does not seem to me to reflect anything like the involvement from 2007, 2008 etc.: http://rsb.org/about/organization/member-list/ Also there were (and still are) sustainability roundtables for the raw materials/feedstock: the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil, the Roundtable on Responsible Soy, Bonsucro (then the Better Sugarcane Initiative) etc. You could look into their membership but also look for attendance lists of their meetings or seminars/workshops etc. organised by them. 
Likewise, there were a lot of conferences on biofuels sustainability, and you could look at attendance records of these, as well as presentations made. Apart from those organised by the roundtables mentioned above, GBEP, FAO, UNEP, UNCTAD, UN Foundation, the German, Dutch, UK, US and Californian governments, there were a couple of big ones in Brazil from 2006 to 2008.
Finally, if you want to know very quickly the range of issues being discussed regarding biofuel/bioenergy sustainability, I would recommend looking at the GBEP sustainability indicators for bioenergy. The 24 indicators, plus discussion in the report on governance issues, probably covers every major issue that NGOs (and anyone else) were talking about and are still talking about! https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303651148_The_GBEP_Sustainability_Indicators_for_Bioenergy_-_First_Edition?ev=prf_pub
Good luck!
Best,
Jonathan
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I'm writing an article about social media and NGO spread dissertations. However, a small number of literature in this field and the degree of correlation is not strong.who can recommend some scholars or papers on this field?
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Dear Shao Jingyuan
University of Shanghai for Science and Technology,
I wonder if these two papers be helpful for you.
Good luck.
Hiep.
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Dear all,
This is an important question for me. Many development projects designed by NGO fail to help the poors. One of the causes lies in the identification of the problem and how it must be tackled. Thus "ingénierie sociale" (social engineering) is good to work with people to design the project, many techniques arise then (PRA, SARAR, DIGRAP, etc). 
Are social entrepreneurs using these techniques? If they use the same approach, will the fail as NGO?
Thanks
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 Dear Remilien, I would differentiate between two types of failure: failure to meet social needs /demand-side/ and failure to find resources /supply-side/.
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NGOs as a social movement
NGOs as role players in education in South Africa
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 Especially in India NGOs particularly concentrated  in Tribal areas as well as the development of rural poor. Education is the key for development. Now the NGOs mainly concentrated in education and health. There is no bus facility, health facility and electric facility in rural interior places. Now the political scenario in parliament and assembly's they are not interested in rural poor and the problems of the poor, but they are concentrated in political mileage. this is also one of the backwardness for rural education. So there is a need for NGOs to involve in rural education.   
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I would like to conduct research about collaboration among non-profit organizations. The aim is to identify the obstacles and positive factors that influence collaboration between them. The complexity of collaboration of this case lies in the fact that three projects with similar goal have two different donors moreover one Recipient is a governmental, and two others recipient is international organization.
The research questions are: What are advantages and disadvantages for collaboration among non-profit humanitarian organizations? What are the factors that can affect collaboration?
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Hi Rob Thank you very much for sharing the articles with me.
With Regards,
Takhir
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Charitable organizations in the U.S. are allowed under IRS rules to lobby for specific legislation.  They are not allowed to support specific candidates or parties or seek to influence elections.  Many nonprofits do not know the difference and so refrain from legislative lobbying out of fear of losing their IRS tax exempt status.
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Hi James,
Yes, there is some confusion by the NPOs regarding the difference between Advocacy and Lobbying!
Besides the IRS Form 501c(3), NPOs must submit Form 990 annually outlining resources used in this regard and within prescribed limits. This info available from IRS and National Center for Charitable Statistics (NCCS).
However, a problem arises when a NPO says it active on these forms but aren't.
The other issue is that the individual State (some 40) require the NPO to register/disclosure of Lobbying, again some still do not actively lobby. This is governed by the Department of the Secretary of State specifically. So to collect accurate data regarding your query, for the whole of US, will be problematic.
All the Best
Rob
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As the number of big companies wanting to meet their social mission grows, they are trapped with less skills and knowledge in achieving this. The desired results are at times not achieved as compared to the investment, leaving the company at a cross roads on whether to continue investing in it's social mission or withdraw from it. The confusion multiplies when there are no trusted social mission driven agents like NGOs and CBOs to collaborate with to achieve this social goal. Can the NGO certification movement bring relief to companies that are interested in fulfiling their social missions?
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Hello Jimmy,
Here are two sources I recommend for you to read as part of your research; those are specifically addressing the issue of labels and certifications - from ISO to Fair Trade to B-Corp... and so on. While some certification programs assess a product others look at a specific process or component of a given company. The Equator Principles, for example help lending organizations such as banks follow a process to determine environmental and social risks to a given project. Some lending institutions demand such a process be followed as part of their lending assessment of a project. 
Signed, Sealed... Delivered? is a non-academic study that evaluates the myriad of certifications 'out there' from a business perspective. The study found that there are many labels that confuse both consumers and the companies whose product they certify. http://www.sustainability.com/library/signed-sealed-delivered-1#.VqEVhLygLiA 
Another source is IISD which publishes a review on sustainability initiatives, specifically standards. Here is a link to the 2014 report that may be useful:  https://www.iisd.org/pdf/2014/ssi_2014.pdf 
Good luck!
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i want to analyze the role of scientific associatons on regional innovation and development, anyon know articles or books on this topic?
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 Prof. Anil Kumar Gupta of Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad had worked extensively on the subject you are talking about. His publication Honeybee is worth reading. You can search for Honeybee on net also.
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What are policies and measures taken by the EU to engage the peoples (general publics, interest groups, NGOs, political parties, social communities, etc), not the governments, of the Central and Eastern European Countries in their transition and accession periods? Any important literature and sources? Thanks a lot!
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Some of the information you are looking for is in my article "The Past, Present, and Future of EU Enlargement". For example, the EU - in cooperation with the candidate country governments - opened "Info Points" in many larger and smaller towns across the CEECs to provide easy access to information about European integration. The Commission also funded training for legal professionals and other interested private sector professionals across the CEECs, much of it in the context of PHARE. I don't have details about support for NGOs but, as one example, the EU did support the creation of European Communities Studies Associations (local ECSA groups) among academics and funded the creation of Jean Monnet Chairs for professors in law, political science, economics, and European history in the CEECs, as well as European Union Documentation Centers either at university or national libraries. I hope this will help...
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As after the implementation of IFRS numerous difficulties have been seen by the not-for-profit sector in adapting to the international standards.
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Basically I would agree with John Cooper. Would like to give  some additional considerations.
1. It depends on your definition of an NGO. If the NGO is delivering services on behalf of or funded by government, issues of consolidation and accountability towards government can come up. That might be a reason to use a system similar to that of government.
2. It also depends on the purpose of data-collection. Is it meant for accountability reasons or are you looking for statistical standards that have to be met. IFRS and IPSAS are not necessarily exactly the same standards as those used for statistical purposes.
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Do u think that the NGOs and the Public Sector using the accounting standards which are sector neutral.
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My biased perspective is that assessing neutrality and transparency of any standard can be determined by understanding the standard development process and probably the oversight functions
Countries have national standards bodies and accounting bodies have oversight committees. If you want to be value judgments on their neutrality you can assess how standards are developed and overseen. How many stakeholders are allowed in the process, the role of media etc. Just more general thoughts on the transparency of standards.
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financial management in NGOs
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I would add:
Joel Zimmerman,(2004) Using a Balanced Scorecard in a Nonprofit Organization,  Creative Direct Response, Inc
 
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I would like to carry out a research on the changes of Hong Kong civil society and the recent Umbrella Revolution, for this research I have to talk to organizations there. 
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Hong Kong University - political science and public administration department has a few scholars on this
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I'm doing a master on the NGOs in Montréal, Canada. I'm trying to understand how they create their program, how they visualize the human's rights and the respect of the local traditions and how they see their political implication. Up to now my research has been pretty varied and I would like to know different opinions for the research community.
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NGOs have different ideologies: some are welfare oriented (e.g running an orphanage), others are for incremental development (e.g facilitating sustainable agriculture development), a third category is rights based group (which work on ensuring that rule of law prevails) and a fourth are advocacy and network based groups. Some NGOs combine different approaches. The welfare oriented ones create projects with client groups. The development ones may engage directly with clients or through CBOs/federations or through local governments. The rights based NGOs may work through people's organisations, building them in areas where there are none. They may also work  through union  The advocacy and network NGOs may have as their partners the smaller development and rights based NGOs- advocating with state or with private sector which violate rights. I have argued in my coauthored book "Indian NGOs and their capacity enhancement in the 1990s" that the NGOs that go beyond welfare (other than in situation of disaster) and combine the other three approaches are the most effective. Ranjani 
See Book: Addressing Poverty: Indian NGOs and their Capacity Enhancement in the 1990s
Ranjani K. Murthy · Nitya Rao
[Show abstract]
01/1997; Friedrich Ebert Stiftung., ISBN: ISBN: 9788174400451
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Thank you in advance!
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These could be of some help:
1. Barr, A., Fafchamps, M., & Owens, T. (2005). The governance of non-governmental organizations in Uganda. World Development, 33(4), 657-679. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2004.09.010
2. Dicklitch, S. (1998). The Elusive Promise of NGOs in Africa: Lessons from Uganda
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In need of some contacts to further my research. 
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Thanks everyone! 
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Clark's triangle of coordination (1983) seems to the model of relations: university - state - market. What is the place in these relations for NGO and social society in general?
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I write from a practical, not a theoretical point of view.  Having worked in a University set up for more than 15 years while at the same time operating in an NGO environment I want to suggest there is wide scope in having a mutual relationship between NGOs and Universities. My simple analysis drives me to conclude that the NGO offers Universities a practical, testing ground, laboratory you name it for putting theory into practice. The NGO also referred in some instance as civil society either becomes the fourth actor in addition to the University - state  market relationship or could be part of the"market" 
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I'm doing a research on identifying and differentiating between NGO's and Government Budget Plan. I"m basing my research on Child Funds International Budget Planning and then a comparison between the two will be a determining factor of the two.
Based on this questions:
The budget is a governments plan for a year. It shows how much money the government expects to receive and how much it intends to spend that money. There is a slight difference in how the government prepares its budget as compared to the private and NGOs. Identify a facility (from different health sector), Analyses and compare how it prepares its budget.
GUIDE
  • A profile of the institution:
  • What guides its existence?
  • What are the development and strategic goals?
  • When the budget period does commence and ends?
  • Where is the source of funding coming from?
  • What is the budget process?
  • Is the budget process (system effective?)
  • What areas needs review/change (your recommendation)
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I'm not sure if I'm understanding exactly what you need, but all of ChildFund International's financials are available to the public on their site. Budget timelines will probably tend to vary, especially because their sources come from multiple places (individuals sponsoring a child, grants, etc).
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If a donor from another country donate to support a program which is run by a non-government organization in another country, will it donate the fund directly to the receiving organization or to the head of finance and treasury of the receiving country (if its money)?
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Yulia is correct but it also depends on the legislation of the recipient country. Some countries do not allow foreign donors to give money directly to NGOs or other natural or legal persons under their jurisdiction. The foreign donor then has two options. Either to comply with the local laws or to withhold the funds. Sometimes a recipient country will create an entity under government control to manage the distribution of funds and - of course - to make sure that they don't end up with opposition or pro-democracy groups...