Science topic

Music Therapy - Science topic

The use of music as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of neurological, mental, or behavioral disorders.
Questions related to Music Therapy
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In the last years a lot of studies and meta-analyses have been published in music therapy. But in the light of the current "crisis of confidence" a lot of questions arose. Respecting the publication of Fanelli (D. Fanelli: „Positive“ Results Increase Down the Hierarchy of the Sciences. PLOS one. 2010, 5 (4) e10068.) one question is about the high rate of positive results in psychology, clinical medicine and psychiatry. Therefor our intention is to find studies with negative results in the field of music therapy. Help from the community would be great.
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Just some thoughts in case anyone else is still thinking about this.. it would be great to hear from anyone else who has observed negative wellbeing effects from music engagement.
I haven't seen much published data but I have heard of music therapy protocols that had to be abandoned early because it was quite clear that the participants were experiencing increased distress from the specific music. The music was created by a certified music therapist, but unfortunately was too direct in terms of the way it attempted to deal with the clinical issue and inadvertently made people feel worse. It was an unforeseen adverse effect, but unfortunately the appetite for reporting on this seems to be quite low.
I have also come across instances where music can trigger negative sensations for people with spinal cord injuries or damaged nerves. They can become physiologically over-sensitised to music and other sounds to the degree that it actually triggers painful sensations. Given that this is a physiological response it would occur regardless of whether the music was delivered by musicians or a music therapist. Typically individuals seem quite aware of the phenomenon themselves and often quickly decline from music intervention studies. This seems to be relatively rare, I have only seen it in clinical contexts, but have not seen systematic clinical evaluations on this. Nonetheless for this reason I always do safety checks now when I'm recruiting for music intervention studies and recommend that people discontinue listening if they feel any increases in discomfort.
I've also collected some data that indicates that people with musical anhedonia (people who do not experience pleasure as a result of music listening) do not appear to benefit to the same degree from music interventions as people who enjoy music. This would undermine the therapeutic benefits of music interventions, and should be considered and potentially controlled for in future research.
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My project is:
Effect of Aromatherapy and Music Therapy on Alzheimer’s Disease Caregiver Perceived Stress & Salivary cortisol levels.
So I will be collecting saliva samples and conducting an experiment.
Thank you
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I aggree: You will need a full review IRB (depending on your state, however) and you will have to point out the clinical relevance of your research since you a most likely include patients who are not (fully) able to give informed consent.
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I am working on the effect of music therapy on persons with Alzheimer's Disease. I require EEG signals of healthy individuals and people with Alzheimer's Disease/Dementia that have undergone music therapy. Due to the on-going pandemic, I am unable to collect signals in real-time. It would be helpful if I could be directed to a database that I can get EEG signals from.
Thank You.
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I have enclosed a music therapy and Alzheimer's review of literature article for your perusal. Chris
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Researches have showed the cost-effectiveness of music experiences, as opposed to other types of experiences, in enhancing quality of life in the general public and for specific populations and age groups. It is hoped that inclusion of music in daily life enhance and maintain well-being of the people including patients with chronic diseases.
Given the positive effects of music on quality of life and reducing depression and anxiety in hospitalized patients, how can music therapy be promoted in hospitals?
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Thank you very much for sharing this question
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I am attempting to write my first research literature review. Is this a good research question and topic? Can I please get some direction on a topic or research question associated with music therapy and cognitive neuroscience? My paper has to have at least ten full-text, peer-reviewed journal articles (ten years and younger). It has to be 8-12 pages. I have to include statistical analysis and methods. Thank you, sincerely for the help and support!
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The first aspect is attention modulation . Namely, music attracts our attention and distracts us from stimuli that can lead to negative experiences such as worry, pain, anxiety .
Another aspect is the modulation of emotions . Many studies have shown that music can regulate the activity of brain regions involved in the initiation, creation, cessation, and modulation of emotions.
Cognition modulation - Music is associated with memory processes (including encoding, storing, decoding music information, and events related to musical experiences.
Behavioral modulation - Music therapy also works through behavior. Music evokes and conditions behaviors like movement patterns that involve walking, speech.
Music therapy also affects communication - Music is a means of communication, which further means that music can significantly affect our relationship with other people. Music gives non-communicative people the opportunity to express themselves without words, but it also allows all people to communicate with others through music in an emotional way, making it easier to express emotions.
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my research project is:
Effect of Aromatherapy and Music Therapy on Alzheimer’s Disease Caregiver Perceived Stress
Dependent: perceived stress scale (will be measured at the beginning of study, 1/2 way in, and end of study) so three times total.
Independent: 1: intervention group aromatherapy
2: intervention group music therapy
3: intervention group combo therapy 
4: control group. 
I forgot which spss system to use. I am trying to get the sample size using G-power but first I have to figure this out!
I am stressing out and don't know what to do. 
THANK YOU!
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It depends on your hypothesis, study design and the data is perceived stress scale nominal or numerical data. Also do you need to measure change or difference.
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Hi,
I am researching LGBTQIA+ ageing and the unique experiences and challenges that people face. Any recommendations on insightful publications on these topics would be most welcome?
I am also interested in connecting with music therapists or psychotherpaists who may have worked with LGBTQIA+ older adults or LGBTQIA+ individuals who have engaged in music therapy.
Thanks
Bill
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Hogan,S.(2019).Arts Therapies and Gender Issues. International Perspectives on Research. London: Routledge
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I am working on a project - Effects of Music Therapy on Alzheimer Disease patients. It was originally a real-time simulation work but due to the pandemic, all the plans have gone down the drain.
Since I can't provide music to patients immediately, I thought of working on EEGs of Alzheimer's Disease patients alone.
I urgently require an Alzheimer's Disease patients' EEG database so that I can work on feature extraction with MATLAB.
It would be great if I can get a database to work on.
Thank you!
Best Regards
Saisruti
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the article contains detail information including the link of an AD dataset
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The tool should have the possibility to:
- upload mp3 files (for me and maybe the participants )
- define a set of questions which should be answered
(one kind of answer could be an audio file)
- give a selection of answers, between which participants could distribute for instance nine points. (answer 1, 3 and 4 could receive 0 points, 2 would get 7 and 5 2 points)
- there should be a management of participants, so that it would be registered, if one did answer a specific recording more than once
The listeners would choose an audio recording, and answer a set of questions regarding this recording. After the first, they could choose a second and do the same thing. So the name of the audio recording should be saved additionally to the answers.
I did a survey with google forms, after evaluating other tools, but there are some restrictions, which made the analysis of the answers quite difficult.
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Hey guys- putting this out there for anyone still having issues with embedding audio recordings. I've built a tool called Phonic (www.phonic.ai) originally designed to RECORD audio in a survey; however many researchers have convinced me to add audio stimuli as an option in the builder.
Phonic has a super generous free-tier for anyone needing this- I'm also here for you if the platform is lacking anything.
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Will lavender aromatherapy, music therapy, or a combination of the therapies decrease cortisol levels and stress in AD caregivers? The null hypothesis would be the following: there is no relationship between music therapy, aromatherapy, and caregiver stress and cortisol levels.
I will be having four groups!
(A) Only Aromatherapy for 4 weeks
(B) Only Music therapy (assigned by music therapist based on participants' preference) for 4 weeks
(C) Both therapies for 4 weeks
(D) Control group no intervention
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This is a four arm clinical trial with factorial design. (Randomization was not mentioned).
There are many types of bias may happen.
First, selection bias due to improper/ biased selection : this may happen due to biased selection or faulty selection criteria for groups and can be minimized by Randomization, concealment of allocation.
Secondly Information bias : that is attributed to faulty measurement, false/ biased response from participants and bias from researchers. Practising standard operating procedures, Masking, Blinding, use of standardised/validated questionnaire can help you to minimise this bias.
Third is confounding bias :
Identification of potential confounders and adjustment in multi-variable analysis/ stratified analysis may help to reduce it.
This three are major categories of bias during study design phase.
There are several biases which can happen during data collection (like Hawthorne bias, social desirability bias etc) and data analysis and dissemination phase (like publication bias etc).
Please go through any standard book of biostatistics and epidemiology before starting your work.
These articles may help you
Regards.
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My research is about alzhimer's disease caregiver stress. I want to implement a 4 week long quasi- experimental study on one intervention group (no control) using pre-test post-test. I want to collect demographic data, Vital signs, salivary cortisol levels, perceived stress scale (PSS), and Kingston caregiver stress scale (KCSS). Then I will do the intervention (daily lavender aromatherapy via essential oil diffuser & 15 mins music therapy sessions for 4 weeks). Lastly, I will remeasure vital signs, salivary cortisol levels, PSS, and KCSS.
Are my variables correct?
Nominal: Marital status, number of household members, occupation, race, gender, and relationship to the care recipient.
Ratio: age, salivary cortisol level, blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate.
Ordinal: duration of providing caregiving, Kingston Caregiver Stress Scale (KCSS) and A Global Measure of Perceived Stress scale (PSS).
Is my research design appropriate? What is the next step? DO I need null hypothesis?
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Yes, but the relationship to different persons does not sound like a nominal scale.
There should be a group with no intervention, this group I called a group with nothing. I did this many time with mice on the open field and one group just ambulated on the open field but did not get any intervention. Then we could see if the groups with interventions differed from the one group which did not get anything, e.g. was not subject to maze learning and so on. With MANOVA you see eventual interactions between lavender and music for example. You can also use
linear regression analysis where you see how much of stress, music explains or is reduced and how much lavender explains and so on.
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I'm currently studying for an MSc in Creative Writing for Therapeutic Purposes, and am researching the effects of meditation and mindfulness on creativity and creative writing for therapeutic purposes. I was hoping for advice on research/ readings?
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Please also take a look at these useful RG links and PDF attachments.
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Hey everyone, I was hoping to gain a better understanding of conducting a systematic review and more specifically whether a systematic review needs to separate adult and pediatric populations. For instance, if I were conducting a systematic review on the use music therapy for reducing anxiety in a post-surgical patient population, would I need to specify if it is an adult or pediatric population?
Can my systematic review contain both adult and pediatric populations in the final results?
Thank you in advance for your help!
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Dear Randell,
You sys review data depend on the research questions you try to answer. Check this out:
The Influence of Music on the Surgical Task Performance
  • 📷Michael El Boghdady
  • 📷Béatrice Marianne Ewalds-Kvist
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Are there any current articles on play, art, dance, or music therapy as a behavior intervention?
Thank you,
Jeanne
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If a song is played louder does it increase or decrease our enjoyment towards a song? Do we have to already enjoy or dislike a song in order to notice the influence of volume? Any possible resources you can provide me with to read regarding this topic? Many thanks!
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I think it can increase the emotions towards a song. If it is a song that you like it will increase the enjoyment and the opposite if you dislike the song. Volume is important because it will let the song take part in your body system, muscles and nerves, and this will effect the subconscious by reaching deeper into your system. You can find interesting articles in these two books: Handbook of Music and Emotion. Theory, Research, Applications. I: P. N. Juslin & J. A. Sloboda. Music, Health and Wellbeing. Hanser, S.
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Congratulations on this wonderful international project. I am a postdoc researcher conducting microanalysis studies of vocal interactions (speech and singing) in premature mother-baby dioids at the Center for Studies of Sociology and Aesthetics at the Faculty of Social and Human Sciences of the New University of Lisbon and Professor of the Master of Science. Music Therapy in Portugal in addition to performing duties as a volunteer music therapist in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Lisbon-Portugal. I would like to know if Portugal would be viable to apply as a partner of the LongStep Project and what are the conditions or requirements for this application.
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Dear Maria,
Thank you for your interest in the LongSTEP study, and for your inquiry. Generally speaking, when we establish relationships with partner sites, we look for a combination of the following: 1) sites with Level III or IV NICUs with adequate and stable census, 2) "social support" countries/societies with generous parental leave policies that enable at least one parent to be consistently/continuously at bedside throughout NICU hospitalization and at least one parent present at home with the infant during the first 6 months following discharge from NICU, 3) a local research team at the NICU (or in conjunction with a partnering university) that has experience with interventional research and ideally with conducting randomized controlled trials, and that has personnel resources sufficient to dedicate at least one staff person to the role of site investigator (other roles like research assistant for data entry may be required in addition), and 4) availability of at least one music therapist (educated, certified and/or credentialed) who already has advanced training in the use of music therapy with premature infants and their caregivers and can be trained on the LongSTEP protocol (typically with at least a 50% position in the NICU). That being said, we are currently focusing our efforts on improving recruitment at our current partner sites (especially our Norwegian sites), instead of adding new international partners, but we are happy to hold dialogue with sites that feel they have resources aligning to the four points mentioned above, in case there is a need to add sites in the future. The project is not able to fully fund each site, and thus sites must be prepared to contribute resources in kind to make the project feasible to implement.
Your areas of research expertise sound very interesting and complementary for this project, so we can also keep you in mind if opportunities for related side-projects arise.
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For students
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Like in alcoholism or drug addiction the quantity and frequency of the substance consumed is less important compared to the impact the use causes in someone's functioning in various areas including family, work/school, relationships, legal issues, financial issues, etc. The Diagnostic and Statistics Manual (DSM-V) defines addiction as an issue if it negatively starts impacting a person's functioning in the areas mentioned above. It is a continuum with social use on one end and dependency at the other end. If one does not want to use an instrument related solely to Internet addiction one could always look at the instruments available in substance use disorder literature and modify them to suit your situation. Some common instruments used in substance abuse/dependence are MAST/DAST, SASSI, ASSIST, AUDIT, ASI, etc.)
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As it's quite often the case, the research seems contradictory.
I've found that infrasound allegedly creates all sorts of psychological and emotional discomfort (there are many papers on low frequency noise becoming a public health problem for example) and that there are infrasonic (IS) frequencies with healing potential too—as in promoting pain relief, bone health, stimulating the healing of fractures, decreasing the symptoms of dysponea (an obstructive pulmonary disease) and other lung diseases.  
I've also found some studies on the capacity of infrasound mechanical vibration to stimulate or inhibit microbial growth (this would have a wide scope of applications I'd imagine) and that the effects of mechanical vibration on cell activity do seem to remain controversial, since the mechanisms of vibration-induced biological effects on cells and organisms are not clear either.
I have the feeling that there's life-affirming potential to IS, so I'd appreciate any and all thoughts, suggestions and contributions on the matter :) 
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The individual and public health hazard aspects of infrasound have been extensively researched. The hazards have been specifically linked to frequencies and amplitudes that were explicitly identified. Perhaps such hazards overshadow the healing effects. It is reported that every human being's metabolism uses body-generated infrasound for normal health. So it is quite plausible that future research can identify specific spectral characteristics of infrasound that heal.
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Hi everyone, I'm looking for research on music and vulnerability in music therapy. I'm interested in studies that are examining the level of vulnerability that clients experience during musical play and how that impacts the therapeutic process. Because music play requires an innate sense of vulnerability I'm wondering if this expedites the therapeutic process compared to traditional talk therapy maybe?
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Thank you Leandra, I didn't know that.
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I am a psychologist specialized in psychotherapy and a musician graduated in non-European musical traditions with an indological address. I work in the field of pathological addictions and prevention in adolescence in the Health Service of the Piedmont region.
I use some Raga of Indian tradition that provide the opportunity to explore, through listening and singing, the emotional states aroused by sound. I do not know similar experiences in my country.
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I suggest you this article, maybe it can help:
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Background Information: A good dance friend of mine recently revealed to me that he has Parkinson's. During a recent dance clinic I decided to use what I know about music and Parkinson's (music helps improve movement) in order to see how it impacted his symptoms over the course of the week. At the beginning of the week, his symptoms were rather mild and music, when paired with dance, made him appear as if he was never diagnosed with Parkinson's. (Sometimes, even hours after listening to music or dancing, one would not be able to tell!) As the week went on, despite the music that was playing or the opportunities to dance, his symptoms appeared to worsen. To what extent does music help these individuals? What does exhaustion do to the brain that no longer allows music to help with motor functioning? What do I seem to be missing when reading this research? Many thanks!
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I am working on a similar topic regarding music therapy & cognitive behavioral conjoint therapy. If you have any references that you could share that would be highly appreciated.
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Thank you!
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Could you recommend any convincing studies about positive or neutral impact of listening music in 432 Hz intonation (in comparison to 440 Hz) to human health. What is your opinion in this area?
The difference between 432 Hz and 440 Hz is relatively small, but more and more artist (and scientists too) suggest that this kind of intonation would positive influence to relaxation and even health. Maybe its only marketing?
There is a very nice sample:
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The real problem with this question is that the expression "music tuned to 432 Hz" (or "to 440 Hz") hardly makes sense. First of all, it should give a note name. One probably must understand "music tuned to A3=432 Hz", but it would be better to say so. Then, suppose that A3 indeed is tuned to that frequency. What is the frequency of the other notes? This depends on several factors:
-- What instrument?
-- In what tuning or temperament is one tuning?
-- How long after the tuning does one measure the effect?
-- What kind of music is played?
It must be realized that an orchestra may have tuned to any pitch standard to start with -- say A3=432 Hz -- and neverteless may play at some other pitch standard -- say A3=440 Hz -- after half an hour, if only because of the increase in temperature in the room.
The French Government decided in the mid 19th century that the French standard pitch should be A3=435 Hz. Then the Austrians wrongly believed that this pitch had been measured at too low a temperature (around 15° centigrade) and estimated that pitch would raise by 5 Hz between 15° and 20°: this is the origin of A3=440 Hz.
Most instruments do not tune from A; D often is considered a better choice. But then the frequency of A will depend on the size of the fifth tuned in the particular temperament (or tuning system) considered.
Also, it is well known that choirs singing a capella (without instruments) tend to lower in pitch. The cause is often believed to be that the singers get tired, but it has been shown that the effect of tonality is much more important, because it entails harmonic progressions in one direction. Tonal music tends to lower in pitch, and the effect may be quite more important than the difference between 440 and 432 Hz (32 cents, only about 1.5 comma).
To sum up: this whole affair about playing at 432 Hz is nonsense. It is probable that a lot of music has been played "at 432 Hz" throughout history, and that nobody ever noticed. (Ellis, it the late 19th century, was able to document hundreds of historical pitch standards.)
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Recently, in my Psych of Music class, we were discussing the influence that music therapy (MT) has on people with aphasia after suffering a traumatic brain injury. After watching a video on Gabby Giffords, I started to wonder how internal speech is impacted, if at all. I am curious to see if internal speech plays a role in the positive outcomes of MT (in being able to produce internal music) and whether or not it is through the familiarity of MT music that provides cues for speech production. Please refer to my comment below for more information.
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Hi Chris,
While inner speech is usually comparatively poor in aphasia if comparing inner speech to neurotypical adults, I have found (on my page, "Inner Speech" area) that many individuals with aphasia, particularly non-fluent types of aphasia, do indeed have inner speech intact. In some cases, inner speech is particularly preserved relative to overt speech.
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There is very little in the way of formal biomedical or behavioral evaluations of learning/playing harmonica; nor is there much social science on the harmonica or blues harp. Andrew Gussow is a humanities scholar of harmonica, and David Barrett wrote up an MRI study of the mouth and throat while playing harmonica, but I can find no others. Are you aware of any?
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Thank you Simon! I am developing some materials designed to provide easy access and the "communication ramp" required for Aphasia - we are going on 4 years teaching a sub-set of The Aphasia Tones (TM) choir. It has dawned on me this might a very good access point for anyone looking to learn or just enjoy making music 'late in life', with minimal music expertise and/or as part of a rehab plan. [If I can make headway here, I will move on to drum circle style rhythm facilitation; and/or possibly ukelele seeking the easiest and most adaptable entry into music for elders or anyone with disability, etc.] At risk of rambling - but some background: Personally, I learned harmonica because I broke my knee at age 27, PhD fresh in hand (ending my hopes for a run at gentleman's/Masters bike racing). Harmonica was the rehab to heal my broken spirit. If you have any interest in the project, keep in touch, one of my partners in creating the materials is Tomlin Leckie, based in Edinburgh; After lots of screening; I am taking his well-structured basic harp e-learning program just to learn his approach and see what materials would be most useful for our application, he has a psych background and is interested in the rehab application. Another inspirational and educational model for me is David Harp who does "Harmonica and Mindfulness Breathing" workshops, a bit more spiritual and meditative, he has taught millions of people meditation, mindfulness and/or harmonica - but does hold formal training in psych, though he operates more in the human potential movement outside of academia.
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I am seeking more information about Hanna Kwaitkowska's six-step art-therapy evaluation framework in order to attempt to apply the framework to a music therapy evaluation. Obviously it will be an adaptation but I can only find parts of her writings; I am seeking other authors' insights and research outlining her six-step framework.
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Hello Christopher,
This is a Master's level thesis:
Del Dosso, R. L. (2016). Family Art Assessment And Advocating For Children.
I expect you will be aware of the relevant references:
Kwiatkowska, H. Y. (1975). Family art therapy: Experiments with a new technique. In E. Ulman & P. Dachinger (Eds.), Art therapy in theory and practice (pp. 113-125). New York, NY: Schocken Books.
Kwiatkowska, H. Y. (1978). Family therapy and evaluation through art. Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas.
. . . in this thesis:
Betts D. J. (2005) A Systematic Analysis of Art Therapy Assessment and Rating Instrument Literature  
Very best wishes,
Mary
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In our longifudinal yoga study with more paralell groups, we met a problem. In order to standardize the social effect of the classes, we asked the teacher not to initiate dialouges with participanzs before/after the lessons (but of course react any questions from the students). The teacher found that because of that, an important benefit of yoga, namely the social experience is lost
How would you handle this in an intervention study: how to standardize the social effect without changing the intervention itself?
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Hi Benedek,
I would be very careful with a narrow notion of "measuring" - especcially if you have a small number of comparable  interventions  The very core of intervention research is to leave controlled lab conditions and to understand effects in real-life conditions. Therefore, you will get complex interactions that defy any attempt to controll or measure with any precision - often, you can miss the point completely. On the other hand, you can understand very much abot the mechanisms of your intervention (ant therefroe about their practical potential and shortcomings) by gathering and analysing  a broad spectrum of related data (interviews with single participants, focus group interviews, also some mearurements). I like using "constellation aanalysis" as a tool to map out the notions different people connect to an issue/an intervention , but ohter methods might work just as well, as long as they help you understand, rather than measure, the effects.
good luck with your interventions,
Richard
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Does the knowledge of mathematics and acoustics help music creation? Dose it harmful to artist's soul and emotions?
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The knowledge of acoustics and mathematics is important for a musician.
Allow to know and explain a series of phenomena associated with the perception of the sound/music, musical performance and musical composition.
Depending on the type of musical composition, the mathematical knowledge can be associated to pure inspirations.
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A minor case that due to the changes suffered in recent months has begun has carried out their needs over claiming that it is not aware of effortless have led several guidelines without any results
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Can you clarify the question? What is the problem? What are the guidelines?
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I would like to focus on magnetic nanoparticules caused by car pollution and increasing rate of Alzheimer's disease.
It's for an exposé and then a bigger research at my school.
Thanks for you cooperation :)
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A friend of mine say a 60 Min. show that featured the multiple generational  occurrence of Alzheimer in Malawi.  I was amazed at their findings.  So may theory of fast food and the one with emissions from cars may be shot given the remoteness of the are and the long term historical occurrences.  Several people in several families from several generations had Alzheimer.  There may be a genetic predisposition proven with the longitudinal study which was featured.   
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I am developing a new course on this topic, so any well written articles or book chapters that explore the connections between curiosity and/or playing and human health (physical, psychological or psychosocially) as it relates to the built environment would be much appreciated. I have a few to start with, but I know you all have amazing resources! Thanks!
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Hi, Sounds like a fun course!  You may want to contact my friend David Thomas to learn more about his research and resources but here is a fun TED Talk Boulder that he gave a few years ago:
TedxBoulder - David Thomas - What Makes a Place Fun
It isn't a very specific overlap related to health but I do think it links playing with the built environment in a few new ways.
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As a therapist at MMH and LCCH in Brisbane this is one of our major client populations. We would be very keen to stay apprised of how this project progresses.
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Dear Louise,
For you to think of the type of early intervention to give to your client, you need to understand the nature of his/her health problem. this will give you direction of what he/she need. For every health condition, the type of intervention needed differ based on the nature of the problem, his/her social economic status(SES) and severity of the condition. Some may requires food (that contain high balance diet or supplementary foods), to others health talk/awareness/sensitization is ok, provision of drugs, skills empowerment may also be ok to others.
You therefore need to understand your client very well interms  of his need, health condition, SES status, his environment among others before you start  coming up with an intervention that will solve or minimize his/her problems 
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There are ties to tie problems together as a boundary. If can break a hole for the boundary, then, those mental problems people can turn them into productive contributors.
I know there are some programs can help them:
Acupuncture or NADA treatments can help for the emotion disorder side.
A dream builder program can help them build up a dream and get out their situations. Please see the dream builder event to learn some concept and discuss with Mary Morrissey to see if she can talk to the community church or whatever. I know many coaches in this field, if there is funding opportunity, please let me know. I might refer you some coaches.
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My main activity is to push the "Humane treatments are Patient's right!" movement. Meanwhile, cut down medical cost.
Under this goal, now, I am organizing my training programs and will market them to health-conscious general publics as well as medical professionals. I also preparing my certificate programs in order to spread the whole body healing system.
I also invite researchers to join the scientific study the whole body healing system. As an industrial engineer background, an entrepreneur and a licensed acupuncturist, I see so many researchers put their talents in and so many grants invested in the medical field, but the severely sick patients' number keeps going up and the age of the patients is going down quickly. There should be something wrong. I try to encourage researchers after finding our why should process to how to solve the problems. Otherwise, without finding out solutions, it wastes the grant. It's due to all of the problems exist 
Otherwise, without finding out solutions, it wastes the grant and the research talents' life. It's due to all of the problems exist always. To get the solution to solve the real world pain in needed and find out the problems and describe them is only partially reaching the goal. Without finding out the solutions, the research lost its meaning at an entrepreneur's practical view for an investment.
Meanwhile, I share my clinical experiences to ask researchers to compare the Chinese medicine treatment result and cost efficiency. Meanwhile, keep patients' quality of life.
Actually, many nowadays majority of the no clue diseases already well treated and documented in the ancient Chinese medicine books that are not well known by many Chinese medical schools' professors and/or practitioners that include China's. It's due to the cultural revolution, makes a lot better kinds of stuff lost. I was lucky to get trained in the ancient traditional Chinese medicine field. I also integrated the knowledge with NLP, hypnosis, dream builder, life consultant skills, magnet therapy, cosmic energy healing to create innovative therapies to cut down the medical cost.
As treated severe sick patients realize that they do not need to suffering so much if get treated right, seeing increased severely sick patients and accompany my Mom's last journey in her life. A tube in her mouth, she could not talk, drugs made her weak and organ failure soon. These will not happen under Chinese medical treatment. I cannot keep silent anymore! I do my best to let people keep their health. 
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I'm doing my dissertation about music therapy in medieval arab and still cant find out what the factors of development are. thank for advance. :)
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There are number of books as follow:
1. Risalat al-Ikhwan al safa (in Arabic)
2. Kanz al tuhaf (in Persian)
Good luck,
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I am currently researching play, art, dance, music, and theater and teacher management tools in the classroom.  I am in search of current articles.  Governmental regulations have removed control of most classroom discipline from the teachers and school administrators.  I believe the aforementioned therapies in the classroom could return order and discipline in a passive manner through teachers.  I am in search of supporting articles.  I have exhausted traditional avenues of research.   I am mostly struggling with dance, music, and theater.
Thank you.
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Thank you,
Jeanne
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I'm trying to find out whether a movement-based music therapy affects the dopamine level of patients with Parkinson's disease. I would measure the dopamine level in patients' brain by a PET scan, but I haven't found an article that would specify what exactly 'normal dopamine level' means, what the specific numbers, units are, and how quantitative PET data are analyzed. I'd really appreciate it if someone could help me out and point me in the right direction.
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Your normal data will need to come from your own control group.  Fluorodopa PET scans have previously been used to compared striatal levodopa uptake in normal controls with that of subjects with idiopathic PD and manganese exposure induced parkinsonism so you can look at papers related to this work for some guidance on study design.  Your sample size will likely be small and so unless your effect is relatively large and variance small you will be unlikely to find a significant quantifiable difference between groups.   Please be sure to do a power analysis and determine necessary sample size before you start these studies. 
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Sounds, when organized into specific frequencies, can have emotional effects e.g. minor, major chords, etc. Can the resonating harmonic frequencies of voice have similar affect?
If so, could this correlate with historically charismatic individuals, like Hitler, Cesar Chavez, or Fidel Castro?
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I think the effect that it has is that we can recognise the harmonic pattern and thus recognise the speaker. Someone who has heard my voice a few times will, upon hearing it again, pick up on the specific harmonic content and associate it with the memory of the previous times, even if I were speaking at different loudness or in a different mood.
Consider also that the emotive respones to major and minor chords may be learned responses, specific to certain cultures.
Whether or not certain historical figures had similar harmonic patterns, I'm not so sure, but they certainly used other aspects of speech to ellicit emotional responses in their audience, like prosody, as mentioned above. They also may have utilised up and coming broadcast technologies to allow their messages to be sent with higher fidelity than before, as radio and microphone technologies certainly improved in the 1930s.
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I'm working with people with muscular diseases and I would like to know if there's any scientific evidence of a positive relationship between quality of live and making music.
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A recent literature review: Music therapy: Bettering lives one note at a time.
By Ferrer, Alejandra J.
Charyton, Christine (Ed), (2015). Creativity and innovation among science and art: A discussion of the two cultures. , (pp. 53-69). New York, NY, US: Springer-Verlag Publishing, xvii, 239 pp.
The present chapter discusses the field of music therapy and the benefits that individuals of all ages and levels of functioning obtain from participating in music therapy sessions. A literature review pertaining to music therapy with the clinical populations of oncology, mental health, gerontology, medical/surgical, and developmentally disabled was presented. Music therapy is an effective adjunct therapeutic modality that can support clients in achieving goals of a cognitive, physical, emotional, and social nature. Music therapy professionals are highly skilled clinicians trained in the areas of general music, psychology, and therapeutic principles. Their broad education supports them in designing unique and creative music-based interventions. While music therapists view the profession as a dynamic, therapeutic process consisting of interactions among the music, therapist, and client, it is impossible to deny the intrinsic qualities of music and its benefits upon the human spirit. The present chapter ends with a discussion regarding the use of music in our personal lives. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
Art therapy after stroke: Evidence and a need for further research.
By Reynolds, Frances
The Arts in Psychotherapy, Vol 39(4), Sep 2012, 239-244.
This review presents available evidence regarding the benefits of art therapy and therapeutic arts interventions for stroke survivors. Whilst available evidence is very limited, it suggests that art therapy may address many of the diverse cognitive, emotional and functional needs of people disabled by stroke. Attention, spatial processing, sequencing and planning seem to improve among those who persist with art therapy. Use of the stroke-affected limb may increase. Several studies report improvements in social interaction, and emotional expression. Most published reports offer single case examples, which are idiographic and illuminating. Nonetheless, the brevity of these reports, the reliance on therapist's own accounts, and uncertainties surrounding case selection make generalization of the findings uncertain. There is a pressing need for multi-method research studies. These could use quantitative standardized scales to explore changes in stroke survivors’ physical and emotional functioning, and qualitative enquiry to gain the insights of stroke survivors concerning the art therapy process. Such research designs might help to establish a better recognized role for art therapy within multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation programs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Dynamic sonification as a free music improvisation tool for physically disabled adults.
By Lem, Alan; Paine, Garth
Music and Medicine, Vol 3(3), Jul 2011, 182-188.
This paper reports on the development and initial evaluation of a video-based, dynamic, sonification device used with 5 physically disabled adults, recent clients of Creative Music Therapy (CMT). Of particular interest was the extent to which the dynamic properties of the technology could assist the participants to engage in a dynamic musical interaction at the level of autonomy available to physically able people. Each participant took part in 8, half-hour sessions utilizing free interactive improvisation. During the study, several sonic algorithms were trialed and adjusted according to each participant’s movements and preferences. Informing the sonification design was the concept of dynamic orchestration developed by Paine, and real-time sound synthesis. Results indicated that video-based dynamic sonification systems may be used effectively as free improvisation tools with people who have mild physical disabilities, but that modifications may have to be made for people whose movements are more severely restricted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
From imperfect to I am perfect: Reclaiming the disabled body through making body adornments in art therapy.
By Yi, Chun-Shan
Moon, Catherine Hyland (Ed), (2010). Materials and media in art therapy: Critical understandings of diverse artistic vocabularies. , (pp. 103-117). New York, NY, US: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group, xxxi, 303 pp.
The two projects described in this chapter focus on the creation of body adornments as a means of identity exploration, self-expression, and empowerment for people with physical disabilities. In the first project, I explored disability identity through the creation of a series of body adornments for my hands and feet, and photographic self-portraits wearing these adornments. These works led me to investigate the embedded social, cultural, and media influences that have prompted the gazes of strangers. In the second project, I extended the use of body adornments to the clinical realm, to my work with clients with "missing limbs or digits" (deficiencies). Both projects show the transformation from seeing oneself as a person with imperfections, to recognizing one's identity as a "perfect" disabled person. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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We are interested in arts related to mental health. One approach is for instance music therapy, but another angle is more general art activities, often facilitated by personell without therapeutic training, but rather a main background from the activity itself, like painters, musicians, actors etc. People with mental challenges seems to benefit from taking part i these activites. Does anyone have example of studies in this field? Especially local community based experiences would be interesting.
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Have you contacted the American Art Therapy Association?  You can access research via the Journal of the American Art therapy Association.
I am a licensed clinical art therapist (MA, ATR-BC, LPC-AT/S).  Hospitals bring in artists with no training to work with people but it is best practice to use clinically trained professionals. 
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I am researching how and why  binaural beats support healing. Especially in Parkinson's music has positive effects. Can music assist healing in medical treatments concerning organs?
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Hi dear
Music Helps Movement, Mood in Parkinson's Patients
By Jim Morelli, MPH
Music. It does a body good. Physical therapy may help keep Parkinson's disease patients limber, but now researchers have found that music therapy may help them move faster -- and make them happier.
This is the first time that music therapy's effect on Parkinson's has been objectively studied, the Italian researchers say, and their results appear in the latest issue of the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.
Parkinson's disease is a progressive, incurable nervous system disease that is characterized by difficulties walking, moving, and by uncontrollable tremors. It's caused by a decrease in brain cells that create dopamine, a chemical that is important for regulating body movement. Often, improving patients' ability to move and walk can help improve their well-being.
Thirty-two Parkinson's patients with mild to moderate disability participated in the study. They were divided into two equal groups -- one group went through three months of weekly physical therapy sessions; the other had weekly music therapy sessions. The latter consisted of listening to music, creating it on instruments, and moving to it rhythmically.
The researchers noted that physical therapy improved stiffness -- but did not have a significant effect on overall daily performance. Music therapy did. Patients reported improved ability to do such tasks as cut food and get dressed, and said they were less likely to fall or experience the sudden freezing-up of muscles that occurs with Parkinson's. Also patients with Parkinson's sometimes have trouble initiating movement, and music therapy improved this problem -- possibly because of its rhythmical quality, the authors suggest.
But the patients' emotional response to the music could also have affected their ability to move, they say, by activating a particular pathway in the brain that is thought to help regulate some movements. But either way, the patients were happier when listening to music, and it increased their motivation.
Enrico Fazzini, MD, a neurologist at New York University Medical Center, says the effectiveness of music therapy is linked to what Parkinson's disease takes away from patients: their ability to move automatically -- for example, their ability to ride a bike without thinking about it. "[With Parkinson's] people have to bring walking [or biking] into their consciousness. ... They have to bring into consciousness what was previously unconscious. Anything that helps them do that will help them to move."
Music can do that, Fazzini says -- sometimes dramatically. "A lot of times Parkinson's patients can dance beautifully when they can't walk. I have people who can barely take a step, but they can dance. Because they bring the unconscious into the conscious."
In other words, they know where to put their feet because the music is giving them a cue: the beat. By the same token, he says, some Parkinson's patients walk better in soft sand than on firmer ground because they use the feeling of sinking as a prompt to raise their feet.
Fazzini, who also runs a Parkinson's web site, says many Parkinson's patients have to do without music therapy to help them with activities like walking, because of the need to take music with them. "A lot of times these people are older, and you want them to [be able to] hear what's going on," -- such as the approach of a car, he says.
Lucy Irizarry, a social worker for the National Parkinson's Foundation in Miami, Fla., is a big fan of music therapy. Twice a week she oversees 30 patients in a day care setting. She's convinced of the importance of music in their lives.
"It helps the patients use their voice," she says. "It also helps them socially and emotionally. The songs are the old ones. ... It stimulates them." And, she adds, it helps them to remember.
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I mean, there are certain things that can only be expressed with music? This language that use no words but notes. Aren't the words capable of express the same thing? There is a certain type of knowledge that admits no words but music instead?
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Maximiliano,
''Why the humans created the music?''  WE did'nt, only add some more. Many animal species have created musics much before our primate ancestors.  Why did biological evolution created it?  It makes senses that some early animals had to detect other moving animals through the sound they emit while moving and walking.  These type of sound contains a lot of rythms associated with moving animal bodies. The purpose of the detection is also to infer the type of movement, the type of animal doing it, the position and direction of trajectory, etc.  HOw this could be best achieved?  Through interpretation of the sound vibrations in the ears through the motor systems equipped for enacting such movement in the animal.  So I assume that the origin of music is this interpretation of sound through the self-enaction of the motor system.  At some point in evolution it became possible for some species to go futher and to actually produce sound using the motor system in ways that were pleasing for the animals and could be used for many social functions such as mate selection through musical selection or coordination of motions into a kind of swimming dance as for sea mammals, etc, etc.  
Music is a universal cultural elements of homo sapiens and music has many common elements with human languages.  Babies responded first to the musical part of the language sound and it is likely that humans became humans through a form of collective singing dancing. There are many empirical evidences for this hypothesis.  
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 Bullying comes in many different forms. Some several examples of bullying including: name-calling, spreading rumors, threatening, teasing, excluding others from a group, humiliating others with public gestures, hitting, pinching, chasing, shoving,destroying or stealing belonging etc. There are several examples of the result of bullying which includes: makes people feel lonely, unhappy, frightened, unsafe, loss of confidence, unwilling to go to school, shyness etc. 
Are there some music interventions to help teens who are affected by bullying?
P.S. It would be best to give me some surveys on this topic.
Thank you!
Kostas
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Hello Kostas
This is interesting - a concept that I had never thought of. This paper advocates music, but to reduce bullying rather than to help the victim. Unfortunately, I was not able to access the full text:
Ziv, N., & Dolev, E. (2013). The effect of background music on bullying: A pilot study. Children & Schools. 35(2):83-90
This is a review of the paper:
One of the references may be of help?
Koshland, L., Wilson, J., & Wittaker, B. (2004). PEACE through dance/movement: Evaluating a violence prevention program. American Journal of Dance Therapy, 26(2), 69-90.
It will be interesting to read the responses of others
Very best wishes
Mary
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music is very commonly used for relaxation and probably acts by activation of parasympathetic nervous system. what is its effect on the return of bowel motility in a post laparotomy patient?
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Music therapy is the use of interventions to accomplish individual goals within a therapeutic relationship by a professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. Music therapy is an allied health profession and one of the expressive therapies, consisting of a process in which a music therapist uses music. I think it is for treatment of mental diseases.Is there any research about music impression on treatment of a patient with a  somatic chronic diseases not a mental diseases?
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I came across this brief article with references:
Music--The Medicine of the Mind by Jennifer Gibson, Pharm.D.:
"Music is the language of the soul. Where words end, music begins. Now, a review article suggests that where modern medicine ends, music begins.
The review evaluated 30 trials that included almost 2,000 cancer patients who received music therapy in concert with traditional treatment. Overall, music had a beneficial effect on the patients’ anxiety levels and moods. Music also decreased the patients’ heart rates, respiratory rates, and blood pressures. Patients reported an increased quality of life after intervention with music therapy..."
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in my research dissertation i am looking at musical emotions when music is listened to in everyday settings. my undergraduate dissertation looked at musical emotions and physiological measures but in an experimental controlled lab. This time i would like to see how musical emotions are evoked in naturalistic settings.
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Perhaps the involuntary (spontaneous) tapping of feet to music.  As an indication of the metrical structure of the music. Another response on a higher order would be whistling to a tune or humming to it. In that case both the metrical/rhythmic structure and melodic phrases seem to have elicited a emotional and behavioral response from the listener. These seem to be more naturalistic cues from everyday setting.
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Looking to add a questionnaire on perceived stress to a study in which music therapy is given to subjects who self identify as having high stress levels. I've seen the Perceived Stress Questionnaire which seems to have been highly validated and reliable. Just looking for other opinions/options.
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Dear Peter
Holmes and Rahe stress scale is a simple measure that lists 43 stressful life events and can be completed on line.  I like this scale and find it useful. 
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Music Therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. Is it useful for every patients and all of diseases? How?
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Hi Nader,
Thanks for your question. I appreciated Ahmad's insight into cultural differences in accepting music as a useful therapeutic intervention.
The following music therapy websites might answer your question.
Best wishes,
Stephen
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In line with Moller, Meier & Wall (2010), although their contribution is a theoretical proposal.
I am interested in methods to experimentally manipulate flow, e.g. listening to an audio message, intrinsically motivated tasks, listening to music, etc.
I think it is really interesting but with little developments, it's potential to study flow is enormous.
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Moller, A. C., Meier, B. P., & Wall, R. D. (2010). Developing an experimental induction of flow: Effortless action in the lab. In Bruya, Brian (Ed) Effortless attention: A new perspective in the cognitive science of attention and action, 191-204. Cambridge, MA, US:MIT Press, 2010.
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thank you both for the orientations! Indeed it seems that methods nowadays point out the best way to induce flow states is to make participants to do things, and more specifically, things they enjoy. Maybe it'd be a good idea to build an instrument to map participants' activities susceptible to induce flow, and then apply in a lab context.
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which helps students to improve their behavior 
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I agree with Alexander Crooke. If the students are typically-developing, then music education techniques can be helpful. There is also the possibility of adapting some techniques that music therapists use but you would need to consult with them. 
If you have children who have learning challenges, I have 2 articles off the top of my head that may suit. Granted, they are older literature and they come to mind because I work with the author, but they may lead you in the right direction.
Gfeller, K. E. (1983). Musical mnemonics as an aid to retention with normal and learning disabled students. Journal of Music Therapy, 20(4), 179-189.
Gfeller, K. E. (1986). Musical Mnemonics for Learning Disabled Children. Teaching Exceptional Children, 19(1), 28-30.
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Is there are standard of measurement for the efficacy of a music centered treatment intervention?
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No Doubt , nature has kept some remedy for each disease but we have to find it, it may be form music world plant animal river ocean
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I am writing a dissertation on the effects of music therapy in dementia and a lot of articles are private! 
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Dear dr Harries I think this article is use ful
8455 Colesville Road, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910 (301) 589-3300 fax (301) 589-5175
American Music Therapy Association, Inc.
MUSIC THERAPY AND ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
"...[W]e lose sight of how powerful melody and rhythm can be in the realm of medicine, particularly with respect to Alzheimer's patients and their caregivers... nursing homes and hospitals are finding that working with a music therapist can make a big difference..."
- C. Gorman. Time, November 14, 2005
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Is there a way, in which music or sound can influence a living system - especially the human body - directly and not only as a result of interactions between the hearing organs, ear, skin and bones, and brain activities?
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When electromagnetic and mechanical systems interact there must be a transducer, somewhere.  Sound reception necessarily involves (typically vibratory) motion , so it is easy to imagine that electric and magnetic fields could be result according to Faraday's and Maxwell's laws.  Since the body also has electromagnetic properties (galvanic skin response, nerve impulses, etc.), these fields could easily induce small currents.  Who can say (yet) if some small current might affect your opinion about something?  Unfortunately, absence of evidence is also not evidence.
Finding a reliably reproducible effect of this kind would be very interesting, but it would need to be carefully verified.  Do you know of one?
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I am researching expressing art therapy tactics that have been proven to relieve the physical or psychological symptoms brought on by Parkinson's Disease.
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  • John argue wrote a book called the art of moving, helpful, not enough to recover atrophied muscles, need resistance training along with drama.
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Ulwila method is a special music educational and therapeutic method for music education and music therapy for people with disabilities. This method is used mostly in special schools, organizations, but as I see it should be an easy applicable music educatiional method in preschool and primary education too.
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Thank you for answer. It is good to know, that this method is succesfull an interesting. Do you have any publication or study about this topicin english language? I would need it for my research.
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I currently work with a two year old who is living with both, hearing and visual impairment. Is somebody experienced in this field and can help with ideas for effective interventions? 
The child has no cognitive impairment and is spatially very well oriented. Focus of the therapy is currently to help her get in contact with other children.
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A famous musician, a person who can tell you more with own experience about this question is the deaf percussionist Evelyn Glennie. Contact her via homepage: http://www.evelyn.co.uk/evelyn-glennie
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Although MIT is a useful method for speech therapy in Broca aphasia and autism, but there is not enough research about that in different languages.Why? Please give me your opinion about that.
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Thank you very much.
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I’m currently a Master's student of research oriented music therapy at the SRH in Heidelberg/Germany. Within a project, we are currently looking for all the research centers worldwide, dealing with music therapeutic questions. Therefor I would like to ask for your help. If you are currently working in a research field of music therapy, it would be very helpful if you could send a short e-mail or message explaining where you’re coming from and what you’re working on right now.
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I am a music therapist conducting research at the University of Iowa. My clinical (music therapy) research involves working with children who have hearing loss and cochlear implants. I would encourage you to contact the American Music Therapy Association (musictherapy.org) for resources of other music therapists doing research. I would think most universities (about 70 in the US) that have music therapy programs have research programs underway.
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For instance, if the person is feeling low and sad, does he/she choose to listen to music or songs whose lyrics reflects the sadness, or similarly when in a happier mood to listen to music that is more upbeat and cheerful?
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Yes and no. If people are feeling sad and want to continue to feel sad, they will often choose music that matches their emotional state. Conversely, if they are sad and want to feel better, they often choose music to elevate their moods. This, however, requires acknowledgement of their mood state and a conscious effort to improve their moods. I don't believe, however, it is able to be generalized for someone with a mental illness (such as depression).
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Singing and other led activities are essential in music groups for pre-school children and parents. It provides a clear structure and helps both parents and children feel safe. What can improvisation offer to the group, particularly in promoting interactions between parents and their children?
Can anyone share any reference related to above topic?
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What are the specifics with the group? If the children are developing their language, the improvisation could function in a "call and response" type setting whereby the children are learning the functions of appropriate communication: taking turns, asking questions and waiting for responses, etc.
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I believe the approach of Miranda Yeoh is very important. Many years ago, during medical school, I studied for two years (before turning to surgical pathology) the rehabilitation of aphasic patients after a stroke. The majority of patients were older, came from the countryside and only spoke the local dialect . However, the rehabilitation was done in Italian. So these people who were older and had severe brain problems had to learn a new language. On this issue I had big problems with the heads, and this was the reason why I abandoned this field of study .
This can perhaps be related to the first problem Miranda shows: the fact that her students are not native English speakers. But I think there may be more. I do not know if she has watched the extensive literature on the rehabilitation of aphasic patients and music. Perhaps you might find some interesting ideas to tie the two. However, this work is very elegant and it could also open up new avenues in the treatment of children with dyslexia and attention deficit . What do you think of these suggestions?
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Yes, this is a great idea. My experiences in neurorehabilitation and in stroke management have redirected my thinking towards using music for treatment of patients with aphasia and dysarthria. I have indeed achieved much progress on this. It is also effective in teaching an individual a new language. However, for the apahsia and dysarthria, you need to understand the pre-morbid social life of the patient especially the kind of music that s/he is in turn with. Individual responds to music emotionally an there is always tendency to verbalise and vocalise the song especially if it is the one that the individual loves. The concurrent and consistent stimulation of the area 43 and 44 and some overlap to area 42 of the brain is very essential in aphasic patient.
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Music is well known to be a therapeutic tool for individuals suffering from depression, anxiety and other conditions. What about its use in a larger context? With music so readily available for all, can it be harnessed to facilitate positive change?
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Called social change "any observable change in time which affects in a way that is not temporary or transient structure or function of the social organization of a community and change the course of history ." Social change power must be logged in to see the time from a reference point in the past. From there, you should be able to say what has changed and how it has changed.
Social change occurs through agents more or less aware of the factors that affect sociaux.Les change agents " are actors and groups whose work is driven by goals , interests, values, ideologies that have an impact on the future of a society. "
Music is no longer linked mostly to the divine, has not provided a feature simple décor, and can not use more than just as an object of consumption. Instead, the music able to conduct a reenchantment world .
In this connection it is not to understand the study of music in a progressive or rationalist line, but rather follow the way it "appears" in the contemporary world .
Music is in large part the background sound of the environment. It creates a directory of composition and technique and a value system that are the result of our sociocultural environment.
More than any other philosopher Nietzsche can address the musical continent. First for being a musician, then for the Dionysian thinker par excellence.
For him, music is the heartbeat of the world. He designed the musical moment , not isolated from the cultural sphere, but as a means of expression thereof .
" So what wind music my whole body ?
It's ... I think its relief .
That's why I need music "
"The music never ceases to dramatize and make dramatic catharsis that task to rule by all means the night and darkness. "
Mangue Beat movement also appears as an issue in a social context that since the 80's is getting worse. Analysis of the economic and social situation in Recife . The idea is to add some thoughts to the discussion of the place of culture and leisure in society.
The music for this philosopher - artist expresses , more than any other art, the reality of the will to power , it is the stimulus of life.
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Modern psychotherapy and psychiatry are currently very rational disciplines. There are a lot of advantages of rational perspectives of these disciplines. But humans are not only rational beings. In my opinion arts therapies (like music therapy, art therapy, dance and movement therapies, drama therapies, etc.) have the potential to contribute a lot to humanize psychotherapy and psychiatry contexts. These approaches are unfortunately often less respected in institutions and healthcare systems. What do you think?
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I’ve been following the discussion with interest and would like to share one observation: While the initial question raised by Thomas implies (or at least this is my understanding) that a closer connection between the fields of arts therapies and other medical professions may be possible (beneficial?), some of the points raised in discussion seem to highlight that there are significant (and quite obvious) differences in understanding of the nature of arts therapies practice by the practitioners themselves and other professionals. Personally, I believe that any bridging needs to start with education on and de-mystification of arts therapies, so that their nature becomes comprehendible for those who are not experts in the field.
Initially, the meanings of arts in health and arts therapies should possibly be clarified. Again, I support interdisciplinary dialogue in general and definitely do not intend to pose artificial divisions, but I believe it is important that practitioners of other professions understand that the presence of the therapeutic relationship and focus on therapeutic process is what is crucial in arts therapies and not necessarily in the use of arts for health benefits. I second Virginia and Melissa in that the use of arts in psychotherapy may present risks and therefore requires skills and experience from the therapist. However, the therapeutic relationship in arts therapies includes the three essential elements: the client, the therapist and the arts, and it is the interaction of the three that makes arts so powerful and thus potentially harmful. However, arts themselves should not be considered dangerous and I believe it is important to remember that in arts therapies they have a special role to play, which differs from artistic engagement outside of therapy space.
I wonder what others think and whether you have any other ideas on how to improve the dialogue between the disciplines? (If you at all believe this is needed?)
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Is there a difference between passive and interactive music intervention when it comes to reducing agitation in dementia?
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There is definitely a difference between the two interventions. To have a richer discussion the question should be "what is the difference?", or "which is more effective, and why?" or "what are the merits of each in reducing agitation?".
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I am working with a colleague from music therapy. We are working on a piece of research that looks at the effects of music upon the later development of resilience. I wondered if anyone has any knowledge in this area they would be willing to share?
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Would any of the music therapy literature regarding coping and rehabilitation be helpful? I'm thinking of hospitalized children or children who have chronic health issues (no articles come to mind immediately). The articles referenced by Nelson are definitely of very high caliber.
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There are many myths and philosophies of traditional and international musicians stating the music has the power of healing. If so, what is the evidence of it and which music can helpful in healing of particular diseases without any medications. Please provide your valuable comments and suggestions on it.
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You might want to look at the websites of the Australian Music Therapy Association and the American Music Therapy Association for more information for the wide range of applications of music in health care and medical treatment. The new journal, "Music and Medicine" also includes much relevant information for you. You have asked a very big question, and you many need to narrow down to specific areas as you investigate this.
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I need a survey that is valid and reliable for my dissertation proposal. I want to know what the kids (2nd graders) think about music therapy and whether or not they think music therapy would help them. The kids are speech-language delayed.
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Hi Mary,
You may find The Individualized Music Therapy Assessment Profile: IMTAP, Jessica Kingsley Pub. useful, but I am not sure. If you contact the American Music Therapy Association; www.musictherapy.org, they might have different survey forms for a speech-language delayed child population.
Good Luck!
enrico
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Can the music therapist benefit clinically when using experimental theories of music explored by modern composers, such as Nono, Lachenmann, Wolff and/or Stockhausen? Can these theories of music influence theories of therapy?
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Well my guess for the second question will be yes. And its not without some logic that I tell this. The first question's answer will also be yes but what is to be kept in mind by musical therapists is that there will definitely be subtle variations in various aspects of treatment (read elements of the music therapy) to be given to each individual. Also the time taken for the clinical benefit to become conspicuous may vary considerably from person to person.