Science topic

Music History - Science topic

Music history, sometimes called historical musicology, is the highly diverse subfield of the broader discipline of musicology that studies the composition. In theory, "music history" could refer to the study of the history of any type or genre of music.
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This question is the synthesis of long hours of research in the field of Social Musicology, I ask this question with the music that is played on national holidays, to show struggle or descent. It is related to my project Music, History and Society.
If there is any secondary or primary evidence or experience anyone could share?
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Sorry for the late reply, this thing only just brought me here and I can't hold my tongue! Generally, 'good/effective' protest music is composed when a social issue has elevated such that a consensus for concern is enough to appeal to a popular-classical-underground audience. So, regarding national morals protest music is quite a common occurrence when there is a a hot issue at hand. More specifically, national holidays often celebrate a 'great' triumph or defeat of some kind. Unfortunately I cannot think of a source on this topic in general that I would recommend other than a quick search that anyone is equitably capable of as I. Thus I suggest you take a specific example of national holiday music as they are all quite different in historical and sociological terms... Hope I could help!
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In the last years a lot of studies and meta-analyses have been published in music therapy. But in the light of the current "crisis of confidence" a lot of questions arose. Respecting the publication of Fanelli (D. Fanelli: „Positive“ Results Increase Down the Hierarchy of the Sciences. PLOS one. 2010, 5 (4) e10068.) one question is about the high rate of positive results in psychology, clinical medicine and psychiatry. Therefor our intention is to find studies with negative results in the field of music therapy. Help from the community would be great.
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Just some thoughts in case anyone else is still thinking about this.. it would be great to hear from anyone else who has observed negative wellbeing effects from music engagement.
I haven't seen much published data but I have heard of music therapy protocols that had to be abandoned early because it was quite clear that the participants were experiencing increased distress from the specific music. The music was created by a certified music therapist, but unfortunately was too direct in terms of the way it attempted to deal with the clinical issue and inadvertently made people feel worse. It was an unforeseen adverse effect, but unfortunately the appetite for reporting on this seems to be quite low.
I have also come across instances where music can trigger negative sensations for people with spinal cord injuries or damaged nerves. They can become physiologically over-sensitised to music and other sounds to the degree that it actually triggers painful sensations. Given that this is a physiological response it would occur regardless of whether the music was delivered by musicians or a music therapist. Typically individuals seem quite aware of the phenomenon themselves and often quickly decline from music intervention studies. This seems to be relatively rare, I have only seen it in clinical contexts, but have not seen systematic clinical evaluations on this. Nonetheless for this reason I always do safety checks now when I'm recruiting for music intervention studies and recommend that people discontinue listening if they feel any increases in discomfort.
I've also collected some data that indicates that people with musical anhedonia (people who do not experience pleasure as a result of music listening) do not appear to benefit to the same degree from music interventions as people who enjoy music. This would undermine the therapeutic benefits of music interventions, and should be considered and potentially controlled for in future research.
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Contemporary of Casella.
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The Grove Dictioary and Wiki are likely to provide you with further links to experts. And try this file:///C:/Users/Stella%20Dell%20XPS/AppData/Local/Temp/THESIS_MASTER_OF_MUSIC_SHIELDS_Philip_William_2019.pdf
Good luck.
Diana Ambache
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While there are several individuals and studios offering online lessons, at the tertiary level many have contended that face to face lessons are immeasurably better. In the current climate with Covid-19 forcing remote music lessons we are forced to rethink and to quantify exactly what it is that we do, why and how it should be tested. The move to remote music teaching is also time intensive and while there are some existing technologies that can aid with testing, what is possible and affordable is not only influenced by the institution and the teachers resources, but also student resources.
I am in the process of writing policy for such an unusual situation and would welcome your input. To some extent several music classes might be taught online: Applied music classes (normally one-on-one face to face) via video linking software, also music history, music theory.
Problem areas are with band/ choir/ steel band or other ensemble. The skills gained through ensemble work cannot be easily replicated, and - so far - we have been unable to come up with an alternative assignment.
Students who are due to have practical examinations at the end of semester (performing for 7 mins) may be in a physical setting, having been sent home, where they do NOT have access to the internet, or in some cases to a piano or keyboard. What can be done?
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Nice Contribution Katherynn Hamilton
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I would like to measure STI (speech transmission index) in a 3D environment. I have been thinking about use Unity and reproduce the sound from a speaker and record the sound from the character ears but I would like to find something more profesional. All has to be in 3D because the building is not real any more.
Thank you for your time.
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I completely agree with the answers from Tim Ziemer and Xenia Kontogianni . We did a similar investigation on the STI in a virtual room. Check out the poster and let me know if you have any questions.
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... or for comical effect? Think of Hendrix-style gimmicks, but documented in a traditional context. Examples from the Mediterranean area and the Middle East would be particularly welcome. 
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Movies are fiction, but there is a comical scene early in the Amadeus movie where Mozart plays a ditty on the piano while held upside down by a friend.
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For empirical studies we need to define the subject of the research. The question of 'what is music?' has never be asked before? If there is no 'correct' definition, 'musicology' or research on 'music' is no science!
There isn't even a philosophic answer for it!?
Where are the limits of musicology to other cultural studies?
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Moreover the question of "what is music," asks for both an answer from scientism (that only science has answers to questions of knowledge and even meaning about, in our case, the true, the good, and the beautiful); and an appeal to essentialism that takes for granted that there is an "essential" irrevocable and core--insuperable--meaning to the word "music.".  These and important and related questions are best not discussed on this site.  Write an article or an email to discussants, because the question of "what is music" is philosophically problematic and takes a lot of words--actually endlessly so--to discuss..(tom regelski@ helsinki.fi)  but as a starter, this.
Music is not like an apple that. agreed upon what it "is" can be investigated (as opposed to oranges).  And apples can be studied from many points of view: as a biological organism  (plant) , as a food, as a social entity (what apples mean,  how used), as any number of 'things'.  And so, too, with music.  To ask what music is, to investigate it  scientifically, is similarly to ask what an apple is, as regards its role in life, nutrition,  recreation (apple bobbing contests), a cooking delicacy (pie), and intoxicant (alcoholic  cider), an industry, even a symbol (e.g., states that identify with their apple industry) , and .romance ( "you're the apple of my eye") etc. (was it ever true that students brought apples to their teachers?)) 
Asking what music is, as a scientific, ontological problematic is as misguided as asking what love is,  As suggested in entries above,  the question to be answered is not what people call "music" is but what it is that is called "music" does for those whose "appreciation" is best seen in how they  use  in fulfilling a rich live..
Too much "study" of music is lite a an autopsy, no longer of a living praxis, but as a  remnant  of something previously alive.  (If you're a musician, consider the often deadheading effects of your music theory and history classes),  Paradoxically, such is anesthetic., as result of its  "scientific" study in orthodox musicology and music theory, Strangely, this or that "work" as identified in advance by aesthetic theory as "good music" (as a great work worthy of analysis) is subject to positivist criteria as though a cadaver. Nothing is more deadening of musical values  than musicology and theory conducted on such premises..  And as concerns social aspects of music, at the same time that "absolute music" in the 19th century and since is sacralized--i.e., asart religion--, religious music is  heard in the concert hall as "art music " and secularized.  
So the question of what music IS  as a focus of scientific study  is not well considered.  As I offered several entries ago, the important question to be researched is what music DOES, why,  and how,! The answer must be that music is a social praxis, and like language, makes its contributions to life according to what it is "good for."  A pragmatic criterion.  And it is good for so many socially important things--so don't agree so easily about the difference  between  "highbrow" art music and :'lowbrow" musics .  I'd argue that both are important in the fabric of society and that . therefore,, both are needed and important to the meanings of life occasioned by music, in its situatedness--where it serves the needs well that bring a music into being to begin with.  (That is no doubt how music arose in the first place). That is "good music," for just listening, dancing, singing, celebrating, mourning, and all forms of praxis.
Praxis, for Aristotle is "virtuous doing" on behalf of others, guided by an ethic of accountability.  Techne, instead, is "excellent making" that attests to the need for craftsmanship and even artistry.  But, for praxis, artistry (virtuosity in any realm of life) is calculated by the needs  in question.  The praxis of students as amateurs can be guided by the poiesis (excellent making) of professionals,' but amateurs (amat=love) have different ''goods" in mind as fulfilling. 
The the question raised is ill-considered.  To study music is to study what people call music, and what role it contributes to their lives and how and why,: viz,what difference, in a pragmatic sense it contributes to the life worth living.  Don't try to "define" an apple  'look to its role in humans being human  Eat it (as John Cage's Zen wold recommend)., then you'll belong. as a starting point, at least.
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The Canterbury Tales Project used the Splis Tree program (see Huson, Phylogenetic Networks (2010)) "to explore the textual tradition ... of the Canterbury Tales" (Robinson, Analysis Workshop). That was about 20 years ago. Is anyone using this approach to analyze sets of texts to explore relationships among versions (not necessarily to try to build phylogenetic trees)?
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I mean, there are certain things that can only be expressed with music? This language that use no words but notes. Aren't the words capable of express the same thing? There is a certain type of knowledge that admits no words but music instead?
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Maximiliano,
''Why the humans created the music?''  WE did'nt, only add some more. Many animal species have created musics much before our primate ancestors.  Why did biological evolution created it?  It makes senses that some early animals had to detect other moving animals through the sound they emit while moving and walking.  These type of sound contains a lot of rythms associated with moving animal bodies. The purpose of the detection is also to infer the type of movement, the type of animal doing it, the position and direction of trajectory, etc.  HOw this could be best achieved?  Through interpretation of the sound vibrations in the ears through the motor systems equipped for enacting such movement in the animal.  So I assume that the origin of music is this interpretation of sound through the self-enaction of the motor system.  At some point in evolution it became possible for some species to go futher and to actually produce sound using the motor system in ways that were pleasing for the animals and could be used for many social functions such as mate selection through musical selection or coordination of motions into a kind of swimming dance as for sea mammals, etc, etc.  
Music is a universal cultural elements of homo sapiens and music has many common elements with human languages.  Babies responded first to the musical part of the language sound and it is likely that humans became humans through a form of collective singing dancing. There are many empirical evidences for this hypothesis.  
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I consider that music analysis must be consolidated under new points of view,: the open, live, and music connected sociology, like sociosophy understanding of music history. By other side, the music listening must be more rich and productive, music is history, life of society, so, por this reason it is very important to apply elements of musicosophy. Now I am working in Shostakovich`s music, and I found there we all we have a bigger field. I need this suppor, and found materials about this new perspectives to apply my theories and opinions.
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New neologisms to me,But they imply new approaches to theories of  philosophy and sociology of music.  What is "new" in your coining of these terms?  My recent contribution to both fields is: A brief introduction to the philosophy of music and music education as social praxis (Routledge 2016).  Maybe the "new point of view" is hinted at in that book.  LIving in Helsinki, I hope we might meet to discuss this--after you have read my book and find interest in my theory, not negativity.
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I am looking for some studies on the quantitative and usage evolution of loudspeakers production.
Is seems obvious that since the invention of the loudspeaker late 19th century, the number of loudspeaker produced and in service has always increased as well as their functionality spread-out, but I could not find studies on that subject yet.
If you know some works on the matter, please let me know.
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I am observing speaker consumption from last two years in Chennai & suburban region (South India), There are hundred of labours involved in this seasonal work & They are assembling customised speaker in the rural region.
Urban population buys through online.
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By incorporation, we mean any level of relationship between the traditional manifestation and the compositional process of the author.
We want to find pieces wherein music parameters from both new composition and traditional music would be somehow related.
For instance, the composer could create his pitch logics, sense of time, textures, musical gestures, rhythmic, sound colors, process, performance rituals, among others, based on aspects of the traditional culture's music.
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I would like to add that the composers of "Música Viva" Mouvement associated 12 tone technique with Brazilian elements in many works composed around 1950  like "Negrinho do Pastoreio" (by Catunda) and "Quartet n. 1" (by Guerra Peixe) and Música para Cordas (Claudio Santoro). .
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Due to the 'restraint of trade' and 'undue influence' doctrines applied to contracts in the music industry does this give the exploiters of music a disadvantage in their bargaining power?
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I have some info about influence of Sufism on music.
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I'm currently writing a research MA on the history of those rare double bassists who (like me) play the instrument 'back-to-front'. There's a brief summary of my areas of research here: greggottlieb.net/educator/research/
I would like to enlist your help, as members of a wide-ranging musicology community, with answering two questions:
1) When was the first left-handed double bass built ‘from the ground up’, rather than converted from a right-handed instrument?
(Even if we can’t answer this question outright, it would be great to know what is the earliest fully left-handed instrument you know of).
2) Do you know of any more double bass players who play the instrument ‘back-to-front’?
(So far, my list includes Earl May, Tony Archer, Sherwood Mangiapane, Bud Loyacano and Mark Geddes).
Your help and input is greatly appreciated - and please feel free to get in touch with any other enquiries or anecdotes relevant to the research!
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Chris Jennings is a left handed player who plays a bass custom made by Tom Martin. It might be worth contacting Tom if you ahven't already doen so. http://www.thomasmartin.co.uk/double-bass-home/double-bass-testimonials
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  • Operatic music in the colonies--specifically Jamaica
  • opera companies in the colonies--specifically Jamaica
  • orchestral music in the colonies--specifically Jamaica
  • band music in the colonies--specifically Jamaica
  • Orchestral performances in the colonies--specifically Jamaica
  • Any lead that you can give is appreciated
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HELO,
YOU CAN LOOK UP SIBTHROPE BECKETT. HE DID A LOT OF THE FOUNDATIONAL WORK IN MUSIC IN JAMAICA founding several orchestral and  operatic groups. The Jamaica Journal did a feature on him. There was also an opera written by a Jamaican in the 30's I believe. You can also look up the work of Dr Olive Lewin. 
BECKETT, Sibthorpe Leopold, O.D., J.P.; Retired Civil Servant, Musician. Founder, Permanent Resident Conductor, Director of Music, Jamaica Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra since 1940; Founder and Director of Music “Y” Choral Group since 1943; 
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I've looked everywhere. I suspect that since this work was done before we started using the internet for this sort of thing (storing music scores online), no one ever got around to it, the principals having gone on to something else.
There were a number of performance decisions1 that I would dearly love to know Adrian Shepherd's thinking.
Karl
1. The performance in question: Thomas Augustine Arne Symphonie 1 - 4, LP later a CD on Chandos.
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Shepherd? Ask the Scottish Music Centre first. They're at City Halls, Glasgow.  Or try the Performing Rights Society, but I'd check with local connections first.
Arne? UK music libraries have the Encore website, for orchestral and choral sets in libraries.  Sometimes you can arrange a direct loan with the library holding a particular set, but other times you need to go to your local public library (or the university where you study), request an inter library loan, and let them handle the transaction for you.  http://www.iaml.info/iaml-uk-irl/projects/encore.html
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Given the fact that music historiographies still today deals almost entirely with “dead subjects” (i.e. music of the last centuries which in many cases represents discourses not active anymore), is it possible to draft a non-linear concept of a contemporary history of music that focuses on the “effectiveness” of the past in the present (perhaps in the sense of Warburg´s pathos formula-idea)?
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You could also try to put your question into the context of media archeology, starting with Foucault's Archeology of Knowldege this would mean to consider music as a special discourse or a  number of discourses and as a media. This way music, its form and function also has to be seen within the context of other media. In the end history is not about dead things, it's just another (and helpful) way to see the present.
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Are there any related resources, which corroborate that the market for creative endeavors related to music technology expanded or shrank?
any suggestions are greatly appreciated! 
niklas
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Es wäre ein Versuch wert, Kontakt mit der Geschäftsleitung von "Amazon"/Deutschland aufzunehmen. Bestimmt liegen dort statistische Daten über verkaufte Geräte, Artikel, Music Downloads usw vor?! Viel Glück!
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I am studying musical instrument making, and circulation of knowledge in relation to wood trade. Thank you for your help.
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Thank you very much, Julian.
All the best,
Anne
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I have become intrigued by the musical devices employed in such a simple piece of music as Thomas Arne's closing chorus to Alfred "When Britain first at heaven's command"; My latest fascination has been with the Bassoon line as that's my primary area of study right now.
That particular part is so lovely but the question arose in my mind. How did this piece become the quintessential patriotic song.
But my question for wider consideration is in the area of prior scholarship on this point. Surely there is a 19th century clergyman who studied the rhetorical devices (and there are many - try the 3 sixteenth note syncopated flutterings throughout). How do these devices so clearly define the "us" group which triumphs over the "them" group (to put it in simple terms)?
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I cannot answer your technical question about the bassoon, but insofar as Arne's music becoming more popular, I think that was consequent upon a tiredness of Italian music and the related theatrical changes e.g. as portrayed in Hogarth's The Enraged Musician. I recently added a new analysis of that print to my website at http://tobiassmollett.blogspot.co.nz/2015/01/william-hogarth-and-enraged-musician.html which discusses Arne and the London theatre, and it may be of interest?
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For instance, Sinfonia del Silenzio e della Morte possibily premiered in Vienna in 1911 but can we discover more about where in Vienna, who might have written up the concert and where it took place etc.?
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Most useful; can to same conclusions mysefl thinking hard and logically....many, many thanks...I went to Vienna and found amazing things....
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I'm currently studying the use of the traditional music during the Francoism (1939-1975) and I would like to establish links with other European Fascisms.  
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I know very little about the details of Spain under Franco other than I have read of the civil war in the literature of Laurier lee and George Orwell, however I feel if you take 'traditional music' to be the folk music of countries or regions the use of song as a way of carrying news and ideas has a very long history in human communication. 
In this I don't think you could determine any particular bias toward the political left or right, I'm sure both the incumbent regime and its opponents used traditional music within their communities as a device for both social interaction and ideological propaganda.
whether one variant of traditional Spanish music was particularly usurped by the Franco supporters you will know better than me. 
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I'm conducting a research on Frescobaldi's toccatas. Any help or contributions would be very appreciated. The results will be presented in the Milano's Conservatory of Music within next June.
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Yes, of course I can help you. Doctoral dissertation:
- Naomi Joy Barker, "Analytical Issues in the Toccatas of Girolamo Frescobaldi", Ph.D. in Musicology, Royal Holloway College, University of London, 1995;
- Elena Burundukovskaya, "Organno-klavirnye sotchineniya Jirolamo Frescobaldi i voprosy ich ispolneniya na organe" [Girolamo Frescobaldi's Keyboard Works and the Questions of Their Performance on the Organ], Ph.D. in Music, Moscow Academy of Music, 1993;
- Étienne Darbellay, "Primo et secondo libro di toccate de Girolamo Frescobaldi, édition critique. En marge des deux livres de toccate de Girolamo Frescobaldi, étude de style", Ph.D. in Musicology, Fribourg, 1971;
- Michael J. Eisenberg, "Keyboard Secunda Pratica in Transmission: The Copper-Engraved Toccata Publications of Girolamo Frescobaldi", Ph.D. in Musicology, City University of New York, in progress.
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The decline in CD sales by retailers. The decline in new music being sent to radio stations the decline in concert bookings and performances decline in recording company jobs.
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That is very true. I find it very hard to convince my kids that just sharing their music is wrong. It has become such an accepted part of their social life particularly 'online'. They are confused that I insist on buying tracks from the artists I admire. And yes I totally agree that many of the problems of the industry are self made. And yes encryption will not be a viable option for quite some time, if ever! However if we want new music it has to be funded on a professional basis somehow. Will we have to return to a form of patronage?
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I am looking for journals to cite on the POSITIVE EFFECTS of music on any of these broad areas: brain development, coordination, spatial IQ, cognitive IQ, overcoming learning disabilities, overcoming neurological delays, increased chances of going to college. It is fine if the source is a recent or old journal. Please provide links, thanks.
(When I looked in RG, there was one, but it's still at an accepted article stage.)
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Music is present in all cultures since prehistoric times, but still it is not clear what the source of gratification that we feel listening. Two newly published studies now contribute to shed light on the brain mechanisms involved in the joy of music.
As you can read in "Science", Valorie N. Salimpoor and colleagues at the Montreal Neurological Institute of McGill University have analyzed the neural processes of volunteers who listened to the first few songs. To give way to the experimenters to assess the degree of pleasure evoked by the music, the subjects participated in a kind of auction in which they could make an offer to listen to a particular song.
"Viewing the activity of a particular brain area, the nucleus accumbens, which is involved in reward, it was possible to reliably predict whether subjects would have offered money to listen to a song," says Salimpoor. The involvement of the nucleus accumbens confirms recent indications of the fact that the emotional effect of music would activate mechanisms of expectation and anticipation of a stimulus desirable, mediated by the neurotransmitter dopamine when it comes to a song already familiar, the mechanism of leave would be evoked mental anticipation of the passages most enjoyable. In the search for Salimpoor colleagues, however, the music was not known, but functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that the activated areas and dopaminergic mediation were the same as those of well-known songs. The cause, according to the researchers, is an "implicit knowledge" of music, obtained over the years and internalize the structure of the music characteristic of a certain culture.
The activity of the nucleus accumbens, also, is not isolated, but also involves the auditory cortex, which stores information on the sounds and the music during the test, as the piece was rewarding, the more intense was the cross-communication between the different brain regions. This result supports the idea that the ability to appreciate music refers not only to the emotional aspects, but also on assessments of cognitive character.
Still on the subject of brain reactions to music, Vinod Menon and colleagues at Stanford University School of Medicine, authors of an article published in the "European Journal of Neuroscience," have shown that listening to classical music evokes a unique pattern of activation of areas of the brain in spite of the differences between people.
The team recorded the activation of different brain regions of volunteers who listened to the music of William Boyce, an English composer of the eighteenth century, or pieces of "pseudo-music", ie sequences of auditory stimuli obtained by altering the songs Boyce with appropriate algorithms by the computer. The reaserchers identified a distributed network of brain structures whose activity levels followed a similar pattern in all subjects while listening to music, but not in that of the pseudo-music.
"In our study we have shown for the first time that, despite individual differences, classical music evokes in subjects other than one very consistent pattern of activity in various structures of the frontoparietal cortex, including those involved in the planning of movement, memory and attention, "says Menon. These regions, in particular, participated each with its own activation rate to the development of what was being heard, helping to make sense, with its own specific contribution to the overall structure of the music.
Particularly curious is the preferential activation of the centers of motor planning in response to the music but not the pseudo-music: according to the authors, it is a "neural correlate" of the spontaneous tendency to accompany listening to music with body movements, as in the dance, or simply clapping his hands.
I red with particular interest these two papers which well summarize the mucic/brain interaction. And let me understand what is happening when I am listening to a favourite music. I do not know whether similar mechanisms are activated when I enjoy to  write, play and sing my songs. Many of you know that this is one of my hobbies.
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What method could be used to link the rhythm and the melody line according to ex. tonal harmony rules during automatic generation of piece of music.
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Yes, for now only european music, but very interesting is mathematical model for tonal harmony and jazz, i have this somewhere on my computer. If someone likes mathematic very big equation it is very nice:)
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I am beginning research on a paper writing on the history of military music and I want to focus my research. The history of military music is huge, as all histories are, of course. I am interested in getting to know what is military music in the mind of an average citizen at this point in time and in searching out how that idea came to be prevalent.
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The primary classical "military" combination was trumpets and drums (both snare and bass). That's why D major was the tonality of military marches, because trumpets were most often made in D. The three small bells of the Janitshcarenmusik pedal on pianos c.1810 were always (more or less) in D. The French also had military oboe (and bassoon for the low voice) bands. The eye-witness account of the siege of Barcelona (1714), for example, mentions how the French soldiers constructing the trenches during the night were encouraged in their work by the oboe band, bales of hay being lain down to dampen the sound in order to keep the Catalans from aiming their guns by the sound. The Ottoman version of the military oboe was the zurna, which is incredibly loud and piercing, well-suited for the purpose of striking fear in the enemies' hearts.
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We have many kinds of great music and songs world wide.
Many of them raise issues of disabilities, as broadly understood human condition. They also indicate specific perception and attitudes towards disabilities of particular times.
Do you know the lyrics, songs of any species, which highlight in any way human disability? I share famous song by Janis Joplin(Big Brother & The Holding Company) entitled "Blindman", depicting person with vision disability, being in the need of help. This great song is from 1967 year, and in my opinion is expressing some need of public awareness of persons with disabilities in public spaces.
What are your opinions ? Please share your lyrics and songs.
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Be careful , we must well choose words and must be more than a psychologist, it is very sensitive, it takes wisdom and true and deep love ...
They must feel that we reaching out , but this hand is low and they are higher and have value ....
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Does humor belong in music? In the West, the three B´s, Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms, dominate classical music and are mostly serious. What is your view? Can you provide examples of humorous music from your country if you have any? Youtubes are welcome. Also, since the West does not own a monopoly on humor in music, contributions from non-Westerners are more than welcome.
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Dear Nelson,
I what to offer to your attention the Russian Musical Film "Anton Ivanovich angry" (was created in 1941) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVgYJQ-OXXQ .
"Conservatory professor gives his daughter classical musical education expecting that she will continue the family traditions. However, Simochka is fascinated by the “light” music. She makes a brilliant debut in an operetta and finds her vocation in this genre."
"Old Conservatory professor Anton Ivanovich Voronov, . recognized only major classical music, . was forced to change their attitude to the "light genre" after, . I saw a brilliant performance in the operetta of his daughter Simochka."
"Anton Ivanovich played only Bach, but his daughter is studying at the conservatory. After her walks a young composer (Kadochnikov), writing an operetta, which Anton Ivanovich for the music did not think - because of this he became so angry that even quarreled with one another.It took the intervention of the great Johann Sebastian and daughter debut (Tselikovskaya) to severe orthodox melted and approved light music and ... love. Wonderful, charming musical comedy, and time is on her favor, as good wine. A lot of hilarious vignettes, and almost caricatured characters.Film studios restored to them. Gorky in 1988, Vladimir Berenstein. Lyrics Vsevolod Rozhdestvensky. (M.Smith) "
In my opinion, this film is the best Youtube on your topic. Please, just see this film and you will get huge pleasure. This film contains humor and classical music.
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By analogy with philosophy which reflects on philosophizing as part of itself, metafiction is currently conceived as fiction whose remarks about fiction-writing form part of the artwork itself. Would it be possible to conceive meta-poetry, meta-essay, meta-painting and meta-music? If so, do examples of such actually exist? Can you name them? Are they high-quality works?
Forced by the pressure of inquiring minds in this question thread, I have had to extend the theme of inquiry from metaesthetics to metasciences both in the sense of natural sciences and social sciences. Hence metadisciplines can signify reflections about disciplines themselves which differ from those disciplines in practice, but metadisciplines can also mean reflections about realities lying beyond the usual province of the disciplines as such.
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Magic!
I have written and performed a small amount of slam poetry. One of them is about writing slam poetry. A few lines are:
On the page my poems slumber, unmoved and unmoving, only truly awoken when spoken. When held in the mouth of someone who cares how they gallop or canter or trot across space to dance on the drum of your ear. The vibration of speech makes the air that we breathe, truly seethe with significance, or not.
Good vibrations are needed to make the words sing, to hear is to feel. To see is not real for my poems.
Hope it is interesting to you. I've appended the full poem in case you have a mild interest. It is obviously written for speaking not reading.
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How can you explain the existence of art that expresses mystery or secrecy for its own sake? Debussy found mysteriousness in music a synonym of beauty. Picasso communicated a sense of mystery in his famous synthetic cubist painting, "The Three Musicians" (1921). Yet how can you judge the quality of hermetic art if what it attempts to convey is purposely veiled? Could you offer examples of such art and account for their immortality?
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That is an excellent answer, Peter! I am reminded of "trobar clus" in Provencal poetry, concealing the name of the beloved to preserve her honor (while quasi-deifying her). Much enigmatic literature cultivates mystery to avoid social opprobrium. As to the expression of mystic union through incestuous love, compare the "Song of Solomon," 5,17: "I come to my garden, my sister, my bride." This biblical book has often been repeatedly interpreted by mystics in the Middle Ages and Renaissance as a secret code for the union between God and His Church, when not between the Holy Spirit and the human soul. Somehow the sense of mystery endows the sibling relationship with sacredness.
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Translation in Spanish required.
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Jacobo, la mejor fuente del epitafio de Seikilos se encuentra en E. Pôhlmann y M. L. West, Documentos de la música de la Grecia antigua: las melodías y fragmentos que han perdurado. Oxford: Clarendon Press 2001 (reimpr. 2009).