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I'm looking for studies and experiments done on human subjects to measure their mental stress and how that can connect to the development of musculoskeletal disorders.
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Studies on fibromyalgia involve the cognitive aspects
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I am a research in Andalussian School of publc health (SPAIN) and I coordinate a project to pilot a intervention for prevention of musculoskeletal disorders at the workplace focus in care health professional older than 45.
I would like contact with you for a possible colaboration
Best regards
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Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
EMBS publication In association with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
EMBS publication In association with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
EMBS publication In association with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
EMBS publication In association with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
EMBS publication In association with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
EMBS publication In association with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
EMBS publication In association with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
EMBS publication In association with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
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Want find relationship between stress and musculoskeletal disorder.
Stress measured with with 5point scale. Musculoskeletal disorders measured with yes/no (if yes thn right/left/both) scale.
Please guide me with analysis.
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Completely agree, initially, with the answer of Béatrice Marianne Ewalds-Kvist ;well, that way, SOMETHING COULD BE OBTAINED; Despite this, I am VERY SCEPTIC about the possibility of obtaining some kind of correlation between one variable at the Nominal level and another at the Ordinal level or any other (not even the "fi": phi type)
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Research is actively trying to innovate an propose new tools that will be used by future generations. However, this constant flow on new technology, that will continue to increase exponentially, accelerates the progress and replaces certain tools that we currently use.
An example that is close to my field of research is serious games for functional rehabilitation. Currently we are conceiving and implementing home-based serious games for people with musculoskeletal disorders. We suppose that the current adult generation should be open to using these systems since they are well adapted to using PC's and connected objects. But will these platforms that we are developing, going to be relevant in 10 years time, when the adults are supposed to benefit from them? or will they be replaced by other concepts.
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This is a very pertinent issue. From the hypotheses which we drew from some strategic foresight exercices, we have studied along several years the developement of technology in order to see if these hypotheses were verified or not. That led us to note that there is a real tendancy to the change in work methods, in production organization, which is not really motivated by real needs, but by a simple will to change, because change is supposed to be good (agile firms, etc.)
Consequently, some hypotheses formulated in the articles, books, etc. listed below will have a short life. If you have enough time to read some of those papers, you should find several examples:
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there are a lot of assessment tool for MSDs however, some of the journals did not mention the specific validity of some. i need this for my research paper.
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There is a wide variety of tools used , you need to determine musculoskeletal diseases whether it’s regional or rheumatic diseases because every disease has specific tools . Best regard
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I want to start indepth examination of postural deviations in patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Please suggest me a reliable and valid tool for the same.
Thank you😇
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I am working on the CMDQ scores and would like to get a answer from my fellow research gate members.
1. How to interpret the scores and the statistical analysis for CMDQ values?
2. Which graph suits best to show the pain points?
3. How do you compare RULA and CMDQ scores?
4. Is it necessary for a researcher to do both tools- RULA and CMDQ for Posture analysis?
Regards,
Geetha Suresh
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There is a very usefull paper about the German version of the CMDQ written by Steffi Kreuzfeld, available in a free access version: "German version of the Cornell
Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ): translation and validation"
[Steffi Kreuzfeld et al.]
In the discussion of the paper are very interesting facts also in statistics.
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Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the most common work-related injuries, affecting millions of workers across the world. There is no single cause of MSDs, they are usually caused by various factors of the working environment. Apart from the most obvious physical causes, are there any psychosocial risk factors, affecting the development of MSDs?
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Hi Peter, Absolutely yes! one of the symptoms of MSDs is pain and its caused by a improper movement that lead to a trigger point! Also, we know the trigger point can be irritated with psychological factor.
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Musculoskeletal disorders are one of the most common work-related health problems, affecting millions of workers and resulting in significant costs by the employers. Are there any recently published/reported studies related to the occurrence of MSDs in woodworking and furniture enterprises?
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  1. Musculoskeletal Disorders in Manufacturing www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2010-129/pdfs/2010-129.pdfMusculoskeletal Disorders in the ... and Tobacco, Food, Wood Products, Primary Metals, ... NIOSH NORA Manufacturing sector musculoskeletal disorder msd
  2. A national cross-sectional study in the Danish wood and ... www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7729404A national cross-sectional study in the Danish wood and furniture industry on working postures and ... Musculoskeletal disorders constitute a major problem ...
  3. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (WMSDs) in Washington ... www.lni.wa.gov/safety/research/files/wmsd/manufacturing...referred to collectively as work-related musculoskeletal disorders ... Other Furniture Related Product Manufacturing ... 4. Sawmills and Wood Preservation 5.
  4. A national cross-sectional study in the Danish wood and ... www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00140139508925150?...Musculoskeletal disorders constitute a major problem in the wood and furniture industry and identification of risk factors is needed urgently. Therefore, exposures to ...
  5. Musculoskeletal exposure of manual spray painting in the ... www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S...A study of the ergonomic situation in the Danish woodworking and ... Danish wood and furnitureindustry on ... to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders.
  6. Identifying High Risk Industries for WMSDs - Washington www.lni.wa.gov/Safety/Research/Wmsd/IndRiskWmsd/Default.aspWork-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders ... SHARP identifies high risk industries for work-related musculoskeletal ... Management Of Companies And Enterprises (53 ...
  7. Managing musculoskeletal disorders — Cyprus | Eurofound www.eurofound.europa.eu/observatories/eurwork/...Managing musculoskeletal disorders — Cyprus ... Occupational Health and Safety in Small and Medium Enterprises, ... The first case involves a woodworking industry,
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Patient is a 21yo female active and healthy, she had no previous medical concerns.
She does have a history of syncope and collapse, saw and ENT, neurologist and cardiologist approx. 5 years ago to rule out major health problems. Test results showed no significant findings and ruled out vertigo.
6 weeks ago the patient presented with stabbing pain on the left side of L4-L5, no previous history of injury or illness. Pain occurred suddenly in the middle of the day, shortly after muscle spasms followed. Muscle spasms made worse by heat, cold, and touch. Patient has hypermobility and maintains a great range of motion left, right, forwards and backwards. Patient had a fever of 100.2-100.4 for two weeks, however blood work came back normal, no elevated white counts etc. Patient complains of nausea from pain and is unable to sleep due to pain and muscle spasms. During office visits the patient had elevated blood pressure (144/90 to 120/70, her normal is 90/60).
Six weeks later patient still has pain, muscle spasms, is unable to sleep more than an hour, and still has occasional nausea. Patient has seen two chiropractors, a neurologist, a rheumatologist, a gynecologist, and internal medicine – none of the doctors could provide an explanation for the pain etc.
Comprehensive metabolic panel - mostly normal, Alkaline Phosphatase low 28, ALT high 35 (both were normal in Dec)
LDL and HDL - normal
Vitamin B12 low – 188, Folate-normal
TSH-normal
CBC (includes diff/plt)- normal
ANA Screen, IFA – negative
Lyme Disease Antibodies (IGG, IGM), Immunoblot- negative/non-reactive
Magnesium- normal
Sed rate by Modified Westerngren- normal
C-reactive protein- normal
Rheumatoid Factor, PRP titer – normal/non-reactive
GLUC-UA HMG- negative
Urine -routine
MRI wo contrast– unremarkable
X-rays – no c spine curve otherwise unremarkable
CT wo contrast- unremarkable
Patient has been on: Tramadol, Codine Apa, Vicodin, Toradol, and Morphine – none provided pain relief
Cyclobenzaprine, Zanaflex, Soma- none helped with muscle spasms
Two rounds of Prednisone, different dosages- no improvement
Has anyone heard or had patients with similar symptoms, if so what was the diagnosis? Any additional tests I should run? Thoughts, Comments, Suggestions??
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In almost 40 years with LP patients I have seen this quite often. Solution is LONG TERM TRACTION, see www.avazo.com
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treatment charcot ankle is a challenge. which type of ankle arthrodesis is preferable in such cases?
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In my experience those with a charcot ankle also have STJ involvement.  I have had my best results with IM nailing with a long nail that extends at least past midshaft of the tibia.  I have had more issues with using external fixation on these patients than nailing with pin tract infection and a couple that went on to non union and collapsed some time after frame removal.  I have one with a non union with a nail and with the neuropathy and rectus alignment functions very well in a crow boot.
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56yo pt needs a unilateral hip replacement due to Osteoarthritis. No significant Past medical history. Pt is active and would like to continue activities such as basketball, snow and waterskiing. What type of replacement will allow hip to continue such activities for as long as possible, with as few revisions as possible. 
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This is a very difficult question аnd not clear enough. Do you mean inflammation of the joint(osteoarthritis) or degeneration of the joint (osteoarthrosis )?               Anyway, the requirements for longevity and activity seem to me to be very high. In fact, every replacement surgeon strives to secure such excellent outcome results on a long-term basis. Based on my practice, I would also recommend cementless total endoprosthesis (highly crosed linked poly and ceramic femoral head with porous coated stem). In average, 92-93% of the implants do well in a 10-year period. Thereafter, the revision rate slowly increases. Just one more issue to be kept in mind:  big loads on the THR may lead to an earlier loosening and exchange.  As far as the implant models recommended are considered, you may have a look at The Swedish Hip Registry which gives  precise and actual data on the prosthesis survivorship almost every year.
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Osteoarthritis means inflammation of the joint. Osteoarthrosis means degeneration of the joint which is correctly used in German, Russian,French, etc. Why? It is time for change in the terminology?
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Dear Mr. Long,
Thank you for your post and the reference cited.
Unfortunately, I have to disagree with the evidence presented. Osteoarthrosis (in English literature “osteoarthritis”) is a degenerative joint disease but may have different origin (etiology). The most important point here is what is the primum movens for this variety of pathological conditions. The majority of osteoarthrosis types are of secondary nature i.e. DDH, intrarticular fractures or cartilage injuries, static disorders, sports overloading (pure mechanical causes !), state after femoral head osteonecrosis (M. Chandler), metabolic and endocrine disorders, etc. All these are non-inflammatory conditions. The most important factor for degeneration of the joint is the mechanical overloading leading to progressive cartilage wear and damage.
In the paper of CJ Malemud (2015) the accent is placed on the accompanying synovitis which is often encountered in the so-called activated osteoarthrosis. Yes, I agree that in similar cases the inflammation of synovia adds an inflammatory effect and promotes the progression of degeneration. But this is not always the case and it is a secondary pathophysiological moment.
Yes, RA and other rheumatic or bacterial conditions are certainly arthritis types because the primary moment is inflammation or infection. However, when the inflammation subsides or heals, the joint disease goes on the pathophysiolocal pathway of degeneration, and may be accepted as a postarthritic osteoarthrosis.
Unfortunately, this terminological misuse and embarrassment in the English-speaking literature and practice is nourished by some famous medical dictionaries. You may read in Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary the following terms and explanations:
- osteoarthritis - “noninflammatory degenerative joint disease… characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, hypertrophy of the bone at the margins, and changes in the synovial membrane…”
and also:
- osteoarthrosis – “chronic arthritis of noninflammatory character”
What is it ? What is correct ?
In my opinion this awkward situation may be compared for example with the never-happening misuse of “spondylitis” instead of “spondylosis”, and “discitis” instead of “ discosis” which are clearly and correctly differentiated in the medical literature and practice. Such a misuse is unbelievable.
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Need to measure function instead of pain intensity in adolescents with fibromyalgia, migraines, chronic musculoskeletal pain, abd pain
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I would suggest caution in using function as a surrogate for pain (if that is your intention). Individuals may adjust function due to pain, and /or may continue to function at high levels inspite of pain. The Human capacity for soldiering on inspirte of pain is under appreciated in today's anti pain management climate. Finally, be cautious regarding underreported pain precisely because indiviiduals want to avoid labels or be looked at as a potential pain med "user". This is a very sad and unfortunate facet of today's media hyped anti pain management climate, and is a terrible commentary for those of us who fought s hard to make pain a key vital sign of health.
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This was the comment by a reviewer related to my paper about this paragraph:
The proposed effect of pain on activity levels of patients with lower back, neck or shoulder pain has largely been based upon the changes in physical functioning, neuromuscular changes, psychological effects, decreased levels of physical fitness, and alterations in the patterns and levels of activity of patients (Dubois et al., 2014; Hendrick, 2011). This evidence has been challenged, and there are several studies which report no differences between fitness and activity levels of patients with lower back, neck or shoulder pain, in comparison with healthy control groups (Halvorsen et al., 2012; Hendrick, 2011).
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Disability is not the same as having back pain and is driven by independent variables, including, for example pain catastrophizing and emotional suppression.  You might want to look at this literature and may find it of use.
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We would like to use this as an outcome measure in an early intervention for people with a range of musculoskeletal conditions. Ideally it will be brief to reduce participant burden. 
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Measuring the range of motion (ROM) in hip and knee would be helpful.
Comparative reliability of different instruments used to measure the severity of musculoskeletal disorders in office workers.
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I am doing a study to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain  and its correlates with ergonomic risk factors among middle aged rural women home makers in kerala. So i am planning to use nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire as the pain screening tool. So i want to know the malayalam version of this questionnaire is available or not.
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Yes, But it is better to use Cornell questionnaire as it is more accurate and recently I have published the Malay version.
The Bahasa melayu version of cornell musculoskeletal discomfort questionnaire (CMDQ): Reliability and validity study in Malaysia
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Most of the previous researches just suggested to do exercise training rather than a specific pattern of exercise training for office workers with MSD.
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Yes there are exercises for MSDs for office workers  but they are again very specific according to the work station, work schedule and dimensions of MSDs. However some head, neck, upper extremity and few lower extremity are generally asked for the office workers, although not tested scientifically.
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Kindly share some articles related to musculoskeletal pain or musculoskeletal disorders  and ergonomic risk factors which helps me to  decide the analysis method. 
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There are more in my list of publications at research gate -  it may help you in your search for statistical techniques and analytical methods.
All the best for your endeavors.
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It appears to us that the literature treating of Fibromyalgia and Mg efficacy has been derided in the literature as deriving from poorly-designed studies. We need more studies, shelved or not, to feed our greedy statistical monster for a meta-analysis proposal. 
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The answers to your doubts and questions should be sought and found in Psychosomatic and Somatopsychology because generally these types of diseases emerge from very depressed people with inferiority complexes, of guilt and of very anxious people extremely distressed.
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to find any molecular changes in old adults and to known reason of shaking in old adults.
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Dear Kaniaw,
The following publication entitled " The Loss of Skeletal Muscle Strength, Mass, and Quality in Older Adults: The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study" by Bret H. Goodpaster et al. published in J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci (2006) 61 (10): 1059-1064 describes a study conducted on 1880 older adults for three years and the methods used to determine muscle loss or/and decline:
Background. The loss of muscle mass is considered to be a major determinant of strength loss in aging. However, large-scale longitudinal studies examining the association between the loss of mass and strength in older adults are lacking.
Methods. Three-year changes in muscle mass and strength were determined in 1880 older adults in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Knee extensor strength was measured by isokinetic dynamometry. Whole body and appendicular lean and fat mass were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography.
Results. Both men and women lost strength, with men losing almost twice as much strength as women. Blacks lost about 28% more strength than did whites. Annualized rates of leg strength decline (3.4% in white men, 4.1% in black men, 2.6% in white women, and 3.0% in black women) were about three times greater than the rates of loss of leg lean mass (∼1% per year). The loss of lean mass, as well as higher baseline strength, lower baseline leg lean mass, and older age, was independently associated with strength decline in both men and women. However, gain of lean mass was not accompanied by strength maintenance or gain (ß coefficients; men, −0.48 ± 4.61, p =.92, women, −1.68 ± 3.57, p =.64).
Conclusions. Although the loss of muscle mass is associated with the decline in strength in older adults, this strength decline is much more rapid than the concomitant loss of muscle mass, suggesting a decline in muscle quality. Moreover, maintaining or gaining muscle mass does not prevent aging-associated declines in muscle strength.
In addition the following link contains a number of studies on mechanisms and countermeasures of muscle mass decline  in aging and neuromuscular disorders:
Finally, the following is a review article entitled "Human neuromuscular structure and function in old age: A brief review " by Power et al. published in Journal of Sport and Health Science Volume 2, Issue 4, December 2013, Pages 215–226 which focuses on motor unit loss associated with natural adult aging, age-related fatigability, and the age-related differences in strength across contractile muscle actions:
Abstract
Natural adult aging is associated with many functional impairments of the human neuromuscular system. One of the more observable alterations is the loss of contractile muscle mass, termed sarcopenia. The loss of muscle mass occurs primarily due to a progressive loss of viable motor units, and accompanying atrophy of remaining muscle fibers. Not only does the loss of muscle mass contribute to impaired function in old age, but alterations in fiber type and myosin heavy chain isoform expression also contribute to weaker, slower, and less powerful contracting muscles. This review will focus on motor unit loss associated with natural adult aging, age-related fatigability, and the age-related differences in strength across contractile muscle actions.
Hoping this will be helpful,
Rafik
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Loss of somatosensory function with regards to neuropathic pain indicates abnormal function mediated by small and large nerve fiber.
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In thinking about your interesting question, as a rheumatologist, I am not certain exactly what your question is referring to. Ciro refers to autoimmune processes that would imply the arthropathy is not OA, but certainly connects arthritis with SNHL or Corneal involvement (so does syphilis). If you are referring to neuropathic pain and conceptualization of loss of function in Somatosensory pathways to cortex as negative symptoms and gain of function as positive symptoms, then this Medscape article that uses a BMJ figure explains both aspects and likely pathways quite clearly. See link to figure one below. 
 How to imagine the MOA of OA to trigger peripheral and/or central NP , neuropathic pain with both loss and gain of function OR negative and positive symptoms would invoke theories of afferent input modulation and neuroplasticity evolving in a chronic fashion. Emil suggests swelling that may be one means by pressure on mechanoreceptors that sprout into dorsolateral columns lamina and overlap with type c nociceptive pathways and cross over each other and up the contralateral spinothalamic tract. However, swelling may be associated not only with pressure on surrounding nerve fibers of various sorts, but also with various cytokines and soluble inflammatory factors that modulate various type of nerve stimulation and conduction. I hope this helps you.
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there are several methods have been used for DHI, so which is the most reliable method? here is one example, see figure adapted from BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2015 Nov 9;16:344. doi: 10.1186/s12891-015-0798-5.
Risk factors for lumbar intervertebral disc height narrowing: a population-based longitudinal study in the elderly.
Akeda K1, Yamada T2, Inoue N3, Nishimura A4, Sudo A5.
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The most simple way to measure the real height of intervertebral disc is to calculate the magnification factor on X-rays. For this purpose you have to place a metal marker fixed to the skin on the level of the disc (i.e a coin a with known size A). Then you may measure the disc height (C)and the coin size (B) on the roentgenogram, and calculate its real size of the disc (X) by using this simple equation:  X =  (A x C): B
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Hello from Germany,
I am searching for the "Standardized Nordic Questionnaire". I was wondering if there is a validity german version available?
Thanks a lot for your help.
Warm regards and merry christmas.
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Thanks a lot!!! Thats very helpful. Happy New Year!
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I have seen papers which measure femur length etc. using whole body scans, however I am unable to locate any tools to do this during analyses. I have noted that these scans have been on an iDXA whereas I am using a Prodigy scanner. Is anyone aware of how to do this, or if this in an add-on to the software that will have to be purchased?
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Thank you for your help!
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type of spinal mobilization technique with outcomes
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In general, spondylolisthesis is considered a yellow flag/precaution by some manual therapists. I would avoid mobilising the segment itself as any posterior to anterior force may bring the lumbar spine into more extension and causes pain/discomfort. I don't have any articles to support any type of mobilisation but emphasise on strengthening the anterior abdominal muscles and the core in general. 
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Would
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According to Manfredini  the literature shows that TMD are not often related to specific occlusal conditions, and they also do not have any detectable relationships with head and body posture. The use of clinical and instrumental approaches for assessing body posture is not supported by the wide majority of the literature, mainly because of wide variations in the measurable variables of posture. In conclusion, there is no evidence for the existence of a predictable relationship between occlusal and postural features, and it is clear that the presence of TMD pain is not related with the existence of measurable occluso-postural abnormalities. Therefore, the use of instruments and techniques aiming to measure purported occlusal, electromyographic, kinesiographic or posturographic abnormalities cannot be justified in the evidence-based TMD practice.
Manfredini, D., Castroflorio, T., Perinetti, G., & Guarda-Nardini, L. (2012). Dental occlusion, body posture and temporomandibular disorders: where we are now and where we are heading for. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 39(6), 463–471. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2842.2012.02291.x
Kind regards
Ulrich Kritzler
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As a chiropractor who uses the Blair Upper Cervical Technique I want to know what others think about the upper cervical subluxation/misalignment.
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"facilitating of healing" and the whole concept of "subluxation" and "misalignment" are overused, confuse patients, and I agree cannot be measured, time for clinicians using these terms to re-evalute. I think i have read enough evidence for the risk of harm regarding upper cervical techniqes for  me to be able to make a reasoned judgement with the patients I see, and discount any benefit against the potential risk in this specific area of the spine. thank you for the recommendation though, perhaps what is more important is to really address unfounded concepts underpinning practice.
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What are your experiences with the combination of cryotherapy and (focal or radial) shockwaves? Is the combination a better option and what do you think should come first?
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Dear Dr Tanchev,
I was thinking about the usual soft tissue indications for shockwaves like tendonitis.
Some indeed say, like you do, to put the cryo behind.  However, a huge discussion is going on between my colleagues because some say to use the cryo first in order to make the (radial) shockwaves less painful.  On the other hand, nobody seems to make a statement about the expected physical effects.  Do they influence each other in a positive or rather in an negative way?  I can't find any descent literature on this topic and I hope some Research Gate members will be able to speak about their experiences.
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I need an answer urgently for this question. 
Do folate metabolizing genes have any protective role or do they confer risk in development of rheumatoid arthritis?
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Thank u Faiq Isho.. My question is does folate genetic variants have any role with the disease susceptibility in RA.
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I have some cases of workers with sure exposure of vibrations and/or overuse of arm, without degeneration of tendons but con arthrosis of elbow
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Appearance of elbow joint artrhrosis (not accompanied by radial epicondylitis) is not only possible but a logic sequence of repeated vibrations in cases of arm overloading. I believe you are tackling the problem of workers working with vibrating or drilling portable instruments. Here the insertions of tendons are fixed in a certain position and the overloading of repeated compressive force is taken by the joint itself. 
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It shows significant results in treatment of idiopathic scoliosis but I'm sceptical. The methodology doesn't seem so good, the journal (Asian Spine Journal) doesn't even have an impact factor and the investigator is the person who created the technique himself...
Thank you for your opinion.
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Thank you for your contribution. I've already red what it is and their hypothesis of how it works.
But their etiological hypothesis for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is totally different of all the other authors and is based on nothing.
Their results seem interesting but I'd like to read the opinion of other people about this study and this technique.
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Is early injection better than standard Gleno-humeral injection?
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Dear Bruce
In most cases individuals learn to live with the condition for 12 to 24 months - (providing the pain in tolerable and you can cope with the activities of daily living). If you have not reached the "frozen" phase within 9 to 12 months, then there is a reasonable case to perform a Manipulation under Anaesthetic and an injection of cortisone. This requires an admission to hospital for a few hours and a general anaesthetic. The shoulder is manipulated and injected with cortisone under sterile conditions. Following the procedure will be necessary r 3 to 4 months of physiotherapy
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I am interested in compiling evidence on various non-surgical approaches for EDS patients including; active rehabilitation, orthoses, and manual therapies, focusing more specifically on the musculoskeletal manifestations. As the literature is sparse, I was wondering if anyone has input, or know of any specialists I can try contacting. Also, if there are any trials currently being conducted or similar work being done kindly bring them to my attention! Thank you!
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You might like to look at this recent systematic review paper
Physiotherapy 100 (2014) 220–227
Systematic review;The effectiveness of therapeutic exercise for joint hypermobilitysyndrome: Palmer et al
Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physio.2013.09.002
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I am giving a lecture to a audience of sports physicians, physiotherapists and physical trainers on the topic.
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Dear Christan,
Good question. Exercises on OA knee has been performing form many decades and it has built strong positive evidence. As you are going to talk in front of experts I would suggest to prepare the material/ slides using recent guidelines/ position statements/ review etc. Below is some of the recent guidelines on Exercise and OA Knee. Hope this will serve the purpose...
Many more recent publication are also there but couldn't attached all of them...
Regards
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What are the gold standard tests done manually to measure neck muscle static and dynamic strength and endurance? Is there normative data available on this? I would like to work on the same aspect, so require help regarding it.
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Pls Check out this.Might be useful
Sebastian D, et, al. The neck extensor endurance test: A reliability study. Accepted for presentation AAOMPT, 2014, San Antonio, TX (Publication in process).
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I want to know what is your experience in dealing with such questions in daily practice. What are your difficulties and how do you perceive this process of patient education in the context of low back pain.
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It looks like a cry of despair. Yes, there is a role for the body.
Many patients with spine related disorders (such as low back pain and neck pain ) have impairments of neuromusculoskeletal and movement - related functions, sensory functions, pain, activity limitations and participation restrictions. The pathophysiology of stiffness of the spine in patients with low back pain is not well understood. Conventional therapy, consisting of physical therapy based on pain avoidance and functioning within the tolerance of pain, has shown disappointing results and often leads to more inactivity and to more stiffness of the spine. Many RCTs , systematic reviews and Cochrane reviews are available on this topic .
Many patients hold strong biomedical views on their chronic spine-related pain . Earlier in my comment on this question, I already pointed out the fact that physiotherapists should be aware of their own focus on chronic musculoskeletal pain. Is there a consonance or dissonance between patients ' and therapists ' attitudes and beliefs about chronic pain? Focusing on the biomedical model only will result in inadequate treatment results. I refer to a very important article of Jo Nijs et al., Thinking beyond muscles and joints: therapists' and patients' attitudes and beliefs regarding chronic musculoskeletal pain are key to applying effective treatment (Manual Therapy 2013;18:96-102).
A new and promising therapeutic approach is Pain Exposure Physical Therapy ( PEPT). You can find an extensive description of PEPT in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS - I) in an article of Karlijn Barnhoorn et all., of which I am coauthor ( BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2012,13:58 [open access] ).
In summary , PEPT exists or progressive loading exercises and desensitization beyond patients' pain limits. To decrease the enhanced sensitivity of the skin, muscles and joints for touch, pressure and movement, desensitization is carried out using self-massage and forced movements and use of the arms, legs and spine in daily activities. The progressive loading exercises are tailored and focused on body functions of the joints, muscles and nerves including passive and active exercises to mobilize joints and muscle stretching. Complaining about pain is discouraged and it is no longer a subject of debate or a reason to reduce the intensity treatment. The results of this treatment in a randomized clinical trial will be published shortly. This is the first study that does not focus on a single treatment modality but compares two treatment strategies based on completely different pathophysiological and cognitive theories.
I hope that this discussion will ultimately lead to improved treatment strategies in physiotherapy in a combination of the latest findings in biomechanics, psychoneurophysiology and other related fields.
On this way, there is also a role for body functions in the physiotherapy!
Nijmegen, The Netherlands,
March 10, 2014
Rob Oostendorp, PhD, PT, MPT
emeritus professor Manual Therapy and Allied Health Sciences.
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Are there additional questions/tests needed?
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Pincus T published many articles about RAPID3 in rheumatic disorders
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Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are more prone to falls due to their muscle and joint characteristics.
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I agree with the colleagues above as far as exercises, balance training, muscle training,streching, etc. are concerned. Generally speaking, this will be helpful to prevent falls and fractures, respectively. On the other hand, I disagree with the opinion of Mahammadreza Nematollahi that "slow walking speeds can be a major contributor to falls". On the contrary, I advise my patients to be careful when walking, to avoid quick steps and harsh movements, rapid change of direction of walking, etc. The arrangement of their house, living room should be simple, with more free space, less furniture, no slipping carpets, appropriate bathroom flour, etc. This is important too.
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Does anybody have any experience with training for adolescents after surgery for pectus excavatum?
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Dear Nelson, I am sorry but I have to disagree with you as far as funnel chest correction is concerned. Unfortunately, conservative treatment (orthoses, exercises, respiratory gymnastics, etc.) may only contribute to improving the general status but not the local deformity. Usually, the pars anterior of diaphragma is too short as a congenital anomaly at birth and this is a sort of rigid rein that pulls the sternum inwards. Especially, in the prepubertal phase of growth the deformity gets deeper and deeper. There are different grades of pectus excavatum. Of course the light forms should not be treated surgically because they represent just a cosmetic defect. Unfortunately, there are severe grades and forms which restrict the respiratory function, displace the heart and cause severe functional problems (i.e. Marfan syndrome). These cases are indicated for surgical correction. The results are good, although sometimes serious complications happen. We use for many years the classic Ravitch procedure in combination with transverse plates to keep the correction untill the healing of the sternum occurs (usually 1 year after the operation). After that we remove the plates.
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Of all the ankle ligaments present, the most commonly (85 %) involved ligament to be sprained is the Lateral ligament complex (Anterior Talofibular, Posterior Talofibular and Calcaneofibular Ligs.). Based on the severity (stable / unstable) of sprain the protocols are carried out usually. I came across this article and found it quite new that these UNSTABLE ankle sprains can be corrected without SURGERY (based on evidence obtained from more than 1500 articles on the Rx for ankle sprain). So, could the unstable ankle sprains be rehabilitated in a FUNCTIONAL protocol (as this article has proven) ??
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The surgical when compared with conservative treatment shows no difference in the results particularly in ROM and stability.(my personal experience)
Functional treatment with a short period of protection and early weight-bearing, followed by physiotherapy is my option in the majority of the patients. I think the surgical treatment may be superior in selected cases , for example, in a person who is skilled in competitive track and field events (athletics)
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It is usual to wait for three months to start electrical stimulation, how well does that hold?
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dear colleague,
Using electrical stimulation for a baby with Erb's palsy is very controversial.
We have had long discussions about this on the paediatric forum of the physiobob website many years ago.
The only study I know of looking into; Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Current Treatment Strategy, Long-Term Results, and Prognosis was published in 2009.
In the 3rd edition of Physical Therapy for Children Campbell et al state that "Electrical stimulation is not promoted as no reports were found that described or investigated the use of electrical stimulation in this population. Without such reports, the benifits and risks of the use of electrical stimulation for children with OBPI cannot be discussed".
My answer to your question is therefore.... we do not advise using electrical stimulation in young children with Erb's Palsy and/or other OBP lesions.
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Any cues/explanations as to how these problems are interrelated? Even if a causal relationship is difficult to assess in the case of anxiety or other psychological variables, which would come first?
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Good question. There are certainly reasons why anxiety could lead to musculoskeletal pain in musicians. One of the characteristics of anxiety (i.e. the physiological and psychological consequences of perception of a stimulus or situation as threatening) is increased corticospinal excitability. This is a feature of the 'fight or flight' response to the stimulus, in that it readies the body for action. However, this increased corticospinal excitability during music performance could lead to excessive muscular activation, which could easily lead to damage of muscular and tendon fibres. That is, the anxiety-driven heightened excitability of neuro-muscular responses to motor commands could produce forces that exceed those that would normally be needed to make fine-grained musical movements. Of course, in terms of causal direction, pain and injury caused by such processes may lead to greater anxiety about practicing and performance so there is arguably a bidirectional effect.
My (admittedly limited) understanding of focal dystonia among musicians is that it is less associated with anxiety, but rather with neural cross-activity of different motor regions (muscle controllers) that is induced by over-repetition of particular movements. This, to my knowledge, is prevalent in musicians who are particularly perfectionist and tend to over-rehearse certain passages.
In terms of personality factors, trait anxiety is associated with neuroticism and extroversion. Of course, there may be many other factors influencing what particular musician is likely to suffer from anxiety and if that is likely to cause them musculoskeletal pain.
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Since people with osteoarthritis live with a wide range of pain experiences, anything from intermittent episodes of pain through longstanding constant pain, it follows that some aspects of the pain might be attributed to actual or impending tissue damage while other aspects of the pain might be attributed to aberrant pain processing in the central nervous system (CNS).
Based on the literature of treatments for conditions that involve aberrant pain processing in the CNS (e.g. phantom limb pain, complex regional pain syndrome) the treatments for these two sources of pain are very different. What is your experience with this in your practice?
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Recent research data from our group has shown that about 30% of those with knee OA show signs of centrally augmented pain independent of psychological / social factors (yet to be published). This includes both generalised neuropathic-type symptoms and widespread hyperalgesia to quantitative sensory tests (especially cold). I think the challenge is to find a valid clinical test to reliably identify this group and also of course to decide on the optimal treatment. We are working on it!