Science topic

Multiculturalism - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Multiculturalism, and find Multiculturalism experts.
Questions related to Multiculturalism
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
4 answers
Hello everyone
In your opinion, the questionnaires' psychometric evaluations are sufficient and scientific in the official language in multi-cultural countries?
Do you think it is possible to implement the questionnaire in all cultures or languages in those countries?
What do you think is the solution?
Relevant answer
Answer
I have conducted research in several minority groups, and always found that if possible, it is always preferable to distribute a given scale in one's native language, even if he/she is fluent in other languages. The best way to do this in my opinion (although this is not always feasible), is: (1) Back-translation of scales; (2) Conducting a small pilot study among the minority group in order to receive feedback on the relevance of items to the group (for example, this process helped us in removing certain items which were not relevant and/or offensive to specific minority groups); (3) Continuing with the main research.
I also think it is important to conduct a CFA for the scale after data collection, to demonstrate that the scale's internal structure remains strong for the study group.
Hope this helps!
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
10 answers
I`m doing my masters on applied linguistics for spanish as a foreign language and the topic I chose for my research is about the use of humor in social media, specifically the use of imemes, as a way to bring students from different cultural background together in a multicultural class.
So I`m currently looking for some information about the origins of imemes
Relevant answer
Answer
Re i-memes and Social Media, check out this PowerPoint about Humor and Journalism where we show that Western Tall Tales became Urban Legends, which became Q-Anon Conspiracy Theories. We also discuss humor in the news and humor in fake news.
International Society for Humor Studies: http://www.humorstudies.org/ .
Alleen and Don Nilsen’s The Language of Humor (Cambridge University Press, 2019) is now available. We have developed a PowerPoint to accompany each of the twenty-five chapters of the book as follows:
Chapter 1: Introduction & Humor Theories Chapter 2: Humor in Anthropology & Ethnic Studies Chapter 3: Humor in Art Chapter 4: Humor in Business Chapter 5: Humor in Computer Science Chapter 6: Humor in Education Chapter 7: Humor in Gender Studies Chapter 8a: Humor in Geography I (International Humor: Books, Conferences and Organizations) Chapter 8b: Humor in Geography II (International Humor: Examples and Discussion) Chapter 9: Humor in Gerontology Chapter 10: Humor in History Chapter 11: Humor in Journalism Chapter 12: Humor in Law Chapter 13: Humor in Linguistics Chapter 14: Humor in Literature Chapter 15: Humor in Medicine and Health Chapter 16: Humor in Music Chapter 17: Humor in Names and Naming Chapter 18: Humor in the Performing Arts Chapter 19: Humor in Philosophy Chapter 20: Humor in Physical Education Chapter 21: Humor in Politics Chapter 22: Humor in Psychology Chapter 23: Humor in Religion Chapter 24: Humor in Rhetoric and Composition Chapter 25: Humor in Sociology We’re sending you a PowerPoint indicating how humor is important to your particular discipline. Please let us know if you would like to receive any of our other humor-related PowerPoints (see above). Thanks. Don and Alleen Nilsen don.nilsen@asu.edu alleen.nilsen@asu.edu .
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
3 answers
White Privilege and Multicultural Counseling Competence: The Influence of Field of Study, Sex, and Racial/Ethnic
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
10 answers
Positive psychology has become a pillar in a variety of domains in many societies, such as the workplace and the classroom. However, in multilingual and multicultural spaces individuals may interpret aspects of positive psychology through their own culture and worldview. For example, excessive smiling-or the lack of it- may trigger distinct responses in people from different cultures.
To avoid misunderstandings and to promote harmony, the term 'positive' should be negotiated and offered in a way that everybody can benefit.
I'd be very happy to listen to your opinions!
Relevant answer
Answer
A positive value could be viewed and appreciated differently in different cultures. It is imperative for whoever practice positive psychology to be multiculturally equip with more awareness, knowledge and skills about one own unfriendly aspects regarding certain diverse cultures and able to differential how to manage it. Failure to see own weaknesses and bias towards other cultures is sure recipe to conflict
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
4 answers
I'm doing a master thesis about the relationship between the multicultural working environment and IT companies success (across 3 types of companies startup/SME/Enterprise)
How can I measure companies' success and if I would go with the annual revenue growth approach to measuring the company's success?
How can I know the annual revenue for a non-listed company? in scientific research (for sure this information is not public and they will not give it to be )
You are welcome to suggest another way to measure the success of a company
Relevant answer
Answer
If the IT sector company is a public company whose securities are listed on the stock exchange, the results of the financial analysis, including the ratio analysis, can be compared to the increase in the company's share in the markets where certain IT products or services are sold. You can also conduct market research and take into account the issue of brand recognition of the company and its offer from potential customers. Technological aspects, including the technologies used, compared with direct competitors can also be taken into account. If other categories of information are also available, it is possible to carry out a multi-faceted technical and economic analysis.
Best regards,
Dariusz Prokopowicz
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
4 answers
In other words, I would like to know what makes a company a multicultural entity? if you have any idea about papers or researchers that have discussed the factors which determine cultural differences in organizations it would be greatly appreciated.
Relevant answer
Answer
Marilyn Loden's Implementing Diversity is a very good resource to start with, although not very recent.
Out of experience, I'd say the first determinant is the existence of a strategy acknowledging the need to create cultural diversity in organizations. Without it, it's just window dressing.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
1 answer
Since its inception, the discourse of ethnic marketing has advanced the benefits to firms of segmenting markets and targeting ethnic minority groups in advancing business activity (Cui, 2001). Pires and
Stanton (2015) adapted the definition of marketing from the American
Marketing Association (2013) in defining ethnic marketing as “the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for ethnic identified customers, clients, partners and communities, and for society at large”
Relevant answer
Answer
Manu Vasudevan Unni see if the attached article is of any use. I'm not sure if your stating a purpose or asking a question. Happy to discuss further. :)
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
2 answers
Dear Cengiz,
Excuse me please for the delay,
Your article was very helpful for me in my research about fallacies ...
Thank you so much.
Regards,
Kamel
Relevant answer
Answer
Good luck
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
278 answers
In one of my articles "The need for a values-based university curriculum" https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=2019092415204357 I propose that higher education should adopt a ‘values-based’ curriculum. A values-based curriculum engages the learner on multiple levels (e.g., an understanding and acceptance of their obligations to all humanity, multicultural respect, civic commitment and global consciousness). In your opinion, what are the most important values we should teach to our students? Your opinion matters.
Relevant answer
Answer
Ethical values must be taught
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
3 answers
A scale that can be used at any culture to measure hypermasculinity
Relevant answer
Answer
Alwin Paul Alias He Him very interesting question, I'm on stand by :)
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
4 answers
I am embarking on research on multicultural counseling competencies, can someone be able to send me the MCI
thank you
Relevant answer
"In the year of 2020 I think you should be able to request the Multicultural Inventory."
Actually, you're not! You have to fill in the agreement form and pay 100$ to use it for one research purpose, I tried a few days to write Mrs. Roysircar on getting the items... [https://www.antioch.edu/new-england/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/2016/12/MCI-Agreement-form.pdf]
But there are plenty of other multi- and intercultural measurements, maybe you find yourself another useful one? For example here: [https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022113492891]
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
6 answers
Hi everyone,
I am a Msc psychology student and working on my desertation project on role of empathy in development of close friendship in multicultural environment. Kindly suggest a good and valid questionnaire measures available to tap in both the variables.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks for helping.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
5 answers
to work in a dynamic multicultural team in the fast-paced world to achieve better tomorrow with caring society, culture and the planet.
Relevant answer
Answer
In today's fiction when myth is been revisited implies there lies ample scope for study within our folklore. (Considering myth as a pivotal element that emerged due to folklore primarily).
Content that will enhance values are always a welcome in professional as well as non professional courses.
Folklore apart with its grace that exhibit culture and ethnicity contains immense values with universal appeal.
This adds the scope of bringing ethnic tales as a medium to glance the versity of lessons ready to beam to generations who can hold
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
3 answers
After WWII and with regard to some causes like intercultural philosophy, the multiculturalism and poststructuralism , comparative literature has been distinguished from its previouse situation, which was known American school and has tended to cultural studies. Some scholars like Susan Bassnett and Jonathan Culler have criticized this tendency. What about you? Do you think that this tendency is usefull or not?
Relevant answer
Answer
Comparative literature may be part of the cultural studies, or the contrary, if the literary text reflects really its cultural origins.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
9 answers
Will growing multiculturalism all over the world increasingly affect cross-cultural communication? What possible forms can this influence take? Will it be mostly positive or negative for different cultures?
Could we possibly foresee any potential drawbacks of this process and try to avoid or prevent them?
Relevant answer
Answer
In the environment of globalization it is most important for persons to be culturally competent in all aspects including communications. This means that the person not only understands the spoken or written word but also the nuances, body language (if applicable) and cultural context behind the conversation.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
10 answers
This question is probably not PC, but the truth rarely is. We read and hear every day about how diversity and multiculturalism is so beneficial for the host society, how we really need it to stay competitive and what not. That we need more and more immigration and tolerance of minorities, and so on, Of course, I am aware of classical urban theorist Simmel and Durkheim, but it is not what I mean. I also do not mean the Weberian urbanization economies. And other sensible positions. What I mean is about today's extreme global diversity and multiculturalism brainwash that really goes beyond any kind of realistic scenarios. As far as I know the answer is 'no', but I am open on this point. I am writing a paper on this and need to be 100% sure.
Relevant answer
Answer
@ Dr. Bradley:
So the benefits of immigration related decisions can be of many kinds, either economic or multidimensional. The host society obviously have to decide about them, preferably through democratic process, at a national (and local) level. Otherwise, European Americans might share the fate of Indigenous peoples and Western Europeans will also be minorities in their own countries (i.e. Great Replacement). And it is not only about rights; there are obligations as well. Anyway, I was interested in evidence, not ideology.
@ Dr. Caplan:
Thanks, I have to look it up. What you say strengthens my initial assumptions.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
4 answers
I am looking for my master research for studies or projects about Brazilian multicultural society. How immigrants from all over the world, Portuguese colonisators and locals (Indians) created an hybrid culture without racial/religious conflicts.
Thank you for any information!
Relevant answer
Answer
Here are some ideas:
Bletz, M. (2016). Immigration and acculturation in Brazil and Argentina: 1890-1929. Springer.
Ramos, D. (1986). Community, control and acculturation: a case study of slavery in eighteenth century Brazil. The Americas, 42(4), 419-451.
Bastide, R. (2007). The African religions of Brazil: toward a sociology of the interpenetration of civilizations. JHU Press.
Fujii, Y., & Smith, T. L. (1959). The acculturation of the Japanese immigrants in Brazil (No. 8). University of Florida Press, School of Inter-American Studies.
Ginsberg, A. M., & Gioielli, M. M. (1979). A Comparative Study of Acculturation and Adaptation of Descendants of Japanese Born in Brazil (Nissei) Compared with Japanese and Brazilians. Human Development, 22(5), 340-357.
Bletz, M. E. (2003). Whiteness of a darker color: Narratives of immigration and acculturation in Brazil and Argentina, 1890--1930.
Van Den Berghe, P. L. (1976). The African Diaspora in Mexico, Brazil and the United States. Social Forces, 54(3), 530-545.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
5 answers
Students raised concern that Maslow's research reflects a singular cultural perspective and would like a multicultural perspective.
Relevant answer
Answer
Regardless of singular or multicultural perspective I think Maslow's pyramid states with basic needs and carries on until the highest wants of a normal being. Moreover, Maslow's theory is not scientifically proved but it's his own theory which turns out to be famous and referred academically all over the world.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
1 answer
This is my recent article on the issue.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Ximu Xu and Stephen Dobson, I feel your artcle will demonstrate that student learning is affected by multiple factors, having different emphasis depending on the location of the learning.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
2 answers
I am doing a group proposal to form a multicultural psychotherapy group to address anxiety among college students. Gender and ethnicity are key considerations in the operation of the group. I understand the research regarding male versus female disclosure, as well as, attending ethnic differences, but am not sure how to strategize to ensure optimal participation.
Thanks for your help.
Relevant answer
Answer
I agree with what is indicated by Béatrice Marianne Ewalds-Kvist .
Good question
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
9 answers
Please state its steps or introduce a good article if you know
Relevant answer
Answer
I have been doing research on social entrepreneurs, and among them very accomplished physicians. I found in those excellent medical doctors very strong soft skills like empathy, and also, a strong sense of willingness to understand and appreciate the patient's culture. There is a lot to be done in 1. Teaching Empathy , 2. Teaching cultural sensitivity.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
6 answers
Good evening research gate members,
I am looking into assessing and analyzing counselor case conceptualization competencies, an integrated theoretical framework is preferred.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks for the article.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
11 answers
Hi,
I am quite fascinated by the work on culturally competent social work. During my M.Phil research I realized the importance of culture for people.Earlier I wanted to define culturally competent social work in Indian perspective, for Phd thesis but later learned that there are several research on it. Can you please guide me on some of the topics under it that are worth reseaching?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi, Rajan,
I recommend Marsiglia and Kulis' Diversity, Oppression, and Change: Culturally Grounded Social Work (Lyceum Books, 2015). I have a book review of it that I can share with you. You may also want to look at my article with Mary Caplan on Understanding Fringe Economic Behavior. I can also share this. It is a meta-ethnography applying the sociological theories of Pierre Boudieu. His seminal work on this is The Logic of Practice.
My take away from all of this is that we err when we attempt to define culture in a macro context. Each of us exists in interlocking and overlapping Bourdieusian fields with their on social rules. It is this micro culture that is most determinative of our behaviors, and the level of culture most likely to be overlooked by researchers.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
2 answers
In Europe, three models of policies can be distinguished, related to integration:
  1. The model of the seasonal worker, for which Germany is the prototype. Migration process is mainly determined by the needs of the labor market, and the presence of the immigrants is only temporary. As a consequence, a legal status is not a necessity and nor a reflection on the possibility to facilitate the cultural diversity.
  2. Assimilation model, for which France is representative. Immigration is considered to be permanent; migrants are welcome and get a legal status, under the condition of assimilating the behavioral models of the dominant culture. Immigrants are considered, first of all, as individuals, the concept of immigrants’ community not being acceptable within this model.
  3. Ethnic minorities model, for which Great Britain is the prototype. Immigration is regarded as permanent, but the immigrants are defined depending on their ethnic and cultural origin. They build their own communities, different from the existing ones, but the real challenge is to make these communities to live in harmony, within a multicultural society.
The current situation in Europe requires new theories, grouping and understanding. Political agenda hasn't changed accordingly.
I would appreciate links to good material on this topic.
In addition, Estonia & Latvia (most probably all Baltic states) have declined current immigration wave with the notion that they haven't been able to solve the one from 1970s. Both countries have 1/3 of the population nonspeaking and non-citizen immigrants. The number is growing.
Is it cultural difference, leftover from transition state or something else?
Relevant answer
Answer
I recommend to contact Prof Paul M. Zulehner from Vienna.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
4 answers
I am looking for books, articles or any publications on the subject.
Relevant answer
Answer
Bartosz, it depends what are you understanding as multiculturalism (it could mean demographic multiculturalism, multicultural politics, multicultural ideology...). Here I give you some general references (mostly not only from Great Britain) that could be useful:
1- Nathan, M. (2011). The Economics of Cultural Diversity: Lessons from British cities . THESIS
2- The Oxford Handbook of Multicultural Identity (2014)
Edited by Benet-Martinez and Hong.
3- Verkuyten, M. (2008). Support for Multiculturalism and Minority Rights: The Role of National Identification and Out-group Threat, Social Justice Research, 22, 31-52.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
5 answers
Cultural dominancy is one of the aspects in the modern era
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Saman Dizayi,
It does uncover the cultural dominance. Language is the carrier of culture and influence the processes and manifestations of social formation. Especially, in the 19th century literature.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
7 answers
What approach would you recommend for a study on reconciliation in poetry? Do you have any poets in mind who might be considered for such a topic?
Thanks!
Relevant answer
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
1 answer
Do you think Passing/ Code Switching in Schools assists in achieving multiculturalism or works against it?...Here's my view currently...
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
4 answers
with the new wave of immigration, and in a contemporary multicultural society, new feeling and sense of identity came to surface, culturally how could we read and understand the issue of identity? and how to contribute to give a clear image of understanding identity formation by the immigrants as they might be confused between two completely different identities?
Relevant answer
Answer
The identity of migrants is part of the identity change that is part of the most complex phenomenon of globalization migrants are driven by perceived needs but also by dynamics above them. Their access to an identity of their property is limited.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
5 answers
I am a second year master student and I am preparing the proposal for my upcoming master thesis in the spring semester. My topic is the perception of immigrant about the integration process and challenges they face in their path to integration in Sweden. I planning to conduct a qualitative research design, particularly I want to undertake a case study. I know the fact that, in qualitative research, including theoretical background in your proposal is very challenging before you collect your data. However I am instructed to do so. So please can any one help me to find out theories related to integration of immigrant to mainstream society. I was thinking that I can use assimilation and multiculturalism as my theories but I am not sure whether they are concepts or theories. I am also thinking if I can use Acculturation model as theoretical background. Please let me hear form your side. thanks
Relevant answer
Answer
Many thanks for your answers and advices. I will consider your prospectives and really appreciated. Thanks
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
7 answers
Hello! I am interested in researches about the socio economical influences in early childhood development, especially to learn about how they feel at school and the difficulties they have to face depending on their economical incomes, researches releated to low income families and children in a multicultural school context.
thank you
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Ane.
Urie Bronfrenbrenner's ecological approach to human development is a must regarding your question. You can learn a from reading some of his books and papers.
Kind regards,
Orlando
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
2 answers
Multiculturalism and plural ethos are highly required to establish a successful democratic society. Democracy cannot become a successful enough until principles of accomudation will be taken into cognizance. Respecting diversity is very important in developing a progressive society free from violence and clashes.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Raj I don't deny that India is not a secular and democratic state even I am not saying that Indian Constitution is not giving religious freedom to its citizens. Although Indian constitution is based on democratic and secular principles no problem in that. However, do u think India is secularism and democratic experience is successful. To my understanding India is democratic in constitution but when it comes to practice there is lot of democratic failure and plenty of challenges to secularism. You need to look at that thing. Thats why i asked what strategies India needs to adopt to maintain a balanced and sustainable society. How to handle situations where there are challenges to both mentioned ideals of democracy...
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
5 answers
Hi there,
I am trying to find some literature on the relation between consumption, identity and migration in order to improve a research proposal. So, I would like to ask, does anyone have any suggestions regarding the effects of migration on identity through consumption? Is there any suggestion or any research on that issue?
Relevant answer
Answer
I think the question is too broad and so it needs to be narrowed down or reworded! Both migration and consumption are big concepts and identity of an individual or a group of people can be changed and/or reconstructed when people migrate to another country! Dietary practice is just one aspect of identity, which can immensely be influenced by the movement of people from one place to another. Think about the diverse identities of diasporas in transnational world!
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
17 answers
Dear,
I want to ask,
I was offered from Lambert Academic Publishing for publishing my manuscript. This institution is interested in my article entitled "multicultural society in the explanation of Islam". But I personally don't yet know this publishing agency. Maybe someone can help me provide information about this institution.
Thanks.
Greetings of peace for all of us
Relevant answer
Answer
I follow
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
7 answers
Migration, Acculturation and Consumer Behaviour
Relevant answer
I’m starting a research on the forms of resilience and reaction to Western culture and specifically the role of religious schemes in identity process of African migrants. The results will be ready in late summer.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
3 answers
Consider the following:
The role of education to
a. to develop young peoples’ sense of belonging in multicultural Britain through developing interfaith dialogue.
b. to enhance young peoples’ sense of belonging in multicultural Britain through developing interfaith dialogue.
Relevant answer
Answer
1) This is a well-considered and precise question, which I rarely find in RG for my subject, educational science. It is therefore extremely stimulating. It makes sense to distinguish between acquiring an ability and strengthening the acquired ability. And the idea of trying to do this through an inter-religious dialogue deserves special attention. This makes the question interdisciplinary, because here educationalists and social educators on the one hand and practical religious educators and theologians on the other hand would have to work together. "Integration" of immigrant ethnic groups from other cultures is not my field of work. However, I am interested in the question of how best to proceed.
2) I define "sense of belonging" as a hypothetical construct that balances the need, values, relative beliefs and lifestyles one brings with one from the country of origin and the new challenges that life in British society brings. The process of adaptation and the establishment of an inner balance will take place somewhat more rapidly under favourable conditions, perhaps not at all under unfavourable conditions, or only over the following generations.
3) Imagine that the first step is to know exactly what groups with what religious and cultural background they see, under what conditions they currently live in Britain and how large these groups are. In the preparatory phase, it is important to know what integration attempts have been made for which immigrant groups in the UK so far. This will be somewhat difficult because such measures almost always take place at local level and are not centrally controlled. But one can probably grasp the most important examples, which became known by the media. The experience of other countries should also be taken into account here. In my experience in Germany it was often the case that such programmes were always tried to get off the ground with a great deal of media response, that in the end, when the programme was completed, it was rarely heard whether the programme was successful - that is, whether it achieved significantly more than the integration achieved through the everyday experience of the groups concerned and in such a way.
4) From the past we know that such a new acclimatization takes place much more easily in the area of academically educated families, and here too there is often a freer relationship to religion, which is a prerequisite for an "interreligious" dialogue. Such a research project could run the risk that it would only be successful for the higher social strata, for
families of the lower social class, however, is rather connected with resistance, because the attachment to religion is particularly strong here in some ethnic groups.
5) The variable that is meant to make a difference is called "interreligious dialogue". Here it is extremely important to know which religion or denomination the immigrant groups belong to. Within a Christian culture I can well imagine an interreligious dialogue. But when it comes to interest Islamic families in an interreligious dialogue, I see some difficulties. But this must be discussed in detail. The question should contain an indication of what is meant by "interreligious dialogue" in detail.
I want to stop here and perhaps wait for further discussion.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
5 answers
when countries start to create a cultural or multicultural product
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello to everybody
Please take into account that question is about the stars point of multicultural design, as political plataforma, to deal with culture and diversity... It is very important to distinguish the socisl and real fact (cultural diversity) from our ideas and proposals to deal with it, like multicultural one.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
12 answers
Dear all,
I am currently working on an ethnographic interview that can help to investigate teaching experience in multicultural classes. what questions do you think I should ask, in order to bring out emotions and thoughts about that kind of teaching experience.
Thanks in advance to those who will help!
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Soumia Erraji,
Here are some possible questions for your interviews.
-How do you approach culturally-sensitive topics in your class/lecture?
-In which ways do you aim to diversify the readings and literature so as to represent the ethnic backgrounds of your students?
-How do you encourage class participation from students who come from 'passive' learning educational backgrounds?
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
19 answers
Human rights have emerged in Europe, considering universal European values. So would they be against multiculturalism or not? What is the relationship between multiculturalism and human rights?
Relevant answer
Answer
Querido Diego,
Great question. I am critical on both sides of the equation.
First of all, I am critical of the notion of human rights, along with many of the leading theorists of international law. I'll mention just one example, David Kennedy of Harvard who is quite critical of human rights. My own perspective as a global health specialist and cultural psychiatrist is that human rights are only as useful as one's ability to exercise them and that is dependent upon power and privilege. So it's all very nice to assert rights as a principle, quite another to ensure them as a matter of policy. And only a very few nations in the world ensure the rights of their citizens and even fewer the rights of foreigners, visitors, migrants, and refugees.
A broader critique is that human rights and their allied concerns is a kind of sop for neoliberalism, hiding the real horrors of hegemonies and monopolies and dressing up their injustices with a humanitarian face. That is why the serious left is critical of human rights.
I am for pluralism and living with difference - I am for the notions of porosity, divergence, syncretism and other ideas that argue for many, divergent voices in any society and in the world that enrich us and edify us. I am not comfortable with multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy or in any other country. I am not comfortable with multiculturalism when that means privileging one group of people against another such as affirmative action due to past injustices. This engenders strong reactions and is ultimately self-defeating. That is why I believe that, depending on how one defines the two key terms - human right and multiculturalism - they are either not in conflict or very deeply so. For example, if one sees human rights as universal then some interpretations of multiculturalism could be seen as tipping the scales in favour of one group against others. If one sees multiculturalism as a way of rectifying and redressing past omissions and commissions such colonization and Eurocentric assumptions, then one may be tempted to ironize the notion of universal human rights.
I do not hold by such self-serving definitions and am equally uncomfortable with each of these terms on their own and believe they are destined to be in conflict. We need new ways of imagining a better world, not new ways of continuing and maintaining parochial, partisan views of the world. This won't make me popular with anyone but it's what I believe to be true and good.
Warm wishes for the season from southern Brazil,
Vincenzo Di Nicola
Université de Montréal &
The George Washington University
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
6 answers
Some useful perspectives when considering selective schools for your children. "Ideally, schools are microcosms of society, where children learn everyday multiculturalism in an organic way," Are selective schools racially skewed? If yes, will it represent the broader Australian society? If not, what would be the developmental impacts on students (such as on creativity, wisdom, resilience, critical thinking etc. )? How do competition, affordability and fairness in relation to education relate to this situation?
Relevant answer
Answer
We have so many school systems in the world and so much empirical (also comparative) research about the factors of educational success so it is surprising, at the first glance, that such a question gets no clear answer. Actually, it is so, because the field of influencing factors of school carrier are complex, also traditions (see the difference between state schools like the French, German, or Russian system or community schools (like Dutch/English/Commonwealth system play a role. It is not clear: What means "selective" - which difference should stay in the focus: Private schools against public schools, school choice of parents or not, joint teaching or not, comprehensive school against school diversity. I suggest, formulate one or more hypotheses on the base of the newest results of empirical research.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
6 answers
Can non-mathematical skills survive in the 21st-century?
Relevant answer
Answer
In a comprehensive review of recent research on geometry education, we concluded that more research is needed "both on how to provide teachers and students with more opportunities to engage in visuospatial reasoning and how to find ways to adequately assess and value such reasoning"; see:
Sinclair, N., Bussi, M. G. B., de Villiers, M., Jones, K., Kortenkamp, U., Leung, A., & Owens, K. (2016). Recent research on geometry education: an ICME-13 survey team report. ZDM: Mathematics Education, 48(5), 691-719. 
A pre-print is downloadable at the link below:
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
17 answers
multicultural/diverse population
Relevant answer
Answer
Excellent Question. This is one of my favorit subjects, as a perofessor.
Let’s look fitst at our role as professor and try to apply what we do at the college/university level to the school level.
Here is what I do as a professor of Social Work, Who also teach about diversity.:
Group Discussion: Highlighting & Appreciating Diversity: Teaching about diversity to a diverse group of students can be very challanging, especially when students represent different identities, privilages, ages, gender, religion, socioeconomic classes, races, ethnicities, immigration statuses, sexual orientations, disabilities, and the like. However, I firmly believe that exposure to diversity lends itself to good knowledge and practice.  Students who engage with peers of  diverse backgrounds are better prepared to practice any profession with a wide range of diverse populations. I encurage a group discussion method where students reflect, discuss, debate, explore, agree/disagree. For example, I encurage students to share their own personal experiences with race/ethnic/gender/religion/ immigration/ and disabilities based discrimination; provide a safe space for group discussion, inspire interactive communication style, while mainting a respectful way in disagreeing with each other. I encourage students to share their experiences, both personal and professional ( at the uniooversity level), and to engage in meaningful dialogue with one another regarding these experiences. My role as a professor and as a facilitator is to create a safe, supportive, and encuraging environment, where mutual learning may occur.  Students have told me that this class discussion and dialogue between them has been very enlightening, and enjoyable.
Diverse Curriculum and activities: A diverse  classroom is usually embodied some challanging topics. In teaching and wortking with a diverse classroom, I put delligent efforts in diversifying my course materials before each session by sublmenting each topic with a list of in class and online activities including short videos, case studies, news paper articles, or presenting a brief segment of a radio talk. To increase interactive online discussion, I seek students’ reflection, using their own critical thinking, while interacting with one another by having each reply to at least one of their classmate posting. 
Case studies: I also diversify my teaching methods using different case studies that best reflect on the course materials.  through Moodle ( Blackboard) activities examples or come up with their own topics that matter to them. This teaching technique help students to use interactive communication while creating a more  inclusive classroom. Some times, I  introduce a topic using the “Not-knowing position,” admitting or pretending not being an expert while seeking students feedback and views of the  discussed topic. By doing so, I become not only a teacher but also a learner along side my students. I work collaboratively and together with students to create a safe, supportive, and  encuraging environment.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
3 answers
If you have participated or managed virtual teams with members from more than one cultural backgrounds, I need your experience to help respond to the questions that are meant to establish the impact of  differing cultures on virtual collaborations.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Alan
The questionnaire seeks to establish if virtual project team members are trained on culture before participating in virtual teams and if so, on which elements of culture the training is done. It also seeks to establish if responds feel such training is necessary for team collaboration. 
I have attached the questionnaire, your response to the questionnaire will be highly appreciated.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
3 answers
Visual clues of a moment, model or made-up design to contribute to the overall brand positioning spectrum - powerful approach. Many of the highly creative ads are not universal - specific culture / market oriented. Communicating ideas through texts / written - different segment of audience groups will make different meaning, communication gaps, miscommunication - brand positioning diluted. For multicultural markets - visual clue based ads are highly potential. Any thought?
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
17 answers
In multicultural and multiethnic societies public schools need to offer quality education to students in a heterogenous classroom population. In which particular way can educational technology contribute to the quality of education and to the narrowing of the social gap between different cultural and ethnic groups of students in the heterogeneous classroom? 
Relevant answer
Answer
Fernando thank you for your observation. Papert's seminal postulation is certainly acceptable without any question or doubt. However, in my experience I have found a large discrepancy between the declared goals of the use of educational technology in the heterogeneous classroom and the practical results of its use. If I may present my own perception I would say that while technology has made a profound positive contribution to medicine and health, to commerce and industry and to the military, there has not been a commensurate contribution of technology to education. 
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
8 answers
Many refugee camps exist for decades, by creating a self- organized and multicultural society.
The particular environment faced by refugee entrepreneurs in camp (different regulatory and statutory condition from the host community; limited freedom of movement; economic assistance from international organization), make their experience substantially different from other entrepreneurs. Many refugee camps are kept trapped without adequate access to basic rights, including employment, mobility and education, over a long period of time. The lack of functioning markets, inefficient legal and political systems, and poor infrastructure are the three institutional barriers to RCE (De la Chaux, 2015). Despite these limitations, refugees’ camps are characterized by proliferation of many business activities.
Relevant answer
Answer
You can read this interesting book, even it is quite an old one :
Dusenge V., Sibomana R. (2004) Auto-organisation des réfugiés dans les camps à l'Est du Zaïre (1994-1996), Namur (Belgium) : Presses universitaires de Namur.
Also an article :
Contal M. H., Revedin J., Vers une nouvelle éthique pour l'architecture et la ville, Sustainable Design, Vol. 1-2-3-4. 2011-2014-2016.
Finally, many humanitarian associations have done some empirical researches, even it is not scientific ones, it could be really usefull. For example, in Calais and Dunkirk (North of France), many expériences have been made, i.e. in Calais's jungle.
Hope it could help you,
Christophe Gibout
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
19 answers
I am working on the impact of intercultural communication competence on the performance of multicultural teams :the role of conflict management,.i need so badly to read more about intercultural communication competence,the conflict management and the performance of multicultural teams ,so i think that any interesting article or book or a measuring scale of one of those concepts can really help me.
So far i have found  an inetresting study of Alexei V.Matveev ,2002,The perception of intercultural  communication competence by American and Russian managers with experience on multicultural teams.
Relevant answer
Answer
There are many aspects of communication which differ from culture to culture, including how loud we talk, the directness with which we speak, how much emotion we express in various situations, the rules for turn taking, the use or avoidance of silence, and many non-verbal aspects of communication like posture, eye contact, proximity, touching, tone of voice, etc. that occur almost totally beneath our conscious awareness. It is clear that communication patterns develop very differently in individualistic and in group-oriented cultures. With the increased globalization of workplace settings across most industries, today’s managers need a more precise understanding of intercultural communication in an effective management strategy. it is important to have a plan in place and keep these points in mind:
1 Know Your Team: 2. Do Your Homework: 3. The Platinum Rule:
Skilled professionals who are leaders in their field can provide not only the knowledge, but the personal experience to make the concepts come alive.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
15 answers
I need to come up with an inventory of scenarios where the white are in advantage compared to people of color in Australia.
Relevant answer
Answer
You might have a look at my book below where here are a number of comparative figures regarding different areas (Education, Health, Employment, etc). And an article in attach published in Ute Eickelkamp (ed.) Growing Up in Central Australia: New Anthropological Studies of Aboriginal Childhood and Adolescence, Oxford, Berghahn Books : 239-272. ISBN hardback 978-0-85745-082-1 ; ebook 978-0-85745-083-8
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
2 answers
Celebrating diversity seems to be the buzz word world-wide and is used in every sector of life.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
13 answers
Fearon and Alesina et al. analysed these concepts and constructed some indices on these subjects. However, none of the values of the indices are not up to date now. I need more recent data. Thanks for your responses... 
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Nezhart;
Please follow the Hofstede centre, it is operated by itim International, a network based consultancy with the endorsement of Prof Geert Hofstede on the field of the Cultural dimension theory, Hofstede conducted one of the most comprehensive studies of how values in the workplace are influenced by culture.
For more detailed, see the following link and maybe they could be of your interest:
Best regards
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
5 answers
I teach an undergraduate Education and Learning Theory course and tend to present those theorists that have had an impact on my life - Dewey, Gardner, Glasser. I am looking for theorists that are more representative of the diversity of students on our campus.
Relevant answer
Answer
I would echo Ivo Carneiro de Sousa's suggestion to reflect on your question and set against the critical perspective offer by Frieire - sometimes now we cite him but do not engage with him and there has never been a greater need to engage critically with scholarship in an isomorphically homogenised world of learning and culture!
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
13 answers
The multicultural approach attempts to create unity through difference, holding that although a nation's subcultures are diverse, those subcultures share common values. In terms of legal policy, Canada was one of the first nations with an official multicultural act and they are an officially bilingual nation, using both English and French. Cultural assimilation is a process of consistent integration whereby members of an ethno-cultural group are "absorbed" into an established, generally larger community. This presumes a loss of many characteristics of the absorbed group. The two approaches are quite different. The contrasts between them are often given comparative analysis in France (assimilation) and Britain  (multiculturalism). The world continually refers back to these two case studies in order to weigh the pros and cons of these two social models. With both countries holding tight to these different models and with other countries diverging in their  choice between them, the debate continues to be hotly contested and highly important to how societies deal with diversity in an attempt to construct the best, healthiest, safest, most dynamic, and most productive nation and world.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Kiran, I am not sure whether "multiculturalism" and "assimilation" are "models". I think that "multiculturalism" is mainly a demographic expression that accounts for the cultures that exist in a "mixed" community. In fact, I understand that "multiculturalism" does not even mean that people are "trapped" in their culture forever in a sort of cultural ghetto. Assimilation is a description of how a person comes into another culture and adopts its characteristics. It is probably an individual thing, more that a community thing. Assimilation is usually necessary insofar as a foreigner needs to learn the language, enough of the cultural traits of his or her new community. etc. But those "negotiations" need not constitute a change from one culture to the other. 
Best regards, Lilliana 
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
8 answers
I live in a small urban community north of Detroit, Michigan where there are growing multicultural communities. It is my desire to create a program that will change the dynamics from Multicultural to Intercultural. Has anyone done this before and what model can we use?
Relevant answer
Answer
Contemporary societies are complex and the role of education is changing as a consequence of societal Change.  Multiculturalism describes the existence, acceptanceof multiple cultural  traditions within a single jurisdiction usually considered in terms of the culture associated with an ethnic group. Many people living within multicultural and plural societies are pluricultural. Pluricultural individuals are people with the competences of knowledge, disposition and linguistic and behavioral skills required to function as a social actor within two or more cultures.. Interculturality refers to the capacity to experience and analyze cultural otherness, and to use this experience to reflect on matters that are usually taken for granted within one’s own culture and environment. Interculturality finally involvesevaluating one’s own everyday patterns of perception, thought, feeling and behaviour in order to develop greater self-knowledge and self-understanding. Interculturality thus enables people to act as mediators among people of different cultures, to explain and interpret different perspectives. Interculturality does not involve identifying with another cultural group or adopting the cultural practices of the other group. Interculturality entails a number of underlying cognitive, affective and behavioural competences. These include knowledge ( knowledge about other cultural groups and their products and practices and knowledge about the ways in which people of different cultures interact), attitudes (such as curiosity, openness, respect for otherness, and empathy), skills of interpreting and  relating (for example, interpreting a practice from another culture and relating it to practices within one’s own culture), skills of discovery (such as the ability to search out and acquire new knowledge about a culture and its practices and products), and critical cultural awareness (that is, the ability to evaluate critically the practices and products of one’s own and other cultures). An intrinsic aspect of analyzing intercultural social activity is the reflective process of relating new knowledge to one’s own self-understanding and values. Sensitivity is an important element in attempting to understand another's way of life, but part of the reflective process is to relate new understanding to one’s own values and beliefs with tolerance and respect for those of others. It involves a positive attitude towards diversity, seeing the meeting between people with different beliefs and cultural practices as enriching for all, and seeing one’s own individuality as being developed through meeting ‘otherness’. This is the process of intercultural dialogue which underpins the achievement of social cohesion.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
66 answers
In another thread on the issue of International Human Rights law that has proven very popular, I have noticed that the discussion has degenerated into a a quasi-vitriolic exchange between pro versus anti-immigration sentiments. My question is this: given the incendiary rhetoric, particularly in Europe, concerning immigration, is it possible, for purposes of formal academic analysis to separate the wider problem of immigration from the narrower, and more technical issue, of multi-culturalism? That is, to what extent is it possible to discuss and analyze the question of movements of peoples across borders (a universal phenomenon within World History) as a separate issue from the managerial, technocratic, bureaucratic and bio-power dimensions of the social engineering process known as multi-culturalism, which seems to be wholly unique to Western Europe, North America, and Australasia?
Relevant answer
Answer
I think that Canada and Australia wanted to avoid the empty concept in place in Britain and therefore their definitions and policies are much more developed, after all these are countries that needed migrants but they had to think well how to choose their citizens (and they implemented points-based systems for a reason - to evaluate human capital skills).
What is valid for cheap labour is also valid for international students or jobs in the US going to China and India. Some research papers have pointed out that there were excellent foreign students among terrorists in the UK and US. The same goes for some regulations in the US regarding aviation pilots because it is easy to start such a course, no matter one's status.
Multiculturalism is not as positive as it sounds but the receiving country is also responsible for security, selection and business (incl. universities) compliance with local and national laws. 
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
3 answers
Is there any potentiality in Law - Morality relation to be reconsidered and revisited to achieve better social integrations in Western Europe?
Relevant answer
Answer
Reflection on the Law - Morality relation as a way to rethink basic goals of Law. In other words, the question is did we reach full potentiality of Law as strictly positive rules without taking moral dimensions in account? What is the place of values in creating Law rules especially when we have in mind anticipating dimension of Law. Can we answer the contemporary challenges without revisting that complexed relation of Law and Morals?
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
5 answers
My research is on the socialisation of international students in seminars and I'm collecting data via classroom observation. From the classroom observations, I obtained two types of data which are the field notes and recordings which I have transcribed. 
Thanks! 
Relevant answer
Answer
I agree with the general comments that of course you can use thematic analysis.
I also agree with David's comment that one should start analysing observational data immediately.  There are two aspects to that.  During the observation of events you will notice connections and questions  that you will forget if you don't make a note of them immediately. It's a good idea to have a column for themes and questions in your field notes. Second, if you  review your field notes straight away, within a few hours of the events, you will make more connections and see themes you had not noticed during the observation phase but that you will forget if you don't make a note of them.  Perhaps more importantly the questions and themes help sensitize you to issues you may need to pay attention to in later observation.    Indeed as Malinowski pointed out, you need to start organising and putting down your ideas as soon as possible because it is only when you do so you realise that you have missed hugely important questions and issues.
"To anyone who reflects on the subject it will be clear that the information about a phenomenon of such high complexity and of so many ramifications, could not be obtained with any degree of exactitude and completeness without a constant interplay of constructive attempts and empirical checking. In fact I have written up an outline of the Kula institution at least half a dozen times while in the field …"  (1972: 13) 
You have to start thinking about the meanings and themes straight away. Indeed Malinowski organised his material into thematic tables and kinship diagrams as son as possible an then kept testing and re-working them.
See also
Caulley, D. Qualitative Methodology: Qualitative Data Analysis in Program Evaluation. Evaluation News and Comment, 3, 2, 68-73.
Bogdan, Robert C, & Biklen, Sari K 1982, Qualitative Research for Education: An Introduction to Theory and Methods, Allyn and Bacon, Boston.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
6 answers
Today’s marketplace is in search for more than single specialized graduates. Jobs opportunities are offered to individuals that are ready to solve problems in innovative ways and who are competent in working with multicultural and multidisciplinary teams. A contextualized curriculum will aid students, through cooperation, to fully embody the complexity of their world.
Is this the kind of education that will give students the tools to constantly adapt and innovate in this kind of world?
Relevant answer
Answer
I don't necessarily agree that Jobs are "offered" (your term) based on education. Here's a really interesting editorial (with very good links) (though the point is arguing agains STEM obsessions, I think it relates well to your question).  http://www.dailycal.org/2014/03/07/employability-myth-humanities/ - and the author makes the point that, "Part of the reason college graduates of any major are having difficulty getting steady work of any kind is because all young people (with or without a college degree) can’t find employment all that easily. This salient detail is lost on many in the business world"
The author sums up the argument as, "“It doesn’t really matter what you major in at college; what’s important is where you go to school and what you want to do for a living.”"
You may also find the "anti-meritocracy" discourses useful - e.g., http://ojs.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/article/view/3302
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
12 answers
The focus of current research I am involved in is connecting processes of intercultural communication to the learning that takes place (or doesn't) as a result of intercultural interactions. I find that while there is much written about IC communication there is far less on IC learning.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Fran,
Thanks for starting an interesting conversation topic. I am currently working on my PhD which looks at how young people engage with interculturality in their everyday lives. My understanding is that intercultural communication is mainly dealt with in the fields of applied linguistics and sociolinguistics and intercultural learning is studied in the field of education. So my impression is that scholars of intercultural communication focus on language use whereas it is conspicuously absent from discussions of intercultural learning. With regards to the distinction between intercultural communication and intercultural learning, I am dealing with something similar. I’m working with the term ‘thinking diversity’ to describe critical understandings of self and Other that don’t necessarily involve interpersonal interaction, and ‘living diversity’ to describe interacting successfully with Others that does not involve the kind of critical reflection and understandings generated by ‘thinking diversity’. When the two are enacted simultaneously I think of it as ‘doing interculturality’. I’d be interested to hear your thoughts on this.
.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
83 answers
Currently, some political candidates in the United States have done their best to further alienate the world-wide Muslim Community.   What can we do as social scientists (and U.S. citizens) to neutralize the effects of crazy candidates like Donald Trump?
Relevant answer
Answer
I appreciate your concern in this regard . Just as Donald Trump does not represent  all Americans , the extremists don't represent all Muslims, I wonder why it needs to be emphasized so much. Its not that complicated . I really loved the way Pres.Obama expressed his concern on the issue during his recent visit to a mosque, that's how other enlightened social scientists can reach out as well.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
19 answers
In favour of cultural egalitarianism and the insistence to retain what is termed 'cultural heritage(s)', many researchers (philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, and others in the humanities) resist the views of critics from 'outside' their culture(s). Most of the time, the basis for the resistance of the critical and reconstructive demands/ views of the 'cultural-outsider' is akin to the central arguments of Thomas Nagel in his "What is it like to be a Bat?" The arguments of those who resist the contributions of the reconstructive critics from the outside is that every culture has its subjective uniqueness. This resistance is consolidated, at the surface, by the idea that cultures vary, that worldviews vary (some even argue that worldviews are incommensurable), and that as long as multiculturalism respects cultures and peoples - as the opposite of the principles that defined and sustained colonialism - then, it is the best approach to cultures.
However: granted that multiculturalism introduces mutual respect for/among cultures, I am wondering whether the same principle (multiculturalism) necessarily invalidates the framework that  sustains cross-cultural criticism/ evaluation. Should the merits of multiculturalism be stretched beyond mutual respect for cultures and people, to include a faulty assessment of every situation of cultural criticism as intentional cultural humiliation and attempt to re-enact cultural hegemony?
Relevant answer
Answer
I think it depends on what you exactly mean by "Multicuturalism". On the one hand you have respect and equity for all cultures, with all having equitable access to resources.Then you have the coalition building/breaking (depends on the identity) colorblind Multiculturalism which says everyone is equal (not equitable) and has equal opportunities, and US identity politics. This 2nd outlook attempts to negate the histories of the Maafa, colonialism and Manifest Destiny by claiming an equal playing field for hard workers, ignoring the intersectionality of an individual that allow or deny one economic and political equity. 
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
22 answers
My Ph D supervisor who is a sociologist, is asking me to consider Giddens' concept of reflexivity in analysing migration phenomenon. I don't have a sociology back ground, but from the initial reading it seems to me that it does make sense to assume that migrants do make a "reflexive assessment" of the opportunities related to migration. However, I don't think that this is a process that should apply only to middle class skilled migrants who want to change their lifestyle. In ultime analysis all migrants being these  unskilled or not, low or upper income, move because they make an assessment of their current situation and believe that they will be better off in another place
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Bruno,
I apologise for my tardy response - from a Giddensian perspective you are correct in saying that the 'migrant' is the agent and the 'outside' is the structure. But it is important to define the 'outside'. The 'outside' could be seen as a macro-level structure - i.e. the erction of borders by governments which reinforce what migrants do at the agency level. But also, the 'outside' could be interpreted at a meso-level structure: that is, the interaction of the migrant (agent) in relation to their wider social group (structure) which co-constitutionally reproduces the norms, values and customs of what the migrant does or does not do.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
15 answers
I am conducting a study on intercultural partnerships/marriages/cohabiting couples, and I am wondering where can I go to find participants? They need to be two individuals from different cultures or of different nationalities (e.g. Chinese-American, Colombian-Peruvian, Russian-Mexican...), preferably living in Florida, but will also consider anywhere in the world if they have access to Skype. I am putting out flyers in different places and an online add, but would appreciate any suggestions. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Lucia,
For cohabiting couples I think universities will be an effective way to reach intercultural couples. In particular universities in Eastern U.S. and Canada will likely get you significant numbers of potential participants. The Central Canadian Universities below have both high levels of international students and are multiethnic populations - student associations, depts. of Psych etc. are first line contacts: 
Carleton University: www.carleton.ca
McMaster University: www.mcmaster.ca
University of Ottawa: www.uottawa.ca/welcome.html
Queen’s University: www.queensu.ca
Ryerson University: www.ryerson.ca
University of Toronto: www.utoronto.ca
York University: www.yorku.ca
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
14 answers
Researchers recently focus on studies for developing growth mindset in schools. A review of the literature suggests the processes and variables involved in a growth school mindset may be similar to those that develop a group open to a multicultural view in schools. Does anyone have articles referencing studies connecting multicultural views in schools or ESL teacher development with Dweck's concepts of growth school mindset? Thank you in advance.
Relevant answer
Answer
Omar,
I write to thank you for sharing your special references with me. I have read much though not all of the resources since one is quite lengthy (1700 pages). I paste a notable quote from one regarding the Prophets teachings:
 He taught that there is one God for all mankind.
 He taught Muslims to believe in all of the prophets and all divinely revealed scriptures, especially Biblical ones.
 As the Prophet established a peace sanctuary called Madinah after his migration from Makkah, he negotiated treaties with the Jews and the pagans of Madinah. Muslims consider these treaties to be the first written surviving constitution in the world. The constitution guaranteed freedom of religion, self-governance, and legal autonomy in all matters. It called for the common defense of Madinah, and declared the Jews, pagans, and Muslims of that treaty to be one nation, or “one Ummah.”
 He prohibited hunting and the cutting of trees in the peace sanctuary of Madinah.
 He declared killing non-combatants to be illegal, placed severe restrictions on how warfare could be conducted, and even paid compensation for the killing of some dogs by one of his commanders.
 The Prophet’s teachings and the Quran are the two major sources of Sharia. Some of his precepts include the following:
  • o Moral behavior: personal cleanliness; emphasis on preservation and nourishment of all life forms, including plants and animals; rituals and spirituality of prayers; fasting and charity; righteous conduct and good deeds; and rights of parents, children, spouses, and neighbors.
  • o Interpersonal relations: teaching to enhance human relations and to avoid breaking relationships; encouraging mutual consultation in all affairs; prohibiting bigotry and racism; and emphasizing kindness and hospitality toward others, especially the weak and the poor.
  • o Financial guidelines: encouraging charity, rights of the poor, respect for workers, and rejection of exploitation; and circulation of wealth among all classes.
  • o Personal rules and laws regarding privacy, gender relations, marriage, divorce, and inheritance.
  • o Criminal laws implementing the many of the Ten Commandments. (The only one of the Ten Commandments not having a parallel statement in the Quran is the one having to do with keeping the Sabbath.) Less than two percent of Quranic verses deal with the criminal law of Islam, which is a part of the Sharia but not the totality of it.
 The Prophet asked his judges to make things easy for people, not difficult.
 He declared all sins forgivable as long as a person asks God’s forgiveness and that of the one who has been wronged.
 The Prophet gave special emphasis to honoring treaties, standing up for justice, and opposing oppression. (Mjahid, 2011, pp.2 &3).
Gratefully,
Janet
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
7 answers
What practices and challenges need to be considered for multicultural group psychotherapy?
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Ashley,
Cultural competence (including self-awareness, knowledge and skills) is required. The following resources may interest you:
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
6 answers
Globalisation and cross-border movement of labor has given rise to workforces where differences in nationalities, cultures, traditions, customs, religions, languages, economies and social structures play a crucial role while flexible labor policies provide organisations with access to global talent. In addition, the large movement of populations from East to West due to continuing wars as well as the existing European strategies of protecting immigrants strengthens the existence and spread of multicultural workplaces. Thus, it is evident that the need for multicultural awareness and sensitivity becomes imperative. To this vein, how a multicultural team performs within an Organisation and in its relationships with other organisations, their groups and teams is of great value.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you Arhan for your answer. Actually Hofstede's model is included in my literature review and partly I have integrated some parts in the model I am proposing. I was just wondering whether there was a newer model, more "applicable" like the one I am proposing, and in parallel a model that helps organisations to benchmark their capabilities of managing multicultural issues within them. Thanks a lot for your contribution.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
38 answers
Student course evaluations do not usually ask for the student's ethnicity (cultural group with which student identifies e.g., African American). But, if they don't, chances are that the aggregate (sum of the different sources of data) data on course evaluations could mean course improvements in favor of the majority group. What are your thoughts?
Many thanks,
Debra
Relevant answer
Answer
The Arts and Sciences course evaluation was created to help you develop professionally as a teacher. Questions on the evaluation focus on student engagement, which is essential for successful learning, as well as instructor performance. Well-designed courses create a structured but open-ended environment that encourages students to take primary responsibility for their learning, motivates and facilitates their continued engagement, and offers them ample opportunities for assessment of and reflection on their progress. 
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
4 answers
The issue of race has been evaded in the field of Library and Information Studies (LIS) in the United States through an unquestioned system of white normativity and liberal multicultural discourse. To counteract these paradigms, this paper draws from various scholarly writings about race and racial
formation in order to center race as the primary axis of analysis in the reinterpretation of major theoretical issues in LIS. Beginning with an analysis of the historical construction of libraries as an institution complicit in the production and maintenance of white racial privilege and then turning
toward present-day discourses surrounding diversity and multiculturalism, this paper discusses at length the epistemological forms of racism that exist in LIS.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Edwin, you put it in a good and necessary context. I agree.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
62 answers
Can we have an education system that prepares young minds to be TOLERANT of other cultures and religions?  Can we have an education system that teaches our young people to ACCEPT DIFFERENCES?  
When I searched for papers on changes in education policies, this was the best match, but it’s just an abstract.  (I have asked for the full text.)
Relevant answer
Answer
It's because RG is a melting pot of cultures that I can ask such a question here.  We have different backgrounds, but many of us are not antagonistic to people who differ.  We know something about the contents of the books of faith of our friends.  We know that each one cannot help but be different. 
 We accept our RG friends.  We don’t downvote when others tell us something in their holy book.  We make it an opportunity to learn.  We ACCEPT our differences.  How can we transmit this tolerance and acceptance to our students who MUST LIVE IN A MULTICULTURAL GLOBAL VILLAGE?
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
15 answers
Monocultural nationalism illustrated by the rise of populist anti immigrant sentiment and political rhetoric in some EU states has been fuelled by the recent economic downturn.
Relevant answer
Answer
Particularly I perceive this issue by the prism and lenses of constitutional pluralism. I agree with modern scholars who are indicated that pluralism is more suitable concept than multiculturalism to tackle all the contemporary challenges faced mankind globally. In the light of this thesis, I will offer you very comprehensive research paper published by Global Constitutionalism on 2013.
TURKULER ISIKSEL (2013). Global legal pluralism as fact and norm. Global
Constitutionalism, 2, pp 160-195 doi:10.1017/S2045381713000130
I deeply believe that this kind of perception of legal or constitutional ideas will help you to construe the robust framework for your paper and concretely to your answer.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
67 answers
The contemporary European model of nation-state is based on the ideology of one state, one nation and one language, so we can follow many conflicts involving nationalism and multiculturalism. How can we overcome this contradiction and to ensure equal rights for all? After all, multicultural environments, today and in the past (before the European model of nation-state), are a reality.
Relevant answer
Answer
My answer may seem to be unusual since I'll approach the subject from a chemist's bird's eyes. In chemistry, we used to classify catalysts into (2) types: (i) Homogeneous (which means that the catalyst exists in the same phase as reactants). (ii) Heterogeneous (which indicates that the catalyst exists in a phase different from the phases of the reactants). This classification went on for years & is still adopted in general introductory courses.
Recently, progress in the field of catalysis increased the types to (4). The two additional types are: (iii) Homogeneously heterogenized catalysts. (iv) Heterogeneously homogenized catalysts.
Now, apply types (iii & iv) to answer the question about co-existence between nationalism and multiculturalism within a national state setting and there ought to be a way out from what appears to be a paradox. Human intelligence can work out a satisfactory resolution which is good for all provided that earnest intentions prevail.  
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
52 answers
Whither multiculturalism?
How are we to best understand multiculturalism, and is it good or bad thing for each multi-ethnic country?
Though he applauds the encounters and broadening of the people of differing societies and cultural backgrounds as positive, Kenan Malik, a British intellectual of Indian background has recently offered the following criticism of what is called “political” or “state multiculturalism”
As a political process, however, multiculturalism means something very different. It describes a set of policies, the aim of which is to manage diversity by putting people into ethnic boxes, defining individual needs and rights by virtue of the boxes into which people are put, and using those boxes to shape public policy. It is a case, not for open borders and minds, but for the policing of borders, whether physical, cultural or imaginative.
---end quotation
Whether multiculturalism is a good or bad thing, Malik describes the division of opinion:
It's a question to which the answers have become increasingly polarised in recent years. For some, multiculturalism expresses the essence of a modern, liberal society. For others, it has helped create an anxious, fragmented nation.
---end quotation
See:
Relevant answer
Answer
Multiculturalism is the superior level of interactios between different cultures. When the guest and the local and the foreign know that all have knowledge and traditions to share and when tney knos each other le outcome is better for all
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
16 answers
The "openness" or "closeness" of public institutions vis a vis the actions undertaken by the migrant/ethnic entrepreneurs to transform the city would either allow such transformation to take place authentically or not allow it to take place. In such context:
  • How does cultural distance between immigrants and natives determine that "openness" or "closeness"?
  • Would the following assertions always hold true: "the higher the cultural distance, the higher the control" and "the lower the cultural distance, the lower the control"?
Thanks for sharing your thoughts!
Ralph
Relevant answer
Answer
(1). Comparatively, the homeland of an immigrant and  a native, if it is a devloping or developed state, is an important element in the creation of the balance versus dominance, in majority. (2). The background of the entrepeneure's previous experiences in this vicinity is essential. (3). The educational level and the status of the both sides in understanding the condition of each other is helpful. (4). The specific era for each ethnicity or culture in being or not being accepted by the international communities, is another historic factor. (5). The economical gap between the immigrant and native could open another avenue of possiblities, especially if there is an educational difference exists in between.             
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
6 answers
I'm interested in Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) and the Latin American culture.  As I was searching for information, I came across Dimensional Accrual and Dissociation (DAD) Theory studied within the Latin American culture.  I have to do more research on DAD but would like to know in what capacity could these two theories be studied together?  Is anyone working on either theory and the Latin American culture?
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
37 answers
How can a teacher be able to get international students engaged in a class if they are a minority, especially if the course is deeply on a culture completely different from theirs? Has anybody tackled the relationship between teaching and anthropology? 
Relevant answer
Answer
Let it not be an assumption that international minority students are lacking something in their lives and need to be engaged only for them to 'catch up' with their home national counterparts. In fact, the question should rather be, how can we translate the rich experiences of international students into their new environment to help us--faculty and students learn from them? In fact, international students already possess many of the 21st century skills required for the job place which many of us don't possess. Some of the listed skills are, for example, cultural resilience, adaptability, cross-cultural communication, and critical analysis. It demands a lot of resilience to leave one's home; being in a foreign country demands adaptability; cross-cultural communication is what is a challenge to every international student; and, it takes critical analysis for the international student to navigate through life daily in a foreign country. So, now back to your answer. First, we can engage international students by respecting the skills that they possess and making them to know that we're willing to learn from them, that is, we're willing for them to engage us in learning because they have a lot that we don't have. Secondly, nobody learns from a stranger who does not respect your integrity and therefore it's left to us to stop being strangers to our international students, that is, we should let them know that we care for them and we respect their integrity. So, it's time for us to start learning from international students.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
7 answers
I need information on these issues and their conceptual relationship.
Relevant answer
Answer
Following some of the most important thinkers on those issues (that is Zizek/Jameson and the Group Modernity/Coloniality), it is important to keep in mind that multiculturalism and the dialogue of different groups in society is always something where political power is at work - however, not always in a visible fashion. Hermeneutics could be a good way to trace the discursive position of those terms and the practices and politics they imply - for instance: the modern nation state with its ideology of "one people, one language, one state" is in a harsh crisis. One result is the emergence of discourses on dialogue as a necessity in society and multiculturalism as a renewed ideology of integration of "the other". So, the terms you put in your question are related to a renewal of the nation state.
  • asked a question related to Multiculturalism
Question
20 answers
The notion of race is contentious, and, yet, with the manifestation of racism it is clear that researchers cannot pretend that the social construction of race--peoples' lived realities based on race, not the biological configurations previously used to create a scientific hierarchy--does not exist. How should researchers address this sensitive conundrum? Should researchers identify their racial affiliations, and underscore the pertinence of such demographic information, or should they just ask for the information without providing such background? Or should the topic be avoided, and no data gathered? What are the ethical, moral and professional responsibilities of researchers conducting research on race or on topics that involve a racial dimension, which includes most social science research? Having conducted several studies related to the experiences, perceptions and perspectives of educators in relation to democracy and education, in which I and the research group have included demographic questions on gender, birth place, parental occupation, educational experience, and racial origin among other variables, we have found that it would be irresponsible to not try and understand how racialization may or may not play a role in how one experiences democracy, for example, regardless of the context. Our research has confirmed that the usually 15% or so of each sample (of which there have been many in Canada, the USA, Australia and about a dozen countries around the world) which is non-White presents us with some interesting insight into experiences with normative, relativistic and hegemonic notions of democracy. I would be interested to know how colleagues address this issue, and the importance of signifying racial positions, identities and postures.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dr. Carr: