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Motivational Interviewing - Science topic

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Huge and vague inquiry from a non-professional active in mental health social work: I have read that there is not much evidence for the value of "I-messages." This leads me to ask about a lot of things I use:
-mindfulness in trauma reactions-
-reflective listening/validation-response
-challenging questions to people [in therapy, although I am not a therapist]
-I-statements/I messages
-Broken-record technique to avoid arguments
-Application of motivational interviewing to misinformation, e.g. "I don't want to have therapy because only crazy people need therapy."
-very simple screening questions
-scaling questions
-miracle questions
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Sorry: figure of resilience
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I would like to carry out a research based on Motivational interview skill application by trained staffs and if the method used was effective or no, in changing the lifestyle behaviour of the population. but i do not know how to go about it as there are nurses and doctors who are trained but due to challenges if they are applying their knowledge to practice. i want to do this research because despite many interventions the NCD rate for Fiji continues to increase, therefore I feel there is a need to change peoples mindset towards their lifestyle behaviour.
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This is interesting. You can observe the practice of doctors and nurses and establish whether what they do is in fact motivational interviewing and take it from there.
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I am looking for an evidence-based guideline for motivational interviewing in the context of behavioral mental health. I am planning on conducting research for this topic as I finish my doctorate program. I am particularly looking for guidelines that have to do with anxiety and depression. Can anyone recommend sources to me?
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Does anyone know a study on motivational interviewing applied to families in the field of socio-educational intervention?
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Hi Rosario,
Our team used a MI-based approach in the context of peer-support for breastfeeding, which was a really interesting experience. There is a real challenge with using MI with educational approached, and what we found in practice is that peer-supporters slip back into information giving when working with mothers, which is not consistent with the MI style, which should be far more about guiding people through their own thought processes. Women did like the person-centred aspects of MI though, so it can be a useful method when working with families, providing we have a good understanding of what MI does and doesn't do. These articles may be of interest to you:
Kind regards,
Rhiannon
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I am looking for research using motivational interviewing in hospice symptom management. Thank you!
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Susan-
Thank you for your response! I recently completed a single-day MI HETI training, and have been reading several books to understand MI methods. I am also a hospice nurse, though I recently left clinical practice. I agree that MI methods and/or spirit are especially appropriate in the hospice context!
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With growing use and acceptance of MI in the health care community, I still hear a lot of "yeah, but's" related to an ablity to use this skill in health care. I would like to understand better what the issues are. Thanks!
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A motivating interview is a technique in which you become an assistant in the change process and expresses your acceptance of the customer. A motivating interviewer must go with strong intent, clear strategies and skills to achieve this goal and lack of timing in critical moments. The general five principles that must be kept in mind are express empathy through reflective listening, conflict between customers' goals or values ​​and their current behaviour, avoiding arguments and direct confrontations, adapt to customer resistance rather than directly opposing it, and supporting self-efficacy and optimism. Know that you are not changing or managing your client, but rather making it easy or helping your customers change. These include learning skills in motivation areas such as; communicating customer respect, acceptance and emotions, encouraging an unbeatable and cooperative relationship, giving you the opportunity to be a solid and knowledgeable consultant or practitioner, sincerely favours pleasure rather than smashing, listening rather than tells persuades him or her to understand that the change decision is customer support and support throughout the restoration process. Finally, do know when to close the conversation.
Asking open questions will help you understand from the point of view of your customers and help customers make the most of the speaking in MI counselling. Open questions facilitate dialogue, they cannot be answered with a single word or phrase, and they do not require any specific answer.
Barriers:
Learning and Practicing MI is effective for many practitioners because it requires a new way of thinking and behaviour.
The organisation of treatment processes, staff and capacity can prevent MI.
There is the need for more training skills in the MI area.
Because of the heavy workload, there is no time.
MI techniques take longer than traditional methods.
The higher the depth of the customer relationship with the service provider, the better advice is, if the service providers receive only one or two sessions with their client, this may not be enough to maximize the impact.
Customer feedback plays an important role in assessing the quality and quantity of MI professionals.
Practitioners uses of MI are not effective unless there is recognition that an important health problem must be resolved.
Benefits:
Practitioners feel more confident using MI with clients who have health compromising behaviours and or risks that the practitioners feel they have expertise in.
It possesses a theoretical base rather than simply being a collection of techniques.
MI points out that a good relationship where customers are considered as an expert in their own life tends to minimise the resilience of change and thus increase motivation.
Its job satisfactory when practitioners aim and objectives are achieved.
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Training to be applied in some study of force/torque sensing grippers
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Thank you. I actually have a basis in Electronics and Microcontroller but not practical enough
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We used structural equation modelling with latent variables using items indicators for our analyses. Given the sample size and the complexity of the model, the use of structural equation modeling using parcels/packets as indicators might be a good alternative. Although I have read some disadvantages about parceling, I would like to give it a try. However, I cannot find a tutorial or something similar that explains step by step how to use parceling in mplus. Does anyone have a suggestions?
Thank you very much and kind regards,
Noud Frielink
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Dear Noud,
You can use the DEFINE command to create parcels within MPlus. 
For example with three items:
DEFINE:
parcel1 = (item1 + item2 + item3)/3
Than add this new variable in the USEVARIABLES ARE line behind all wihtim data set variables u use in your model and it should work.
Best
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Dual role- Therapist abiding by the spirit of MI at the same time being on a multi-disciplinary team that confrontation is used frequently to point out substance use.
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Hi John,
This is challenging because your program appears to use an AA disease model with confrontation as one of its main interventions, whereas MI is much more supportive and collaborative.
In response to your question, I have these ideas:
  • As long as your program permits the use of MI, you'd use confrontation with some clients when it's most appropriate, and use MI with others when it fits them.
  • In the best interest of some of your clients, you may integrate the two approaches in a sequential manner if necessary.  
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I have thought of 8 session Relapse Prevention module and Motivational Interviewing module already.
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You might want to check out this book:  Cognitive-Behavioural Integrated Treatment (C-BIT): A Treatment Manual for Substance Misuse in People with Severe Mental Health Problems
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In 2015 we will have coordinated 25 years of monitoring nocturnal owl populations, and have data on volunteer participation frequency. I would like to send a questionnaire to assess or analyze motivation of volunteers to seek correlated variables and reasons why some people participated only once, while others did so enthusiastically year after year.
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Thanks very much Steven,
I have shared these resources with my honors thesis student.
Cheers, Jim
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I am wondering what is known about possible characteristics (e.g. demographics) of clients/ patients that influence the receptivity of persons to MI counseling.
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Thanks for your interesting question, Rolinde. I appreciated the input from John, Vera-Christina, and Sylvia.
I agree with you on that MI can be applied to a variety of populations (e.g., those with substance-related disorders). It can be used well with the Stages of Change (SOC). In my clinical experience, it is very challenging to use MI alone with those suffering from severe and persistent mental disorders such as schizophrenia, and psychoeducation and supportive therapy would do much better with them.
I came across this article which may be of interest to you:
Motivational Interviewing: A potential framework for co-occurring disorders treatment for adolescents. Please click the attached link for the article.
Best,
Stephen
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Nowadays, more and more attention is paid to the importance of assessing MI therapist/ counselor fidelity. Various instruments have been developed to assess MI fidelity, including the MITI, MISC and BECCI. In addition, Madson et al., have developed the CEMI questionnaire in order to assess the client experiences of MI.
Interestingly, I could hardly find any information about the therapist/counselor experiences with their own MI consultations. In other words, is a trained MI therapist/counselor able to correctly classify a conversation as a 'good MI conversation' or a 'bad conversation'? In addition, I could not find a self-assessment instrument to measure the experiences of the therapist/counselor with his/her own level op MI skills.
Therefore, I am wondering if somebody knows more about the possibility of trained MI therapists/counselors to assess their own MI skills correctly. And whether any research has been done on the relationship between such subjective experiences and the (more) objectively measured MI fidelity.
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Dear all, thank you for your replies to my question. In the meantime, I have searched in the literature for relevant evidence on the possibility of counselors/therapists to assess their own MI skills. I have found relevant information in an article of Miller et al (2001/2004). They suggest that counselors' self-report of their MI skills is inaccurate and unrelated to ratings by skilled coders. 
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Psychotherapists
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Take a look at URICA:
McConnaughy, E.N., Prochaska, J.O., & Velicer, W.F. (1983). Stages of change in psychotherapy: Measurement and sample profiles. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 20, 368-375.
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We are looking at predicting adherence to medical and behavioral health care recommendations among individuals with metabolic syndrome. I'm curious if anyone might be able to provide personal insight into specific indicators (behavioral or otherwise) that have been effective/reliable in quantifying the construct of treatment adherence?
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Successful management requires identification and addressing both root cause, barrier. Patient vary considerably in their readiness and capacity. Success can be defied as better quality of life. greater self esteem. higher energy level etc. There is an approach for obesity management from Canadian obesity network: www.obesitynetwork.ca
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What is the process of motivational interviewing?
Is there any example for conducting it?
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Motivational Interviewing has specific steps called OARS  O=openended questions. Questions asked of a clief always require a narrative or descriptive answer and cannot be answered by a simple yes or no. A=affirmation meaning giving the client credit in a objeective praiseworthy manner for answering questions and sharing information about the self and the psychosocial situation such as "Thank you for being so clear about your marital difficulties. You're displaying a lot of courage by t elling me what you feel." R = reflection meaning reflecting back to the client what the client has said so it is clear that what was said is accepted and understood. S = summary. periodically during the session summarize for the client where the two of you are in the process of the session, pulling things together so to speak. Use these steps and you have a motivational interviewing session. Doing it well takes a lot of practice.
It is help if you read the literature written by William R. Miller and Stephen Rollnick. Some of it is available on the Internet.
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I want to do distance learning online course on motivational interviewing and seek advise from people who have done it before.
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There is a good online interactive course through HealthSciences Institute that includes multiple types of learning activities and a formal assessment of a real play session, along with a skill-building session, using a validated, standardized tool. Full disclosure: I am on their advisory board, developed the course and also am paid as lead instructor so I'm definitely biased when I use the adjective "good". :-) Kidding aside, I have compared the proficiency outcomes of the online course (6-weeks long) with the traditional 2-day workshop plus follow-up webinars that I generally offer. A pilot study showed that the online course had a higher level of participants that reached the beginning threshold of proficiency (100% vs. 65%) but slightly more participants in the traditional workshop training reached higher levels of proficiency (24% vs 16%). Hope this helps!
Susan
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I need to conduct a health staff motivation survey in a rural district in Northern Mozambique. Are there any validated questionnaires? Where can I find them?
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Try public service motivation (Perry 1996). It uses four dimensions to measure the intrinsic motivation of those involved in public service. It has been used specifically in health sector in Spanish, Italian and American studies.