Science topic

Moths - Science topic

Moths are insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.
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Does it act as a visual deterrent for predators or serves a purpose in the body's physiological processes?
Also, is there any similarity between the Sphingidae caterpillars and the larvae of Trilocha varians (Bombycidae) which also has a horn-like structure in the larval stage ?
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The horn is absolutely not for defense. I’ve tried super hard to get hurt on the horn but the horn does nothing at all. It’s too floppy to do anything defense-related. I’m guessing it has something to do with sensory functions or tricking predators. This would be a cool capstone research project for anyone interested!
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Hello everybody, im currently writing my bachelor degree project, and im working with DNA polimorfism on plume moths (Pterophoridae) with two genera, theta, pi, hd, and S, my question is, how can i know where those values, for instance for tetha pi and hd are high or low? which crireria do i have to know? is there teoric fundament that explains a scale between 0-1?
my values for pi are : 0.015 and 0.08
for theta are: 0.015 and 0.029
and hd are : 0.833 and 0.892
i have read a lot of papers and they catalogue those values as low, but dont know with which criteria.
thank you so much for helping.
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Thank you so much for your answer Professor
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Common commercial Baciilus thuringiensis insecticides are only capable to control one group of insects (beetles, caterpillars, ...) depending on strain. I got offer to use product based on Bacillus thuringiensis var. Thuringiensis. with declared efficacy against spider mites, beetles and moths. Would this be possible? I'm suspicious of that.
You can find more information about this insecticide here:
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It is used efficiently with lepifopterean larvae because its mouth parts are biting
But spiders are not suitable for it because the parts of its mouth are piercing and sucking
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The Jamildes alecto continuous chasing and touch its abdomen on the upper and underside wings of the Moth several time when it resting on leaf surface.This continue more than 5 minutes. At last the moth escaped from Cerulean and hide underside of a leaf. What this phenomena? Experts please give answer .
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Any pictures to share with us...
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Dear Sir,
A 20-year-old woman presented with recurrent painful left auricular erosive plaque for 6 months with left sided cervical and submandibular lymphadenopathy for 5 moths. Her FNAC of lymph node result was lymphadenitis and IGRA test was positive for M tuberculosis. She denied open biopsy for cosmetic purpose. Can we start Cat-1 anti-tb medicine for her.
I need your valuable opinion.
With regards.
Dr. Md. Mostaque Mahmud, Asst. Professor, Dermatology & Venereology,
Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Attachment: Picture of the case (with consent of patient)
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Dear Md Mostaque Mahmud, thanks for asking the question which was solved earlier by prescribing anti-TB drugs cat-I. How is the patient doing now? Could you please share the follow up reports of the patient?
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I have collected apple leaf miner (moth) from Apple crop (Jammu & Kashmir). Which primers are the best for the molecular study of this moth?
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I agree with the comment of Dr N K Singh sir
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Hello everyone,
I am going to rear the European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana in the laboratory to study the biology of this moth and test some pesticides. In this time, I got a number of larvae from grape berries but all larvae dead when I feed them on new grape berries or grape juice. Does anyone know artificial media that I can use to rear this grapevine moth?
Thanks in advance for your suggestions!
Kind regards,
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Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella) is considered to be the most troublesome pest infesting stored products. Most control methods are suitable for places like storehouse. My stored rice in kitchen is infected with it, I'm looking for a good and safe way to control this pest
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Itz not through scientific base... But through experience.... Put sodium chloride in ball form.... And garlic... That will reduce both weevil and moths.... Keep the storage tank air tight..
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Most of the journals are asking for Bayesian interference in phylogenetic studies. However, performing the same requires high-performance computing which is not available at our place.
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One good phylogenetic analysis with plausible, clearly explained assumptions is sufficient. The trick is finding a method with plausible and clearly explainable assumptions that your reviewers, editor and audience agree upon. People like to run multiple analyses because if they get the same answer from different methods, this reduces their worry that they need to provide a justification for their methodological choice, and satisfies a greater diversity of people who favor alternative approaches for one reason or another. However, just like performing multiple statistical tests on a dataset does not increase the significance of the result, so running multiple phylogenetic analyses on a data set does not increase the chances that the answer is "true". See Rindal and Brower, 2011. Cladistics 27:331-334 (request a copy from my ResearchGate page).
The assumptions of phenetic and Bayesian analyses are quite different, by the way, and in my view, it is rather irresponsible just to run incompatible methods because you can. A better approach is to understand what you are doing, and pick a method that you can justify.
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The caterpillars of the moths were collected as fruitborers in pepper at a farmer. I reared them till the adults hatched and compared them with pictures and descriptions on the internet. Are these moths Spodoptera frugiperda? The caterpillars have different colors, but I did read that they can vary in color. The same caterpillars were also found inside bittermelon as fruit borers. Does anyone know if S. frugiperda really can be a fruit borer? I only found information that the older caterpillars act as borers in corn.
Compared with the descriptions on the internet, my caterpillars also have a Y-shape on their headcapsule. They also have the four spots at the end of their abdomen.
In the pictures you can see: 4 moths (presumably 2 females and 2 males); some caterpillars of different colors; the pupa; and eggs about to hatch.
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Yes it looks S. frugiperda.
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Dear Entomologists, I need to pick the swarm brain.
I'm planning to mark moths with fluorescent dust for better observation and recapturing at night. Can anybody provide experience with DNA extraction from insect marked with this kind of dust? Or point me towards suitable publications? I can't seem to find any. There is lots of mosquito marking, but without subsequent DNA extraction.
Thank you, swarm :-)
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@Patrick Gorring
Thanks for your answer and making me realize that my question is not clear. Should have seen this from David's answer already. My concern is the contamination of the extracted DNA with the pigments, not with DNA from unclean dust. In the past, we had trouble with eye pigments inhibiting PCR, for instance.
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I want to test a product to find out if it is a repellent for moth
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Spray or mix the sample on the food source of moth and allow them to navigate by keeping control in which only food alone given. Take the reading and compare the data.
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It was collected in Colombia, the larva sticks the leaves and feeds on coffee plants (Coffea arabica). It measures approximately 1 cm. Probably  genus Platynota sp.
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Agree with Houda Kawas
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Good day. I am working on collecting larvae samples of a saturnid moth (Imbrasia belina), of which i would like to use for DNA barcoding and SNP genotyping. How do i prepare the specimens to avoid contamination from the gut contents? do i have to degut the larvae prior to preserving in absolute ethanol? so as to extract good grade DNA?
Many thanks in advance..
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Thanks very much Sven Thatje ..that is so helpful. the larvae is about 5cm length, on average....so i believe i will get enough muscle tirrue from it.
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I am interested in the size of Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) and would like to know what is the smallest known species of this group of insects. It is probably a Nepticulidae (pigmy moths). The species in my figure below (unidentified) measures about 4 mm with the wings spread, and its dry body weight was 0.3 micrograms (0.03 mg).
We are generally more impressed by the higher figures (the oldest tree, the heaviest vertebrate…) than by the minima. Thus for instance one can read about the largest moths (Thysannia, Attacus: http://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu/walker/ufbir/index.shtml). However 'smallness' has interesting biological implications (see the recent book by A. Polilov 'At the Size Limit - Effects of Miniaturization in Insects'). I have seen descriptions of other nepticulids in the same range of size as 'my' species (around 4 mm: Dooren weerd et al.: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/syen.12212/full). Perhaps there are slightly smaller European species (some Stigmella spp., e.g.: http://lepiforum.de/lepiwiki.pl?Stigmella_Magdalenae).
So, does anybody know of any moth smaller than 3.5 / 4.0 mm?
Thanks!
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Dear Munira Nasiruddin,
Dear colleagues,
We kindly suggest, prior to providing your answers in this discussion, to read about results of the most recent study (attached above and in the current message). Do you know anything smaller among Lepidoptera than is mentioned in the paper? Let us know please if you possess such info. We can expect that there might be many more extremely small species in the tropics and subtropics.
So far, the minimal recorded forewing length was found to be around 1.2–1.3 mm and the wingspan around 2.6–2.8 mm in two families, the Gracillaridae and Nepticulidae. Among Lepidoptera, the following species have the smallest moths globally: the European Johanssoniella acetosae (Stainton), the Peruvian Simplimorpha kailai Stonis & Diškus, the Mexican Stigmella maya Remeikis & Stonis, the Mediterranean S. diniensis (Klimesh), the Mediterranean Parafomoria liguricella (Klimesh) (Nepticulidae), the South East Asian Porphyrosela alternata Kumata, and the Central African P. desmodivora De Prins (Gracillariidae) (see Stonis et al. 2021).
Kind regards,
Andrius
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The caterpillars of this moth were found in stems of Echinochloa polystachia grass as stem borers. The length of the caterpillars are something about 1.7 cm. I have compared images from the internet for identification and it looks me similar to Diatraea saccharalis. Is this correct?
In the pictures you can see: lateral and dorsal view of the moth; caterpillar; and the pupa
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yes, it is Diatrae saccharalis, the sugarcane borer, is a species of moth of the family Crambidae.
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Hi,
I would like a detailed explanation/photos/video
How to do it in moth?
(I work with Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugipreda larvae)
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Dear RG friends,
I am providing a complete H. armigera diet for larvae and maintaining the eggs in the growth chamber as well as in-room conditions. But since three months, eggs laid from the moths are not at all hatching. Could anyone tell the reason?
Thanking you.
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Dear Kariyanna B. you're welcome. Please also see this potentially useful article entitled
Rearing the Cotton Bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, on a Tapioca-Based Artificial Diet
This article is freely available as public full text on RG.
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Dear all
In this year, I have joined a research team focusing on how to rear larvae and moth of durian seed bore (Lepidoptera : Noctuoidae), for example : Mudaria luteileprosa Halloway and Canogethes punctiferalis frequently found durian cultivated in Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia, to be used for conducting a series of quarantine treatments on fresh durian. In initial steps, we need to collect massively those insects. Unfortunately, what we have seemingly efforted still far away to the target. We would highly appreciate if you could share the information about how to obtain those commercial mass-reared of durian seed bore and their artificial diets. Thank you very much before.
Kindly regards
Hendra Adi Prasetia
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Go through the previous literature and if you want to grow on commercial level please take care of infection during larval stage.
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Dear experts,
I want to culture Cloth moth (Tineola bisselliella) in India for evaluation repellency of some plant derived-oils against them. I really need help to find its Mother culture, if any research institute or scientist engaged in this study.
Would appreciate if anybody share their experience or approved method of rearing these moth under lab condition.
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Perhaps this paragraph extracted from the reference that I quote below will be useful for you:
" The eggs, larvae, pupae and adults of T. bisselliellu came from our rearing room (temperature, 20-25”C, relative humidity (r.h.), 40-60%). Insects were reared on pieces of rabbit skin in clear polyethylene boxes (18 cm x 12 cm x 7 cm) with ventilated lids. The total lifespan of T. bisselliellu is extremely variable in these conditions, which are natural for this synanthropic species. The lifespan depends on the temperature and larval density (Titschack, 1922) as well as on the r.h. (Chauvin, 1977; Chauvin et al., 1983). In our laboratory conditions, the complete development from egg to adult lasts between 80 and 150 days (Chauvin et al., 1992). Adults do not feed and live approximately 10 days. Eggs hatch after 10 days. .During its growth, the larva goes through 5-20 moults in a period which can vary between 40 and 100 days. Pupation lasts approximately 15 days. "
From:
G.Chauvin; G.Vannier., Supercooling capacity of Tineola bisselliella (Hummel) (Lepidoptera: Tineidae): Its implication for disinfestation. Journal of Stored Products Research
Volume 33, Issue 4, October 1997, Pages 283-287
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Greetings to all!
I am humbly asking for some help, in regards to the checking of my moth samples. Though it is of great inconvenience to you all, I will respect your decision nevertheless. However, if you so do choose to give me your insight on my identification. Then, you are all the more willing and I cannot thank you enough for that. Once more, thank you all for your time and consideration!
(P.S. my id table is found down below).
Sincerely,
Mark Quimno
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Mark:
The problem with your photos is lack of focus. For small moths such as Pyralidae you should use a digital camera with a macro lens function to obtain close-up and focused photos. Mobile phones are not suitable for taking pictures of small insects.
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I have sequenced the mitochondrial genome of some moths species. I want to annotate and the sequence will submit in the NCBI.
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For mitochondrial annotation, besides MITOS and DOGMA tools, for gene sequences, can also use tools such as MitoZ- animal mitochondrial genome assembly and annotation, MOSAS- insect mitochondrial genome annotation, and SG-ADVISER mtDNA tool- a web server for mitochondrial DNA annotation.
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I am looking for sample interview questions for research study about smoking cessation in hospitalized patient
qualitative study data collection will be interview mothed
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@ hello Izidro thank you for your recommendation i will do
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I am planning to conduct a cage study to determine a critical density of an univoltine casebearer moth in red clover seed crop. This requires to release first instar larvae in the cages with the plants. However, I guess I can't rear them to get a lot of eggs. Can anyone suggest, how should I get the eggs?
Thanks
Babu
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Usually feed the most desirable vegetation to the moths, as for silkworms?
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Location: Philippines
All my moth samples for identification are on this word file down below. P.S. Thank you so much in advance!
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Hi, I'm sorry to say but your photos are virtually impossible to evaluate. The green one 2.1 is a Geometridae an Emerald, but can't say which one, 1.2, 4.1, 6.2, 8.2 are probably Crambidae, 5.2 looks like a male from a Lymantriinae group.
With moths, you need to make sure you are working with clear defined markings on the photos, preferably a good dorsal photo of macro species, will identify ca 70% of them. With Micro-lepidotera species depends on their form, a side and dorsal photo will help, but as you will learn if they are worn with their age as some of yours are it becomes impossible.
With best regards
J.Connell
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What is the best method to collect Ephestia eggs?
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Good afternoon! Also interested in collecting Ephestia eggs. Can you suggest the best option for collecting eggs?
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I would like to determine the movement of moths in response to mating disruption pheromone traps.
Pheromone lures (matting disruption) were placed in the center of the treatment plot. High numbers of male moths were caught in the trap in treatment plot as compare to control plot with no pheromone lure. Unfortunately, there was no difference in the fruit damage despite high male moth catches.
I would like to check if males are flying from other control or untreated plots into the treatment plot ? Any trap suggestions?
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Thank you for all your replies.
How should I detect if the moths were moved from adjacent plots/orchards into the treatment plots? Is there any way to determine flight direction?
Presumably if males are caught then there wont be enough males available for the females and hence less fruit damage?
Any suggestions?
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I am preparing a research article about the complete mitogenome of moth. I want to include the details in my research article.
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Bombyx mori, 2001. Seems to be the earliest. But you should probably try a few more searches to be sure. See attached screen shot.
submitted to GenBank in 2001 still unpublished.
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I have a student who during long time has studied the moths in central Laos. She also document them from larvae to butterfly. She speaks English and is looking for possibilities to make a bachelor and master in the field og environment/biodiversity.
kind regards
Lars Bjork
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Hello,
Following the mentioned request, I came across a paper entitled:
A preliminary annotated checklist of the Papilionidae of Laos with notes on taxonomy, phenology, distribution and variation published in April 2007 by Adam Miles Cotton from Thailand and Tommaso Racheli from Italy. They both you can find on ResearchGate. As you can observe in their published paper, they have experience and interest in working on butterfly fauna of Laos. Also I can recommend you the link below:
which refers to a list of butterflies from Laos (very useful data) and you may find out experts in the reference part you may contact with them concerning your question.
Good luck, Elaheh
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Hello,
I have the option to write a Bachelor thesis about a simulation of a test bench for elastic materials in Ansys/Abaqus. To be honest I am an industrial engineer and I have only experiencie with CAD and just a little bit of construction knowledge. But that isn´t much.
It is still intriging to me to try it out, because it sounds very interesting and I feel like I could learn a lot.
I just do fear that I am underestimating the amount of time and dedication this will take to master the thesis in 3 moths. You can see the part of the testbench that I will have to simulate in the attached picture. From what I understood first I will have to model this part of the test bench, than I will have to calculate the mechanical forces, I will have to find out the material characteristics and calculate some thermodynamics.
Do I need knowledge about the behavior of the material? or does Ansys/Abaqus do this part for me?
I know this isn´t much information, but I wanted to ask what do you think about it? Is it risky for me to try to learn and write it down in 3 months?
Thanks a lot!
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Probably the most important question to answer is what effects you need to include.
If it is all just linear elasticity, that's fine.
If plasticity or contact come into play, you can probably manage.
If your task is more complicated, it will be difficult.
And if your supervisor has no good knowledge of Abaqus, don't do it.
Never, ever take a thesis topic where no expert supervisor is available in case things go wrong. I've seen supervisors with no FEM experience hand out bachelor thesis topics that would actually be challenging as PhD thesis....
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I need to purchase both moth species for laboratory experiments. Any suggestions? Thanks!
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Hi Jaime,
Benzon Research sells codling moth but not OFM. https://www.benzonresearch.com/
Larry Gut's lab at MSU has both CM and OFM in colony and might be able to send you some critters to start your own colony (I doubt they can provide ongoing shipments though). DM or email me if you want to get in touch with Larry's lab.
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How long can we preserve Spodoptera litura eggs in refrigeration without opting for cryopreservation. What are the conditions to look out for?? Can they be stored indefinitely in refrigeration? Thanks for the reply and patience
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I tried by storing them in airtight screw cap vials, lost viability within a week
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Dear All,
Can adult butterfly or moth feed on solid food, such as pollen? It is known that nectar mainly contains sugar but very low level proteins, lipids. If a butterfly only feeds on nectar, how can this meet its nutritional needs. Especially the lipids, butterfly can't synthesis sterol by itself.
Zha
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Interesting about the heliconids, I was not aware of that. Looked them up and see that they first hold the pollen with proboscis and palps and then dissolve the pollen with saliva before ingesting (otherwise baffled me as the probosics meant that only fluids could be ingested). Micropterigidae moths however consume solid pollen (and some fern spores) as they have functional jaws. Nice Trivial Pursuits question!
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What are some applied methods for controlling Zeuzera pyrina, the leopard moth, a key pest of walnut orchards?Gardeners in Iran have recently had many problems with this pest. Current control methods include:
  • Spraying with organophosphate synthetic insecticides like Diazinon for the control the first larval stage at the young bud
  • Paste formulations for use at new holes (fumigation)
  • Imported pheromones 
These have been used, but have low effectiveness.
Is there a new pesticide?
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You can use Ynject that is an innovative application device for the treatment of trees, composed of a connector and a pressurised bottle. It contains a water solution to which the required dose of plant health product can be added for injection into the trunk. for more details check this website: https://www.fertinyect.com/
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As awareness for insect species as valuable organisms is increasing among people measures for their protection are undertaken. In this course, seed mixtures are offered which are said to benefit butterfly and insect life. However, most of these mixtures preferentially contain seeds of non-native flower species which do not serve as food source for caterpillars. Among these flower-species Centaurea cyaneus is often included in the seed mixtures. I would like to know which butterfly or moth species really utilize Centaurea cyaneus as nutritional source for their caterpillars. Documentations and published data are welcome!
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Dear Peter,
You can check in this old book: Die Raupen der europäischen Tagfalter by Ehrard BODI. Page 35, there is a mention of M.phoebe on Centaurea sp.!!
Also try "Les papillons de jour et leurs biotopes, ligue suisse pour la protection de la nature", 1987. Page 218: mention of the caterpillar on Centaurea scabiosa, C.nigrescens, C.columbaria, Cirsium arvense and C. vulgare. There is no mention of the insect on C.cyanus in"Butterflies of Britain and Europe". You could perhaps try the databases of different Natural History Museums.
Best regards,
Guy
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Can you suggest me some references, that can be helpful for Morphological Identification of Mouth?
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Hello Faisal; If you tell the community what region of the world your specimens are from they will be able to help. Best regards, Jim Des Lauriers
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It has been found feeding on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia.
Family or genus, maybe?
Thank you.
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I want to use imageJ to count the number of eggs in Gypsy Moth egg masses, but I am not sure what camera and camera lens I would need in order to do this. I have seen a couple of mosquito papers that do this using a DSLR with a macro lens, but they do not provide any other specifics. Any thoughts or suggestions would be much appreciated. Gypsy moth eggs are ~1mm in diameter.
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Well it's depends about your budget. An inverted microscope with 600X is around of US$ 3000-4000 (medium gamme), I use a Optika XD-3 and take good photos, other option are the Dinolite digital microscopes around of US$ 2500 (puted in Ecuador) this last is so easy to take photos and to take measures. And the mercedes benz are the Nikon inverted microscopes but are expenses more than US$30.000
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I am maintaining adult male winter moth in captivity for a brief period and do not seem to be able to find any information on whether or not they feed. I can't even establish whether or not they have mouthparts! If anyone could answer this for me, or at least point me in the right direction, I'd be very grateful!
Many thanks,
Laura
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Hello,
Adult moths Operophtera brumata don't feed.
Please check the following useful link:
Regards,
Athanasios
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How can i recognize larva 2 age of tuta absoluta?
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Larva of second stage is creamy colour and 2,6 mm long
It has narrow black band on pronotum
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I am working on the identification of sex pheromones of moths, I have collected the pheromone gland extraction using hexane, i have got bio-active compound in GC-MS, but the peak of the compound looks too much contaminated with other materials, i can't read the fragment ions very clearly, and can't make sure which fragment ions belongs to compound and which are from impurities, I have tried average across the peak and and background subtraction, though i can't minimize the impurities, is there any other way of purification, separation to get clear mass spectrum through any software? Your suggestion and answers will be highly appreciated, Thanks
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Have you tried using a devolution programme such as AMDIS from NIST (free download). Explanation can be found in:
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These species of caterpillars were found in large quantities feeding on Amaranthus, spinach, water spinach and sweet potato leaves. I have noticed that they also eat legumes leaves.
I have compared the pictures of the caterpillar and moth with images on the internet and it looks like a Spodoptera eridania. Is this the correct ID?
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Yes, this is Spodoptera eridania, because of the following characters:
1. Reniform spot in the form of a black or dark brown streak or spot (this is the
most diagnostic character).
2. Short black dash near base of wing along the inner margin.
It is known also from Suriname, and the plants you mentioned are included in the list of its known hostplants: https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/44518
Please check the following helpful PDF attachment for the identification of species in the genus Spodoptera, based on forewing characters. However, for final identification, in many cases, genitalia dissection and examination is necessary.
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The caterpillar of this moth was found on Ipomoea aquatica. The length of the caterpillar was something about 4.5 cm. I have compared images from the internet for identification and it looks me similar like Spodoptera ornithogalli. Is this correct?
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To note that your moth is a male, because of the large light brown patch on the median area adjacent to inner margin.
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But not all work related to moths are included in it. What will be the good title for it and is it good to publish it. Please also suggest the journal related to my work
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The title will depend on the content and purpose of the paper.What is your goal?
What exactly are you "reviewing" about the moths of India? Biodiversity, faunistics, bibliography, zoogeography, systematics, physiology, economic entomology, evolulution, ....etc.
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Hi. I'm working in a tropical rainforest and I need to measure the density of trichomes, but due the lack of equipment in the station, I need to preserve the samples during 1 month to then count the trichomes in the lab. Does anyone know a good method to do it?
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See follwing paper on how to preserved leaf.
Chieco, A Rotondi, L Morrone, F Rapparini & R Baraldi (2013) An ethanol-based fixation method for anatomical and micro-morphological characterization of leaves of various tree species, Biotechnic & Histochemistry, 88:2, 109-119, DOI: 10.3109/10520295.2012.746472
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Being in a rural area of India as a College Teacher, I find a lot of difficulties in making the students to open their mouth to talk in English. Most of the time the students sit sticking their mouth, never opening their moth even to say a proverb or noun in English. Training them for a long time, I find everything in vein by the end of the day. Either they never receive or they forget. I teach them a little bit of very basic grammar rules, especially sentence agreement. Then I tell them some common expressions for day to day life. I general, India has English as a second language. Rural students, whom I care more, show me no development. But, I fail miserably. What is wrong with me or my teaching? Could someone give me a methodology which may be followed to derive a success in the lives of students?
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Dear Madam,
in my opinion, you may attempt to make English Fun, you teach while you play a game or sing as song as your ice breaking, in terms of how to stimulate the student to speak, you could also try to make a nice and interesting topic to be discussed and give them some vocabularies related to the topic given, so they could interest to give an opinion, etc. However, you have to try to teach in more fun way to make them feel free to express their idea or opinion in class.
Best regards.
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Especially in the case of moths and butterflies...
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Yes it is possible, you can see: A simple method for sexing live larvae of pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) at:
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The caterpillars are leaf folders that feed on the mesophyll of Echinochloa polystachya grass. It looks like the moth belongs to the family Crambidae, because of its 'snout'. Is it probably a Cnaphalocrocis sp.?
Thank you in advance
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It could be Cnaphalocrocis trapezalis
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Dear RG Colleagues,
Is there any new effective solutions (Biological Control) for Thaumetopoea pityocampa ?
Thank you
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Thank you Dr Arvind Singh
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I would like to know if the content of a group of lepidopteran caterpillars could be sequenced trying to identify only the parasitoids they contain (endo- and exo-). Maybe there are some specific primers for hymenopterans that avoid amplifying the lepidopteran tissue? Any suggestions?
Thanks in advance,
Alvaro
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It's been done, though only a very few times. See e.g.
I'm not an expert in the molecular side, but e.g. Helena or some of the other authors could perhaps give some ideas.
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I have recently started working on a new project where I am studying the life cycle of pine tree lappet moths. I am following the growth of several individuals and taking weekly weights up until the point of pupation. I have previously worked with communities but I have never done any repeated measures on the same individual like this, so I am not sure what is the best approach to look for patterns across individuals. I was thinking of producing graphs showing each individual's weight trend, I also have information on feeding quantity, pupation time and moulting, but I don't know if that can be incorporated to the analyses really.
Any suggestions on how this can be done in R? Or any good papers to start with? Thanks in advance
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After some more research it seems something along the line of GLMMs will do the trick, just in case anyone is looking for similar info.
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Also, it would be of great help if you know to which insecticides oriental fruith moth (Cydia molesta) developed resistance?
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Yes I understand that, thank you for an advice. Best wishes.
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I wanted to collect adults (moths) of Grapholita molesta using pheromone traps, but those traps have selection only for male adults.
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First, you need to collect males and females to start a breeding stock. Collect fruits of nectarine and peach infested by the Oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta. Place them on a tray with soil in the bottom. The larvae once they finish the cycle, they pupate on the ground. Then place the pupae in a hatching cage to get the adults so that they can mate and lay eggs. The larvae can be raised in artificial diet as in the annexed article. Good luck.
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The larvae of this moth specie was found boring seeds of a tree next to my work place.
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We need close up pictures taken with a profesional camera, also we need more data, locality and host plant at least to ID to species level.
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I test preference and survival rate of one population (moth larvae). I have six varieties of plants (a-f) in six replicates (36 in total) arranged in Latin square block. I applied 5 larvae (1st instar) on each plant (180 larvae applied in total). Plants were isolated from each other by placing them in a mesh sleeve. From the observation my survival data are not normally distributed.
Preference is induced and will be based on the performance (pupa weight, adult weight, eggs laid).
From the visual observation data are not normally distributed.
Do I need to make sure my data is normally distributed (survival across the whole block), e.g. running Shapiro–Wilk test, before considering using ANOVA or use another nonparametric test?
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Although ANOVA can be robust against the normality assumption, I would check normality and heterogeneity of data before proceeding with ANOVA or non-parametric test, to justify the test choice. Best of luck!
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Hi all, I'm looking for a non-toxic UV reflecting white paint or alternative to paint a range of clay model morphs of moths that I will put in the field to record survival statistics. The models may be encountered by native birds so I need to ensure the materials are not toxic. Any suggestions greatly appreciated.
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titania
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I need to a list of organic pesticides that for control of moth larva in stored products. Are there a list of organic pesticides?
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I want the world in general and It's not just for our country.
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Rearing techniques for the varieties of plant associated insect pest especially Diamondback moth.
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Dear Mishra,
you can easily rear it on Chinease cabbage under greenhouse condition ( 25 + 58C, 65 + 10% RH and a photoperiod of 16L:8D)!
you can check this paper as well:
Best,
Mojtaba
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Hello,
For a study of the pollinator guild of Silene nutans species complex we would like to rear caterpillars of moths (especially of Hadena) to obtain adults to identify the species, as it seems difficult to identify them at caterpillar stage (or is it possible?) . So I am searching for a protocol and advice for rearing them. Does anyone have any experience on this?
Thank you very much in advance!
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Even more interesting and very smart for those moths. Then, get ready to have your own patch of Silene plants developing seeds, maybe build an enclosure with the plants growing in a one foot wide by two feet tall by 3-4 feet long wire mesh cage, and add the caterpillars, and do some moth ranching?
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I want to study the physiology of the larvae of a moth, and I must cut the cross section of the body of the larvae, and see the fatty granules of the body. Dear researchers, What is the simple way to create a transverse section of the larvae?
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Dear Samaneh.
Try with honey beeswax.
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We treated the adult moths and observed the egg hatching which was significantly reduced compared with control but the mating behavior was not changed.
If we want to study the mechanism from aspect to endocrine signaling pathways, which hormones or enzymes need to study? If we need to study the Juvenile hormone JH, then which parameters need to study to find the mechanism?
Thanks
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Hi Sakhawat Shah,
Many Hormones effect on Insect oviposition. For example, Base step in oviposition of Mosquitoes of nematocera blood feeding of host vertebrata. Then in Aedes agypti blood feedingcause leave of ovary ecdysteroidogeic hormone(OEH) and insuline-like peptide 3 (ILP3) than cause growth of eggs.
In other research, effect Molting Hormone (MH) with delete ofventral gland in start of nymph last instar of Asian grasshopper cause delay of growth ovary.
In other research, PTTH hormone effect on growth ovary directly. However, in Schistocerca gregaria delete of NSC cause positive effects in growth of oocyte and mating.
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Whether any commercial lure is available for trapping of Conogethes punctiferalis moths?
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Caterpillars are the larval stage of members of the order Lepidoptera.
I'd met this one on the leaf of basil on my balcony in June.
Can somebeody help me classify this species?
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The caterpillar of the last photo is of Euthrix potatoria (Lasiocampidae).
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I would like to sample moths during the night in a remote area, so I cannot go there as frequently as I would like to. I would be happy to track changes in moth abundance from week to week. Is there an efficient solution for this? Thanks in advance!
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In China, Jiaduo company can support this special light trap for this kind minotring.
It can be killed moths by heater system and keep the sampled moths in to sperated bays in each days.
The price is about $ 2000-2500 per light trap
Lu
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All these moths (Family Erebidae) were photographed from Bhutan. About 140 species were photographed, of which around 120 has been identified. I am looking for a person who can help me to authenticate my identifications and suggest ID for the remaining unidentified species. (Unfortunately, all the moths are in photographs as the voucher collection in Bhutan is illegal)
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Pericyma cruegeri
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Now a day many publication on Lepidoptera published from reputed or renowned Journal by experts in the field of taxonomy on Moths. But they mainly focus on morpho taxonomy (mainly on external genitalia) but ignore wing venation. is there less importance of wing venation or due to other reason? waiting favorable response from dear experts...
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Wing venation is mostly used in distinguishing genera, tribes, etc, not species. In describing species, if one places it in a genus, it automatically means that the wing venation is described under the generic description, so there is no need to repeat it in the species description, although some authors routinely show wing venation, leg structure as well as male and female genitalia while describing new species. The important thing is to clearly show the feature that distinguishes the new taxon from known taxa, whether this is genitalia, wing venation, leg structure, palpi or anything else.
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I have in collaboration conducted a RCT, with 25 people enrolled. only 11 (5I/6C) remained at 3 moths follow up and only 4 (2I/2C)at the end of the study (6months)...
Is there anyway to publish the results with such a huge dropout?
Can it be converted to a case report? is they anything I can do or should I just let it go?
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Dear Anders,
Rather than a research report, you might consider writing a Letter to the Editor, to discuss the problems you encountered? This would have the advantage of brevity plus providing valuable information which may help other researchers in the field to avoid such pitfalls in their trial designs.
I endorse Erich's recommendation of Dove Press, which I've found efficient and author-friendly. They have several journals listed by the major online indexes.
Wishing you a successful outcome,
David
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I want to go for collection of Moths in an area probably there is no possibility of power supply. So i want to do the collection with light sheet trap. Can i use ordinary rechargeable lamps for collection. If there is any other possibility please let me know.
and please also let me know that is there black lamps ( uv lamps) available in the market to be used for collection purposes.
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field options:
  • generator plus 80W / 125W / 250W mercury vapour (mv) lights (or 160W self ballasted mv), but you need cables to connect more than one trap to the generator. Lights can be combined with sheet (if expecting other large insects, e.g. beetles) or trap (Robinson / Skinner / bucket / box). Robinson and Skinner traps are "industry standard" and best for any data that is part of a statistical analysis. Collecting at light sheet is very subjective and data should not be used for stats analysis. Downsides - heavy equipment; one can't take far from a road and you'll need a vehicle to carry the gear; equipment takes a long time to set up / pack down if operating more than one light trap/sheet; mv not easy to purchase anymore (banned in EU); if using a sheet, it must be attended at all times.
  • Battery pack plus actinic light source (e.g. blacklight, fluorescent tubes) - more portable, but the light source has a lot less "pull" than mv
  • USB rechargable battery pack plus LED light source(s) - e.g. http://www.gunnarbrehm.de/en/contact.html - this is likely the route to replace mv light trapping. I have operated a couple of LepiLEDs in Hong Kong recently (run at the same time as mv lights) - whilst not as good a catch as mv, definitely better than actinic / fluorescent lights. Can be operated with a sheet or placed on a trap. Really portable, as the battery packs (e.g. https://www.ravpower.com/26800mah-Type-C-external-battery-charger-black.html) are so much easier to transport than a generator. The example linked to will power a maxi LepiLED for about 8 hours.
  • pheromone traps - species specific and expensive on the whole, but for Sesiidae this is the best option
  • "Sugar" - beer + sugar + mashed fruit or a wine rope (unbleached rope) has been a centuries old method to attract species; often taxa that do not turn up at light. Plenty online to search through. Downsides - specimens obtained from sugaring do seem prone to greasing.
Lots of info online on all these options.
Hope this helps.
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This is an Agriculture question. There's this common pest called the pod borer (Conopomorpha cramerella) that is affecting the cocoa pods in plantations. Whenever this moth attacks a particular pod, this affects all the nearby pods which they tend to have strong pods and the seeds inside become really strong and hard. What can be done to stop this disease from passing to another pod? What are the best prevention ways that can be done? What is the real cause of this disease attack?
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Is it safe to place the moths in a glassine paper for temporay storage. Please give me the suggestions
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I've stored thousands of moths in glassine envelopes, just as one can do with butterflies. A single data label can be attached to multiple envelopes that are stapled or otherwise fastened together.
And it doesn't have to be temporary; the museum has large numbers of unprepared moths (and butterflies) that are in glassine envelopes.
Greasy species (such as Cossidae) can be a problem: the grease can spread and stain the wings, and perhaps stain specimens in adjacent envelopes.
But because moths tend to have robust bodies that can be flattened in an envelope, my preference is to store moths on layers of cotton (or cotton-like material) in plastic sandwich boxes (or other plastic container), that, once the specimens have dried, can be sealed along with something to inhibit mold (such as thymol).
For long-term storage, sealed plastic boxes of layered specimens can simply be placed in a freezer, to be thawed and prepared at your convenience at a later date.
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one of my friends ask me to help him to identify this moth the common name or any related information the around was grape and pomegranate, and tomatoes.