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Motherhood - Science topic

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Does anyone know of papers that deals with parenting and digital homeschooling during the pandemic lockdown? I'm specially interented in mothers' social role.
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We (a team of my university) are currently preparing a project (not yet on ResearchGate) on children's texts and drawings (kindergarten to age 15-16) for a competition during the 2020 spring lockdown; the subject of the competition was to describe their homeschooling experiences. We will only start to analyze the data but can keep you updated if you like.
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We are looking for a journal on motherhood and market which is open to discussions of political economy. Do you have any suggestions for journals or special issues?
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You may consider the following journals to submit your article for publication:
1. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society
2. Journal of the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement
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I mean it should leave one when this opportunity came at the same time a correct selection.
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It depends on the country you are having your PhD. For instance, in my country, Portugal, the mother can interrupt the study for 3 months, around the birth date, but continues to be paid. Unfortunately, fathers are not included and no other situation is considered,
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Time management problem
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this difficult , but you if you have husband he can help you to care in few times.
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I have ordered a copy of Creswell's Qual book and perhaps it will answer my question once it arrives but thought I'd also try to tap the collective wisdom of this group. For my master's research I am studying the impact of motherhood on the work lives of women - specifically, what impact they *anticipated*, the constraints and supports they encountered as they worked towards their various plans, and how successful they feel about their adjustments. I want to examine several of the possible paths mothers follow (keep working more or less straight, scale back or change jobs to accommodate motherhood, opt out temporarily or permanently, etc.), so I need a purposive sample for my qualitative interviews.
My question is: how would I best go about selecting my interviewees? I was thinking I would first recruit participants with a snowball approach of advertising the study on Facebook, through various professional networks and also at some local daycares/schools. I would then direct all willing participants to a very basic online questionnaire that could serve to "screen" them on a few demographic questions and maybe just one broad "how significantly did motherhood impact the trajectory of your work life?" question, and choose a few women from each path to interview. Is that approach methodologically sound? How do others strike a balance between obtaining diversity without hand-picking participants? Because I'll be conducting the interviews and transcribing + analyzing all by myself, I'm limited in time/bandwidth and want to ensure my smallish sample size can still yield results that capture the various experiences mothers. Appreciate any suggestions/feedback you research sages can provide!
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You mention that your methodology is anchored in qualitative interviews, but application of questionnaires refers to quantitative research and also application of questionnaires is not the same as interviews.
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Hello! I'm a second-year master's student studying how women adjust (or don't) their paid work upon becoming mothers. There is much quantitative data out there about the "motherhood penalty" and the various ways mothers work differently (and are discriminated against) but far less data on the subjective experiences of the mothers "on the ground," and which factors play the most salient role in their decision-making.
I am proposing a descriptive ("what is") study that begins with interviewing or focus-grouping mothers who followed various paths (kept working in same job, "opted out" for some period of time, scaled back or changed positions to better accommodate family needs, etc.). I will then conduct thematic analysis of the interviews to reveal various factors that supported and constrained the mothers in their attempts to find a balance between working and mothering, as well as how they feel about the arrangements they've ended up with. While that would probably suffice to fulfill the requirements of my master's degree, I am also interested in following the interview process with what I can only think to call a "qualitative survey." (See here for some background: ). I make the QUAL survey distinction because I don't intend to make causal statements or conduct statistical analysis of the survey data but rather thought I could translate some of the themes/salient factors from the interviews into survey questions (including open-ended options to capture what the interviews might have missed). I hoped these survey responses could serves as additional pieces of feedback from a wide swath of the population of mothers that would either corroborate the story from the interviews and/or to uncover additional themes. I know that this survey would fail to meet the rigor of a true quantitative survey but if I adequately address all of the things the survey ISN'T, then would you agree that such survey responses could serve as additional data points that could then be analyzed in a qualitative fashion (with some descriptive stats thrown in)?
My logic is as follows: this is a largely unexplored area of the research on the "motherhood penalty," so interviews feel crucial to uncovering broad themes that are as-yet unidentified. However, because there is so much diversity among mothers and the work paths they follow, even if I make efforts to interview a diverse group, I might still be limited by time/resources to conduct a sufficient number of interviews to capture all the variables involved. I hoped the QUAL survey portion would allow for more data points and fine-tuning of the themes, with a potential to create a true QUAN survey as I embark on a PhD down the road. But I am relatively new to this and am wondering what other issues I should consider?
Appreciate immensely any feedback or suggestions you might have. These forums have been a godsend to me as I begin to wrap my mind around the research part of this process!
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I am not sure why you want to do two rounds of qualitative interviewing, especially for a masters-degree project. Qualitative research (and especially the analysis of qualitative data) can be a very demanding process, so it seems to me that the first set of interviews would provide a rich set of data that would be more than enough for your purposes.
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Is it fare to question the reality of motherhood –that men are created from women. As far as birth is concerned, a man’s role is to offer his seed only. For him it is only a moment of pleasure; for a woman it is the nine months of austerity. It is the woman who receives, conceives, and makes that life a part of her being. Women are essentially mothers, the creators of life.
Your views are solicited
Thanks
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Women are wonderful. Give her a smile and will give you her heart. Give her a ring and she will give you a family . Give her a sperm and will give you a baby. Give her a house and she will give you a home........ But don't give her hard time; you will never know what she will give you back ☺
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I am at the same time a wife, a mum of two cute angels, an ict engineer working full time, a contractual assistant working part time and a PhD student who will graduate next year.
If there is any researcher that shares with me such situation or has such situation colleagues, please I invite you to share with us how to create equilibria between such different and simultaneous situations :)
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You are very brave! But too much is too much
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I am looking for any research on vision of own motherhood in young childless women (adolescence, emerging adulthood, early adulthood). I am interested how young women see their future motherhood and the way to become mother.
Important questions for me are:
1) When young women want to have first and last child?
2) How they want to prepare to being a mother?
3) What are their fears about being a mother?
4) How they expect to combine being a mother with other ares of their life (work, romantic relationship, hobby)?
5) What they are thinking about changes in relationship with husband/partner after delivery?
6) How they want to spend time with their children?
7) What they are thinking about their impact on the development of their child?
I need this to my PhD thesis.
Thank You for support!
Kamil Janowicz
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In the paper The social protection of employment in Romania, Lambert Academic Publishing, I have a chapter III that analyzes Social Protection pregnant female employees or who have children,
maybe the information is useful
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Mompreneurship is about women who have been working, but hit a plateau because of motherhood or family requirements. There is a common perception that these women start their own start-ups from home as garage sales or online selling. This creates both a negative and positive perception about moms turning entrepreneurs.
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A very interesting topic indeed. I will love to be part of this study if given the opportunity. Most women who can't afford to pay for a nanny will turn to mompreneurship or full professional housewives. Mind you that 'houswife' is a profession in Cameroon - the only profession in which you work 24/24 & 7/7 without any formal income. Clearly stated on your ID card (Profession: Housewife).
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I am interested in becoming a mother phenomenon and will do a research about that. I already have some information about becoming a mother theory of mercer in part of chapter book (Tomey and Alligood, 2014) which is providing limit information. Thus, I need more detail explanation about the theory. Thank you
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there is an article in Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 2005. Attached below.
Let me know if this works for you. If not I could send via email. 
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Does anyone know of social psychoanalytic articles (2002 onwards) detailing older mothers' experiences of pregnancy and child rearing - including stigma and/or pressures from society/culture, family and/or the medical profession and how this affected their parenting? Thanks.
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Thank you Brenda
I am trying to find articles on mature first time gravidas/primaparas (35 and over), ie delayed parenthood.  I should have clarified.
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This is for my doctoral thesis and I would like to look at the factors that increase motherly guilt and dissatisfaction or reduce confidence in their abilities and how these affect their mental health.
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You are welcome Reyhan! I'd love to hear your thoughts about this approach to research (Institutional Ethnography) if you find it helpful :)
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Hi there.  I am beginning my PhD studies in Drama and Sociology, investigating how the experience of motherhood influences the identity, career trajectory and creative output of Australian women who originally trained as actors.  I'm starting my literature review in earnest, and would be tremendously grateful for any leads or suggestions.
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May I say that the orientation of your study sounds like feminism study? If it is correct, I would like to recommend the following books: 
Simone de Beauvoir. The Second Sex. Trans. H. M. Parshley. London: Jonathan Cape, 1953.
Mary Ellman. Thinking about Women. New York, Harcourt, Brace & World, 1968.
Kate Millett. Sexual Politics. 1969. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2000.
Judith Fetterley. The Resisting Reader: A Feminist Approach to American Fiction. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, c1978.
Julia Kristeva. Desire in Language: A Semiotic Approach to Literature and Art. Trans. Thomas Gora and etc. New York: Columbia University Press, 1980.
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I am researching the psychological effects of birth trauma to women and an emerging theme of 40 interviews appears to be PTSD. However, it would be beneficial to examine the accuracy of this theme.
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Dear Beatrice and Daniel
 Thank you so much for this great information - I will also  share this with Prof Hans Peter Dietz - the head of this research team re levator ani/ OASIS birth injuries.
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I’m trying to conduct a research about early motherhood, but almost all what I found is focused on contraception, abortion or sexual-affective education. What about the teenage mothers themselves? Maybe a qualitative perspective about how do they feel, what do they think about early motherhood and what do they think about governmental support.
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Thank you for your answers.
I've already noticed that most popular themes are related (if not to the affective-sexual education) to health aspects, but what about adolescents as persons with life projects? or how do they really live pregnancy? (as Christine Morton refered: researches about narratives from teen moms). As the OMS stated last year, there is a huge link between early pregnancies and poverty. Teen mothers without resources understand motherhood as an alternative to their limited opportunities.
As Attia said, health risks linked to early childbearing had been widely studied and proved , but what about governmental responses?
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I am doing my PhD qualitative research proposal on teenage mothers/pregnancy. What I have in mind now is I am planning to use Orem's self care theory/self care deficit theory to study on their self care needs during pregnancy and preparation for motherhood. I would appreciate any suggestion on any other theories that can be used as my theoretical framework.
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Is Responsible fathering Conceptual Framework by William J. Doherty suitable to use to study on the experience of adolescent male becoming father?
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I would like to examine, how important to women is to have children in order to feel fulfilled?
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Do look at the Appendices in these links; they're rather old articles, but may give you some place to start. The Social Roles Questionnaire by Baber & Tucker (2006) may also be useful. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11199-006-9018-y
Hope this helps :)