Science topic

Minority Groups - Science topic

A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.
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Where are independent higher education research centres specialising in TRUE Orthodox Christianity, not to be confused with Orthodox Christianity ? True Orthodox Christianity rejects the modernism with its roots in the Russian and earlier Revolutions, including the paracanonical (canonically impermissible) calendar reforms promulgated by incomplete Robber Synods starting with the Patriarchate of Constantinople in the 1920s and the genocide of True (aka Authentic, Genuine or Catacomb) Orthodox Christianity by modernist Orthodox Christianity, resulting ultimately in the response of the True Orthodox Christian 1983 Anathema against Ecumenism by the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia (ROCOR) aka Russian Orthodox Church in Exile (ROCIE), embraced by all True, Authentic, Genuine and Catacomb Orthodox Christians. The True Orthodox genocide is numerically by far the greatest Christian martyrdom ever, with tens of millions in the former Russian Empire alone (a large majority of the 110 million "The Economist" estimates were murdered by the Soviet regime alone), was triggered by the refusal of the World Council of Churches, meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, to allow a Greek True Orthodox bishop to speak about this matter, though the New York Times published his proposed address. In response the anathema was promulgated, in English, the WCC official language, at the ROCOR Synodical meeting at their monastery in Mansonville, Québec, also in Canada. Despite making up between 1 and 10% of the Orthodox Christian populations, in the broad sense of the term, throughout the world, I have been, even as an interested True Orthodox Christian, been unable to find any state recognised study centres devoted to the study of True Orthodox Christianity, as opposed to Orthodox Christianity. Some institutions, such as Cambridge University's Institute of Orthodox Christian Studies claim to have all locally active Orthodox Synods represented on their governing bodies, but didn't respond to my request for the publicly available details of the True Orthodox Christian Synods represented there. In any event, that Institute is not an Institute of TRUE Orthodox Christian studies.
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No, they've been involved in instigating and coordinating the persecution of True Orthodox Christians since their forced introduction of the new calendar in the 1920s, for example sending in the Greek police to shut down True Orthodox liturgies by force, resulting in the death of peaceful True Orthodox Christians trying to block them off, peacefully, from their priests. St. Catherine of Mandra died in this way from her injuries from a Greek police rifle butt to the back of her head in 1927 after over a week in hospital (in which, though she never regained speech, she was able to write a note to her surviving husband asking him to take care of her two small children, her angels. The new calendar has always been rejected by True Orthodox Christians who uphold holy tradition and reject the thoroughly modernist dominated Patriarchate of Constantinople's failure to repent and consequently haven't re-established communion with it until this happens. The official address of the Patriarchate of Constantinople is Constantinople, Istanbul, Turkey. Istanbul is the biggest city in Europe and one of the largest in Asia, with 15 million plus people and still growing fast, with the Constantinople part of it, including the Phanar, long swallowed up. The fact that they've received some very raw treatment themselves from the Turkish state, though utterly deplorable, doesn't alter this. I'm fairly certain (99% confident) no such independent institution recognised by the academic and state authorities, exists. I would much welcome collaboration in getting one set up! Long overdue since the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad (ROCA) seminary and college at Jordanville, upper New York state, affiliated to, but receiving no funding from, the State University of New York, joined the Ecumenist and Sergianist "Moscow Patriarchate" (entirely subservient to the Soviet Union and its successor state the Russian Federation since Sergius's surrender in 1927), in the 2007 union between the Sergianists and most of ROCA. 105 and counting years of pers
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Does anyone know where I may get my hands on ANY related data?
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Diversity and inclusion in STEM – data, culture and social benefit
In a recent government Science and Technology Committee meeting, a number of experts shared their opinions on the current barriers to increasing diversity in STEM, as well as ways the sector can move past them..
The underrepresentation and variety of groups [in STEM] means a loss of opportunity and talent for them, but it also is a loss of opportunity for society as a whole...
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Our lab is conducting a research project about Asian-American families. We are investigating Asian-American families' well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic, specifically, their experience of racial discrimination, their parent-child relationships, and their children's development. So far we manage to contact churches, organizations, and school communities, but we still need more Philippine and Korean teenagers (12-18 years old) and parents to participate. Any suggestions to help us recruit? I appreciate your help.
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One way is to go through the schools. A common approach is to reach out to the superintendent of the district with your IRB approval, summary of study, and that you are seeking support/permission. Once granted, you would then reach out to individual principals of schools in those districts to get their support. At that point, you provide the students at the school where you have support an informed consent and permission letter to take home for parents. If the parent consents, you may even schedule a call to address any questions or concerns they might have. Once you have consent, you then can proceed. Good luck.
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Rawan, this issue of integration or convergence has made it difficult to follow the discussions.
My opinion is that for your academic level research project, you should ensure that the conclusions arrived at in the quantitative analysis are supported by your qualitative analysis.
You can reliably enhance the validity of your study by using the same respondents and questionnaire.
This is a common practice in thesis writing as opposed to journal articles.
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In more developed countries, Blacks, Asians and other minority ethnic groups have been found to suffer more severe COVID-19 infections than other ethnic groups. Some have postulated that this is more likely due to genetics. I think than poorer socio-economic states, access to care and health inequality might be a more straightforward reason for this than just genetics.
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Muhammad, this is a good article, but we still lack critical data to fully understand the mortality and morbidity differential re: COVID-19 . We believe that much of the structural issues of healthcare availability, housing, employment options for working at home, and the preponderance of “essential” workers who are people of colour and implications for spread of the virus are causal. But we are very early in understanding this pandemic and routes of source and spread. I hope this paper is not seen as definitive but rather as a stimulus for more study - sooner and not later. The acuity of need for objective data and understanding is important for all of us.
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I am conducting research on minority teachers and wondering what to expect with regards to minorities' attitudes toward other minority groups. Will they be more tolerant? more prejudiced? the same? Can anyone please refer me to some literature on the topic?
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Dear Shahar
Sorry my answer comes very late.
For Central Europe, Andreas Wimmer has found out, that immigrant minorities tend to make social boundaries towards more newly arrived immigrants by emphasising precisely those markers that the majority uses against the more newly arrived as well. They may even be more decisive in their boundary making than the majority, in order to defend their gained belonging and participation.
Wimmer, Andreas (2004). Does Ethnicity Matter? Everyday Group Formation in Three Swiss Immigrant Neighborhoods. In: Ethnic and Racial Studies 27, 1-36
For primary school teachers in Switzerland, I have found the same effect in those teachers that are strongly oriented on social upward movement. In my study, I call them 'type D'. From the four types I have identified, type A would be particularly open towards minorities, while types B and D would be particularly distancing.
Mantel, C. (2020). Being a teacher with a so-called ‘immigrant background’: challenges of dealing with social boundaries. Intercultural Education, 31(2), 173-189.
Good luck with your project,
Carola
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Hi, I'm a bit confused on the differences between grounded theory and thematic analysis.
My study is looking at the following :
Mental health, suicide and minority groups : A qualitative investigation.
Aim : to explore how mental health and suicide are perceived by members of tminority groups
Objectives
1) To explore minority groups perceptions of the causes of poor mental health and suicide.
2) To explore current coping strategies used by minority groups for mental health problems.
3) To explore any barriers to mental health care for minority groups.
Methodology will be qualitative semi-structured interviews with members of the minority group in question.
After collecting the data how will I analyse their answers? Thematic analysis or grounded theory?
I've ruled out IPA because there is no specific lived experience or event I want them to talk about, just their perceptions in general.
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There is an important sense in which you have answered your question just by the way you asked it" "After collecting the data how will I analyse their answers?"
The idea of collecting the data and then analyzing it corresponds to thematic analysis, while one of the key identifying characteristics of grounded theory is that data collection and data analysis proceed together. In particular, grounded theory emphasizes ways that the data collection process can evolve, based on the ongoing analysis, leading to changes in who is being interviewed and the questions they are being asked.
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Just think about it from the sustainability point of view, who should be expected to benefit locally and internationally and why when a dominant extreme democratic outcome like 2016 USEXIT takes place?. The local minority or majority? International normal liberal democracies or dictatorial systems/democracies/regimes?. What do you think?
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Dear friends, those interested in ideas about Trumpconomics may find some good food for thoughts in the following unpublished article and I am sharing it here:
The 2016 shift from normal liberal democracy to extreme liberal democracy in the USA: Pointing out the structure of Trumpconomics, its meaning, and its expected local and global implications, both analytically and graphically
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I am looking for a qualitative instrument (e.g. scale) related to minority stress, felt stigma, internalized stigma but specific to LGBTQ parents.
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This article may help you
Goldberg, A. E. & Smith, J. Z. (2011). Stigma, Social Context, and Mental Health: Lesbian and Gay Couples Across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 58(1), 139-150. DOI: 10.1037/a0021684
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His philosophy and par-xis have solution on caste/class/gender/religion question.
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Because it was never tried out.
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There is a growing debate about expertise in peer review. The debate focuses on claims that lived experience needs to be a requirement for those reviewing papers from marginalized, minority groups or persons who face discrimination.
What do you think are the appropriate responses and strategies to address the concerns expressed in the debate?
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I am definitely for inclusion an diversity. We should find pragmatic ways of working towards that.
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Propose a discovery or hypothesis for the first time is important in science. Frequently, pioneering research is published in abstracts of scientific meetings (for example, the abstracts of the Society for Neuroscience). In these meetings, new, preliminary and / or controversial ideas are more welcome than in the journals and they are defended face to face...
Therefore, the publication of the title and the date of the abstract in the references of a paper is very important.
Is this a good reason to convince reviewers that they should accept abstracts in the references?
Why do some reviewers not accept this easily?
How many publications have really been withdrawn or rejected because of disagreements on this issue?
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Hi,
The mention of an abstract in the reference is important, mostly because not always a full research paper follows this abstract, and it is well known that abstracts are rarely cited, and if the abstract is not mentioned in any reference, its priority could be lost.
It is difficult to say how many papers were rejected on this issue , or why some reviewers do not accept this easily, maybe they are not aware what a rejection of this type of reference could cause.
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I am planning a small research proposal as a part of one of my masters' units. The broead topic of the proposal is social differences in students' academic achievement. I am interested in investigating whether there is a correlation between peer victimization and Academic achievement, using a test of relationships (Pearson, Spearman, Kendall etc.) The sample will be students from ethnic minority groups. My variables will be peer victimization which will be the independent variable and academic achievement which will be the dependent variable. I was thinking of include race/ethnicity as a third variable but if I do so, I don't know which will be the appropriate test for testing the relationship of all three variables.
Can you spot any drawbacks on the research design or in the Research Question?
Is there any reliable and valid measurement for primary school students' academic achievement?
I would appreciate that, because I am a novice in research.
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What's your definition of "peer victimization" (please be comprehensive and explicit; provide a few examples)? Interested. Use ethnicity if possible. I would also consider other variables such as socio-economic status, home and school environments (social, physical, geographic, linguistic, etc.) and many others. Many similar studies have been done. Also, and importantly, if you're just beginning to get into this kind of research (you mention you're a novice), be sure to familiarize yourself with and follow ethical standards and protocol.
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Teaching and learning about multi-dimensional identity is complex. I attach an article chronicling my own wrestling with this issue in the context of Australian young people and the Australian school curriculum.
But supervising some excellent higher degree research candidates exploring the teaching of identity in other contexts such as Pakistan, Nepal, and international schools around the world has only underlined the complexities. Respect for ethnic, indigenous and religious minority groups is usually extolled in official curriculum documents but often majoritarian views dominate in reality in prescribed textbooks, and there are degrees of 'othering' of in-country minorities or countries that are perceived as different.
It would be great to hear from countries or jurisdictions where you feel that genuine, successful and intelligently nuanced educational practices are in place in relation to teaching about identity.
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Did you try inclusive classes, I think that should work very well. Projects with social outreach, interaction with local communities and with the students within their project groups should also contribute to your issue solution. There’s hardly a “silver bullet” though.
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The membership of any sport organisation is provided by the membership. The skewed representation of sport organisation boards is quite likely as much to do with the structure of the legitimising membership. For example, in clubs, where the membership is made up of individuals, one would expect some degree of reflection of the overall membership, certainly with respect to the main differentiations such as gender. However even in these cases it often does not occur. Why?
So then for minority groups with say less than 20% of the total membership, given the democratic processes, why would anyone expect them to gain fair representation. In a democratic process the majority rule.
For organisational membership organisations such as NGB's NOCs and IFs this situation is exacerbated further as minority groups, even gender (which is not really all that minor in many cases), becomes minor due to the way in which the membership is formed and in turn legitimises the next level of organisation.
I would be interested to hear how you feel this can be changed and also why you feel that the minority view should be even disproportionally represented if at all in a majority based democratic system.?
My own opinion is not expressed here, however I do believe that the very structure of sport facilitates the issues that you are investigating.
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Hi Brian and Andrew!
Thanks for your interest in our project and for your notes, I do hope that I’ve interpreted them as inteded. Brian, why minorities should be disproportionately represented in a majority-based system is indeed a question that warrants further explanation. Take for example the Swedish Billiard Federation (http://www.biljardforbundet.se/) in combination with the question of gender diversity. This federation’s membership is approximately 90 percent male, and in that sense their all-male board is an almost perfect representation of the membership (i.e., not at all skewed).
However, from our perspective neither an all-male (to continue to use gender as an example) membership nor an all-male board is legitimate or wanted. Many reasons could be given for this, but in a Swedish context one of the most obvious ones is that sport is heavily dependent on public funding, and that skewed memberships and boards therefore give certain groups access to and control over more public funding, which is highly problematic from a diversity and equality perspective.
As you rightly point out Brian, the very structure of sport facilitates issues of representation. Because board nominees often (though not always and why this is, I believe, is an empirical question) are ‘plucked’ from the organization’s ranks, the composition of the membership is one such important structure. There is thus an inexorable connection between the diversification of the membership base (an important sport development goal in Sweden and I would presume many other countries) and issues of representation.
What however complicates the matter further is that there are all sorts of grounds of representation (and in effect skewedness) in sport, gender is but one of them (and now I’m drawing on the data we have so far in the project to exemplify). Some of these has to do with social categories such as gender (e.g., “Maybe we should nominate a woman?), age (e.g., “Maybe we should nominate someone younger?”), and ethnicity (e.g., “Maybe we should nominate someone with immigrant background?”). Others relate to geographic representation (e.g., “Maybe we should have someone from the northern districts?”) and representation of intra-sport varieties such as the representation of specific sports organized within the same federation (and thus governed by the same board) (e.g., “Should we nominate someone from cross-country skiing or downhill skiing to the Swedish Ski Federation board?”) or the representation of various orientations within a particular sport (e.g., “Maybe we should nominate someone from recreational and not competitive skiing?”). On these types of issues of representation, issues of skills and competencies (e.g., “Maybe we should nominate someone that works in marketing?”), associated networks (e.g., “Maybe we should nominate someone that knows a lot of people in public policy making and funding?”), interpersonal relationships within the board (e.g., “That person do NOT get along with that person, s/he can’t be nominated!), and board terms (e.g., “We shouldn’t nominate all new candidates at the same time”), are also brought up for consideration in board nomination processes.
Our project, broadly speaking, is oriented towards finding out what considerations/criteria (as exemplified above) regarding what constitutes an “appropriate candidate” for a NSO board are brought into the nomination process, how such criteria are weighed against each other, and how this process works inclusionary and exclusionary. Essentially: why is a candidate made a candidate? (And who are by definition excluded from being a candidate.) Our hope is that such knowledge will be fruitful for practitioners (whether in policy-making or sport) when they seek to develop governance as it relates to board composition. Again: thanks for your interest in this topic, hope to continue this dialogue once we’ve come further in our analysis.
Cheers,
Cecilia
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Which one of the two claims below exposed is right, in the opinion of the experts in gender issues in social research in RG?
1) A gender analysis is not limited to the analysis of the women as object of research, but it is aimed to understand the social construction of gender and to discover the difference in the problem studied.
2) Women can be taken into account as one of the minority groups, such as they are thought in the feminist studies and queer theories, which go beyond the gender construction issue.
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Good afternoon Maria,
In my opinion the construction of gender dialetics by the social sciences, beyond a theory, is a form to distinguish societies levelings in, as you well say it, social categories. However I consider that gender differentiation should not be seen as social evolution, agreeing with Bussey and Bandura when they say: "Human differentiation on the basis of gender is a fundamental phenomenon that affects
virtually every aspect of people’s daily lives."
The "Gender Perspective in Social Research" should be a base for social criticism if seen as a differentiation factor, as well as a behaviour conduct.
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Anything that regards a correlation between repressed minorities and organized crime.
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You might want to have a look at Perri, F. S., Lichtenwald, T. G. & MacKenzie, P. M. (2009). Evil Twins, the Crime-Terror Nexus. The Forensic Examiner, Winter 2009, pp. 16-29.
Perri et al. posit that organised crime has its strongest influence where the rule of law is at its weakest and where law enforcement performance is poor. They also note its particular prevalence where there are significant ethnic minority groups in a community that law enforcement have difficulty policing. Although the co-operation may be most overt in weak states it does occur in more stable regions, but particularly in ‘parts of otherwise viable states where law and order is absent or compromised, including urban quarters populated by diaspora communities’ (Perri et al. 2009). 
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I am designing a research project about the effectiveness of bilingual education programs for minority children in China. I need some insight on evaluating the effectiveness of these programs.
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There are many factors and social conditions that have to be considered in bilingual education programmes. I recommend Monica Heller's Linguistic minorities and modernity. London-New York: Continuum 2006 as one of the most compreensive studies on bilingual education.
You can also have a look at some case studies, e.g. Nicole Dołowy-Rybińska and her studies on Sorbians, Bretonians, Kashubs, Welsh and other
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I am specifically asking for socio-psychological studies. I do not like the term "intolerance" since it is politically loaded, but make use of the literature on tolerance, too. I am looking for how groups others each other mutually..
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Ayse, perhaps you could also contact prof. Huber hermans, here: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Hubert_Hermans
Best...
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especially cultural heritage of national, ethnic and religious minorities
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For a historical perspective, you might want to check out Conserving Culture: A New Discourse on Heritage, edited by Mary Hufford.  University of Illinois Press, 1994.  It contains some early articles on the intersection of culture and resource management. 
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I'm looking for research into the effectiveness (or not) of staff networks to support minority groups. Focusing on disabled staff networks but also interested in any other minority groups.
Any suggestions very much appreciated.
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Githens and Aragon (2009) have this nice overview on LGBT staff networks: http://adh.sagepub.com/content/11/1/121.full.pdf
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Particularly for minority groups. For example, would symptom reduction for an African American depend on the racial composition of the group?
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Hi Jennifer:
We found some interesting racial/ethnic composition results in our study of transdiagnostic group cbt. See attached link (http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2015-00522-001/) and feel free to email me for questions!
Best,
Dan
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The research is looking at alternatives measures of success among ethnic minority groups. Apart from the attribution theory, what other theory(ies) best explain the construct of success?
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For researching entrepreneurial success among ethnic minority entrepreneurs, the following ways can be taken up:
1. Devise survey of ethnic minority entrepreneurs,
2. Use personality measures for survey,
3. Also use attitude measure around personality traits measure,
4. Devise and include measure representing success,
5. In survey, also include contextual/environmental variables,
6. After collecting data, analyze by using regression or logistic regression analysis,
7. Write the results.
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Burma has adopted a Constitution in 2008, which features fake federal system. It has a long history of ethnic conflict between majority Burman and many other ethnic minority groups. The political system under the current Constitution is 2008 semi-presidentialism (literally, it is not correct to say).
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Parliamentarism is certainly better than presidentialism in the abstract, if by presidentialism is meant a one-person office. (Collective presidencies have their merits). But in a deeply divided place it is just as important to consider how to create a properly collegial cabinet, under either parliamentarism (which can be combined with an overly powerful Prime Minister) or presidentialism. The electoral system is just as  important: list-PR will likely be the most suitable option in Burma. For more information see J. McEvoy and B. O'Leary (eds). Power-sharing in Deeply Divided Places, and A. Lijphart Thinking About Democracy. So-called semi-presidentialism (the French model) is not to be recommended: its sole use in a deeply divided place that I know of is in Sri Lanka. In Burma it would ensure permanent Burman domination. Enough said. 
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In a world characterised by increasing integration on economic, political and institutional levels, the notions of sovereignty and independence are becoming somewhat vagues and a number of social entities such as ethnic groups which exist within wider societies are perceiving such integration - which is partly due to globalisation - as a threat to their culture and identity. How can such social groups protect their culture in this context?
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Different people will have various opinions on this subject, but many believe (including myself) that maintaining native languages is the fundamental and essential key to preserving cultures and traditions. As languages disappear, the oral traditions that go along with them also fade away, which is an immense loss to the world as well as to the native population.
Modern English (or mutilated forms of modern English such as is spoken in parts of the USA) simply does not have words for many elements of native cultures, so keeping the original language active and alive is the only possible answer.
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I'm the editor of a book on Participation in Community Work and one of the authors had to quit suddenly. I therefor need to get in contact with another author that can be interested in writing a chapter in this book that will be published by Routledge and have authors from 5 continents.
If you are interested in participating in this please contact me. The chapter has to be finished by the end of november latest.
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The book is now published: see Larsen, Sewpaul & Hole (2014):Participation in Community Work - International Perspectives, London: Routledge
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Can security policymakers respond to societal security threats without increasing the insecurity of minority groups?
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I have written a short essay (2000 words) about it. The link to this paper will be available soon.