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Hello friends,
I am working on a project involving three groups- two active intervention and waiting list control group. I have some missing data. So do I go for ITT or PP model of analysis as it is a mind-body medicine technique that is given as intervention? KIndly help.
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Best would be to do both.
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Strychnos pseudoquina is used by Brazilian native people as healing compounds.  
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Students enrolled in nursing programs, especially programs offered for nurse practitioners and advanced nursing specialists, could adopt this philosophy by incorporating elements of both Eastern healing and Western medicine. This would expand their understanding of the fascinating world of Eastern medicine. Through this learning experience, they will discover the value of well-rounded treatment approaches that address the mental and spiritual elements that often give way to physical suffering. Nurses in Australia should embrace the philosophy and practices of TCM and include acupuncture as an additional skill. This would allow them to build upon their already impressive capacity in the nursing industry.
What is your view on this?
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These days patients often ask health care providers about TCM. Therefore, curriculum for training health care providers should have at least basic content about TCM.
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This is just a philosophical question. I am curious what you guys think. Body-weight is tightly controlled downwards (to prevent weight loss) but more open to weight gain in case of starvation or famine. So why have satiety and satiation at all, from an evolutionary perspective, when food was not always omnipresent and scarce.
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One could be that there are digestive problems. To much ingestion would lead to problems and no movement at all. So that is why satiety would exist I assume. There seems to be a difference between satiety and it reaching the brain (20-30 minutes).
In case of foods, fats, casein, fibre would give satiety, while whey and fast carbs would lead to situation of continuing insulin-glucagon pathways. So it might not be food related as different foods can contain different nutrients.
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We have some important organs inside our body, which is placed at right side and left side. While the organs placed reversed it made the systems not run well, abnormal.
I am curious about people's using right hand for eating, everyday we use right hands. Is there any influences to our systems? Such as to the gastrointestinal system, cardiovascular, respiration, endocrine system, etc. 
What happened with those who left handed in eating ? Any different with those who right-handed? And what about the handicapped?
Anyone can answer my curiosity?
Thank you very much
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Than you very much for your answer. I appreciated it .. 
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When measuring changes in human resilience we have found the Connor Davidson scale not as sensitive as to be expected. Any suggestions please on other options?
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This is tangential to your immediate question regarding measures of resilience, but as a kind of sidebar, I thought I'd mention the concept of "nadir experiences" as discussed by some in (primarily humanistic) psychology a generation ago. Following on Maslow's observed correlation between self-actualization and the occurrence of spiritual-like "peak experiences," it was noted that some among us also effect growth and realization of personal potential in response to "hitting bottom" types of life events, which became dubbed "nadir experiences."
More recently, somewhat analogous discussions can be found among positive psychologists in connection with separating out within "well-being" indices the elements of hedonic subjective experience (i.e., pleasure) and "eudaemonic" (also spelled "eudaimonic") experience, with the latter tied more to valued experiences of substance and meaningfulness which, as often as not, are not particularly pleasant. That discussion remains to my mind an ongoing exploration (i.e., they've got a ways to go to clarify the pertinent construct), but among researchers who have touched on it are:
Ryan, C. D., Huta, V., & Deci, E. L. (2008). Living well: A self-determination theory perspective on eudaimonia. Journal of Happiness Studies, 9, 139–170.
Steel, P., Schmidt, J., & Schultz, J. (2008). Refining the Relationship Between Personality and Subjective Well-Being. Psychological Bulletin,134, No. 1, 138–161. 
Waterman, A.S. (1990). The relevance of Aristotle’s conception of eudaimonia for the psychological study of happiness. Theory and Philosophy of Psychology, 10, 39–44.
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Hello.
is anybody familiar with morning exercises, to "connect mind and body".
- Breathing exercises to increase the oxygen level for example
- guided meditation
things into this direction.
thank you very much in advance!
Kindly Robert
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Hello, you can try any of these: 1. Diaphragmatic and thoracic respiration or breathing techniques; 2. Belly button or Narvel technique; dynamic stretching with relaxation music.
Thanks
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Spirituality is subject matter of the religions. However, may scientific findings be helpful for us, if the science excludes from the scientific debate the “spirit” as an effective part of the human beings? With regard to it, Western medical doctors only occasionally tried to study how the spirit affects both the mind and body; Western scientists were not able to explain in a scientific way the “cause-effect” relationship among these three dimensions, because Western medicine lacks instruments to recognize and measure the “spirit”. So this matter belongs to Middle Ages! However, according to traditional Chinese Medicine the mind, body and spirit of a person are inseparable and, according this viewpoint, for example, a “spiritual” impairment can affect both mind and body of a person. May be, in the next future, Western science will be also able to demonstrate both laws and mechanisms governing spirit. Dreams have been responsible for some major creative and scientific discoveries in the course of human history. I would like to quote this sentence: “It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday is the hope of today and reality of tomorrow” (Robert Goddard, in E.M. Emme Introduction to the History of Rocket Technology,1963).
What is your opinion about this speculation?
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Thank you for your opinions!
Probably if you study every thing existing in nature, both immaterial and
material, by the " scientific method", that can  become
"Science". May be right this affirmation?
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Are there any scientic evidence in favour of practicing meditation? Are there any differences due to the technique used?
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As is apparent in the replies to your question, there are both a variety of definitions of meditation and a variety of meditation techniques.
Two respected researchers' names I'm not seeing so far mentioned are:
-- Richard Davidson, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, whose work (primarily in the area of brain-imaging) has largely examined Tibetan Buddhist meditation techniques. One summary of his work is here:
-- Willoughby Britton, at Brown University, who has done studies with Vipassana and mindfulness (including work looking at some of the difficult, "negative" experiences that meditators sometimes have). A select listing of her work is here:
Both Davidson and Britton also have TED talks and other videos online.
Britton's Research Gate profile is here:
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And there are increasingly many books and studies on applied uses of mindfulness and meditation in, for example, psychotherapy. Two books I happen to have on my desk at the moment are:
Mind in the Balance: Meditation in Science, Buddhism, & Christianity, by B. Alan Wallace (244 pages)
Clinical Handbook of Mindfulness, ed. by Fabrizio Didonna (523 pages)
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Any suggestions/experiments regards designing a Yoga intervention for pain relief (even for short duration) where Morphine is not available? 
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It depends on what kind of pain (Palliative care)? Yoga cannot substitute potent pain relieving like morphine. But long term practices like deep breathing, yoga practice including meditation practice has been shown to enhance endorphin levels which acts as a natural pain killer. As for as sleep is concerned Yoga practice particularly Yoga Nidra and meditation practice with satvik food enhances sleep quality (Mainly NREM sleep). let us know what kind of pain it is.
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beads have been used in numerous ways ie rosary for contemplative prayer, worry beads to alleviate stress and so on, however, I am interested in bead biographies especially in the context of psychological trauma. The beads are chosen at random in a safe environment and under supervision of a facilitator. The client chooses the beads they feel capitulate their lives. As victims they are in a position of power to choose what they share or don't. The importance of social interaction cannot be underestimated. Any further information re this would be much appreciated. Thanks
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Our article published in peer-reviewed Journal "Communicative & Integrative Biology". A few major points discussed in the paper:
(1) Brain is not the source of consciousness.
(2) Consciousness is ubiquitous in all living organisms, starting from bacteria to human beings.
(3) The individual cells in the multicellular organisms are also individually cognitive entities.
(4) Proposals like “artificial life”, “artificial intelligence”, “sentient machines” and so on are only fairytales because no designer can produce an artifact with the properties like internal teleology (Naturzweck) and formative force (bildende Kraft).
(5) The material origin of life and objective evolution are only misconceptions that biologists must overcome.
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Can all human body-mind from evolutionary perspective contain the latent receptor-ligand i.e., Produce neurotransmitters in the synapse so that mechanism can be applied in treating dopamine/serotonin deficiency through mindfulness meditation or corrective genomic allele sequence intervention that are minimal? If so, how would you go about making a breakthrough in this field?
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The well documented placebo effect seems to support the possibility. Positive outcomes using cognitive therapy are also supportive. The particular mechanism used at the chemical and cellular level is the more difficult question. Does consciousness make use of quantum effects such as sub atomic particles randomly materialising from a vacuum? 
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Taichi short forms developed after 1956 are shorter and faster than the old forms, and they become nothing more than low-impact aerobic dances. They do not have any healing effect as the taichi old forms (30 minutes a day), unless you do 30 sets of short-forms in one day (see link below for explanations). But, who would have time and strength to do 30 sets of fast taichi or aerobics?
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Thank you Gregory and Pao Yen for your comments and insights on Tai Chi (TCC). Further to this discussion permit me to add the following thoughts.
TCC is a complex movement form requiring many hours of concentrated instruction and practice for the practitioner to master at a basic level. Whilst the research literature attests to TCC’s effectiveness in dealing with a number of health issues, it fails to mention the steep learning curve associated with it.
Part of the challenge with TCC is that the health gains attributed to it depend on the individual correctly performing the movement sequence—that is to say, s/he needs to not only be familiar with the choreography, but also to be comfortable in performing it, failing which the movements are executed in robotic, unnatural, and rigid form. In order to realise the benefits of TCC, the practitioner needs to be relaxed, fluid, focused, in balance, and natural. Where these considerations assume particular importance is in the area of program adherence. Many neophytes become discouraged by the rigor associated with learning TCC, and generally discontinue the practice feeling inadequate and confused, or dismiss TCC with a “been there, done that, got the T-shirt” attitude.
Ultimately, it's not so much a matter of what you do, as how you do it, i.e. quality as opposed to quantity. So ... enjoy!
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I am thinking mind-body skills groups, meditation, guided imagery, teaching breathing exercises, movement therapies, mindfulness, mindful eating, art therapy, journaling, and so on. How would you put together a virtual therapy group using these techniques?
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You may have something more interactive in mind, but there was a great review recently published on the efficacy of mindfulness and acceptance based self-help interventions:
Cavanagh, K., Strauss, C., Forder, L., & Jones, F. (2014). Can mindfulness and acceptance be learnt by self-help?: A systematic review and meta-analysis of mindfulness and acceptance-based self-help interventions. Clinical psychology review, 34(2), 118-129.
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There are several research on Transcendental Meditation (TM), for example, has found reduced blood pressure and insulin resistance, slowing of biological aging, and even a reduction in the rates of heart attack, stroke and death. The American Heart Association, which last year released a statement saying that decades of research indicates TM lowers blood pressure and may be considered by clinicians as a treatment for high BP.
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There are many aspects to this question, such as who, exactly, will adopt and offer meditation programs to the public, are all public meditation programs the same (and if not, how do they differ), and whether research on the effects or benefits of a specific technique (such as Transcendental Meditation) can be generalized to apply to other forms of meditation or other teachings.
The question as it stands is general, yet does not review all relevant research. For example, increased resistance to infectious diseases, mediated by TM, is not mentioned.
When considering public meditation programs, comparable observation, measurement, and experimentation need to be done to compare and contrast the various programs and techniques that could be made available to schools, medical facilities, or other institutions in society. Frankly, we are missing the kind of easily imitated standard research design (such as using the STAI Form Y inventory for measuring state and trait anxiety) that could be used by an independent research group to evaluate mindfulness, Zazen, transcending, and other such practical programs in a way that permits direct comparison of public benefit. These programs are not all the same in their mental or physical benefits.
Costs also need to be considered, as any effective meditation program will involve teaching, support, and other administration overhead that must either be purchased by institutions, donated by nonprofit organizations, or paid for by government agencies.
When considering expenses, for example, Transcendental Meditation (TM) is not the only organization that makes courses in transcending available to individuals and organizations. The little-known and unpublicized alternative, Natural Stress Relief (NSR) provides quality instruction and support for learning transcending, at only 7% of the TM course fee, by eliminating the need for providing trained teachers for each student, patient, or client. (NSR could also be tapped for research subjects; two papers have been published on the results of NSR, and another is in preparation.)
Since the underlying mechanism of transcending is the creation of a unique state of deep rest (which has physiological markers that show it as distinct from deep sleep or dreaming), a state which, with regular practice, dramatically reduces not only anxiety, but also all other stress-related disorders such as fear, anger, feelings of inadequacy, lack of autonomy, lack of self-direction, and lack of self-satisfaction, inability to relate socially or in a love relationship, low self-esteem, low productivity, bad habits such as substance abuse, and so forth, the public benefits of transcending certainly don't need to be limited to the treatment of non-contagious diseases.
But, as a place to start, using transcending as an adjunctive intervention to lower blood pressure is a good way to begin the introduction of transcending as an accepted and standard procedure for improving general public mental and physical health.
Disclaimer: I am president of Natural Stress Relief/USA and I help to conduct research into the effects and benefits of NSR meditation. I take no salary for this work, and NSR/USA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational and research charity.
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The subject male, who is 80+ years of age, has had swallowing disorder plus weak muscles since his stroke(s) which happened 4 years ago. Now, both his skin colour and cognition have improved a lot from a year ago. The main difference from previous years is that he goes to bathroom (10 feet away) about 30 times a day for cleaning and clearing up his throat. He also seems to be ready to talk very soon. I won't be surprised that he can eat again in a few years time. I could explain this phenomena with my Pao's Law of Exercise which is deduced from my taichi healing theory in 2013 (see attached). This is all about the raising of heart rate moderately 30 times a day and each time after the heart rate is increased, he would sit back to his chair and rest. At that instant, the higher heart rate would push blood to all capillaries until heart rate drops too low after a minute or two. If we assume that he would get a 1-minute time interval of good microcirculations for each bathroom visit, he could accumulate 30 minutes in one day. This is exactly the same as doing a 30-minute set of EXTRA slow taichi (for brain and most tissues, but not so true for muscles), or 30 sets of regular speed taichi (for all tissues).
Some healthy looking people would prefer to spend 3 to 4 hours a day to play 18 holes of golf. This is good but not good enough. If they have chronic diseases, I would suggest that they should play 30 holes, according to my theory.
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This purely neurophysiology. It is unfortunate that the potentials of this patient had never been capitalised upon to effect functional changes and improved quality of life in the patient. This is basically principle of repetition, overloading, anticipation and expectation. I have shown it in some of my previous studies that functional performance in stroke patient will continue to improve beyond the assumed 'window period' only if clinicians learn how to use the principle of repetition and irradiation. We should also know that if an information passes through a pathway continuously for a million times or more, there will be a permanent change in the neural information and consequently, a change in behaviour of the nerve. This will surely results in functional changes in the direction of the impulse.
This is just telling us that we should not stop the rehabilitation process for a stroke patient at any time. In some of my previous publications, I said that though the motor performance change may not be statistically significant, it will definitely bring a clinically significant change to the functionality and quality of life after stroke.
I am really surprised that a patient who can walk to the bathroom to clean up is wheelchair bound. I think the major gap here is that the rehabilitation team have undermined the principle of task oriented approach in improving functional performance. Functional performance is anticipatory and on-going. We should challenge the capacity of the patient by creating goal-specific functional re-orientation. We should create and discuss incentives of achieving a task with a patient while we create a barrier for the patient to overcome in order to earn the incentive(s). By doing this, we are creating an atmosphere for improvement in function. I need to stop here before this writing becomes a manuscript on its on.
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Few data in the literature shows that during yoga or sitting Chinese meditation melatonin seric levels are increased. Does anyone know any work that shows that pineal gland activity is also increased during these situations? Does anyone believe that it´s a link between the mind and so during these practices the pineal glang can be evolved?
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Evidence is quite weak so far for melatonin (some studies say it's going up, others say it doesn't, and even others say, yes, it is going up, but simple resting has the same effect, thus, maybe it is not the actual meditation practice, responsible...), but some fMRI studies and certainly the conceptual studies really point to the fact clear possibility of an involvement of pineal structures and derived networks.
Best, Tobias
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I have often seen the claim that cortisol mediates stress. But mine and other's clinical (and scientific) experience shows, that this hormone on the contrary, suppresses harmful stress changes in the body. The body in unusual (stressful) conditions has the ability to "fine tune" due to cortisol. That means, that cortisol repays (much reduce) all reactions in the body, except those, which are directly aimed at solving the problem.
Depletion of cortisol indicates, that the stress is too strong, and that the body can not keep control of the stress responses. With a lack of cortisol a generalization (considerable redundancy) of certain reactions in the body happens (e.g. inflammatory reactions), which is causing additional stress. However, even in serious scientific journals it is written, that cortisol is a "stress hormone". This statement is misleading. Cortisol - a hormone that "modulates of stress" as a minimum. Maybe someone shares the same view?
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I know that Bauke Buwalda is providing a lot of evidence to that effect in one of his latest articles (The acute glucocorticoid stress response does not differentiate between rewarding and aversive social stimuli in rats).
Renaming cortisol seems unnecessary though. Cortisol is still strongly stress related. It is much like the way we used to look at serotonin in depression; way to simplistic. It is however useful to have serotonin come up as soon as depression is mentioned.
The same is true for cortisol I feel. While I, and likely anyone in the field would agree that we can no longer simply say: high cortisol = high stress, it is still one of the hormones that needs to be mentioned.
So, for quick reference cortisol can still be the 'stress hormone', and nuances can be mentioned when going further into it. It's a good point though.
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It is shown that some techniques (yoga, meditation, tai-chi, relaxation, conscious breathing, etc.) improve immune system, cardiovascular performance, pain management, quality of life, and other aspects of well-being. It is reasonable that these changes would have positive outcome on cancer supression. Does anyone have experience, considerations or explanations on the mechanisms and efficiency of such interactions?
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I am not sure why I was sent this question. There are many who have far more experience than I in this area. One person that comes to mind is Prof. Patricia Carpenter of the Psychology Department at CMU in Pittsburgh..
That being said, my own 'intuitions' in this area are as follows:
I believe that the fundamental cause of many types of cancer is stress - both metabolic and psychological.. Techniques are now being developed by which we may quantify the health of a single cell. Quantities derived from our new understanding of dynamical systems (living systems are dynamical systems), are being applied such that we may now have an objective measure as to what it means to be healthy or diseased (see reference below).
One may argue that such approaches are limited to the metabolic domain and are not relevant to the psychological. However, recent theoretical work (and I include my own contribution) suggests the possibility that function and metabolism may actually be the same thing in ALL biological processes - including the brain. Such unified theories offer a means by which the psychological and the physiological may be more closely aligned. Although, perhaps, counter intuitive, such approaches greatly simplify the relationship between the emotional and the biological.
Within such a theoretical context, there is a necessary relationship between the metabolic state of the body and the metabolic state of the brain that equates to a 'logical sympathy'. The mind/body relationship becomes less of a dualistic problem and more of a complimentary dichotomy.
If these advances prove to be useful and relevant then it comes as no surprise that the stress relieving techniques that you have mentioned in your question would have a positive effect with respect to oncogenesis.
Davia, C.J (June 2006), "Life, Catalysis and Excitable Media: A Dynamic Systems Approach to Metabolism and Cognition", in Tuszynski, J.A, The Emerging Physics of Consciousness (The Frontiers Collection), Springer, pp. 255–292, ISBN 978-3540238904
Villorba, F; Van Piaggio, V.E (2010). "The role of mitochondria and mit-DNA in Oncogenesis". Quantum Biosystems 2 (1): 250–281.
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Effectiveness of mindfulness
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Thank you!
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What we experience in our life is affected by our thoughts and emotions we consciously think about. And such thoughts may include certain unavoidable natural fears.
Does all negative experiences of life are outcome of our own thoughts ?
Are there any efficient techniques for reprogramming such habitual negative thoughts ?
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Shweta , unavoidable thought to be reprogrammed needs effort and self programming. This is what psycologist do. On other hand if you see our traditional scriptures they also showed meditation lead to such control. Meditaion in scientific view leads to suppression and excitation of number of hormones which in turn leads to personality changes and also thought process. Person start thinking with different prospects which earlier he never thought of.
So yes.certain unavoidable fears or negative thoughts be reframed/reprogrammed by some mental techniques.
Thanks
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There is a lot of debate about how to measure the effect of stress on the body. What is the current thinking about allostatic load? Is there a more effective way to measure physiological stress?
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The concept of allostatic load seems viable, but there is not universal agreement on how best to measure load. Several different approaches to measurement have given promising results, with values related to disease prediction. The initial method of measurement was not meant to be the final. Measures continue to improve. Only one study I know of has found indications of reversal of allostatic load from intervention, and that was a pilot study. This seems to be a good direction for some of the research to take.