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Migration Studies - Science topic

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Questions related to Migration Studies
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I just wondered how colleagues relate their research on Deaf migrant and refugees to other fields or if they think the issues about Deaf migrants and refugees should be considered as an interdisciplinary commitment between Deaf Studies and Migration Studies.
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This question is really interesting! It engages many evaluations, dealing with migration issues. First of all, the host country and its general migration policy must be taken into account. What I am able to say is that, generally the reception of migrants does not concern the handicap aspects or particular problems of individual migrant. That is the reason why I said it depends on the host country, the sensibility of the country or something like this. The particular problems are identified later, when the migrants already have an accommodation and a legal status. For this reason and other things I think the best solution should be an interdisciplinary commitment between Deaf, Social and Migration Studies.
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Dear Global Research Community,
The issue of ,Race' and Blackness has been invisible in Eurocentric Disability Studies as Postcolonial, Migration and Black Studies more broadly have been accused of neglecting the issue of Disability in their critical analysis of power and racial discrimination.
Do you think black feminist and intersectional disability frameworks could fill this gap in critical examination of the colonial dynamics of power and knowledge?
Thank you so much in advance for your critical thoughts!
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Have you checked the respective papers:
Black feminist disability frameworks have already been suggested and developed, e.g.:
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Dear all,
I am looking for projects/initiatives regarding refugee representation and new media technologies. I am interested in researching how refugees use new media technology to represent themselves and how that contrast or not with mainstream representations. Can anyone suggest to me some research on the topic or does anyone know about specific projects/initiatives to check out?
This would be my Master Thesis on Migration Studies and I would really appreciate any advice, suggestion, or observation concerning the topic!
Thank you so much in advance
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I would recommend the following article:
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I am currently performing scratch wound healing assay using HUVECs. I serum-starved my cells overnight prior to wounding my cells. I used EBM + all supplements except growth factors + 0.1%FBS as my starving media, as I found that the cells were not healthy (they start to lift and die) if I only use EBM without any supplement. I had BBE in my starve media.
Interestingly, 24 hours after human VEGFA stimulation, I did not manage to see an effect in the migration area of VEGF group compare to no VEGF control group. This is quite surprising considering VEGF is a potent angiogenic factor used in many HUVEC migrations studies (I used 25ng/ml, same as many other studies). Our VEGF and HUVEC batches are new and we used P3, cells looked healthy after 24 hours migration so the issue is unlikely to do with the cells. Could it be the starving condition? Can someone who has done this offer a suggestion?
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Hi All,
I just realised that I have completely forgotten to reply for almost a year! I did manage to optimize the protocol, and in the end my HUVEC got a pretty good response to VEGF (more than 150% migration 18 hours after treatment). I think the trick here is not to add BBE or any other supplements into the EBM starve media, other than FBS (0.5%), Glutamine and ascorbic acid. It is possible that these other supplements/growth factors may have other effects on the HUVECs (e.g proliferate) rather than migrate, which may be why I didn't see a response to VEGF. Also I did starvation for 4-6 hours only and not overnight.
Thanks for all your contributions! If you have an even better protocol, please do share.
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Discussions about how to deal with demographic ageing and shrinking are taking place in increasing numbers of countries, especially in East Asia and Europe. Japan is my focus. So, is large scale immigration a solution to the perceived problems of ageing and depopulation in developed countries, but particularly in Japan and East Asia?
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This is an interesting question, that I've just run across now. In the case of Japan, this is complicated by the meaning of being Japanese, which is not simply a matter of citizenship, but also an ethnic or racial identity. If I get Japanese citizenship, it is unlikely that anyone will actually see me as Japanese in Japan, although I have had friends in Japan state that they think this could change. Also, the decline in the Japanese population is not entirely viewed as a "problem". Many of my interlocutors in Japan have indicated that fewer people is a positive, not a negative. The problem lies in the transition from the current population of about 125 million to a projected population of about 45 million by the end of the century if nothing changes. Costs related to care of the elderly, and a variety of other issue, present daunting issues that are facing the government to relax, to some extent, immigration policies. This recent article of mine may be of some interest: http://bjwa.brown.edu/24-2/empty-houses-abandoned-graves-negative-population-growth-and-new-ideas-in-neo-rural-japan/
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I am a little bit confused in indentifying some differences between brain/ or knowledge exchange and trans-knowledge in terms of mobility studies. So, could you clarify it for me? Thank you very much in advance.
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I agree with you. The term is confusing. My background is in Developmental Psychology and Psycho Analysis. I have never heard of such terms.
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I would like to know whether migration is bad for the originating countries/regions, or has some positive implications that are mostly ignored in socio-economic studies.
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Dear Dr. David Boansi you have raised the world wide growing concern that has a very serious impact on economy, health, education, etc in the developing countries.Brain drain is defined as the migration of health personnel in search of the better standard of living and quality of life, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide ( Dodani and LaPorte, 2005).Yes you are right dear Dr. David Boansi . The majority of migration is from developing to developed countries.The main drivers of brain drain are:
  • Better standards of living and quality of life,
  • Higher salaries,
  • Access to advanced technology and
  • More stable political conditions in the developed countries attract talent from less developed areas.
So, addressing the aforementioned gaps can minimize brain drain from the developing countries.
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I'm interrested in measuring the volume, the motivation, the institutonal settings and the economic effects of high skilled migration with special focus on Central Asia
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Dear Dr. Manfed Sargl you have raised the world wide growing concern that has a very serious impact on economy, health, education, etc in the developing countries.Brain drain is defined as the migration of health personnel in search of the better standard of living and quality of life, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide ( Dodani and LaPorte, 2005).Yes you are right dear Dr. Manfed Sargl . The majority of migration is from developing to developed countries.The main drivers of brain drain are:
  • Better standards of living and quality of life,
  • Higher salaries,
  • Access to advanced technology and
  • More stable political conditions in the developed countries attract talent from less developed areas.
So, addressing the aforementioned gaps can minimize brain drain from the developing countries.
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I am trying to review and analyse few public policies in migration studies. What could be the approaches or methods that help to go through and analyse policies effectively and efficiently. I would love to hear from you public policy analysis approaches and frameworks.
Thank you!
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You can also use USE THIS approach . I am attaching a document for your reference.
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Hi,
I am wondering if anyone can tell me what protein in focal adhesion complexes produces the most reliable and specific localization of the sites of focal adhesions when immunostaining. The context of my question is for the purposes of labeling for identification in cell migration studies? Thanks in advance.
Best,
Sam
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Hi, Sam
Is not necessary to stain both, with one is enough. Maybe I should have written "vinculin or paxillin". Those proteins are part of the focal adhesion complex, so they will give nice results.
As Han Zhang said before, you can also counterstain with phalloidin for F-actin. Those fillaments go directly to focal adhesions, so you will be sure that what you see is what you're looking for.
Take a look at figure 4A
Regards
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Method of calculating intensity of Migration?
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It depends what you want to do and what data is available. . If you want to work mainly statistically then you might want to check, if migration is part of the questions asked in the census. Then you can calculate migration data from one to other censuses. In the end you have statistical data on how relevant statistically migration is, but you not necessarily know, what makes people migrate.
To learn about reasons, you better make interviews with migrants. These would be most likely immigrants, people who moved to the place where you conduct field work. This kind of research will be more qualitative in nature.
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Dear All,
Can any one please help me how to simulate the shear-induced particle migration study in Poly-disperse fluid flow in Ansys Fluent software.
Please guide me how to simulate it in Fluent and provide me if any one has written UDF code for simulating Shear-Induced Particle migration (i.e.Diffusive flux Model  Phillips et al.,1992) in Ansys Fluent?.
Please help me,
I would really appreciate the inputs.
Thanks a lot in advance
Regards
Abdul
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Dear Mohammad Zandsalimy, Thank you so much..Its very useful one
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i am now working on the field of migrant (largely muslim) education in sweden, especially how to integrate then into the swedish society through education, and how the host society make then to accept the swedish identity, and accomodate the minority's identity
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Take a look this papers too: 
  1. David Westerlund, Ingvar Svanberg, Islam outside the Arab world, Palgrave Macmillan, 1999, ISBN 978-0-312-22691-6
  2. Carlbom, Aje (2006). "An Empty Signifier: The Blue-and-Yellow Islam of Sweden". Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs. 26 (2): 245–261. doi 10.1080/13602000600937754
  3. Alwall, Jonas (1998), Muslim rights and plights : the religious liberty situation of a minority in Sweden, Lund : Lund University Press, pp. 145–238
  4. Carlbom, Aje (2003), The Imagined versus the Real Other : Multiculturalism and the Representation of Muslims in Sweden, Lund: Lund Monographs in Social Anthropology, pp. 63–163
Nielsen, Jørgen S. (1992), Muslims in Western Europe, Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, pp. 80–84
I don't know anyone in my range that is working in your specific issue. Good luck
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As far as I have been able to determine it is mainly geographers and sociologists using this in their research. I would like to be able to argue its good use in migration studies as well. I have N. Worth's article, and Collins & Huang, and Caquard. There just have to be more, and later than 2012...
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Hi Ane,
as you make reference to migration studies, Ludger Pries already used this method in his article in International Migration Vol. 42(2), 2004: Determining the Causes and Durability of Transnational Labour Migration between Mexico and the United States: Some Empirical Findings. 
I will also use this method in migration studies in the discipline of economics, although my papers are only unpublished drafts so far...
Good luck and would be nice to know what you found helpful
Manuel
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From where we can get the data, information about seasonal migration , Particularly in India.
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Dear Professor Borse
There is extensive information on seasonal migration schemes (often labelled "managed circular migration" schemes) in reports on population movement released by the World Bank, the OECD and the UN Population Division.  Some of these reports contain comparative statistics.  Most of the schemes that are documented in these sources involve movement of labour across international boundaries.
Two collections of essays published in the 1980s addressing a wide range of temporary forms of population movement both within countries as well as across international borders were republished by Routledge last year.  They are edited by R.M. Prothero and M. Chapman asnd their titles are:
Chapman, M and Prothero, R.M (1985 - republished 2015) Circulation in Population Movement: Substance and Concepts from the Melanesian Case
Prothero, R.M. and Chapman, M. (1985 - republished 2015) Circulation in Third World Countries (which includes as essay on India as I recall).
Best wishes
Richard Bedford, University of Waikato
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I'm using IMa2 to get some measures of splitting times, theta and migration rates among penguin populations. I'm new to IMa2 and I'm asking around to see if someone more familiar with this analysis would be willing to take a quick look at my output to see if there is anything glaringly out of order and maybe walk me through the results a little? It will of course earn you a place in the acknowledgements! Thanks in advance.
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 hi, I had a quick look of your output. It seemed that the chains are not merged very well, especially for the t1. There are two standards for showing if you have a good MCMC mixing: the estimated ESS values (some of it are very low <6, 28,<5 );  the trend plot (the trend plot for t1 is not uniformly distributed ).  You might need more brun-in time and keep on looking of the ESS values and trend plot. 
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In particular I'm looking at the impacts that Russian architecture leave on harbin contemporary architecture and culture as well. And I am reading the book of difting" architecture and migrancy, any other books or theories discuss about the issues?
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There are a lot of good books about Russian architecture of the end of 19th and the beginning of 20th centuries in Russian. In English – see:
William C. Brumfield. The Origins of Modernism in Russian Architecture. University of California Press, 1991; Dmitry Shvidkovsky. Russian Architecture and the West. Yale University Press, 2007.
If I am not mistaken, A.J. Toynbee wrote about Russian heritage in Harbin: A.J. Toynbee. A Journey to China, or the Things which Are Seen. London, 1931
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There are variety of views on seasonal migration. In seasonal migration the period of staying away from home is important but this period is varies according to different experts and agencies.
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Dear Prof.Nitin Bajirao Borse,
I found some articles with the keyword "seasonal migration". I hope that you can find some views on seasonal migration in these files.
Best regards,
Hiep from Vietnam.
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Since my research is on the diasporic studies therefore I am focusing on how is gender playing a pivotal role in existence of an immigrant.
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Much depends on the sex/gender composition of specific diasporic communities.  For example, in Europe most emerging Syrian communities are made up of far more young men than older men or women, with few families.  By contrast the communities in Canada where I help resettle Syrian refugees is almost entirely made up of families and balanced by sex.  As a result, gender identity is  important in both contexts but interacts differently with social issues and populations.
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I found an interesting article about MSCs migration which is guided by FBS concentrations (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jor.20668/pdf). My questions are: 
1) How cells sense the food sources?
2) Is FBS a good chemoattractant universally (i.e. regardless species)?
3) What components in FBS make it a promising chemoattractant?
4) Seems to me MSCs can sense PDGF better than FBS. What is the reason for that?
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This a very good point Filipo. Do you have any idea to inhibit the proliferation of MSCs?
Thanks.
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I am trying to find a number of migrant workers providing informal care. It would be great if somebody can recommend me studies on this issue.
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Dear Nataliya,
Italian researcher Maurizio Ambrosini has written a book on the subjec with comparative data on several european countries:
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Demography is not my specialty, and I'm new to the study of "neighborhood effects" and geographic clustering by race/ethnicity and language. I'm wondering if there are some (even if more than one) accepted definitions of what it means for an area to be an "ethnic enclave" or a "high density" area (e.g., high Korean population). I'm sure there are many, but are there a few that rise to the top as the most commonly used/cited? 
Ideally, these would be either in the form of a calculation I could make based on ACS or Census tract/block level estimates, or a listing of tracts/blocks or ZIP codes that are considered to be enclaves. 
I've done some lit review and Googling but can't seem to find the kind of definition I'm looking for. Most of what I find seems to be either qualitative discussions of enclaves or one-off definitions used for specific studies. Just want to be sure I'm not missing any obvious "industry standards."
My study is of California specifically, but any leads would be helpful, even if national or international. 
Thanks in advance!
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Hi Matt:
Bildan,  An International Journal of Somali Studies, publishes articles on social and economic integration of Somalis in ethnic enclaves in the United States, Britain, Australia and other countries. Examples from this Journal are:
 P. Harinen, V.S, Haverinen . Contexts of Diaspora Citizenship: Citizenship and Civic Integration of Somalis in Finland and the United States, Bildaan Volume 2 
I Ali    Staying off the Bottom of the Melting Pot: Somali Refugees Respond to a Changing U.S. Immigration Climate, Bildhaan Vol. 9
These two articles and others on Somali enclaves in the US and  other countries are downloodable. 
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My thesis is that reflecting these examples will help in developing and evaluating youth mobility schedules from today. I have worked on the orphan train movement  in the US, the operation Pied Piper (evacuation during WW II) and compagnonnage in 19th century France.
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Many thanks for your precious hints.
I have just watched an interview with Margaret Humphrey, and a documentary on Fairbridge:
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My Ph D supervisor who is a sociologist, is asking me to consider Giddens' concept of reflexivity in analysing migration phenomenon. I don't have a sociology back ground, but from the initial reading it seems to me that it does make sense to assume that migrants do make a "reflexive assessment" of the opportunities related to migration. However, I don't think that this is a process that should apply only to middle class skilled migrants who want to change their lifestyle. In ultime analysis all migrants being these  unskilled or not, low or upper income, move because they make an assessment of their current situation and believe that they will be better off in another place
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Hi Bruno,
I apologise for my tardy response - from a Giddensian perspective you are correct in saying that the 'migrant' is the agent and the 'outside' is the structure. But it is important to define the 'outside'. The 'outside' could be seen as a macro-level structure - i.e. the erction of borders by governments which reinforce what migrants do at the agency level. But also, the 'outside' could be interpreted at a meso-level structure: that is, the interaction of the migrant (agent) in relation to their wider social group (structure) which co-constitutionally reproduces the norms, values and customs of what the migrant does or does not do.
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Does anyone have research papers addressing the problem of managing and training a successful refugees distribution plan? Examples may include refugees originating from South Sudan, Kenya, and middle east countries. The research should include well written research problems/theses and a well laid out research design methodology. These methodologies may be, for example, research case studies or parametric/non-parametric statistical random sampling as are used by sociologists or ethnologists.
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We have studied, for example, Sudan refugee and immigration research using case studies.
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Displaced persons can be perceived - rightly or wrongly - as legitimizing territorial claims. Examples include the IDPs in Azerbaijan (in relation to Nagorno-Karabakh) and the Sahrawi refugees in Algeria (in relation to Western Sahara). 
Are there any examples of similar situations, where displaced persons have found durable solutions other than return, and where "their side" has nevertheless later regained the territory that they were displaced from? 
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refugee movement is most often associated to territorial claims. Historically, you could look at the work of Nezvat Soguk, for example, to see how the refugee institution was assembled in relation to territory and the exercise of authority over it.
The case of Afghan refugees in Pakistan, which I am more familiar with, also allows for different takes on the process. On one side, their movement has historically been associated with claims over territory, between Afghanistan and Pakistan and in relation to s.c. Pakhtunistan. On the other side, the relation between their displacement and territorial claims, also suggest broadening the range of concerns to the involvement of third states (whether historically the British and Russian Empires, or in more contemporary times, Russia the US and regional powers) in the establishment and evolution of territorial claims associated to displacement.
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In fact in most cases, and although on a different scale, the reasons why people migrate and the consequences of such movments, are the same regardless from the spatial context where the movment occur
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There is a fundamental difference between internal and external migration; but before considering this question, we need to face up to the current context within which this question has to be approached, which is the massive external migration into European-created countries from non-European lands. Internal migration within the EU by Europeans can be problem if the historical diversity of particular European nations is thereby undermined, but what is really threatening to Europe is the external arrival of hordes of migrants from Africa, Near East, and Asian. 
Academics have uncritically accepted the notion that immigration is "cultural enriching" and our current establishment, both the corporate and leftist establishment, barely allow for any critical reflection on this central issue of our times. Also, it cannot be denied that academics are afraid to go against the grain, although they like to pretend they are edgy and rebellious, but basically they agree with mass immigration and diversity, even though most of the evidence is showing that Europe does not benefit from Islamic, African immigration. Just Google "systematic raping of white girls in Britain," or  in Sweden, or in Norway, or Google about the expensive welfare costs of maintaining an African-Muslim underclass in Europe. 
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Somewhat is already know about D.suzukii overwintering in invaded areas, but what about aestivation? In South Mediterranean areas trap captures usually disappear (or almost disappear) during summer months.
Where is the fly? Anyone has recorded local migrations or refuge areas as was reported for Lepidoptera?
What do you think? Thanks in advance
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The conclusion we came to while monitoring for D. suzukii was that during the summer months, traps were not as attractive as the fruit that was readily available, giving the impression that the flies were not present (this was monitoring done in blueberry fields using apple cider vinegar; this may not be the case with other baits/lures that have proven to be more attractive).
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I am conducting a study on the socio-economic coping and adaptation mechanisms employed by African  women migrant in South Africa. I am looking at post apartheid era.
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Hi Ben
I use At Risk extensively and I have read the article you attached. I will use it though I still feel there is a gap on African situation. Africa migrants to South Africa are driven by governance issues in their countries. Natural issues are there but there is more of the human factor. I have tried to adapt the SLF.  
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It would be useful for me to meet some survey about the labour situation of qualified spanish migrants
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Hello Prof Goenechea
I don't know if these will be of any interest:
Bernardi, F., Garrido, L., & Miyar, M. (2011). The recent fast upsurge of immigrants in Spain and their employment patterns and occupational attainment. International Migration, 49(1), 148-187.
Goodman, B., Jones, R., & Macias, M. S. (2008). An exploratory survey of Spanish and English nursing students’ views on studying or working abroad. Nurse Education Today, 28(3), 378-384.
Blitz, B. K. (2005). Brain Circulation': The Spanish medical profession and international medical recruitment in the United Kingdom. Journal of European Social Policy, 15(4), 363.
If you cannot access this, look for this on Google Scholar, the full text is available under Google.com
Very best wishes
Mary
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Let's say, we investigate what caused the growth in working-age population (W). There are basically three factors causing the change in W. First, mortality at working ages (MT). Second, migration balance at working ages (MG). Finally, we have cohort turnover (CT) which is the number of those entering working ages minus the number of those leaving working ages (e.g. # of people turned 15 in some year minus # of people turned 65). So,
W2−W1=MT+MG+CT
I want to know how much each factor contribute to the growth in W. The simple decomposition looks like
W2/W1=(W1+MT+MG+CT)/W1=1+MT/W1+MG/W1+CT/W1
Is there any way of decomposing growth in a form of product of three partial growth rates? Something like
W2/W1=mt∗mg∗ct
Thanks in advance for any help, reference or hint.
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You should apply the theory of production with three factors. You could write it out in some additive form, for example, a Cobb Douglas production function with three factors. may be the same could be done with the CES production function.The latter may provide some more flexibility.
Cheers
Bharat Hazari
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Looking for statistical information
  • Immigration London (last 20 years)
  • City government policies
  • Socio political analysis
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Immigration into England is a post WWII phenomenon.
Against would-be-educated leftists who like to say that Britain has seen many immigrant groups settling in, read Bryan Sykes's book, Saxons, Vikings, and Celts: The Genetic Roots of Britain (2006), where it is stated: "We are an ancient people, and though the Isles have been the target of invasion and opposed settlement from abroad ever since Julius Caesar first stepped on to the shingle shores of Kent, these have barely scratched the topsoil of our deep-rooted ancestry."
The strongest genetic signal, the substructure, is Celtic, followed by Anglo Saxon, and some Viking traces; even Roman "genes are very rare in the Isles". A recent study publish in Nature, "The Fine-scale Genetic Structure of the British Population," supports this book, observing that the genetic composition of Britain hasn't changed much since 600 AD.
One cannot compare the episodic migrations of genetically related people into England over many centuries with the current program of mass immigration from all over the world in the last few decades. What is transpiring in England today started in 1948 when the British Nationality Act affirmed the right of Commonwealth citizens (including those of newly independent Commonwealth countries like India) to settle in the United Kingdom. It was from this point on that non-white colonization started to increase steadily, so that by 2012 the proportion of white British had dropped from 87.5% of the population in 2001 to 80.5%. 
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Both qualitative and quantitative research articles would be of my interest. If not for Polish, other eastern European migrant groups as Lithuanian, Hungarian, Slovakian and so forth would be welcome. Preferably in Irish and UK context (Western Europe as well). 
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Try to get in contact with Bryan Fanning at University College Dublin (bryan.fanning@ucd.ie). He is the expert on migration to Ireland and has close contacts with the Polish community. Best wishes. AH
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In my thesis I am analysing the socio-economic impact of migration on the Namibian family. Since internal migration has an important role to play I believe it is correct to assimilate financial and non finacial transfer to the remittance definition
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Thanks Patrick to confirm my thoughts. As you know in the BPM6 definition of remittances they are associated to the "finacial flows" generated bythose who have migrated and are now residing in the country. From my point of view and from the angle of my research this is not only limitative, but also conceptually wrong exactly for the points you have underlined. 
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In this conference presentation, I talk about Swedes leaving The Church of Sweden; i.e., opting out of an ascribed identity as Evangelical Lutherans MAINLY FOR FINANCIAL GAIN (to save on Church membership fees). In other words, this is rational decision-making utilizing a cost-benefits approach. I seriously doubt that the choice to opt out of membership in the Church of Sweden has much to do with religious choice. I could be wrong, but for those leaving “The Church,” I think it is purely an economic choice based on money, not on religious conviction, or lack thereof. By contrast, I do think what has happened with secular Jews in Israel is a matter of conviction. Like Sweden, Israel has a mandatory Burial Tax and a large segment of its population consists of secular Jews (i.e., those who consider being Jewish an ethnicity and not a profession of religious faith). In Israel, these secular Jews became politically active to demand that civil (non-religious) burials be made available; and they succeeded: http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/news/secular-burial-site-approved-in-jerusalem-1.74744
Burial is a significant rite of passage and most people have strong feelings about the burial rituals to be observed upon their passing. I can state this unequivocally as an attorney who specializes in Wills, Estates, and Trusts. I have prepared hundreds of end-of-life decision making documents (Wills, Living Wills, Powers of Attorney, inter vivos burial expense trusts, Donation of Body Parts documents, etc.) and know that clients give considerable thought to the contents of these death-planning documents. In Sweden, the inability to vote in The Church elections results in an inability to elect the leadership of The Church – the 250 odd “national officers” of The Church who determine how The Church’s obligation to provide for non-Lutheran burials in Sweden will be fulfilled. (For more on this, see “The Lives of Different Believers,” pp 62-70 of my dissertation—LEGISLATIVE TERRORISM, uploaded on RG.) It is The Church that administers all of the public graveyards in Sweden (except in Stockholm and the small town of Tranås); in this connection, it also establishes the amount of the Burial Tax, which is imposed on all taxpayers. Since there are practically no private graveyards in Sweden, The Church has a virtual monopoly on burial sites in the country.
Given this state of affairs, would it be unethical to make the rational choice to join The Church so that one has some say in which persons become the elected officials who dole out non-Lutheran burial space? Would it be more or less unethical if the person performing this costs-benefits analysis and joining The Church is a Catholic, Muslim, or Secular Humanist?
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Tack så mycket, Lars!  Det var precis den typ av svar som jag letade efter!  Och det där om Saami befolkningen var väldigt intressant.
Gwen
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I am currently writing my Masters thesis on skilled female migrants and am struggling to find literature that specifically references employment in non-regulated skilled professions such as Technical/Customer support, Project or Product management and such within an EU country. I would be grateful for any pointers.
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Look into the government website there is a 2014 report on skilled migrant workers in low skilled jobs . It is called migration observatory committee. Look also in Hopkins 2012. Simply the Best? Highly skilled immigrants and the UK's job markets. Hope this will help
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Prevailing Literature is about racial or voluntary inmigrants.
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Hola Camilo
mi trabajo habla directamente a lo que planteas. Cual es tu email que te mando un par de papers?
paolo
p.s. considera que estoy en el aeropuerto o sea que de pronto me demorare un poco en la respuesta
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Ideas or remarks for a future planning ?
Thank you !
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Thank you very much. Yes, i am writing my Masterthesis in this topic
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I am writing a PhD chapter about the workplace encounters between my research participants (Polish migrant women) and the local population in Barcelona. I realise the scarcity of materials about the workplace encounters. I am also interested in how the structure of the workplaces influences everyday interaction at work.
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Hi Alina, 
These related publications might help:
Creticos, P., Schutz, J., Beeler, A., Ball. E. (2006) The Integration of Immigrants in the Workplace. Chicago: Institute for Work and the Economy.
Valenta, M. (2008) “The workplace as an arena for identity affirmation and social integration of immigrants”, Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 9(2), Art. 14 (May).
Hashim, I., Mohd-Zaharima, N., Khodarahimi, S. (2012) “Factors Predicting Inter-Ethnic Friendships at the Workplace”, Interpersona, 6(2): 191-199.
Best, 
Dan
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I plan to research into mental health of migrants in a developed country. I am looking to explore the impact of the migration process- from pre migration to settlement phase and how their experiences- usually stressful, might contribute to psychological breakdown. Are there any programmes in the recieveing countries targetted at making the process less traumatic? I am interested in both forced migration and economic/professional migration.
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It is still an under-researched area, absolutely no question; our experience was that it was more commonly an aspect of studies looking at larger issues of health or social care and much less solely on mental health. That said, there are some good starting points here on RG, you can pursue further into their citations tabs for additional materials. Sadly still not a lot, and well scattered over the last 10-15 years.
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A small lutheran community coming from Germany exists in Lyon from the 16 century. This group owned a church, settled in Geneva from 1707.It was mostly composed of traders who went to Geneva four times a year for the holy communion. But, from 1770 onward, when the Calvinists from Lyons got their priest, the Lutherans went more and more to that church, letting down Geneva. For about 75 years, the Lutherans disappeared from Lyons. At the turn of the eighteen and nineteen centuries, the community spent her life in the shade of the Calvinist church. Between 1800 and 1850, the immigration movement of swiss, germans and Alsatians was quickening. In 1851, after multiples fruitless tries during the last fifty years, the Lutheran reverend Georges Mayer create an evangelic german church which is quickly linked with the Augsburg Confession. The german community managed the church for nearly 30 years until the arrival of the first French vicar in Lyons .For another 30 years, the relations were stormies between the two communities. The first world war marked the death of the german parish. The French church survived with difficulties during the twenties and thirties. The “renaissance” was due to two extraordinary personalities: André Desbaumes and Henry Bruston The Lutheran church became an inescapable part of the Lyons’s oecumenism and opened itself to the world.2007 marked the beginning of the merger between the Calvinist and Lutheran churches.
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Dear Stephen,
Thanks for your answer.
I wish you a happy new year 2015
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I'm searching for articles or any papers that use this theory.
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I think you should be more precise. Do you refer to social assimilation?
Labour Market assimilation?
or Educational Assimilation?
Anyway, there is a good quick reviw ofthe most important articles and of the more recent ones on the first part of the fololowing article
Timothy j. Hatton, 2014, The Economics of international migration: A short History of the debate" Labour Economics, 30, pp 43-50.
Also
 De Palo, D., Faini R., Venturini A, 2006, The social assimilation of immigrants, IZA or CEPR working paper.
Luthra R. and T. Soehl, 2014, Who assimilates? statistical artefacts and intergenerational mobility in immigrant families, Working paper no. 2014-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research
I hope these papers can help!
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I am particularly interested in post.2008 empirically-based studies.
Thanks!
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Thank you for your answers. I will be sure to follow up on these leads.
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I am interested in research related to Transfer qualification (Content/ curricula, success factors, Duration etc.) for teachers within the EU. Since the education of teachers still varies within the EU, this is a non-tarifary hurdle for teachers migrating within the EU and trying to work in other member-states. Also, is there any comparative study on qualification profiles of teachers trained within the EU?
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Dear Andreas, I am not sure if I can help you, but there are several works on teachers in Europe here: http://epthinktank.eu/2014/03/20/teacher-education-in-europe/
Of course actually mobility of teachers is reduced to the Erasmus Programme...
Regards and good luck! 
Joaquín
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This makes it necessary to understand what actors, factors and characteristics are involved in this inhuman business.
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South Asia has several key characteristics that cause human trafficking to thrive in a region: large impoverished population, major cultural/linguistic/economic barriers for marginalized groups, porous borders, significant amounts of low skilled labor migration, among others.  Other examples would be Southeast Asia, Subsaharan Africa, Central America.  The vast wealth differential between the affluent and the poor in these areas, combined with social/educational/cultural/linguistic barriers due to discrimination toward marginalized groups, forces people to make risky choices for work.  Lack of opportunity for the least advantaged of a society makes them vulnerable to exploitation in the informal sector.  Just based on the sheer magnitude of the population living in poverty, India has circumstances that encourage trafficking.  Large numbers of unskilled, uneducated migrants means that unscrupulous people are likely to take advantage of that populous.  
The chance at a better life in the big city is motivation enough to engage in risky migration, and these migrants are often exploited by traffickers.  The circumstances create the traffickers and the traffickees.  Traffickers don't manifest in a vacuum, they are opportunistic people, often desperate to earn money, and likely to have been exploited in the past.  
Thailand is a destination, transit, source  country for trafficking, not because Thai people are any more or less scrupulous than anyone else.  Thailand just has a set of historical realities, combined with neighbors filled with large number of marginalized people, and a comparative economic advantage in the region.  These marginalized, disadvantaged migrants (from Laos PDR, Burma, Cambodia, elsewhere) see the opportunities in places like Bangkok, and are willing to take the risks of informal migration for the chance at a better life.  They see the good life on TV, billboards, the internet, and make risky choices in hopes of having that life, as well.  All it takes is to go from the extravagant shopping malls in Siam Square in Bangkok, and travel a few blocks to the slums, and you see how in your face wealth disparity is.  If I were living in a slum within walking distance to a Lambroghini dealership, I might take risks, and even engage in less than scrupulous behavior to access that. 
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I am searching for up to date information on the migration trajectories of Subsaharian Migrants and their living and working conditions in North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, Tunesia, Libya, Egypt) as well as human rights violations by state and non-state actors against them. I am grateful for your advice on recent articles, books and reports.
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You can have some responses from Mohamed Saib Musette
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At the moment I am working in the field of migration research. Very often there are different understandings of specific terms and I would like to gather your ideas and understanding about translocality in order to get an overview on the spectrum of definitions. So how would you define translocality?
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This is a very interesting question and debate, Simon!
I think it is important to stress the fact that the local (trans-local) and the global (trans-national) are not mutually exclusive realities, particularly when looking at socio-cultural accommodation and citizenship processes. This increasingly mobile and interconnected world implies multi-dimensional connections (multi-territorialization rather than de-territorialization) on local and global scales simultaneously; that is, the development of community ties (whether local or cross-border) and of external networks, are not mutually exclusive processes. As argued by Appiah (1998), even cosmopolitans are rooted somewhere; in some cases, they might establish multi-territorialized associations, but they are never de-territorialized beings. Everyone, thus, combines local (particularistic) and global (universal) attachments.
The relationship with citizenship that I find relevant here is that, in a context in which the processes of transnationalism, globalization, and localization all coexist, the notion of citizenship itself may require a bottom-up reformulation, one that considers both its infranational (regional, local) and supranational (continental, multinational, or worldwide) levels and redefines citizenship in political, social, and cultural terms (see for instance Delanty 2000). The local sphere (regions, cities, neighbourhoods), here, gains an increasing amount of importance in the development of strategies for managing immigration and diversity, as this is where most of the social action takes place and is transformed.
Relevant references here are:
Appiah, K.A. (1998) “Cosmopolitan patriots”, in P. Cheah & B. Robbins (eds.) Cosmopolitics: Thinking and Feeling Beyond the Nation, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 91-116.
Delanty, G. (2000) Citizenship in a Global Age: Society, Culture, Politics, Buckingham and Philadelphia: Open University Press.
Friedman, J. (1996) “Being in the world: Globalisation and Localisation”, in M. Featherstone (ed.) Global Culture: Nationalism, Globalization, and Modernity, London: Sage, 311-329.
Geanâ, G. (1997) “Ethnicity and globalisation. Outline of a complementarist conceptualisation”, Social Anthropology, 5 (2): 197-209.
Hall, S. (1991) “The local and the global: globalization and ethnicity”, in A.D. King (ed.) Culture, globalization and the world system, London: Macmillan, 19-39.
Kivisto, P. (2001) Theorizing transnational immigration: a critical review of current efforts, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 24 (4): 549-577.
Levitt, P.; Glick Schiller, N. (2004) “Transnational Perspectives on Migration: Conceptualizing Simultaneity”, International Migration Review, 38 (145): 595-629.
Smith, M.P. & Guarnizo, L. (Eds) (1998) Transnationalism from Below, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.
I hope that this helps!
Dan
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People are moving from one place to another in the search of better livelihood. But in the modern age there is requirement of a passport, visa etc. to cross the international boundaries.
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Here's an article making the same causal link suggested by my colleagues above.
As a counterpoint, however, I'd also say that transnational crime organisations traffic MANY things across borders (not just humans). So, while they might gain a great deal of human smuggling business from a country's lack of legal immigration gateways, some of their OTHER sources of revenue (e.g. drugs), as well as their own general ease of movement, would ostensibly be threatened by increased surveillance and regulation of migration inflows.
I am not by any means implying that this (if true) would justify tighter border controls - only responding to your question of whether border controls CAUSE transnational organised crime, which I certainly would answer in the negative. Human smuggling is merely one source of income among many for transnational mafias, and it is rarely their primary source of income.
I'd also agree with Dr. Pol, above, that it would be fairly easy to correlate the State Department's ranking of countries' human trafficking policies with some measure of the restrictiveness of that country's immigration laws. I had a student do this as a research project two years ago, and he found no correlation (although the analysis was pretty flawed, unfortunately, so I'm not sure I would put any faith in those results).
Good luck!
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I try to find information about which Dodecanese Islands (Greece) are important as stopovers for nocturnal autumn migratory birds. I will try to relate this to the diet of the Eleonora's falcon. I'm in particular interested in the region around Patmos, Samos, Ikario and Lipsi. Is there a report or article describing important Island for stopover for migratory birds in this region?
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We are far away of you... but thinking about islands I can say that in Colombia (South America) the importance of islands for migratory birds has not been established, but has been shown to be sites of emergency stop. They may also be an option for weak migratory birds not compete for best continental habitat sites. During heavy storms and hurricanes the islands are the opportunity of refuge for migratory birds. These opportunities can be exploited by few raptors who remain on the islands as peregrin falcon.
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In social sciences many kinds of rates are estimated but they rarely permit a true international comparison due to the effect of time, space, etc. For example, for internal migration only instantaneous rates of changes of residence are comparable. It will be useful to see in other domains which are the rates that permit an international comparison.
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Yes, I agree with you that many derivates of vital statistics may be comparable internationally, like the TFR, and that the annual probability of changing residence, which can be drawn from population registers, is of the same kind. Unlikely, the single index k drawn from census data (see Courgeau, Muhidin, Bell, 2011 given in previous answer) does not have the same intrinsic or plain language meaning. As Bell and Muhidin (2011) said: k is not directly interpretable as a demographic indicator in the same form as the total fertility rate, the life expectancy or migration intensity.
However, such cross-sectional indices, which compare two countries substituting their true structures by a standard one, introduce an arbitrary in this standard which may lead to incorrect conclusions (see, Henry, 1972). Only a preliminary longitudinal analysis may permit a more precise answer.
References:
Bell, M., Muhidin, S. 2011. Comparing internal migration between countries using Courgeau’s k. In Stillwell and Clarke eds., Population dynamics and projection methods, Springer.
Henry, L. 1972. Démographie. Analyse et modèles. Larousse.
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Looking some online resources on Migration research? Any suggestions?
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ok, I will try it Hasan Mahmud. Thank you very much for the help!
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Anything you know on existing methodologies that evaluate policies in other ILO-related areas often linked with labour migration, such as skills development, access to social security, and working conditions, would also be helpful!
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When I Think of labour IZA comes to mind www.iza.org I'm pretty sure migration is a topic they persue.
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Although immigration processes are usually analyzed as a part of international relations the existence of immigrant and ethnic minority issues as a part of the political interactions between
two countries seem to be usually underestimated. Those interactions might be partially influenced by diaspora policy.
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Furtunately we are about to finish with the violent side of it....But going bat to the diaspora thing we are present in four continents, 22 states and have around 25.000 active members of Basque clubs worldwide...For three years i worked in the Foreign Affairs Secretary right in the Office of the President of the Basque Autonomous Government...And diaspora is a vital part of our paradiplomatic effort....Political refugees are just one aspect of this rich, multilingual,multinational experience...the bad news is that there is few stuff in English.
hey Babak nice to meet you and would like to know about your research interest