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Hello, need some help with these (figures attached).
The surface is very shiny and seemingly smooth, test is quite brittle, all broken, but apparently something attached to substrate and composed of branching globular chambers.
Sea bottom sediment sample taken from Sea of Marmara, about 200 meters water depth. Sample also includes abundant calcareous foraminifera (e.g. Bolivina and small Cassidulina) and a few echinoid spines.
Sorry for the poor image quality. One large Bolivina (about 500 microns long) is present in the last pic for size comparison. Appreciate all the help!
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In the photos you attach, I can see three specimens of planktic forams but you need to provide us with more clear and close photos to allow us to identify it. by the way i think the forams in the last photo is belong to Brizalina not Bolivina?? and you have to give him a double check.
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Greetings to all those who study paleohurricanes!!!
I’m studying paleohurricanes in Cuba through sediments from coastal lagoons. Many researches in the field of Paleotempestology have been developed by applying different "proxies'', such as: (1) Grain-size analysis; (2) Loss-on-ignition (Organic Matter analysis); (3) Micropaleontological indicators; I have identified two shells in both corers; (4) Geochemical methods, which in my case has been X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanning.
Two questions: 1) What is the most correct methodology to identify old events?; 2) After being identified, how to determine the thickness of the deposits (old events)?
Cordially,
Felipe Matos
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Thanks for your answer Dr. Matos Pupo. Before the timescale of French archives, I used other scientific works published around my study site to find other hypotheses of sedimentological imprints of past storms. If these are several works were made in Cuba or around (Maybe Florida, Bahamas, Hispaniola), you can identify possible marine layers in the core studied and presented in other papers to propose connections with yours. If there is no other study, you can propose a new hypothesis never discovered until now. Regarding their thickness, it depends on the number of datings made, the age depth model and the sediment composition/homogeneity, but i think that I can largely differ between events.
Greetings,
Pierre
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Hello everyone, I'm currently working on Early Eocene L.B.F. in Iran.
These thin sections display axial section A form of them.
This species is associated with Alveolina sp., Rotalids & Nummulites sp.
Does anyone have an idea of what might be?
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It is look like Alveolina sp.
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I can't find articles from this journal published in the last few years
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I found out different data of diatom enumeration that present diatom calculation with only count 300 valvae or countinue counting untill 1 full cover slip. So, If want to make represent condition which enumeration should be taken?
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Yes, I am working with peat cores and I count up to 400 valves for layer
Best regards
Maria
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How can we interpolate the age of marker microfossils according to new time scale.
Eg. if the previous research papers or standard zonation charts has used older timescale then how can we use that particular microfossil in the new time scale.
When we are working with multiple microfossils then we try to follow a single timescale (the most recent one) so this is required.
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With an example: in Agnini et al 2014, the LAD of Discoaster lodoensis was calibrated at 48.37Ma on the 1995 GPTS. It is thus between the bottom of C21n (47.906Ma) and the top of C22n (49.037Ma). On the 2020 GPTS, those chron boundaries are at 47.760 and 48.878Ma respectively. The mapped age of the LAD of Discoaster lodoensis on the 2020 GPTS is thus (by linear interpolation): 47.760 + (48.37-47.906)*(47.906-47.760)/(49.037-48.878) = 48.18606Ma. Note that we normally have a page on the NSB website allowing this kind of conversion but it is currently buggy since we updated the website last month and i m currently busy correcting it to allow this type of conversions again).
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Is there a simple and quick way to differentiate those two types, or do we use a special 'key' for that?
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Thank you very much Obianuju ! I had the same problem, which is solved now.
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These species have been seen along with possible Calpionellids and possible Saccocoma fragments
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Yes, these microfossils look like calcispheres.
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I already asked Dr Hisashi Suzuki and Dr Gawlick about the possibility of it being Radiolaria, However they both agreed it is not, though Dr Suzuki did not reject the possibility of it being new Radiolaria specie. It has been seen along with possible Calpionellids and possible Saccocoma fragments and Holothurians of Mesozoic.
I would be thankful to have new suggestions.
Thanks
Hesam
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Dear Hesam it is bryozoan fragment
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It has been seen along with possible Calpionellids and possible Saccocoma fragments.
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It resembles most likely bryozoan (or possibly some encrusting organisms...).
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They have been seen along possible calpionellids
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First of all check whether these could be echinodermal pieces! Each echinodermal piece behaves like a single crystal and turns out black in one goal with cross-polars on when rotating the microscope stage. Because a single Saccocomid animal is made of numerous pieces you should have a lot of them in a single thin section, not few of them.
Obviously your material does not comprise any calpionellid!
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I'm having trouble identifying the round bioclasts indicated by white arrows. Could they be transverse sections of the elements indicated by black arrows? If so, could they be some kind of spicule?
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Hi Alvaro, I would say that they look like calcispheres and some of them could be forams chambers (e.g. lower left of your thin section image). Calcispheres are common in carbonate rocks from cretaceous of middle east and yours have similar features. Please find those examples from Iraq which could be helpful.
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Hi everybody.
I found this in a thin section of an oncolitic limestone that belong to late Jurassic - early Cretaceous period (Tithonian-Valanginian). im a begginer in this matters but my first impresion with help of some books en researchs was that this corresponds to an algae, added to the presence of the rounded structure that I think is a calcisphere or an algal cyst.
I am really looking for some comments or thoughts to help guide me to get a good description of the specimen and thus be able to say what kind of algae it is.
Any comment or thought will be well received, i appreciate your help and time, thanks!
(the pictures were taken with 10x objetives)
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Hi, it does not make much sense to name such biosedimentary microbial structures at a specific level (hence at the generic level). Would you give generic or specific names to stromatolitic structures? The tubes do not show any parting and they are bifurcating with an acute angle. It would be smart to call them "cayeuxia structures" (not Cayeuxia algae). =)
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I am bit confused about which clustering method to use? I have collected sediment samples from an outcrop from old to young (constrained), my samples are hand picked specimens. I wan to run cluster analysis on the foraminifera and thecamoebians , but not sure which cluster method to use, I am between Ward's and Coniss and 'Euclidean' ?
I knew that (correct me if am wrong) Ward's usually used for clustering lateral samples, but what about coniss? in my case I have vertical section where I collected my samples from bottom to top!
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Dear Majed,
This paper may be of interest to you:
Vavrek MJ. 2016. A comparison of clustering methods for biogeography with fossil datasets. PeerJ 4:e1720 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.1720
It concerns biogeographic data but its conclusions are interesting for fossil datasets.
All the best.
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I am studying palynomorphs originating from Central Grecce, Holocene epoch. I have found some brown cysts that I am not familiar with. I think that they could be Quinquecuspis concreta. Thank you in advance for your help!
#biology #palynology #micropaleontology #taxonomy #dinoflagellate
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These specimens can safely be placed under Lejeunecysta sp. For identification of species specimens will have to be examined under microscope.
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This facies belong to upper Cretaceous in the Azarbailan, NW Iran. this is a lime sandstone or sandy limestone that deposited in marine environments. I need more discusstons about this facies with references .
Photos take by 4 and 10 lens of microscope.
Tanks
Mobin
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Dear Mr. Nejad,
your attempt to interpret the carbonate (micro) facies is very ambitious and is in my opinion not the correct way because the term facies is a far-reaching one to discuss the origin of a rock unit, in this case a sedimentary one where all available features of different scales need to be considered. The late Professor Walliser from Göttingen University once showed us a hand specimen and said: “ You should not create a new orogeny using only one hand specimen”. With kind regards H.G.Dill
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These microfacies belang to Cretaceous plagic limeston in the Azerbaijan (NW Iran). I cant identify plancton microfossils.
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No oolite at all, but calcispheres (= calciodinoflagellate cysts) -@ Som Nath Kundal -
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Dear All,
I'm looking for every reference could be useful. In addition I'm looking for the two following specific references that I cant download
1) Larger foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the upper Cretaceous (Campanian) to Paleogene (Lutetian) sedimentary rocks in the Haymana and Black Sea regions, Turkey Kuniteru Matsumaru. Micropaleontology Volume 62, No. 1 pp. 1-68 - online 07 Jun 2016
2) Larger Foraminifera from the Philippine Archipelago PART 1: Late Cretaceous to Middle Eocene Kuniteru Matsumaru. Micropaleontology Volume 63, No. 2-4 pp. 77-148 - online 31 Dec 2017
Moreover, if someone got an update email of Prof. Kuniteru Matsumaru I will be glad to receive this useful information.
Best
Lorenzo
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Hi Patrick,
nice! Many thanks for you very detailed list of references. I will go through them in order to find more on upper K forams.
Best,
Lorenzo
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This is not a project. It is a title of a book edited by me (Khaled Ouda) in collaboration with Marie-Pierre Aubry, and which is already published in Micropaleontology Volume 49, 2003. It is listed in the contribution list of Khaled Abdel-Kader Ouda at the Research Gate. The name Kevin Ouda who posted this project on my page is neither editor nor a writer among writers inside the book. He looks a liar and a fraudster. It seems as a trial from this person to steal the research. I appeal to the management of the research gate to stop this tampering and to verify every research added to the pages of scientists registered in the gate.
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Dear Robert
I guess so. You are right Thank you for your comment.
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Hi! I have found this palynomorph in most of my samples and I don't know what to make out of it.
I think it's essentially a sac that can be smooth or wrinkled with a small ball of citoplasm (?) inside. I can't see any other structure nor apertures.
These samples come from a Early-Pleistocene lake system.
Thanks for the help!
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Could some of the more crumpled specimens, like the second from the left on the bottom, be Leoisphaeridia? I have similar looking problematic palynomorphs that are folded, spherical, with no ornamentation or aperture. Sometimes things get so folded I don't know what they are.
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I am working on low latitude Paleogene shallow marine fauna of W India and would like to understand the trophic scenario of this fossil community. Where can I find relevant information on extant shallow marine fauna for comparison?
Thank you.
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Siddhartha:
Your question embraces broad spectrum of shallow marine environments, but this classic link would provide you essential insights:
Best
Syed
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Upper Albian, Cretaceous
Bed IX, Gault Clay, Folkestone, Kent
scales in bottom left
Best guess is within Hedbergellinae
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Cameron:
Your guess seems right, as the forms may belong to Hedbergellidae. Kindly see this link for insights:
Best
Syed
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Dear colleague!
Would you like to help in identification of attached SEM image Ostracoda. I am suspecting it Cytherella sp. The associated larger benthic foraminifer pointing Palaeocene age and shallow marine ramp setting environment of deposition. Image scale bar =μm
Thanks
Regards
SANJAY
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 Thank you so much   Dr.  Hakima Belkhattab  for your  input.
 Regards
 Sanjay
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Can foraminiferal paleontologists or interested colleagues help me to identify this species of agglutinated benthonic foraminifera from Paleogene of Egypt?? 
I suppose it is new species of Gaudryina...or not??
please be calm with my attached photos as i took it by my camera not attached with microscope,, so it may be low in resolution. Thank you.
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Dear Amr Zaky.
In spite of low resolution, but the image is clear where the last chamber is inflated. It may be hypotype of Gaudryina laevigata. Be sure it is distributed in many samples and in notable number, to be defined as new var. of Gaudryina laevigata.  best regard
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This microscopic photo belong to Devonia icrofacies
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the first picture,s probably is microbal trace and second,s probably is coral fossil remained.
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The picture below is from limestone of upper Cretaceous in KRG, NW-Iraq
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Hi Polla,
Your specimen might be a Spinaxon potyi sp.
Kind regards
Hakima
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I need specific identification of attached larger foraminifera with precise age assignment.
Location: Western Desert, Egypt.
Early Eocene 
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Dear Prof. Cesare Andrea Papazzoni,
Thank you for your interest. Now, I am preparing axial and equatorial sections of the specified species. After getting more detailed photos of it, i will contact with you for more cooperation.
Amr 
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In World Ostracoda Database it is only recent, but in Morkhoven, 1963 it is Cenomanian-Recent, and there are some fossil forms described in the literature like Argilloecia faba Alexander 1934 from Eocene.
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Eugen:
What about Late Palaeozoic Argilloecia regularis Delo, 1930? What's your opinion?
Best
Syed
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These are all recent marine sediments
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Due to number 3 & 4 
Family: Spondylidae Gray, 1826,Genus: Spondylus Linnaeus, 1758, most of can be Clypeaster intermedius
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.I have some images from miogypsina and miolepidocyclina species (east tethyan realm). Who is interested at looking at them?
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Dear Asghar
send your images to my E-mail: jaser.khosroabadi@gmail .com
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Can anyone heip me identify the species of the ostracod from the picuures?
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Hi Zhang,
Fig.9 looks like Leguminocythereis sorneana
All the best
Hakima
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Specifically, I'm interested in estimating absolute ages for nannofossil events (LADs, FADs, acmes, etc.), potentially using published calibrated ages to constrain certain events. The data is in the form of multiple wells with events associated with particular depths. I'm aware of four main methods: graphic correlation, constrained optimization, RASC, and unitary associations. Are there other methods? Any recommendations for software? Suggestions about the best method for this data set? Thanks in advance-
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You might be interested in the very last contribution of Guex and Galster
"A simple technique to establish sequences of datums and to highlight transgressive–regressive cycles"
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I'm trying to identify some diatoms I found on sediments dated from Serravallian (Miocene). The paleoenvironment is marine. The preservation of the specimens is not great but any help in identifying their species, genus or broader ranks, is appreciated.
Also, some of the specimens (fig. 1, 3, 4 and 6) are probably not diatoms and I don't know what siliceous microfossil group they belong to, so I'd appreciate any hints on those specimens too.
Standard treatment method for siliceous microfossils.
Magnification: 1000x
Scale bar: 10 micra
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Hello João,
Picture 1 makes me think of a non-pollen palinomorph (NPP) and I agree with Reza that picture 6 is an Asteraceae pollen grain.
For the diatoms, picture 5 seems to me like a Amphora valves in girdle view. While pictures 7 and 8 could be a Mastogloia genus. However, pictures 9 and 10 looks like a Rhopalodia, maybe a Rhopalodia gibberula?
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Please would anyone help to tell what these figures listed below are. i saw them in my paly slides but could not say if they are acritarch or Dinocysts?
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Hi Celestine,
Your second photo: this is pollen grain.
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 The enclosed photographs are from Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous fluvial succession of Gondwana. I am of the opinion of their origin through biogenic activities, however, not very sure. The preservation of the structures is in light to dark gray clayey horizons having abundant leaf impressions of Pteridophytic to Gymnospermus remains. The clay units occur as interbedded horizons with siltstone or, lenicular/poketed occurrence in medium grained sandstone
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Thanks for comments, interesting, approach you shortly.
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Can anyone identify these Burdigalian taxa?
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Looks a Miogypsina....preservation is not suitable for accurate species identification
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I am looking for detailed descriptions of the different types of acritarchs that can be found on Earth before -1 Ga. I am especially interested in the transitional periods, where some types appear and others disappear.
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Hello Damien,
Unfortunately, there are not many useful Recent review papers ... However, the paper by Vorob'eva et al., published half a year ago, shows a lot of different (Mesoproterozoic) acritarch types ... Best wishes, Mike
Vorob'eva, N.G.; Sergeev, V.N. & Petrov, P.Y. (2015): Kotuikan Formation assemblage: A diverse organic-walled microbiota in the Mesoproterozoic Anabar succession, northern Siberia. Precambrian Research 256: 201-222.
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In order to study internal structure of nummulite can be divided fossil  in to two parts(split sample) with thermal shock.
But how can remove deposits of crystalline calcite from the chambers  of nummulite?
Thank you.
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Hello Mr. Papazzoni,
I just checked the link and it is now active, please go check it out.
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The size of the micro fossil is approximately 50 micron and is very common in the coastal deposits.
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Dear Navnith,
Your micro-photo is of a very poor quality. Nevertheless,  it can not be Asterionella by any means due to the central structure of pentagon (sometimes observed) and elongated spikes, which may sometimes be found in silicoflagellates - Dictyochophyceae. Moreover, Asterionella is a diatom freshwater planktonic genus while silicoflagelaltes are typically marine plankton species. I am attaching two related photos just for comparison, since my filed is not the marine but freshwater environment. 
Best wishes for your work. 
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website of Revista Española de Micropaleontología?
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I suggest that you visit the Geoscience e-Journals' portal at http://paleopolis.rediris.es/geosciences/
There is a good chance you find an Open Access journal to publish in; there are more than 60 journals ... they do not necessarily deal with micropaleontology: you need to dig in the list!
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In SEM image, I got some pitcher- shaped micro-organism attached to the radiolarian shell. Are these Chrysophytes? Need opinion on this.
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Dear Tarun
It is necessary to note that radiolarians capture and digest a large variety of small prays (e.g. silicoflagellates, ciliates, tintinnids, diatoms, crustacean larvae, copepods and bacteria). This is done by use of their “sticky” pseudopodia (in particular the axopodia and/or rhizopodia). Several different feeding strategies have been reported for radiolarians (Anderson 1983; Matsuoka 2007). The captured food is enclosed in a digestive vacuole and carried into the ectoplasm where the digestion occurs. Although many radiolarian species are assumed to be omnivores, some feeding preferences do exist. There are, for instance, species preferring algal- before animal prey and vise versa (Anderson 1983). Some radiolarians are not actively hunting their food, but live primarily of nutrients obtained from their symbiotic photosynthesizing algae.
some link that useful for your question
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I'm dealing with Upper Cretaceous microfossil association that consists of ostracods and foraminifera. Source material – sandstone and marly limestone – was disintegrated in water with some Hydrogen Peroxide (30%) added to solution. The problem is that microfossils are not totally liberated from the rock and still have pieces of it attached to their carapaces and tests.
Can somebody please give me some hints on how to remove unwanted material?
Thank you!
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Acetic is good for phosphatic and occasionally silicified microfossils but it will dissolve calcium carbonate. Ostracods and forams are calcium carbonate so be careful not to dissolve them!
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I have CT scanned some 50 specimens...
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Hi Antonio, I'd like to see them
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This microfossil lacks information for identification
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Dear Alexandre
based on Gallego et al. (2013) and Arai and Souza Carvalho (2001), just Cyzicus pricei Cardoso was described by microalveolar ornomentation.
Regards
Massih
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The object (more objects) was found in the examination of of calcareous nannofossils in the Lower - Middle Jurassic sediments. It can be a part of the nannoplankton body. Thank you for your help :-)
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Can you upload the image of higher size?
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I am working on a marine sediment dated as Miocene, from the northwestern of Madagascar (Ramihangihajason et al., 2014. « Miocene benthic foraminifera from Nosy Makamby and Amparafaka, Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar, Journal of African Earth Sciences 100, 409-417)
Last month, I processed those samples in order to check the diatoms into them, but I didn't find even one specimen. So, I wonder if there is any explanation for that. Thank you
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In warm seas diatoms may not survive during diagenesis - I've never encountered diatoms in my own Paleogene material. However, I note in your paper, that your smallest size fraction is 0.2 mm. This is too large for all but perhaps the largest diatoms. Also for foraminiferal studies you should better use smaller size fractions, at least 125 microns or better even (when preservation permits) 63 micron. The diversity of your assemblages will increase significantly. Absence of planktic forams is no surprise in a very shallow environment, but you may find them also in the smaller size fraction, possibly washed in from the open sea.
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During evaporative condition in a closed basin, there is a high correlation between d13C and d18O of bulk carbonate. What factors that influence isotopic composition of d13C during evaporation, so that it covary with d18O. 
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Hi Praveen,
Stiller et al. (1985) is a good classical example for an evaporitic system.
Both, 18O and 13C of the precipitated CaCO3 depend on the isotope composition of the dissolved carbonate group. Degassing of CO2 from supersaturated aqueous solution leads to the enrichment of 13C in residual DIC. Therefore, since both the distribution of 13C and 18O of the individual dissolved inorganic carbon species depend on pH (e.g., Beck et al., 2005) it will also vary with biological activity, salt contents (e.g., ion pairs-look on the original experimental literature from the 60s and 70s)  and most likely precipitation rate. Biological activity may, therefore, also impact the signal via pH or kinetic effetcs as well as later recrystallization reactions.
Good luck, Michael
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I have found some grains in the Middle Triassic carbonates (Lower Anisian, Aegean, Lower Muschelkalk) and I'm trying to identify them - please see the attached pictures.
Are they calcispheres of algal origin (e.g., Globochaete alpina) ?
Is it possible to identity them in a range of genus, species?
Does anyone have any experience with such objects?
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Dear Monika,
Because your question was formulated: “Middle Triassic calcispheres?” I answered in this connection. On closer examination of attached photos, I turned my attention to the pictures 4 and 7. They resemble the sections of the species Gemeridella minuta Borza & Misik. I hope that for you in this case could be useful following articles:
1. Borza, K., Misik, M. 1975. Gemeridella minuta n. gen., n. sp. aus der oberen Trias der Westkarpaten. Geol. Zb., 26; 77-81.
2. Misik, M., Borza, K., 1978. Gemeridella, Didemnoides, Didemnum und Korperchen ahnlicher Gestalt aus dem Mesozoikum der Westkarpaten. Geol. Zb.– Geologica Carpathica, 29; 307–326.
Good luck!
Daria
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I'm looking to identify very small spherical objects which were found in Upper Oxfordian black clay (Amoeboceras glosense Zone) in the Moscow region. They are 0.25-0.3 mm in diameter and occur in clay together with foraminifers, fish otolithes and embryonic shells of gastropods and bivalves. They are very abundant in Amoeboceras ilovaiskii Subzone and sparse in Amoeboceras glosense Subzone. They are spherical and shiny, with smooth surface, their internal structure seems to be grained.
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Upd. 14 March 2015
Dear colleagues, I apologize for the delay with SEM-photos. Now I can present these photos. The microspheres are not perfectly round. There are no any layers inside them. I also have attached the results of EDS-analysis. It seems that I was wrong when I thought they were solid before fossilization. These microspheres look like phosphatized eggs or cysts. Maybe it's something like Brine shrimp (Artemiidae) egg/cyst?
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Even if spherical objects are quite common in the fossil record, these look very intruiging to me. I have, together with my colluege Mats Eriksson, done some work on spherical things we thought were Cambrian embryos. We used the micro tomography facility, TOMCAT, at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) in Switzerland. This non-destructive method is a brilliant help in deciphering the internal structures of fossil material. The data set consists of 100-2000 tiff images (i.e digital thin sections) that is combined in a 3D-program ( I am using Voxler3), whereafter you can detect morphologic features down to about 1 micron and spot internal structures in situ in great detail. If you are interested in having a go on this, we can run a few of your spheres the next time me or Mats have beam time at SLS. Interested?
Cheers,
Fredrik
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We found a well preserved fossil fish in older Pleistocene lacustrine sediments composed of clastic varves. If there is anyone who can help, please, contact me !
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Hello!
I've seen quite a few papers on this topic on the Olexandr Kovalchuk's page.
You can have a look at his ResearchGate profile and publications, and maybe contact him and see if he's interested:
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Herewith I am attached a photograph of benthic foraminifera. within these one of the species appears blue in colour ( showing with Red Colour Arrow). Please let me know the reason for colour variation for these species.
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Your sieves were cleaned with methylene blue. The remaining foraminifera took this blue. I think this is the reason that color. This technique methylene blue is used to recognize foraminifera from a previous wash and avoid fauna blends.
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It is preserved in Late Cretaceous amber and seems mineralized, maybe siliceous. Diameter is 100 µm.
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Heliozoa too fragile for this, but maybe one of the testate amoebae. I've seen plenty of testate amoebae in amber. One should not exclude that it could be junk (non-biological).
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During palynological slide scanning i have find some unusual structures. Which I am uploading for your opinion. This is from the mesoproterozoic carbonaceous shale.
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thanks Johanenes for your opinion.
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this sample from the Eocene rocks 
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Sphaerogypsina in Loeblich & Tappan, 1987
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This "things" come from the K/T boundary interval in Poland. They are 0.2-0.8mm in size. All have brown color, are polished and usually have oval shape (second photo). Some of them are elongated (first and last photo). Additionally, they have a "nipple-like" structure at one side (compare right side of specimen on first and second photo).
These things are quite common in the boundary interval and I simply don’t know what it is. Waiting for your suggestions. Thank you in advance.
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Very similar structures occur in large numbers in e.g. the Lichtenberg Horizon of the ENCi quarry. These were described by Van Ameron 1973 as Coprolus maestrichtiensis, 
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Beside crystallite growth due to thermal overprint it seems that These crystallites also can be enlarged in different ways. Has anybody an idea?
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For cyanobacteria (phosphate deposit forming cyanobacteria) it is documented that it is their post mortem alteration...same is true for shelly deposits generating phosphatic deposits.....It may be the same phenomenon in case of conodonts added with replacement of calcium carbonate by calcium phosphate. It has also been published (in Nature) that apatite crystallites grow over organic carbon nucleites.  
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Dead Foraminifera tests provide us a time-integrated picture of the foram assemblage at that site, but on the other hand composition of different groups in dead assemblages is subjected to postmortem alterations. So, I am interested to know whether dead or live+dead assemblages can be used for species diversity analysis.
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Yes.But its usage really depends on what you are looking for.Species diversity analysis using dead forams are highly used in paleooceanographic studies to understand the variation in ocean currents resulting from changes in climate patterns.
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I am working on biostratigraphy/palynology teams and I need to treat asphaltic sediments to extract microfossils and palynomorphs.
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You can extract microfossils and palynomorphs by treating the asphalt with kerosene for dilution , and then pass it through nylon mesh and pull the diluted asphalt or even crude oil by pipit and disseminate on slide, let the solution dry for overnight then use transmitted light microscopy to identify the particulate organic matter.
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A section of this foraminifera viewed under a polarised microscope is present in the centre of the image.
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Yes Antonino is right. It is a fragment of Cuneolina which ranges from Valanginian to Maastrichtian.
Check my book:
BouDagher-Fadel, MK; (2008) Evolution and Geological Significance of Larger Benthic Foraminifera. Developments in Palaeontology and Stratigraphy: Vol.21. ELSEVIER
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Want to know when we can tell the sediment is a diatomite deposition.
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Diatom oozes belongs to deep pelagic sediments (more than 500 m depth) that are mostly characteristic for higher latitudes of oceans where diatoms deposits 2-10 mm/1000 years. Diatom oozes that are deposited in hemipelagial area (continental shelf, continental upwelling) where higher biogenic production of diatoms are more common and their accumulation in sediments as a pellets or marine snow could give diatomite or diatomaceous earth.