Science topic

Mexican Americans - Science topic

Mexican Americans are persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.
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Feeding practices include pressure to eat, food as reward, and restriction
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The following RG link is also very useful:
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I used second hand data so I don't have the manual. I tried to find it for a long time.  If you have the copy of the scoring manual, could you please send me in order to use correctly my results?
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Mexican American Cultural Values Scale (MACVS)
The Mexican American Cultural Values Scale (Knight et al., 2010) is a 50 item measure of differential Latino cultural expectations. The measure contains 9 subscales to assess both traditional Latino and mainstream values. Traditional Latino values include familism, respect, religion, and traditional gender roles while mainstream values include independence/self-reliance and competition/personal achievement. Participants respond using a 5-point Likert scale (from 1 = not at all to 5 = completely); a higher score represents higher presence of cultural values.
You can also find it in this very site and correspond the author
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I am a Ph.D. graduate student at Alliant International University. I am in the process of gathering data for my research study. I am attempting to understand the obstacles parents face when seeking services for their children diagnosed with autism. I am attempting to figure out which barriers parents currently face by Mexican-American and Caucasian families. The most prominent barriers are geographic location, immigration status, which has been linked to language, limited knowledge/awareness of ASD, anti-immigration laws and cultural beliefs. Ideally, I would like to publish my results to encourage agencies to modify the services offered to families, specifically, ethnic minorities.
I am reaching out to you to help advertise my study to encourage parents to participate. The Alliant International University Institutional Review Board has approved my study. I am looking for Mexican American and Caucasian parents who have a child diagnosed within the Autism Spectrum between the ages of 3 and 17, who live in California. Parents, who are would like to participate, they will complete a 15-minute questionnaire online and enter for a chance to win one of three prizes, $50 Fandango card, $50 Amazon card or $50 Visa card. By participating in my research study, they will help us understand parent’s experience-seeking resources for their children. I have flyers and a brief explanation, in Spanish and English, of the study. I ask you to distribute them and courage parents to participate in my study. Here is the link ofr the English questionnaire https://alliant.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0rHNKaZGhNhCXAx. Spanish questionnaire , https://alliant.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_etD6QQMW1CvGPVr.
If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to me at 619-356-1438.
Thank you,
Elizabeth Sanchez Arvizu
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I would love to help you. ^_^ Just drop me an email martinemussies [at] Gmail when you still need participants. Best of luck with your research!
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Which option is most moral?
The long term consequences of the Mexican-American War of 1848 was the annexation of the northern half of Mexico. This (formerly Mexican) land became the states of Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and California. Today, the people living in these lands enjoy a material existence far superior to those people left in Mexico. So the moral questions we might ponder are:
Had the USA not annexed the northern half of Mexico, would the people of that country be living far better than they do now and would Mexico (twice as large as it is now) be far closer to the USA in military strength and GDP?
Or
If California, Nevada, Utah and Arizona remained part of Mexico, would all the people in those states be living in conditions close to that of the other Mexican people today?
Finally, would both the people of Mexico and those of USA be better off today had the USA annexed the entire Mexican nation in 1848?
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Well, the Mexican War happened. The per capita GDP of a Mexico that iincluded what was annexed by the USA, would be surely higher had there been no war, since the land is more arable. Part of the USA military strength, may be dependent on the apparent desire of the USA to be a large empire of influence over many countries. It has also been a source of strength in WW2 and to a lesser degree of "sucess" in other foreign affairs but often it has backfired and lessened the overall well being of Americans.and sometimes others. Does Mexico now or the Mexico with the Northern annexation have the desire for empire? Certainly not as much as the USA in either case. The military-inustrial complex (weapons companies) is one of the biggest factors in everything in the USA. Social programs, such as universal health care may be possible if the USA were not spending so much money on foreign interventions that have so little benefit for the American people and often very negative for the USA..
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I'm looking to conduct a qualitative study involving art instruction in a school located within a community with high populations of migrant farmworkers.
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Jeffrey,
The US DOE should have that data, or the states. Obviously Texas and California have high migrant populations, and the Southeastern US also has high migrant farming populations. You might consider contacting the USDA to see if they have data in this respect.
Best,
Amanda
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Valentin de Ampudia was a noted map maker during his two decades of active duty with the Royal Engineers, mainly active in the northern provinces of Mexico, ca 1815-1822. I believe he either married a relative of one of the last viceroys (Grimarest), or his mother was of the Grimarest family, and (by then I believe his rank may have been Col. or Lt. Col.) Ampudia may actually have left Mexico to return to Spain with the Grimarest family at the same time the viceroy was deposed? Also, does anyone have a clue if/where any drawing/painting of him was ever done? Mil gracias!
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Dear Bob,
thank you for the Johnson History. - In my book "Korporierte im Amerikanischen Bürgerkrieg" I had considered already:
Albrecht Ludwig von Röder, who was fencing in a student duel with Bismarck in Goettingen in the year 1832, Joachim von Röder, Otto von Röder and Ludwig Socrates von Röder.
kind regards
Ruediger
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There are multiple measures of machismo, but I have been unable to find one that looks specifically at how Hispanic adolescents conceptualize gender roles within their own (i.e. not parental/adult) relationships. I prefer one that taps into both adaptive and maladaptive characteristics.
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Try doing your own research on the subject. You are in an area of the U.S. where a large segment of the population is Hispanic, so you have a large pool of subjects from which to draw.
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Ignacio Elizondo was born 9 March 1766 in the Salinas Valley, New Kingdom of Leon, New Spain, in the village of Salinas (now Salinas Victoria, Nuevo León, Mexico). He was the son of José Marcos de Elizondo and María Josefa de Villarreal. He was of Spanish and Basque ancestry. He was a New Leonese militia officer, mostly known for his successful plot capturing the most important leaders of the early Mexican War of Independence, including Miguel Hidalgo, Ignacio Allende, and Juan Aldama at Baján, Coahuila, in 1811.
During his childhood, Elizondo lived in the village of Pesquería Grande (present-day Garcia, Nuevo León). His father owned many ranch and agricultural properties then known as haciendas. In 1787, at the age of twenty-one he married María Gertrudis. She died on March 6, 1797, when she was giving birth to his son, José Rafael Eusebio.
Ignacio Elizondo started his military career in 1798, after being designated Lieutenant of Pesquería's provincial militia company. Two years later, he was honoured by being appointed Captain of Punta de Lampazos' provincial Dragoons, one of the largest military 'presidios' of the New Kingdom of León. However, one year later Elizondo occupied again his former position at the Pesquería's provincial militia. In 1806, governor Pedro de Herrera y Levya, recommended him for command of the Eighth Dragoons company, who would help Texas against recurrent Apache attacks, already present in northern towns of the New Kingdom of León. Through a letter to the viceroy Elizondo demanded that he be exempted from his military command position because of serious financial losses he was suffering in some of his ranches and stock properties, among some he had previously bought from the church. In the same letter, he expressed he was also suffering under reprisals from governor Pedro de Herrera, that would force his desertion. After falling out with Herrera, indebted with the purchase of several haciendas from the church, and marrying María Romana Carrasco the same year, he then decided to change his residency to the Hacienda of San Juan de Canoas, in the province of Coahuila, from where he also administered the Hacienda of Alamo, in the jurisdiction of Monclova.
Elizondo briefly left his military service prior to the Grito de Dolores and the outbreak of the Mexican War of Independence. In the Eastern Internal Provinces, the independence movement was not well received at first. Coahuila, Nuevo Santander, and Texas declared themselves for the royalists, but several towns eventually joined the cause. The governor of Nuevo León, Manuel de Santa María, eventually joined the rebels. Within Texas, Lt. José Menchaca and various filibuster expeditions acted to support the rebellion. Elizondo also joined the rebellion and commanded a small force in the Casas Revolt, in January 1811. However, Elizondo, vacillated in his support, marched through Nuevo León, Nuevo Santander and Texas for the royalists, confronting the Gutiérrez–Magee Expedition in San Antonio, at the Battle of Alazan Creek, in 1813. Governor Santa María was removed from his post for the royalist Simón de Herrera. Some historians debate whether General Ramon Díaz de Bustamante or Bishop Primo Feliciano Marín de Porras finally won Elizondo over to the royalists, while others believe, he was converted by Manuel María de Salcedo of Texas and Simón de Herrera of Nuevo León, while the royalist governors were his prisoners, during his participation in the Casas Revolt. He was instrumental in the capture of Father Hidalgo, General Allende, and other rebel leaders at the Wells of Bajan (Norias de Bajan) in February 1811, which effectively ended the first phase of the rebellion. On August 18, 1813, at the Battle of Medina, leading a cavalry division of the Royal Spanish Army under command of Commandant-General of the Eastern Internal Provinces, Joaquin de Arredondo, he played a key role in defeating the Republican Army of the North and crushing the Gutiérrez–Magee Expedition, as well as the insurrection in Texas
Elizondo's victory was praised by royalists, and even King Fernando VII, rewarded him with a promotion to Lt. Col. in the royalist army. However, his well-being didn't last too long, while returning from mopping-up operations in eastern-Texas (and having executed and imprisoning hundreds), he gained many enemies, hence hated by many insurgents, Ignacio Elizondo was critically wounded by one of his own aides, Lieutenant Miguel Serrano (who, it is said, had gone crazy from witnessing the scenes of merciless executions relentlessly carried-out by his commander over the preceding days), while sleeping in his tent at the edge of the Brazos River. Most historians aver that he was buried a few days later on the banks of the San Marcos River, in Texas, New Spain, where he expired, as he was being carried back to the capital on a litter. If Col. Elizondo was, indeed, first interred on the banks of the San Marcos River, where he expired on his return to San Antonio, then his remains must have been exhumed later and re-buried in San Antonio, where on 9 October 1815, his burial is recorded in the campo santo record book at San Fernando cathedral as No. 715: "Ignacio Elizondo, Lt. Col. of the cavalry. Spanish, married to Romana Carrasco. He died of wounds received in a fist fight."
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Dear Ian,
I found 3 other websites that attribute the image you pointed-out to General Rayon, rather than Elizondo. So, it looks like the search goes-on for an image of Elizondo! Thanks for the pointer, nevertheless.
Bob