Science topic

Mercury Poisoning - Science topic

Poisoning that results from chronic or acute ingestion, injection, inhalation, or skin absorption of MERCURY or MERCURY COMPOUNDS.
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Climate change is a hotly debated topic, and there is a lot of political fervor that finds its way into discussions about the topic. A discussion of climate change science, with someone who rejects climate change, will generally lead nowhere. But while climate change is so prominent in the media, health problems caused by burning of fossil fuels, mercury poisoning, and other areas of ecological and public health issues are often ignored.
I think that even such deniers would admit that burning of fossil fuels has led to a great deal of other hazards. Smog has long been a recognized problem of pollution. Recent studies suggest that mercury is almost universally found in freshwater fish.
So would we better serve the population by expanding our discussion about pollution, and focusing less on climate change specifically?
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The process of addressing the environment problems and issues should be decentralized. The priority should be based on the local issues, regional issues, national issues, continental issues and then finally global issues. It will work very fine and majority of the issues will get solved automatically.
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On-the-ground experience would suggest that sound/noise pollution and mercury contamination may be coincidental in artisanal and small-scale gold-mining stakeholders and their bodies. If so, does any literature make explicit this coincidence or explore it further?
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Based on my general understanding and opinion only, artisanal and small scale gold mining stake holders are exposed to both noise and mercury pollution at the same time. However, the impact of both kinds of pollution on their bodies depends directly on the techniques being used. For example, a low noise, low mercury way of mining gold would impact less than a high noise, high mercury technique. Note that the impacts are different, as the chemical effects of mercury poisoning are very different to the more physical and potentially psycological effects of noise pollution. Unfortunately, I do not know any literature that explores this coincidence explicitly.
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i guess that malondialdehyde is a biomarker but what about glutathione , is it important to know if it is totally consumed or it is enough to measure malondialdehyde??
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From our published work on heavy metals toxicity including Mercury their toxicity is associated with increasing oxidative stress and decreasing antioxidants especially glutathione mediated detoxification enzymes which caused unbalance on redox status in cells beside their specific interacting with proteins and abolished their function you can look for details papers on my research gate good luck
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Does anyone know current (2018/2017) US reference values (cdc? FDA?) for mercury in urine (exposure to inorganic mercury)?
I can only find current reverence values for total mercury in blood
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I don't know about the values in the US, but in 1986, I had a paper in the British Medical Journal, describing mercury poisoning in workmen who repaired sphygmomanometers (Brit Med J 1986;293:1409-10).
At that point, the upper 95th. centile for unexposed workers in the UK was <2nmol/mmol creatinine (4ug/g).
Hope that this is of some help.
Bw
Chris Ide
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There are a number of bioassay tools and techniques available. They study LC50, LD 50 (for 24, 48, 96, ....hours). We also do EC studies. I think, mother Nature can provide some hidden physical clues showing toxic effects of toxicants. Different organisms show some defensive or biochemical struggling signals in the form of secretions that can be detected through chemosensing. If we detect the early warning signals by reading the physical or catching the chemical clues mitigation or removal of toxicants could be done  in due time. 
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There is a study about that, the only problem is that it is in Spanish, if you have any questions, do not hesitate to ask, I am the author of the work, I leave the link
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My partner and I will be truly grateful for your insights to the following:
(1) The mechanism behind Bacopa's hyperaccumulation of heavy metals
(2) Identification of the chemical compounds in the plant that may possess high affinity towards heavy metals
(3) Possibility that such compounds may be extracted and used in chelation therapies
Please do refer me to pertinent studies, both completed and ongoing (especially those containing detailed methodologies that aim to (1) extract and isolate natural chelating agents and/or (2) measure the efficacy of chelating agents).
Sincere thanks!
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Such insightful response! Thank you Ms. Medhi!
My partner and I just wish to extend a few more inquiries:
(1) How are bacosides metabolized in the body and are they still effective in their metabolite form(s) ?
(2) Will intravenous injection of bacosides preserve their chelation efficacy?
(3) a.) How can the efficacy of chelation agents be measured?
b.) What are the methods for assessing the applicability and efficacy of these agents in animal (cell/)
models?
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The said model(s) will serve a twofold purpose: (1) to allow a comparison between bioeconomic models from developed countries and developing ones, and (2) to map out the possible strategies that may be employed in optimizing the tradeoff between maximum economic profit and the maintenance of public health and physical wellbeing.
While bioeconomic models exist out there, my partner and I failed to find models that seem to fit our research context and setting -- Albay, Philippines. The whole country is very much dependent on aquatic resources, fish in particular, for food. Existing research on MeHg contamination of commercial fish shows that the issue is already very alarming.
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great
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It has recently been shown that even low doses of mercury may cause toxicity. Increased release of mercury from dental amalgam restorations after exposure to electromagnetic fields has been confirmed by different researchers as well as my team. It has also been reported that the increased mercury release after exposure to electromagnetic fields may pose risks for the hypersensitive proportion of the population, children and pregnant women. Although it was previously believed that the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam cannot be hazardous, new findings indicate that mercury, even at low doses, may cause toxicity.  By the way, now we are looking for the data showing mercury may cause synergistic effects with other heavy metals. Thank you very much in advance.
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There are synergistic effects of mercury with other heavy metals (lead and cadmium), which have been widely reported in the literature since the 1970s. More recently, Haley (2005) has looked at effects on neuron survival when Hg is combined with the hormones (estrogen and testosterone), and also an anitbiotic.
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I knew that inorganic mercury compound such as mercury chloride or mercury iodide is toxic. Organic mercury compound such as methyl mercury or dimethyl mercury are more dangerous. From what I have read before, mostly it is because mercury accumulation occurs easily in organic mercury compound. What differs inorganic mercury compound and organic mercury compound which lead to different toxicity of mercury?
Even in inorganic mercury compound e.g mercury chloride, mercury iodide, mercury cyanide, etc, they have different level of toxicity.
If you could provide some reference about it, it'll be very helpful.
Thank you.
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Mr. Mei-Ling Hamilton is correct that the most common exposure pathway to mercury is via consumption of mercury, particularly fish. However, the mercury in fish is almost all monomethylmercury in muscle, not in fat. This seems a bit counter intuitive since there are important neutral mercury species that can pass through biological membranes (DOI: 10.1021/es950373d) which one might think would accumulate in fat. In fact, there are neutral complexes of Hg(II) and monomethyl Hg, and of course dimethyl Hg that are lipophilc and so do pass through membranes, but they are only moderately lipophilic. Their lipophilicty may explain how MeHg gets into aquatic food webs initially, but not why they bioaccumulate to such high levels. 
Another part of the story is that monomethylmercury binds to cysteine in fluids in the body, while not so lipophilic, it is transported across cell membranes by amino acid transporters since it mimics methionine (e.g., DOI: 10.1146/annurev.pa.33.040193.002553; DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2008.05683.x; doi:10.1006/taap.2000.9018). Thus, its trophic transfer is very efficient, which is why the Hg in fish is almost entirely monomethyl Hg. For the same reason, it is efficiently absorbed and can move around in bodies of animals and humans (DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2008.05683.x).
Finally, it accumulates in muscle rather than fat because it binds to the thiol moities of proteins located there (DOI: 10.1021/es0628856) since bonds of Hg(II) and MeHg with reduced sulfur compounds are extremely strong.
Other references include: doi:10.1016/j.taap.2011.01.010
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The cases of mercury poisoning of populations in Miamata, Japan and distribution of tainted seeds consumed in Northern Iraq reflect on widespread patterning in symptoms associated with severe exposure. Symptoms appear to exist on a spectrum. Known locations of long term low levels of mercury exposure must have widespread symptoms associated with them- what does this look like?
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Bioaccumulation pattern can be monitored.
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Paresthesia is one symptom of mercury poisoning. Are there any sources which provide evidence of an association between DP and mercury?
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Iere  have never seen such cases. It is very strange that parasites have a relation witrh Hg.
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I have speculated on a bridge between mercury exposure and patterns of an unusual medical condition documented in the Languedoc region of France from approximately 1550- 1776 (as mentioned in an 1935 article by Kellett on Sir Thomas Browne and The Morgellons). The use of mercury in dyes may account for the widespread documentation of these symptoms.
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The best way to prove that is to analysis samples from human bones in the tombs from that period of time and fibers. There should be some studies focused on the analysis of the trace elements from that period of time. Not only mercury was used as pigment for textiles in that period. Cadmium and other elements were used as well for pigments as well.
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How can we as the scientific, academic, and healthcare community help consumers with the new and growing threat of broken MCL bulbs? The dangers are extraordinary and economically impossible, yet those who should have addressed the issue before release of product have fallen asleep at the wheel of consumer safety. Please, see http://www.wnd.com/2007/04/41122/ and share your ideas on this very real danger to the public health.
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Mercury Poisoning: Symptoms and Diseases
Mercury is the most poisonous, non-radioactive, naturally occurring substance on our planet. There is no safe level of mercury because even one atom of it in your body is doing some harm to it. There is no debate about the toxicity of mercury and every knowledgeable scientist and health professional understands how poisonous mercury is.
Yet even today the American Dental Association (ADA) and pro-amalgam dentist’s who support its insane, logic defying position, continue to say that these fillings are perfectly safe and are not a health hazard. The World Health Organization (WHO) has stated that there is no safe level of mercury, that means that no amount of it is safe, even one atom. Even if enough mercury hasn't accumulated to manifest a symptom related to chronic mercury poisoning, that doesn't mean you are not being poisoned by it.
Amalgam fillings are made from 50% mercury and the rest is silver, zinc, copper and tin. All are handled as hazardous products until they are placed in the teeth. When the amalgam filling particles are removed from a tooth they must be placed in a hazardous waste container. In addition, because mercury is classified as a neurotoxin it can also cause of contribute to emotional and psychological issues, such as depression, anxiety, mood swings and memory loss. Symptoms that worsen over time may signal the development of a disease. But keep in mind that because mercury can indirectly cause harm by depleting the antioxidants, such as glutathione and alpha lipoic acid, needed to remove it and deal with other harmful toxins and free radicals
You shouldn't be the same house with mercury vapor, let alone having it being released from your fillings. It's a scientific fact that toxic mercury vapor is continually being released from amalgam fillings. 80% of it enters your body and accumulates in it. This accumulation occurs because the body loses its effectiveness at removing mercury over time.
Common Symptoms of Chronic Mercury Poisoning
Head; Dizziness, Faintness, Headaches (frequent), Ringing in ears, Excessive blushing, Hair loss, Vision problems, Tunnel vision.
Nose; Inflammation of the nose, Sinusitis, Excessive mucus formation, Stuffy nose, Loss of sense of smell
Skin problems; Allergies, Excessive perspiration, Skin cold and clammy
Oral/Throat; Bad breath (halitosis), Gingivitis/bleeding gums, Inflammation of the gums, Leukoplakia (white patches), Mouth inflammation, Metallic taste, Sore throats, Ulcers of oral cavity, Burning sensation.
Lungs; Asthma/bronchitis, Chest congestion, Shallow respiration, Shortness of breath, Chronic coughing
Digestive System; Colitis, Diarrhea/constipation, Loss of appetite, Weight loss, Nausea/vomiting.
Heart; Anemia, Chest pain, Heartbeat rapid or irregular
Muscles & Joints; Cramping, Joint aches, Muscle aches, Muscle weakness, Stiffness
Other; Water retention (edema), Renal failure, Bone loss, Anorexia, Genital discharge, Gland swelling, Hypoxia, Hypothyroidism, Illnesses (frequent)
Emotions; Aggressiveness, Anger (fits of), Anxiety, Confusion, Depression, Fear and nervousness, Hallucination, Lethargy, Manic depression, Mood swings, Shyness
Energy Levels; Apathy, Chronic tiredness, Restlessness, Insomnia
Neurological/Mental; Fine tremor, Lack of concentration, Learning disorders, Memory loss, short and long term, Numbness, Slurred speech, Psychosis.
Diseases Related to Chronic Mercury Poisoning
Mercury exposure has been linked to the following diseases. Because mercury has such a destructive effect on the immune and detoxification systems, the list could be much longer.
Acrodynia, Alzheimer’s, Anterior lateral sclerosis (ALS), Asthma, Arthritis, Autism,
Candida, Cardiovascular disease, Chronic fatigue syndrome, Crohn’s disease,
Depression, Developmental defects, Diabetes, Eczema, Emphysema, Fibromyalgia,
Hormonal dysfunction, Intestinal dysfunction, Immune system disorders, Kidney disease,
Learning disorders, Liver disorders, Lupus, Metabolic encephalopathy, Multiple sclerosis (MS),
Reproductive disorders, Parkinson’s disease, Senile dementia, Thyroid disease.