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Hello, good day.
Please I'm working on a project which needs a "review of relevant theories" of the study "medical negligence behavior"
I found 2 theories relating to this study (conflict theory and theory of negligence), but they are not enough.
Please can I get more theories concerning medical negligence?
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There are four legal elements which must be proven: a professional duty owed to the patient; breach of such duty; injury caused by the breach; and (4) resulting damages.
In general, malpractice claims are adjudicated in state courts according to laws (e.g., USA), which typically require three elements for a successful claim: the patient suffered an adverse event; the provider caused the event due to action or inaction; and 3) the provider was negligent, which essentially entails showing that the provider took less care than that which is customarily practiced by the average member of the profession in good standing, given the circumstances of the doctor and the patient. Collectively, this three-part test of the validity of a malpractice claim is known as the “negligence rule.” In theory, this rule should provide compensation to iatrogenically injured patients and lead doctors to take appropriate precautions against accidental harm. In practice, however, the rule performs poorly on both dimensions.
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Applications of bioinformatics in medicine is a key factor in technological advancement in the field of modern medical technologies.
In which areas of medical technology are the technological achievements of bioinformatics used?
What are the applications of bioinformatics in medicine?
Please reply
I invite you to the discussion
Thank you very much
Best wishes
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Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with collaboration with University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
Our Lab EMBS's Publication In collaboration with Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
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Impact of negligent behaviour in medical practitioners to patients
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Any publications
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Gran parte de lo que se ha dicho en la antropología médica se ha realizado desde el estructuralismo de Levi-Strauss; una de las principales aportaciones la realiza Laplantine; sin embargo, hay interpretaciones muy bien elaboradas desde el marxismo, el neoevolucionismo o el mismo funcionalismo. Es importante considerar las aportaciones desde la etnopsiquiatría, el etnopsiconálisis y de la antropología de la enfermedad.
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In the time of Pandemic, it is hard to spend a long time in field research. Carrying out ethnography is very hard in these hard times. Patchwork ethnography might be a good option but there are certain methodological issues too. One can share his/her better understanding here.
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The Corona virus pandemic provides a world wide opportunity to reset one's value system. Specifically via the understanding of one's Beliefs, Love, and Hope.
As such a forensic simulator has been built in which to provide for such and understanding. This understanding must satisfy the equation 1) which is derived from equations its subsystem made up of equations a) and b):
1) Understanding = Knowledge - (Truth + Lies) where
a) Understanding = Knowledge + Uncertainty, and
b) 0 = Uncertainty + Truth + Lies
Additional information from which the forensic simulator is designed is provided in the attachments.
Hopefully this information may be of value to you in your research.
Respectfully, Al Fermelia, Ph.D
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The relevence of Bourdieu and Foucault.
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Foucault is very relevant through the following referential writings: Naissance de la Clinique, 1963, English translation "The Birth of the Clinic. An Archaeology of Medical Perception", several editions; Histoire de la folie à l'âge Classique, 1972, English translation "Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason"; Histoire de la sexualité, 1976-1984, 3 vols, English translation "History of sexuality", several editions normally in 2 vols.
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What determines human behavior in daily life?
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The role of genetic factors should not be underestimated.
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Apparently, untreated tooth decay can be the source of the appearance and development of various diseases and other diseases in the human body.
Therefore, the current question is: Can dental caries cause other serious diseases?
Please, answer, comments. I invite you to the discussion.
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Yes, the most important bacterial spread in the blood and recorded cases of atherosclerosis and high risk of CVS problems and the most serious cases registered for patients with diabetes
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Other than clinical, what perspectives about OCD are there ?
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Steven Hertler approached obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (or rather its more adaptive version) from an evolutionary perspective. He argues that these traits - in milder form - werre and are highly adaptive in the agrarian societies that evolved in parts of the world with more moderate climats. See especially:
Hertler, S.C. (2015a). Migration load, ecological opportunity, and obsessive compulsive personality disorder etiology: obsessive character as an adaptation to seasonality. Evolutionary Psychological Science 1:52-67. DOI 10.1007/s40806-014-0009-x
Hertler, S.C. (2015b). The evolutionary logic of the obsessive trait complex: obsessive compulsive personality disorder as a complementary behavioral syndrome. Psychological Thought, psyct.psychopen.eu | 2193-7281.
The second one is open access but I can e-mail a copy of both to you . Of course, OCPD, is not OCD, but it is related to so-called "incompleteness-related OCD".
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In medical anthropological research, the question of suffering has been a topic of salient interest mostly from two theoretical viewpoints: those of endurance and of agency. The concept "suffering" derives its origins from two etymological roots, those of suffering-souffrance-sofferanza and of misery-misère-miseria. According to the first approach, that of "endurance" and founded largely on Judeo-Christian theology, suffering is regarded as an existential experience at the borders of human meaning making. The question then is: how to endure, how to suffer? The latter view, that of "agency," follows the Enlightenment, and later the Marxist view on mundane suffering, misery, and the modern question of how to avoid or diminish it. I follow the lines of the second approach, but my aim is also to try to build a theoretical bridge between the two. I ask whether agency would be understood as a culturally shared and interpreted modes of enduring, and if so, which conceptual definition of agency applies in this context? I theorize the relationship between suffering and agency using Ernesto de Martino's notion la crisi della presenza. In line with Pierre Bourdieu, I think that in people's lives, there may be sufferings in a plural form, as a variety of sufferings. The question is based on ten-years long fieldwork in South Italy Contemporary villages.
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Hi Giovanni,
Cultural perspectives on suffering vary considerably. I did my fieldwork in Kazakhstan among the Kazakhs who place a high value on long-suffering. They clearly see this character trait as a matter of agency. In contrast, Americans tend to see suffering as a passive experience. I did a book review that might be of interest to you:
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dear colleague, any suggestion main reference about doing meta ethnography?
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Pope C, Mays C, Popay J. 2007. Synthesising Qualitative and Quantitative Health Evidence. OUP.
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Am currently a PhD starter going to work on gait analysis whether, culture has influence on gait and does its have an impact on gait pattern. Could you please help me out in finding some articles. Thanks
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Most certainly.  Two examples:
Youth culture - movements including gait are picked up by many people.  Look at the number of young people who walk in ways their parents would consider 'odd'.
Military culture - my personal experience shows that serving and ex-serving soldiers have ways of walking that they/we learned in our immersion in the Service.  I still now, having retired for 13 years, walk 'like a soldier' I am told.
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I am interested in the constructs of emotional pain and human suffering in the general population and more specifically in those with chronic illnesses (both physical and mental). Any leads/thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
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Thanks, Dr. Durak for sharing these articles. These are very helpful. 
Best
Shweta
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anthropology is a key science for medicine clinical practice for endocrnology-diabetes-nutrition-metabolisme speciality.
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If I understand, you are correct that anthropology can have a lot of valuable insight into the development of diabetes and its relationship with changing human nutrition. Evolutionary medicine, informed by evolutionary anthropological thinking, can be a very important tool for modern medicine. I am involved with a project run by Karen Kramer of the Univ of Utah (USA) that has identified the first instances of diabetes diagnoses among Maya maize agriculturalists in Mexico associated with the recent availability of market foods, especially soda. If you search online for "evolutionary medicine anthropology" several textbooks and more advanced literature can be identified that will give you a start at looking at this perspective if you have not already found some of the anthropology research on this issue. 
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Instruments to measure quality of life in young adults with Cerebral Palsy?
What do you use?
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Thanks. In fact all the scales seem limited to me . Thanks for the suggestions.
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To perform a questionnaire study , how to validate the questionnaire? e.g. Questionnaire study on "AUTOPSY" or "CONSENT"
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A helpful starting point might be a standard textbook on psychometrics and the validation of new measures, such as Nunnally, J.C. & Bernstein, I. H. (1994). Psychometric Theory. New York: McGraw Hill. 
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The incubation period of the disease in which the patient has no external symptoms and the disease does not affect a person's life.
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Hi Hassan,
i have the same caveat as Tomas. Incubation period is used in regard to infections. Clearly it covers the time between the initial exposition to e.g. a virus and the first symptoms, or responses that can be used to tell wether the infection has indeed followed the exposition. E.g. in HIV secondary prevention programs, blood tests can be positive before first symptoms show and thus further spreading can be prevented.
So in cancer there is no infection that precedes the disease as the main aetiological cause. There are often early stages that can be used for screening and early therapy. E.g. cervix carcinoma.
You see in that example that early stages do not affect the patient at all.
I suggest not to use the term incubation.
Cheers
Hans
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I want to minimize beam hardening artefact so I can compare findings of cortical bone width between archaeological and clinical data sets. Also looking at trabecular organization in the diploic space, but not willing to submerge the archaeological specimens in any kind of liquid, so will just have to deal with marrow presence/absence discrepancy. 
I've read things about rice (for DXA), bags of water, gel foam, ground beef... But most of these studies have been with long bones, and taping ziplocs full of food around a skull seems a lot more... problematic. 
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Soft tissue structures are important contributors to plain x-ray findings because of the need to account for overlying structures. However, CT obviates that problem.  CT beam hardening artifact is more a matter or extraneous substances, rather than a routine issue.  If the CT is performed with appropriate exposures, such artifact does not seem to be a problem if density and contrast are adjusted in real time subsequent to specimen exposure..
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Have you read any articles on the history of food diary/journal in relation to its use in medicine? Where can I find any interesting stories, books or articles written by physicians, medical administrators or librarians, patients? I would also be interested if there are any documented stories in medical anthropology, medical humanities or even literature.   
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Now I can access the link via the cached version (that is using Google as a search engine) - to anyone having problem accessing the link above re Yoshiro Nakamatsu interview. If this is the right interview (2012?), there is only one sentence covering the topic: "He also photographs every dish he eats to recall the stimulating ones. " I am not saying it is not worth it, I hope I got the right page. I also think we should reflect more on food and I think any kind of diary could be helpful. Thanks for sharing the link to the interview!
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I am currently developing research protocol on the involvement of men in reproductive/maternal health care services. I want to work on different perspective this time around and I am attracted to Afrocentricity (Afrocentric method) because my protocol focusses on African men/males and reproductive health.
Hope to hear from you all.
Khethisa Radebe Taole
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We have a book coming out in the next months that addresses the issues of women's versus men's involvement in reproductive health, when considering the Millennium Development Goals #4.5 for African and Oceanian societies - follow Naomi McPherson's as editor, MISSING THE MARK 2016.  
Also check on publications from Austria by Dr. Armin Prinz - especially if you read German.  Best wishes
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I'm doing a research in Chile abou Inmigrant physician in the primary care institutions and their integration to medical social circles. I havent found many studies about that neither in the country nor latin america. Studies in other continents are also welcome. Thank you. 
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I co-supervised a PhD in nursing about migrant eastern european health workers in Portugal (if you can read Portuguese and have an interest I will give you the student's email).    
You may want to follow what is happening with Cuban doctors in Brazil at the moment. 
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Does anyone recommend a reading on anthropology of surgery (or surgeons) that I may not know? It seems that this field not much explored. 
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Hello Bauer
This website might be of interest (UCL stands for University College London):
The early history of anatomy and anthropology in and around UCL
By Prof. Christopher Dean
These papers are available from ResearchGate:
Segovia, L. A., Jarrahy, R., Taub, B., Nguyen, P., Siegel, N., Ward, R., ... & Hubbard, T. R. (2014). Surgical Anthropology and Global Craniofacial Screening and Care: Preliminary Lessons Learned. Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 134(4S-1), 110.
Narayana, A., & Thrigulla, S. R. TANGIBLE EVIDENCES OF SURGICAL PRACTICE IN ANCIENT INDIA.
Mundorff, A. Z., Vidoli, G., & Melinek, J. (2006). Anthropological and radiographic comparison of vertebrae for identification of decomposed human remains. Journal of forensic sciences, 51(5), 1002-1004.
This relates to a book on ResearchGate:
Sanjek, R. (1990). Fieldnotes: The makings of anthropology. Cornell University Press.
This relates to the Journal - Medical Anthropology
This book might also be relevant:
An Anthropology of Biomedicine, 2011, Margaret Lock, ‎Vinh-Kim Nguyen (see p.1542)
I hope that there is something of help here
Mary
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I'm writing a research essay for my dissertation on Female Genital Mutilation and the laws and policies worldwide.
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Countries in which female circumcision is performed and rate of women
with circumcision
Countries Rate
Somalia 97.9%
Guinea 95.6%
Republic of Djibouti 93.1%
Sierra Leone 91.3%
Egypt 91.1%
Sudan 89.3%
Eritrea 88.7%
Mali 85.2%
Gambia 78.3%
Ethiopia 74.3%
Burkina Faso 72.5%
Mauritania 72.2%
Liberia 58.3%
Chad 44.9%
Guinea-Bissau 44.5%
Ivory Coast 36.4%
Nigeria 29.6%
Senegal 28.2%
Kenya 27.1%
Central African Rep 25.7%
Yemen 22.6%
Tanzania 14.6%
Benin 5.8%
Togo 3.8%
Ghana 2.2%
Cameroon 1.4%
Zambia 0.9%
Uganda 0.6%
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In order to better understand the clinical presentation of this individual.
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Avez-vous une raison précise de poser cette question? Avez-vous trouvé un passage dans un texte de Descartes qui vous a poussé à présenter cette question (surtout en relation avec ORL)?
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I am interested to explore whether we can use adult learning theories in behaviour health studies?
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I can suggest you the article: Dynamics of Europeanization of Adult Education: Theoretical Reflexions from the Cases of Spain and Portugal.
This article reflects on the situation of adult education in southern Europe, considering theories and policies developed in recent years. Hope you find interesting. Here is the link:http://epaa.asu.edu/ojs/article/view/1385/1147
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Until now we have investigated the arm proprioceptive control in volleyball players - female, but we intend to develop our researches in enrolled patients in rehabilitation programs ( i.e. post stroke ).
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Dear Nicolae, you can ask Mara Fabri Associate Professor Università Politecnica delle Marche Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicinehttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mara_Fabri
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I am researching the correlation of development indices, e.g., HDI, IHDI and Gini, and percentage of Deaf population in total population.
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Unfortunately, formal data in our country also presents not directly the deaf (who are users of sign language and lives in a habitat centralized at/around sign language) but all with hearing problems in any ages. 
I published a few studies to find out the data of real "deaf " population in Turkey for a few years in Turkish. Only one which is also available in ResearchGate (The history of sign language and deaf education in Turkey) is in English. But this paper is mostly related with problems of the deaf in Turkey and also their history in and around Anatolia. None of development indices, but their current problems in education (schooling, special education, university education, etc) were mentioned.
We (me and Pinar Yaprak Kemaloglu) have some other works which are already presented as only conference papers about "social institutions"  (available in ResearchGate: An Investigation of the Social Institutions Regarding Deaf Citizens in Turkiye), and "sports". And some data about problems and proposals in higher education settings for the deaf young which was taken from "E-işit" project, (supported by the Worldbank a few years ago) is also present in ResearchGate as a conference paper. Currently I published another paper about the necessity of sign language in medical services (Dysability, Otorhinolaryngologic Practice and Sign Language) which is also Turkish.
Recently a book is prepared by some researchers in Turkey (but not published yet; editor: E Arik), which is about sign language researches in Turkey, and in this book not only me but also some other researchers pointed out many aspects of Turkish deaf society.
Now I am about to set a research on medical problems and health status of the deaf, which will be done in sign language through the deaf societies in Turkey. 
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Among the well known and analyzed existing models of disability in the literature, (such as medical and social, along with many of their variants) the interesting issue would be associated with cultures. What is(are) the cultural model(s) of disability(ies) ? 
Please share your references, opinions and ideas.
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Hello Beata
In my view, when we talk about culture and disability there are two different aspects that one needs to consider. 1) Culture of disability; and 2) Cultural views of disability.
Culture of disability relates to how disabled people as a larger community or a sub-community of people with specific impairments view themselves. For example, many Deaf people do not view themselves as disabled but claim that they are part of Deaf (with capital D) culture. They have their own set of rules and behaviours (like any other culture) that are acceptable within Deaf community. 
When we talk about cultural views of disability, it refers to how disability and disabled people in general are viewed in various (ethnicity based) cultures. For example, in some cultures when a child is diagnosed with a disability, the parents are blamed for it on the ground that they must have committed some sin in their past life and hence God has punished them with a disabled child. There is a lot of stigma attached in many cultures to being disabled or being parent of a disabled child. Thankfully, such views are changing rapidly as a result of disability awareness campaigns run in different countries largely by DPOs (Disabled People's Organisations) and their allies.
You might find the following book edited by Stone useful:
Stone, J. (Ed.). (2005). Culture and disability: Providing culturally competent services. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications.
Best
Hemant
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Throughout the centuries and history of mankind, different cultures created the artifacts (in architecture, fine art, applied art, literature, poetry, language [sayings], music)  illustrating the concepts of approaches to disability. 
Do you know in your own or other cultures historical or current artifacts illustrating the direct or symbolic issues of following categories as social inclusion orsocial exclusion of persons with disabilities?
To bring this thread inspired me my dear colleague from RG Ans Schapendonk. 
Please share your comments and optionally photos. 
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Thought you might be interested in this blog
Downs syndrome represented in art;
.
And this fascinating journal article;
.
Regards,
Paul.
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Something like the Forensic Anthropology Laboratory Manual by S.Byers.
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I strongly recommend "Forensic Anthropology: Current Methods and Practice" by Christensen et al. (2014; Academic Press). It is a strong alternative to Byer's book which many find overly simplistic and, at least in earlier editions, sometimes inaccurate or outdated.
Additionally, I'd recommend supplementing Christensen et al. (2014) with chapters from DiGangi and Moore's "Research Methods in Skeletal Biology" (2012) which has a strong forensic focus as well as key articles in the field. 
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A very good question - which I hope will inspire a much needed debate. An article of interest may be: Ascuntar, J.M et al (2010): Fear, infection and compassion: Social representations of tuberculosis in Medellin, Colombia, 2007. INT J TUBERC LUNG DIS 14(10):1323–1329. Another is van der Walta, H. and Swartz, L (2002): Task orientated nursing in a tuberculosis control programme in South Africa: where does it come from and what keeps it going? Social Science and Medicine.
A colleague in Norway, Mette Sagbakken, has done a lot of qualitative work on TB in Ethiopia and Norway, and published widely - google her, and you find some good articles. I was working in the TB field till 2009, and have a lot  of good resources on training of health providers in communicating about TB (plus research to assess the effect of the training) - am in the process of publishing the training materials, and articles. The model has been developed with nurses and physicians, and implemented in 7 countries - now going broader than "only" TB. I also have conducted research to develop patient centered materials on TB, but - have focused on making it available for implementers, rather than on writing academic articles. The TB field is extremely dominated by medical professionals, and social scientists are much needed to answer the question you raise.
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Are animal models still needed in biomedical research to understand normal and abnormal function, from gene to phenotype, and to provide a basis for preventive or therapeutic intervention in human diseases?
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Please view the website, pcrm.org for their section on replacing animals in research, http://www.pcrm.org/research/.
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We have many kinds of great music and songs world wide.
Many of them raise issues of disabilities, as broadly understood human condition. They also indicate specific perception and attitudes towards disabilities of particular times.
Do you know the lyrics, songs of any species, which highlight in any way human disability? I share famous song by Janis Joplin(Big Brother & The Holding Company) entitled "Blindman", depicting person with vision disability, being in the need of help. This great song is from 1967 year, and in my opinion is expressing some need of public awareness of persons with disabilities in public spaces.
What are your opinions ? Please share your lyrics and songs.
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Be careful , we must well choose words and must be more than a psychologist, it is very sensitive, it takes wisdom and true and deep love ...
They must feel that we reaching out , but this hand is low and they are higher and have value ....
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Is there a change in uses of plants resources in Dalit communities over time may be because of socio-cultural and ecological changes?
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Dalit peoples exist in many places and are somewhat complicit re their hegeminical status because they allow it as "common sense" and "natural order" of society but Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937) argues that common sense is not rigid ... but ... transforms itself ...(Gramsci cited in Hall 1982:73). Some Dalit people in Gujqarat -as reported in Colombia Telegraph Oct 2013- recently subverted the accepted hegemony by changing their religion/belief system (http://archive.indianexpress.com/news/in-gujarat-thousands-of-dalits-choose-buddhism-for-a-new-identity/1182320/). For example, as Buddhists (inter alia) they are able, at a stroke, to be equal in society and have access to everything previously untouchable... Hope this helps. js
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Are they complimentary or conflicting or both?
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I believe that evolution is generally accepted through out scientific communities..in my field of anatomy, physiology and anthropology it is based on evolution. So even if your personal opinion is that of not believing in evolution, you need to be open minded enough to accept it in the scientific world.
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I am just starting research focused on the decolonization of tribal healthcare as a means to improve tribal health disparities. This article will be helpful since there is a dearth of information on the topic in the primary care realm. Integrated (biopsychosocial) care is always the ideal. If anyone out there has information on any pilot programs or individuals who are doing work in this area, please let me know!
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Dear Mary,
I have gone through your post and your proposed research programme.
In case you need information on Tribal Health Research in India at this period, you may contact the RMRCT (Regional Medical Research Centre for Tribals) at Jabalpur (address: Nagpur Road, P.O. Garha, Jabalpur 482003, M.P. INDIA <www.rmrct.org>) This is one of the institutes under ICMR (Indian Council of Medical Research) Besides, you can see the website of ICMR for its publication especially for the one study by Dr. Kanjakshya Ghosh& associates of Institute of Immuno Heamatology, of Mumbai (another ICMR Institute) I worked as Librarian at NICED of ICMR for more than 15 years and I believe that in case you want to have an idea of contemporary research on Tribal Health in India, you will get ample study materials from them. In case you have any difficulty, you can contact me. I presume though I left ICMR more than a decade & a half, I still have some connection with many of them.
Good luck to your research endeavour!!
Siddhartha S. Ray
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Researchers are familiar with how blunt the BMI (mass in kg divided by the square of stature in m) is at assessing fatness. My obervations, together with historic data from the work of Tyrell et al (1985), imply a shift by about one BMI unit within a 24 hour cycle, and greater values in children. I have long been concerned about the potential for mis-measurement, but misclassification arising from the asynchronous circadian rhythms of stature and mass have gone undetected. Ski jumpers commonly lie down for several hours prior to their stature measurement to enable them to jump using longer skis, thereby gaining a biomechanical advantage for their sports performance. I worry that borderline cases in medicine are not considered with the same diligence, because the ubiquitous use of BMI in clinical care pathways has hitherto not been informed of the potential for misclassification and poorer care as a consequence. My question is: Have other researchers noticed circadian fluctuation in BMI, and if so, by how much?
Tyrrell, A.R., Reilly, T. & Troup J.D.G. (1985). Circadian variation in stature and the effects of spinal loading. Spine 10, 161-164.
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Hi Arthur, It's an interesting methodological issue but I'm not sure that BMI is the variable to be concerned about. BMI, as you know, is used as a crude proxy for fat mass. Therefore anyone wishing to use it is unlikely to be bothered by marginal diurnal differences since this will be vastly overwhelmed by the imprecision of the index itself (especially in children).
However, if you were interested in growth over a relatively short period of weeks or months, then I agree that a protocol should try to standardise assessment of stature to be at the same time of the day - e.g. in the morning - so as to capture any real growth in millimetres that may occur between assessments and reduce methodological 'noise'.
Equally there may be very small diurnal differences in weight due to bladder contents, food intake etc, but unless you are really interested in very small differences - e.g. weighing an infant to estimate milk intake - then it shouldn't be a major issue.
So basically, I would only be concerned about diurnal variation in weight or height individually, and only if I were interested in very small or short-term differences in either. When these two are combined to make BMI, I don't think there is much benefit to achieving a level of precision of < 0.1 kg/m2.
Hope this helps.
Simon
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The answer to this question depends on both geographical, cultural, legal and time-related conditions. Many methods used in alternative medicine, in the Nordic countries, today may be accepted in other countries (for example, homeopathy (Germany), acupuncture (China), and Ayurvedic medicine (India)). Many methods once considered "alternative", are many places accepted today (for example, diet therapy and acupuncture).
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As a researcher I am also an educator in EBM (evidence-based medicine), including both eb-CAM (evidence-based CAM) and eb-IM (evidence-based integrative medicine), so I will provide here first the five most authoritative official definitions of CAM (complementary and alternative medicine) in current use, and offer some brief commentary, then finally offer a Working Definition of CAM based on a distillation of the best of these definitions and from decades of professional experience.
There are currently five authoritative definitions of CAM in widespread use:
NCCAM (National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine)
“Complementary and alternative medicine is a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be part of conventional medicine; that is, medicine as practiced by holders of MD (medical doctor) or DO (doctor of osteopathy) degrees and their allied health professionals, such as physical therapists, psychologists, and registered nurses.” [1]
The Cochrane Collaboration (Cochrane)
“A broad domain of healing resources that encompasses all health systems, modalities and practices and their accompanying theories and beliefs, other than those intrinsic to the politically dominant health systems of a particular society or culture in a given historical period.” [2] Note that the Cochrane Definition has been adopted by the CAMDoc Alliance, constituted by The European Committee for Homeopathy (ECH), the European Council of Doctors for Plurality in Medicine (ECPM), the International Council of Medical Acupuncture and Related Techniques (ICMART) and the International Federation of Anthroposophic Medical Associations (IVAA), now representing 132 European associations of medical doctors actively practicing CAM.[7] See also their Model Guidelines for the Practice of Complementary Therapies (CAM) by Medical Doctors in the European Union [8].
British Medical Association (BMA)
“Those forms of treatment which are not widely used by the conventional healthcare professions, and the skills of which are not taught as part of the undergraduate curriculum of conventional medical and paramedical healthcare courses.” [3]
CAMbrella
CAMbrella is a pan-European research project on CAM that has completed a comprehensive study of the nature and definition of CAM, and has just (2012) published its definition:
"Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) utilised by European citizens represents a variety of different medical systems and therapies based on the knowledge, skills and practices derived from theories, philosophies and experiences used to maintain and improve health, as well as to prevent, diagnose, relieve or treat physical and mental illnesses. CAM has been mainly used outside conventional health care, but in some countries certain treatments are being adopted or adapted by conventional health care." [4]
CAM-Expert Definition / Zollman/Vickers
From acknowledged CAM experts Catherine Zollman and Andrew Vickers, Research Council for Complementary Medicine, London, and now (Vickers) with Memorial Sloan-Kettering:
‘Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a broad domain of healing resources that encompasses all health systems, modalities and practices and their accompanying theories and beliefs, other than those intrinsic to the politically dominant health system of a particular society or culture in a given historical period. CAM includes all such practices and ideas self-defined by their users as preventing or treating illness or promoting health and well-being. Boundaries within CAM and between the CAM domain and that of the dominant system are not always sharp or fixed." [5]
Commentary:
1. In general, complementary medicine refers to therapies used in combination with conventional medicine, while alternative medicine is used in place of conventional medicine, but what constitutes alternative or complementary when seen from a conventional medicine perspective may be, or become, traditional or mainstream for some ethno-cultural groups and/or at various points in history: thus use of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) by the Chinese community within which it is conventional not alternative.
2. It should also be noted that the complementary versus alternative subcategories are contextual, not absolute: thus acupuncture therapy is complementary in one context as for analgesia w/wo traditional analgesics, but is alternative in another, where acupuncture is used instead of physiotherapy for muscular pain.
3. In addition, boundaries within CAM, and borders between the CAM domain and that of conventional medicine, are neither consistently clear nor constant, and these boundaries and borders change and are shaped over time across a continuum of gradually increasing acceptance and integration with conventional medicine.
4. The BMA definition is an especially poor one in claiming that CAM skills "are not taught as part of the undergraduate curriculum of conventional medical and paramedical healthcare courses." Even as of a 1989 survey [6], 64% of USA medical schools surveyed offered 1 or more courses in CAM, or these topics were covered in required courses, and 37% of the medical schools surveyed offered 2 or more courses. Since 1989, both the number of medical schools, and the number of courses on CAM within those schools, has increased dramatically.
5. Nonetheless both significant resistance and sometimes manifest hostility to, as well as ignorance about, CAM remains even today.
So based on experience and research, I will offer the following more constructive definition of CAM that has served well in instruction and in professional interaction:
WORKING DEFINITION OF CAM
An umbrella term for a collection of diverse approaches outside of the narrower framework of conventional medicine for the maintenance and improvement of health, for disease prevention and treatment, and for various associated supportive functions. In addition, when CAM is subject, as it must be, to the same methodological rigors of review and appraisal as any evaluable conventional modality using the protocols and constructs of EBM (evidence-based medicine), we term that eb-CAM (evidence-based CAM). Furthermore when CAM is integrated with conventional medicine, we term that Integrative Medicine and when that in turn is subject to EBM constraints and requirements, we term that eb-IM (evidence-based Integrative Medicine).
Forward Statement:
In systematic reviews and critical appraisals of CAM and its sister disciplines, eb-CAM, IM, and eb-IM, the weight of the evidence supports a finding of "probable efficacy" (Level I and Level II) for dozens of CAM modalities, supported by systematic review, meta-analysis, and critical appraisals, at the level of RCT (randomized controlled trial) [as, with melatonin, ginger, acupuncture, and numerous others evidenced within eb-CAM], and of course the judgment of only "possible efficacy" or "lack of (demonstrable) efficacy" for many more. As CAM, especially eb-CA matures, it is to be expected that significant bodies of CAM modalities, interventions and agents will be winnowed out by critical appraisal and failure in human clinical RCTs, but that nonetheless a significant albeit smaller body will achieve probably efficacy and be ultimately integrated into conventional medicine, a progress we are already beginning to witness.
References
1. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM). The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States. Available at http://nccam.nih.gov/news/camsurvey_fs1.
2. Wieland LS, Manheimer E, Berman BM. Development and classification of an operational definition of complementary and alternative medicine for the Cochrane collaboration. Altern Ther Health Med 2011 Mar-Apr; 17(2):50-9.
3. British Medical Association (BMA). Complementary Medicine—New Approaches to Good Practice. Available at http://www.bma.org.uk/ap.nsf/content/publicpetitioncam.
4. Falkenberg T, Lewith G, di Sarsina PR, et al. Towards a Pan-European Definition of Complementary and Alternative Medicine – a Realistic Ambition?. Forsch Komplementmed 2012;19(suppl 2):6–8.
5. Zollman C, Vickers A. What is complementary medicine? Br Med J 1999; 319: 693–696.
6. Wetzel MS, Eisenberg DM, Kaptchuk TJ. Courses involving complementary and alternative medicine at US medical schools. JAMA 1998 Sep 2; 280(9):784-7.
7. CAMDoc. The CAMDoc Alliance. Available at: http://www.camdoc.eu/index.html.
8. CAMDoc. The CAMDoc Alliance. Model Guidelines for the Practice of Complementary Therapies (CAM) by Medical Doctors in the European Union. Available at: http://www.camdoc.eu/Pdf/Model%20Guidelines%20CAM%20Practice.pdf.
Constantine Kaniklidis
Director of Medical Research,
No Surrender Breast Cancer Foundation (NSBCF)
European Association for Cancer Research (EACR)
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I'm writing my thesis on the development of schistosoma-control in Fayoum, Egypt and the most recent data on the prevalence is from 1992. It would be good if I had any more recent data to see how the situation is now.
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Thanks! I will check it out.
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I am looking for studies that take on a discourse analysis approach that focus on the use of traditional medicine. Suggestions for studies that conducted discourse analysis on medicine using tout court are also welcomed.
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Hi, you may look at the French anthropologist Laurent Pordié's researches:
He is specialized in the social study of science and medicine in South Asia. Some of his publications are in english...
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I am looking for compliance in mental health as well as in general medicine
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Check out a few of these foundational critiques of compliance in medical anthropology:
Trostle, James
1988 Medical compliance as an ideology. Social Science & Medicine 27(12):1299-1308.
Hunt, Linda, Brigitte Jordan, Susan Irwin, and Carole Browner
1989 Compliance and the patient’s perspective: Controlling symptoms in everyday life.
Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry 13(3):315-334.
Brodwin, Paul
2010 The assemblage of compliance in psychiatric case management.
Anthropology & Medicine 17(2):129-143.
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I am doing research about braces that are used for lateral epicondylitis. Everyone says it reduces the strain in the tendon on the ECRB, but there are not many reviews that go into the mechanics behind this theory.
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This paper discusses some details you might find interesting.
They focus on vibration which some researchers have argued could be a cause of injury. I think the actual mechanics are still unclear, however, one could imagine that excessive vibration could cause strain on the tendons that insert at a particular site, in this case, the epicondyle. Attachment sites could experience stress concentrations during vibration which would cause excessive strain.
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When other had developed the approach of anthropology in forensic, medical, and other sub anthropology Indonesia only focus on social anthropology. Sometimes it made me think why anthropology was not know well in Indonesia. I'm shy, sad with this reality. May anthropology grow up, cause anthropology is a knowledge about who is human and who are them in their community.
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Ideally speaking the uniqueness of Anthropology is to study issues related of Man in terms of cultural, biological and environmental factors. There are issues that concerns where culture and biology interact. Having said so, since each branch of Anthropology so vast, it had developed its own methodologies problems that are more concerned within each area of research as such Cultural or Social anthropology specializes its methodological issues and problems more related to cultural with least interaction with other areas.
Indonesia geographically is an interesting island and has rich history of anthropological interest: primates, paleontology, physical archeology and early human habitation etc, which are of interest for both cultural, physical and archeological anthropology. There are a good classical examples of studies dealing with cultural, biological and other issues of Man. e.g. Kuru disease is one such best study that can be cited. Though it is a very complex problem, required several experts to get into it and got even nobel prize as well.