Science topic

Medicago - Science topic

A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. It is distinct from Sweet Clover (MELILOTUS), from Bush Clover (LESPEDEZA), and from Red Clover (TRIFOLIUM).
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How much time does the spores needs to establish symbiosis in natural conditions ?
Lets asume, I put a Medicago seed in a 5 ml box, fill with sterile sand or vermiculite, pour some water drops, add 50 or 100 spores and wait the spore to germinate and establis a simbiosis with the seedling. The medicago seed wil germinate in 24 hrs, but what about the spores and establishment of symbiosis ?
How much time should I wait to have 50 % of my seedlings get mycorrhized. Of course, depends of the plant, the AMF species etc, but more or less ? 10 days ? 30 days ? 60 days ?
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Dear Dr. Louis,
We have grown wheat plants on growth media (pH 5.5) lacking vitamins and sucrose. the roots of the plant were inoculated with a sterilized mycorrhizal spore and the same was covered with aluminum foil to mimic the soil condition (darkness). before inoculation, the spores were stored at 4C to break the dormancy as mentioned in the various literature. this experiment is going on and still, after 10 days, our spores are not germinated. I think other than the temperature there are some factors which influence the dormancy of spores. As soon I receive any positive conclusion I will share with you all.
Thanks.
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In our two -year field experiment, white clover pure stand resulted in higher biomass yield compared to its respective mixtures with grasses and as well as with the mixture of red clover with grasses. Although other legumes such as alfalfa and red clover pure stands resulted in lower biomass yield compared to their respective mixtures. However, overall alfalfa and red clover mixtures were more productive than that of mixture of white clover. What are the possible reasons for white clover to produce more biomass yield in pure stand but when it mixed with grasses its mixture produce lower biomass yield compared to the mixtures of alfalfa with grasses or red clover with grasses.
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THERE ARE SOME POSSIBILITIES, THE DEFICIT OF MYCORRHIZAS, UNBALANCED SOIL, AND COMPETITION OF NUTRIENTS FAVORING THE GRASSES. AND AN ALMOST NON POSSIBILITY OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF ALLELOPATIC EFFECTS THAT SUPPRESSED TRIFFOLUIM REPPENS
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I tried to get seeds from white clover by self-fertilization but I could not get the seeds. As you know the white clover is generally fertilized by crossing. I wanna get the seeds by self-fertilization. If know anyone how to do. Could you please let me know?
best regards
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Dear there is a self-incompatibility so it is not possible
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I am carrying out fatty acid analysis on 3 different pasture mixes. I have a 6 species mix, a 2 species mix and I have divided a portion of the 6 species mix into its individual constituents. In total I have perennial ryegrass, timothy, white clover, red clover, chicory, plantain, 6 species mix and 2 species mix, meaning I have 8 samples in total. I want to look at the differences between the fatty acid profile of the species and then how this changes over time. Initially I thought I would be able to perform ANOVA to analyse the differences between the fatty acid contents of the species, however, the sample prep involved pooling pasture samples from 3 different fields which means the triplicate samples I prepared are from the pooled mix rather than 3 separate samples, therefore I don't think I can perform this. If anyone has any suggestions it would be greatly appreciated.
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I am using the A. rhizogenes mediated hairy root transformation protocol. I have tried three recent protocol but the composite plants are continuously producing non-transgenic and chimeric root. As I understand every single hairy root is an independent event but still interested to know how I can get rid of the chimeric and non-transgenic root without chopping under fluorescence adapter. I tried Kanamycin selection (concentration up to 100) but it's not working properly in soybean as worked in Medicago. I have EGFP for screening which working efficiently but I want to have only transgenic root and nodule in the composite plant before the experiment. Looking for ideas and suggestions. Thanks in advance. Cheers, Kamal
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Thanks Andrew, I never thought about crime scene though, but probably worth a try, lol. It's not the contamination creating the problems. I am actually searching for something to avoid chimeric root which is half transgenic and half-wild. Any great ideas?
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I am working with nematode and host Medicago. I have transcriptome data for both species and I also have a list of differentially expressed genes(DEG). Now I would like to see if DEG of host and nematode are associated by calculating a correlation between genes. Which package should I use? I am new in this area so please give me suggestions on network analysis, steps, packages, papers. Thank you!
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Dear Shova
In this case Your observation points are time-points. And have to say, six - is not an optimal number for correlation analysis, but anyway - yes, the data organization You wrote is correct. Just switch row-column view, because, as far as I remember, "corr.test" recognizes observation points as rows. Although, I may be wrong with this...
Another thing I would mention: if You plan to include for correlation not all genes, but only those that are DE at any time-point, it can be complicated to interpret.
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It is difficult to work on crops and chances of successful experiments are very less, that is why we prefer these model organisms to study the mechanism and then apply the same knowledge on other crops. So, according to you, for different traits and developmental studies which is better?
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I have worked with Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana. As for me tobacco is more easy culture to grow and work with. But for arabidopsis there is full genome and special resourse about genes and etc https://www.arabidopsis.org/
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We have moved the horses of Paddock Sanctuary to different land over the last 4 years, dependent on the forage provided altered if the horses had mild laminitis, ie blood in the white line, and hoof heat. This current land we rent, is high in rye grasses, clovers, buttercups, chickweed, plantain ribwort, nettles. We have found by restricting the horses onto track systems and minimal grass, but ad lib non rye-grass hay forage, laminitic episodes reduced.
It will be interesting to see if you have included pasture findings as part of owner identifying issues.
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We tried meadow hay, but they are on ad lib hay and it vanished quite quickly. Mixed seeded hay takes them longer to eat. Well done with your laminitic. I think track systems for laminitics are a way forwards.
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Dear researchers
Hi
I am isolating a gene from licorice ( Glycirrhiza glabra). the gene is belong to Medicago and involved in biosynthesis pathway. I designed 3 pairs primers. a primer based on the first and the end of Medicago gene. a primer based on consensus regions. I have had a band 3000bp that amplified to DNA of Medicago and Licorice and a band 500 bp to cDNA Licorice. but now It does not amplify 3000 bp band and I sent 500 bp band for sequencing and but Company told me that you do not have any band. I will send my gel picture for you.
please guide me.
best regards
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are you purifying the 500 band before sending it fr sequencing. you have extra bands and a bad primer dimer small band which contains a lot of primer binding sites so will make sequencing very difficult. I would increase the annealing temperature or add up to 6% dmso in increments to your pcr mix to clean up the pcr to a single band. Also get rid of the primer dimer by using less primer, using a hot start taq or redesigning your primers. Try using 1/5 the amount of primer
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If you have for instance 100 markers and all are mapped in the same linkage group. These markers have a physical positon on chromosomes. So, I found that these markers have positons on different chromosome of Medicago truncatula... .
what do you think?????
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I think this the common phenomena because there are homologous and homoeologous in different chromosomes
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I want to use the selection medium with kanamycin (100 µg/ml) as selection. Can I use this concentration? Or is this concentration above the alfalfa lethal threshold?
Thanks
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1. Different plant species or even genotypes, the antibiotic concentration required for selection can be different. You need to find out by doing an experiment.
2. To do so, test non-transgenic materials of your own plant species/genotype on solid selection medium with series of antibiotic (kan, in your case) concentrations. This will help you to figure out which antibiotic concentration is the most suitable for your experiment.
3. I attached this 2015 paper for you (see attachment). In the paper, it has paragraphs to describe how to find out the best antibiotic selection concentration for their experiment. See TWO yellow highlighted parts and Fig. 3.  
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I did association analysis using SNP for some traits in medicago. As a result, I got some significant SNP associated with traits e,g Vf_Mt2g086880 . These SNP generated from Medicago. So, I would like to do synteny to gene function.
Dose anybody know a way to compare my SNPs with those already their function?
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Certainly, but it looks to me that the marker information is wrong. 
What are those traits?  For example if you want to find genetic variation wrt shoor or root or lentils, you can search those trait-related genes and markers associated with them.  
Did you try the previous link?
When I search Gramene, there are a couple: http://archive.gramene.org/db/ontology/search?id=GR_tax:071622
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I want to collect seeds from various farms within the agro-pastoral region of the Western Cape Province of South Africa to determine the quality of the soil seed bank on each of the farms and how different pasture/crop rotation strategies influences not only the quantity of seeds in the soil, but also their vertical distribution within soils. I was also considering trying to determine the natural breakdown of seed coat dormancy on each of the farms by collecting soil samples at various stages after seed formation in order to try and get a rough timeline as to how long this process will take. However, I am not sure how I should go about testing the 'hardness' of the seeds. Would normal petri dish germination trials with the collected seeds be enough to test the ability of seeds to germinate at various time intervals after seed formation?
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A nice review of the factors that influence the breakdown of seed dormancy (hardseeds) in Trifolium and Medicago was published by Graham Taylor in 2005.
Taylor GB (2005) Hardseededness in Mediterranean annual pasture legumes in Australia: a review. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 56, 645-661.
The dehydration of seeds is fundamental for the development of seed dormancy in these annual legumes and you need to consider seed moisture content when setting up in-situ studies.
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Rhizobial inoculation of annual Medicago and Trifolium species are suggested by seed distributors. This is primarily to help with nitrogen fixation, however would these bacteria also help with seed germination and subsequently seedling emergence from deeper burial depths?
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The dark side of biomethod: symbiotic/antagonistic bacteria can be close to plant pathogens and in certain conditions (lack of O2 in deep soil, etc) can turn on synthesis of some enzymes/ plant toxic  compaunds that will kill germinating seeds.  For instance: we have isolated many strains of Rhizobium/Agrobacterium from rotted potato tubers. I cannot say that they were the main reason for rot but  were present in many samples.