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Maternal & Child Health - Science topic

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A young primigavida had an unsupervised home delivery, had some bleeding at home and presented with what looked like anemic heart failure. Packed cell volume however came out to be 42% and 46% on two different occasions. she was discharged home when she appeared to have stablised only to reurn a week later with orthopnoea, pulmonary oedema and a very low blood pressure of 90/?mmHg. Within the resources available, the managing team placed her on a diuretic for the pulmonary oedema. But they also commenced her intravenous fluids for the hypotension in addition to dobutamine for inotropic effect.
Achieving the right balance in concurrent use of diuretics and intravenous therapy in thesame patient is very challenging especially in resource constrained settings.
We would be glad to have peoples' experiences or suggestions/recommendations in the management of such a case.
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actually this is so difficult to give any diuretics patient at home since the pecient is hypotension , the first treatments is the resuscitation of the patient fluid then reassessing of the cases then follow the client at the health facility and giving of the flrocimid drug for edema
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My application requires people that i will visit to discuss my project. my project is about maternal and child health outcomes reduction through preconception care. please if interested on my project, please list your contacts and your organization to find you once i reach USA and our sponsors will contact you before. i want 10 people one should be from rural areas. Thank you for your support. i am waiting you soon
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Best Wishes and Good Luck!
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As I am currently going to start a study on IMNCI program outcome, the information is very much needed for the objective of health policy advocacy.
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I agree with Brett Andrew Sutton
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I'm doing an epidemiological major and I am still creating my thesis. So if we give a supplementation for breastfeeding to women how long will the composition of milk be changed? Please share.
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When the baby absorbs the nipple, a neurotransmitter will pass on to the pituitary gland and hormones called prolactin and oxytocin are produced. Prolactin hormone transfers orders to change blood to breast milk, and oxytocin hormone works to propaves breast milk that accumulates in breast canals.
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I would like to know if live birth receives a different ICD-10 code and incur a significantly different cost when compared to fetal death (may also be referred to as miscarriage, spontaneous termination or spontaneous abortion). Does the cost depend on the method of payment - self pay, Medicaid or HMO? Does the gestational age play a role in coding and/or billing?
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I think in some countries the gestational age play a role in coding and/or billing..
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This is related to a research project I am working on - " The role of De-worming drugs during pregnancy in determining Birth Weight: Evidence from India’s latest Family Health Survey "
According to the NFHS- Roughly, 5% of the sample (n=5,000) had used drugs to rid of intestinal worms during pregnancy - most of them got this at the public health centers - There is no information on which drug or the frequency or which trimester.
I am looking for any material that chalks out the national government's guidelines or recommendations on the use of deworming/anthelminthic drugs during pregnancy(either mebendazole or Albendazole or both).
I know that WHO recommends Mebendazol in the last 2 trimesters in regions with high prevalence of parasitic infections -
Also, from your last email Dhruv - I understood that both are available at public health centers.
Are Anganwadi or ASHA workers given any guidelines regarding these during antenatal checkups for anaemic women?
I have surfed the net and googled enough for the last few days - I must be using the wrong keywords.
I would really appreciate it if you could give me some information on the practices followed in the public health system or pass on any written material on the issue. If you can think of someone who would know more - please fee free to pass on my question & contact.
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It is not recommended to take pharmacological doses of Anti-helmenthics during pregnancy, but it is preferable to take natural substances that have similar properties to medications such as taking small doses of pomegranate peel powder with honey and for no more than five days...
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Hello colleagues,
We have beendiscussing research. I would like to have partners on my current study on "Public and Private providers of maternal and child health care services."
This ia purely social science research that extends an arm to produce cutting-edge research in healthcare systems, capacity and management.
I am willing to share a draft with an interested partner.
Thank you
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Hello Mamatha, please send me an email jasasira@must.ac.ug cc asasirajsts@gmail.com. I will get back to you as soon as I see your mail. Thank you.
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Please see the following:
The Labile Side of Iron Supplementation in CKD
Itzchak Slotki* and Zvi Ioav Cabantchik†
*Division of Adult Nephrology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center and Hadassah Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem,
Israel; and †Department of Biological Chemistry, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
ABSTRACT
The practice of intravenous iron supplementation has grown as nephrologists have
gradually moved away from the liberal use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents
as the main treatment for the anemia of CKD. This approach, together with the
introduction of large-dose iron preparations, raises the future specter of inadvertent
iatrogenic iron toxicity. Concerns have been raised in original studies and reviews
about cardiac complications and severe infections that result from long-term
intravenous iron supplementation. 
J Am Soc Nephrol 26: 2612–2619, 2015. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2015010052
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Most food species provide the required amount of iron. However, the body needs large amounts of iron during pregnancy. The additional amount is given throughout the pregnancy, as well as within 2 - 3 months after birth, to compensate the iron reserve in the body of the woman after birth. Deficiency symptoms Iron deficiency leads to anemia, which includes symptoms of fatigue, fatigue, shortness of breath and rapid heartbeat. It can also show apathy, irritability and decreased body ability to resist infections. Symptoms and risks in overdose Iron poisoning is very serious. The symptoms are: abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, accompanied by high body temperature, abdominal distension, dryness and a serious reduction in blood pressure. These conditions require immediate medical treatment. Pharmaceutical preparations Iron sulphate, iron fumarate, iron gluconate and iron compound - polysaccharides can be obtained over-the-counter in medical preparations, vitamins and minerals. Dextran iron given by injection can only be obtained by prescription and at bedtime. Liver sources is the best source of iron. Meat (especially brains and kidneys), eggs, chicken, fish, green leafy vegetables, dried fruits, whole or fortified cereals, bread and some baked goods, nuts and dried pulses are all rich sources of iron. Iron, which comes from meat, chicken and fish, is better absorbed than iron, which comes from vegetables. The dose is determined individually, depending on the nature and severity of the condition. In adults, anemia is usually treated with a dose of 30-100 mg of iron, two or three times a day. In children, the dosage should be reduced by generation and weight. In the case of pregnancy it is recommended to give between 30 - 60 mg per day. Recommended daily dose Details of recommended daily amount (RDA) for iron, 10 mg (from birth to 6 months), 15 mg (from 6 months to 3 years), 10 mg (4 to 10 years) 18 mg (for males between the ages of 11 to 18 years - for females from the age of 11 years to 50 years), 10 mg (for males aged 19 years and above and for females aged 51 and above) the body needs a larger amount during pregnancy and up to two or three months after Birth. I have foods that contain vitamin and iron
 
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My name is Alaya and a new addition to this insightful platform. I am researching into a reach topic in two areas (policy and health systems and the area of maternal and child health) for a potential PHD application.
Any suggestions on a research question for a PHD in either policy and health systems or maternal and child health
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Health worker beliefs, agreement, and implementation of health service policies of care / guidelines. Why are guidelines resisted? Quite a lot of publications on this overall topic that you could narrow down to one specific topic where there is a solid research base for the practice and national/international guidelines but still not implemented as standard practice in some hospitals - breastfeeding, early and sustained skin to skin contact, protection from marketing of breast milk substitutes and related equipment - and I am sure there are many more outside my specific field of work. Good luck.
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If anyone has good research resources or expertise in this area that I can refer to or read, please send it my way. I am part of a determinants of health team providing support to another team regarding this topic.
Inclusion Criteria: children aged 0-6yrs, Canadian research, up to date (last 5 years), and peer reviewed.
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i was doing some analysis related with maternal mortality by using DHS data sets of sub Saharan African countries. however, i faced difficulties getting the specific variable name of maternal death  and ANC from sub Saharan African countries data sets.
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Hi Diego
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There is high maternal and child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa countries and the solutions could be found at the community levels by promoting the cultural best practices.
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Thanks Muhammad
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I'm looking to measure maternal bonding in mothers 1-4 weeks post-partum but will be using a non-clinical sample.
Many of the questions used in measures of post-natal depression seem to be too diagnostic for what I'm looking at. 
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You might try "maternal role attainment", which is not quite what you're looking for but does focus on non-clinical populations.
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It appears on ResearchGate projects: Citizen Science Judy's 3,4,5 to eliminate PPH.
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No controlled cord traction.   Cut the cord at 3 minutes.  Get the woman into squatting on the floor.  She pushes the placenta out at 5 minutes.   No need to pull on the cord.  The placenta is separated and sitting at the opening waiting to be delivered.
The benefit of this protocol is active management results in a minimum of 5% PPH, whereas this protocol results in 0% PPH.
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In South Asian countries, it is a common trend that after childbirth, women press the forehead and also backside of the skull to give it specific shape. Do it has any effect on the brain function/number of neurons?
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I have heard about this old practice.  It was ascribed  to the beauty.  The shape of skull - brachiecephalic or dolichocephalic  - is determined the  genes.
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as propoli has many benefits to human and animal, I want to know its effects in pregnancy moman
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As previously told by Ms Judy Slome Cohain, you usually cannot know for sure whether there is real propolis in supplements.  unless you gather it directly from a bee hive 
Propolis is very expensive so it is open to fraud. 
While it is generally accepted and advertised to be beneficial for humans, the effects on the embryogenesis can not be predicted.   On the other hand, it is not possible to avoid all harmful effects in pregnancy.  A pregnant woman can not be isolated from the real World.  
Detailed information on propolis and animal studies should be obtained initially..  Also women in close contact with bee hives and those   WHO have consumed propolis in early pregnancy should be investigated for adverse affects.
There is always a chance of hypersensitivity reaction.
A substance can not be assumed to be innocent in pregnancy just because it is natural, as previously stated by Mr. Carl Weiner
Best regards.
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The triple test is no longer the most effective screening test for antenatal Down syndrome and consequently many national guidelines recommend other screening tests instead. Are there any robustly done studies?
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Abnormal Triple Test results followed by ultrasound and amniocentesis may lead to the detection of 60 to 70% of pregnancies complicated with Down syndrome and many Trisomy 18 pregnancies. In addition to potential neural tube defects.
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I need articles and instruments for measurement
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Hello Vero
I could not locate a measure. Most of the papers relate to Internet communication rather than telehealth, but this is the slide show from a lecture:
This presentation may also be relevant:
Bush, E. (2015, November). Statewide Support Network to Improve Breastfeeding Rates in Arkansas. In 143rd APHA Annual Meeting and Expo (Oct. 31-Nov. 4, 2015). APHA.
This paper may also be of interest to you:
Macnab, I., Rojjanasrirat, W., & Sanders, A. (2012). Breastfeeding and telehealth. Journal of Human Lactation, 28(4), 446-449.
There may be something relevant in this paper, but I have not accessed the full text:
Lau, Y., Htun, T. P., Tam, W. S., & Klainin‐Yobas, P. (2015). Efficacy of e‐technologies in improving breastfeeding outcomes among perinatal women: a meta‐analysis. Maternal & child nutrition.
Telehealth Delivery of Breastfeeding support for Post-Partum Women: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines
This is a dissertation:
MC Neely (2010) Breastfeeding experiences of mothers using telehealth at one and four weeks postpartum
Very best wishes
Mary
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I am interested to get promotional materials like poster, food-plate for promoting diet quality of pregnant and lactating women.
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attached are the files I use
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1-what do you think are the most appropriate quanti and quali study designs/methodologies to investigate the relation between caffeine exposure during pregnancy and births before 37-41 weeks of gestation ?
2-what are the ethical considerations to be taken into account during this study ?
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See our article in the European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 23, No. 3, 480–485
doi:10.1093/eurpub/cks089
Risk factors of preterm birth and low birth weight babies among Roma and non-Roma mothers: a population-based study.
In the multivariable logistic regression model (non concerning ethnic differences) the effect on PTB of non-daily versus daily consumption of caffein was: OR=0.97 95%CI=0.84–1.26 p=0.899.
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designing and constructing the garments for breastfeeding mothers and accessing how well the breast is conceal while breastfeeding.
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Dear Precious Ojike,
There is a couple of research work for bra design and garment like
“Breast sizing and development of three-dimensional seamless bra”
“US20110143634- Patent-Lightweight Enhanced Modesty Sports Bra Cup”
I hope my answer will help you.
Thank you so much, Huda
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Uptake of family planning methods is still low in Nigeria. One of my students is carrying out a study on workers attitude towards family planning & would like to adapt an open access standardized family planning attitude measuring questionnaire for the study.   
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These sites might be helpful:
Family Planning and Reproductive Health Indicators Databasehttp://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/prh/rh_indicators/specific/fp
Family Planning and Reproductive Health Survey (A baseline survey from Malawi): http://dhsprogram.com/pubs/pdf/OD11/OD11.pdf
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Many underprivileged women are not able to afford a balanced diet for themselves or their family. Is there any study where specialized low cost balanced diet counseling and education has been provided to underprivileged women with success?  
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Its very true that impact of cultural health beliefs and taboos play very important role in the maintenance of optimum nutritional status, even in case of extremely underprivileged women and their families also, rather I would say its the basic cause of their nutritional backwardness. I had observed these facts when I was conducting nutritional survey at  Manikdoh, a village in Pusad Tehsil of Maharashtra State (India), with my Students. When we visited a house, in front of the house green gram brought from farms was  spread in very large quantity on a cloth for drying and as we entered house we came to know that house lady was suffering from severe protein malnutrition. We asked her and other family members that why they are not using green gram as protein source in diet, the answer we got was very surprising that use of green gram may result in gout. It was quite difficult for us to convince her and family for use of low cost nutritious food in diet. But our frequent visits in village and conduction of need based nutrition education programme, demonstrations of low cost nutritious recipes brought change in villager's attitude and after followup of one year I could notice positive change in nutritional status too.
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In line with achieving the MDG 5.
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For Kenya-specific Maternal Mortality Data, consider
1) Demographic Health Survey of Kenya in 2014:  http://dhsprogram.com/what-we-do/survey/survey-display-451.cfm
For a broader context on maternal mortality estimates by region, see table 2 in this 2012 Lancet Paper by Say et al:
1) Global causes of maternal death: a WHO systematic analysis
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new experiences  .....cooperation.
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STBM microparticles released from the maternal part of the bearing with the development of the fetus. In a normal pregnancy the placenta is the most-developed at 36-40 weeks. In addition, they circulate in the blood to the collapse of the spleen. In most of the microparticles is emerging STBM and pregnancy complicated: preeclamsia. In IUGR bearing is failing is probably STBM microparticle concentration in the blood is lower
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The definition of obstetric violence is “…the appropriation of the body and reproductive processes of women by health personnel, which is expressed as dehumanized treatment, an abuse of medication, and to convert the natural processes into pathological ones, bringing with it loss of autonomy and the ability to decide freely about their bodies and sexuality, negatively impacting the quality of life of women.” <br />
I'm working on obstetric violence. Does anyone know of any studies about this topic?
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Here is an excellent document from the World Health Organization, 2014:
The Elimination of Disrespect and Abuse During Facility-Based (Hospital) Childbirth
Here is the pdf file:
"Many women experience disrespectful and abusive treatment during childbirth
in facilities worldwide. Such treatment not only violates the rights of women to
respectful care, but can also threaten their rights to life, health, bodily integrity,
and freedom from discrimination. This statement calls for greater action, dialogue,
research and advocacy on this important public health and human rights issue."
"Greater action is needed to support changes in
provider behaviour, clinical environments and health
systems to ensure that all women have access to
respectful, competent and caring maternity health
care services. This can include (but is not limited
to) social support through a companion of choice,
mobility, access to food and fluids, confidentiality,
privacy, informed choice, information for women
on their rights, mechanisms for redress following
violations, and ensuring high professional standards
of clinical care. The focus on safe, high-quality, people-
centered care as part of universal health coverage can
also help inform action."
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Is there any reference indicate that the early supplementation may decrease milk production due to less frequent breastfeeding, developing breastfeeding difficulties, reduced maternal breastfeeding confidence, and perceived insufficient milk supply?
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Early introduction of formula or glucose solution reducts breastfeeding rates and duration. Citation from my paper ( Factors Associated with the Duration of Breastfeeding in the Freiburg Birth Collective, Germany (FreiStill), R. Rasenack1, C. Schneider1, E. Jahnz1, J. Schulte-Mönting2, H. Prömpeler1, M. Kunze1 Geburtsh Frauenheilk 2012; 72: 64–69 ): "The breastfeeding situation on the first postpartal day has a considerable influence upon the duration of breastfeeding. Women who, following birth, can nourish their babies on the breast alone frequently breastfeed their children for longer than six months. When glucose solution is orally administered in addition, the percentage of children breastfed over a longer time is lower. With formula supplementation nutrition the percentage of children breastfed longer than six months declines significantly." More literature with the same result: Haggkvist AP, Brantsaeter AL, Grjibovski AM et al. Prevalence of breast-feeding in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and health service-related correlates of cessation of full breast-feeding. Public Health Nutr; 13: 2076-2086,  Declercq E, Labbok MH, Sakala C et al. Hospital practices and women's likelihood of fulfilling their intention to exclusively breastfeed. Am J Public Health 2009; 99: 929-935,  DiGirolamo AM, Grummer-Strawn LM, Fein SB. Effect of maternity-care practices on breastfeeding. Pediatrics 2008; 122 Suppl 2: S43-49
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How can I manage a decrease of maternal CO during Cesarean section ?
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 Can you provide a few more specifics? For example preoperative morbidity - has she valvular heart disease, a cardiomyopathy or what? Also, what sort of anaesthetic are you using and are you measuring cardiac output? What is causing the decrease in cardiac output?
The simplistic (and not very helpful) answer to your question is to increase it. But depending on cause and amount by which the CO is decreased there are a number of possible options including nothing at all (i.e. watch and wait), but we need more details.
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We are conducting a surveillance study looking at various socio-demographic factors and birth outcomes such as LBW and prematurity using birth certificate data. Given the limited info on the birth certificate, which would be a better predictor of adequate prenatal care, the Kotelchuck or the Kessner index.
 
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The Kotelchuck Index, is also called the Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization (APNCU) Index, It uses two crucial elements obtained from birth certificate data-when prenatal care began (initiation) and the number of prenatal visits from when prenatal care began until delivery (received services). The Kotelchuck index classifies the adequacy of initiation as  i.e pregnancy months 1 and 2, months 3 and 4, months 5 and 6, and months 7 to 9. The final Kotelchuck index measure combines these two dimensions into a single summary score. The profiles define adequate prenatal care as a score of 80% or greater on the Kotelchuck Index, or the sum of the Adequate and Adequate Plus categories.The Kotelchuck Index does not measure the quality of prenatal care.
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Is anyone aware of studies from sub-Saharan Africa that deals with men's role in women's maternity experiences (e.g., birthing, etc)?
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I worked not long ago with two Tanzanian colleagues, both anthropologsts (Joe Lugalla and Richard Sambaiga) to conduct a study of factors that affect the duration of birth intervals in two zones of Tanzania. the report includes a discussion of husband involvement in the use of ANC services. The report is available on the Demographic and Health Surveys web site. the reference is:
Yoder, P.S., J. Lugalla and R. Sambaiga. 2013. Determinants of the duration of birth intervals in Tanzania: Regional contrasts and temporal trends. Calverton, MD: ICF International Inc.
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Non-nutritive sucking includes the use of a dummy; mother's drained breast (after expressing); a gloved finger from a care-giver
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Pre-feeding NNS can improve gastric motility in the preterm infant.  It also modulates state control and decreases apneic and/or bradycardic events.  I refer you to the linked article and many of the citations referenced therein.  
The article below addresses gastric motility.
Abbasi, S., Sivieri, E., Samuel-Collins, N., et al. (2008). Effect of non-nutritive sucking on gastric motility of preterm infants. Abstract for Pediatric Academic Society, 5840.22.
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For measuring the women's autonomy/ attitude towards the utilization of maternal health care services in context of the low resources countries like South-east Asian and Sub-Sahara Africa countries, whereas still utilization is lower...
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Literature review= 1 st step to make a questionnaire.
Look at face validity, content validity, stability reliability....
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We captured the raw data of the maternal heart rate as part of another study, but would like to analyze it later to determine possible associations with pregnancy outcome.
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Maternal HRV is a convinient instrument to evaluate regulatory balance that could promote control of hemodynamics. Variability (oscillations) of maternal hemodynamic processes spreads its influence through placental barrier and provide fetomaternal cooperation. Maternal sinus respiratory arrhythmia is the most valuable oscillator in the system of "mother-placenta-fetus".
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Food alone is not enough to stop/prevent or reverse stunting (most aggressive nutrition/food based intervention achieved 0.7 Z-score reduction in stunting or one third only). Many other factors play an important role in how the body receive, react, benefit from and respond to food. Enviromental enteropathy, gut microbiota, food toxins such as mycotoxin to mention a few all play a role. Does anyone have any thoughts or ideas on how to tackle this problem?
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I think that the first step should be to establish an analytic model by which situations can be understood. Armed with that the problem and the appropriate solution can be determined.
There are two situations to consider:
1. The development of the condition of stunting
2. Recovery from stunting
I would suggest that the resource capture models could be a good starting point.
Consider this approach
Growth rate = n × e
Where n is the balance of nutrients and e is the efficiency of uptake/utilization.
Each of these parameters can be considered the sum of individual nutrients, with factors such as enteropathy and mycotoxins changing the efficiency. For instance Aflatoxin can interfere in protein synthesis, so exposure would result in a low protein efficiency, while the same toxin can result in decreased zinc status and prolong diarrhea impacting all nutrients.
Applied to a diagnostic tool the diet can be evaluated and the known deficiencies identified first, and the risk of others predicted. For instance an infant being fed enough corn, beans and veg but with a deficient growth rate will be at risk of aflatoxicosis,if the diet does not have gave the beans then the resource for growth is limiting.
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As nurses we are taught to develop emotional distance with our patients. I have been nursing a newborn for a long time and have just lost him and find myself overwhelmed. Is it appropriate?
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In reading your brief question and thinking of all the words between the lines, my response is that the dialogue of maintaining your distance from emotionally bonding with patients and families can be misguided. There are several nursing theorists who are writing about the need for nurses to cross the chasm as the presence of the nurse (Newman, 2007). Likewise, Watson and various colleagues have proposed that caring requires the type of care that you provided this infant and family.
What has been much less explored (although we have begun doing this) is the consequences to the nurse. A nurse who gives must in return be getting energy and caring from those around. It also seems that a nurse must also be permitted to grieve the loss of a patient, especially if the nature of the bond between with the patient is significant. Personally, I would want you to be providing care to my baby. I am sure that the family was very happy and confident when you were there taking care of their baby. My guess is that the baby knew also. Studies have shown that patients who are cared for by someone in a caring mode have more stable vital signs and fewer physiological crisis than those who are not. Most at risk are patients cared for by someone who is there for a short time (filling in 4 hours).
A concern that was held by nurses is that a nurse who is 'too close' to a patient family cannot remain objective. I do believe that there is risk with this. A certain amount of distance needs to be maintained so that you can keep a cool head and figure out what the best nursing strategy is for the patient. The question is, can you do this if you are too close? My nursing experiences tell me, yes, you can IF you take a few reasonable steps that I will explain in a moment.
An issue that I have had for a long time is this, "Nurses don't ask for help!'. Often nurses don't realize or don't want to depend on another person for help because of our unwillingness to accept that we are fallible. We seem as a group to have this urge to be perfect. It gets nurses in trouble ALL the time. It is very hard for nurses to be vulnerable with others. Getting help requires all of these things. So the first thing I hope that you do, after self-reflection and introspection, get some help. Find a person that you trust--friend, mentor, therapist, family member, minister who can help you sort out your feelings for this child and family. Here are some other thoughts from my 38 year nursing career:
1. Allow yourself to grieve. I used to secretly go to the funeral home. If I had the time off, I would attend the funeral and express to the family how much I loved and cared for their loved one. Interestingly, families usually find this to be supportive. It is a person who knew them a short time, who saw their worth and value as a human being.
Interestingly, I started seeing people from the unit there to visit also. It was unspoken for a long time until all of a sudden we were all planning ways to go together. And we supported each other. I know that one of my colleagues worked extra one day so that I could attend the funeral of a patient who everyone knew I was especially close to and I did the same in return. WE started talking more about it and the little brochures and programs that you receive from the funeral home would be posted on the unit. The next thing is that we started sending out cards. When our pastoral care representative found out what we were doing, she organized a memorial service and invited those who had lost someone in the previous year. It soon became a yearly tradition that would draw in over 150 families, nurses, physicians, and others who cared for patients who were lost.
2. Encourage debriefing on the unit when a patient is lost.
3. Find a good mentor.
4. Read everything you can find on compassion fatigue to help you understand it.
5. Talk to your colleagues and encourage each other to share your experiences.
6. Read everything you can on grieving the loss of a special patients.
7. Be kind to yourself. Give yourself some time to heal and recover. Take care of patients who are doing well, short stays, that will give you back energy.
Eat well, exercise, sleep.
8. Someday, write an article for your professional journal.
Newman, M.A. (2007) Transforming Presence: The difference that nursing makes. (this is a google book also so you can read parts of it)
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I am researching whether postpartum risk assessment scales are adequately measuring all risk variables that contribute to crimes of maternal infanticide.
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hi Collette
i just came across a tool named postnatal negative thought questionaire. hope this will give you some idea
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There have been multiple experiments and analyses performed to identify and tackle preterm labor, but what are the most effective ones?
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Maybe you can find some information in this article:
"A Blood Test to Predict Preterm Birth: Don't Mess with Maternal-Fetal Stress"
Norwitz, ER
Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2009, Vol.94(6), pp.1886-1889
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Should I measure a specific kind of infection instead? Or are there ways in measuring infections in general?
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There are more chances of early onset sepsis from maternal genital tract flora. But this is depends on risk factors e.g. poor handling, maternal febrile illness, multiple per vaginal examination, preterm babies etc. Theoretically there are more chances of getting sepsis in vaginal delivery. You can go for sepsis screen as well blood culture, urine culture.
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Maternal Health Service Utilization among Mothers of Kinaye Primary Health Care area, Belgaum, A Community based Cross Sectional study.
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Improved interpersonal communication skills of midwives through training and creative reorganization of maternity services, with a shift from providing scheduled services to providing services on demand in addition to scheduled services, improved confidence in midwives and women brought other women and family members to utilize facility
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The HIV-infected mothers may have multiple physical, emotional, and social concerns, including coming to terms with the reality of their own infection while facing uncertainty about the HIV status of their infant. If the child is seropositive the mother usually has difficulty to inform him about his illness.
Who should tell the child's status? (doctor, mother or psychologist)
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It will be difficult to have a cut of age for when to give information to HIV infected children about their illness.Key will be to ascertain if they have the capacity to understand and process this information. Information can be given tailored to their age and understanding.
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What is your experience with efficacy of metformin in achieving ovulatory cycles?
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I prescribe 1000-1500mg daily,divided dose for 3-6month.patient before,during and after use should be checked ;liver enzyme,cr,...
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I'm writing a college research paper on this subject. Is there any document that opposes adopting option B+? Scholarly would be preferable but anything will help. I found lancet article and commentary on Is option B+ best? however, could not find any more.
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Option A is AZT prophylaxis in monotherapy for women with CD4 above 350, and this is not considered HAART.
Malawi has adopted B+ and I believe Botswana as well. In Mozambique it is going to be started prety soon.
See the paper attached for the intrauterus exposition to HAART.
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I am looking to write an article about maternal depression and would like some stats on depression beyond PND.
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Thank you! Glad to see someone finally answered :-)
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If that be the case, can the relevance of similar coping styles be explored.
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There have been many studies surrounding maternal stress and infant disorders. The book "welcome to your child's brain" mentions a few studies. I know that PTSD is very difficult to diagnose- Look at the work of Justin Cole- he works with PTSD soldiers.
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Most countries, other than the USA, have some sort of social support to assist new parents. The duration or paid leave is varied, as is the percentage of salary that mothers receives. What are the goals of maternal paid leave in each country? Do countries evaluate the efficacy of the program? Are there long-term impacts that have been researched?
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In Germany, maternity leave started in 1878 (an employment ban for three weeks after giving birth to a child). In 1883, public health insurance was installed, which included payments for women in childbed as well. We had a major reform starting in 1986 that aimed to ensure social protection for a period of three years for parents (mothers and fathers alike). Parents were protected agains dismissals for 3 years, 24 month of which were paid parental leave. This, however, led to rather long work interruptions of mothers (compared by international standards) which is seen as one reason for the rather high gender wage gap in Germany. The reform of 2007 aims to reduce these work interruptions and to promote active fatherhood. Thus, paid paternity leave was reduced to 14 month, with 2 months to be taken by the father. You can send me an e-mail (joerg.althammer@ku.de) and I will give you more information about this reform and Germany's family policy monitoring program.
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I know about some recent studies supporting the association between marital distress and psychopathologies as major depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol and drugs use disorders, and personality disorders in general population. (South SC, et al. J Abnorm Psychol. 2011) But, what about in risk population as pregnant women? In Spain, almost the 98% of induced abortions are because of "mental health disorders". However, this concept in primary care means a big hole where many conditions could be included.
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Great studies on this topic include the following. I have done one paper on this in Somalia and its under peer review and would like to share with you
L Bacchus, G Mezey, S Bewley - European Journal of Obstetrics …, 2004 - nnvawi.org
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Postpartum home-care for mother and baby after early discharge.
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Yes, I am Emmanuel Byaruhanga at MUST Research Collaboration (Mbarara- Western Uganda) and having worked at the Nursing Department of Mbarara University of Science and Technology, have fully been involved in home-care for post-natal mothers. Under the Domiciliary Nursing Program, Nursing students in their final year do escort and care for 3 mothers each post delivery for a week.
As a student supervisor, this has been a rewarding experience for the Mothers, their babies and families. With numerous benefits and positive impact registered for maternal and child health, the program lacks scalability due to inadequate human and material resouces and is done as an academic module.