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Material Culture - Science topic

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Hello,
I have purchased MIN6 and INS-1E cell lines (Beta cell) from AddexBio and I'm culturing them in flask based on the protocol they provided. However, for some of my tests, I have to culture them in 6 and 12 well plates. But 3 days after plating, they start to round-up and lose the normal protrusions that they have while attaching to the surface. I know that the round-up cells are not dead.
this pattern starts from a corner of well and goes forwards towards the center of well. I have changed my well-plate plastic material, culture media, incubator, etc. and this problem is still there.
I should mention they look normal in flask but once I plate them in well-plates, I observe this issue.
So I wanted to ask if you have any explanation or suggestion to help me with this issue? I would be thankful for your comments.
I have attached here an image showing how they look like.
Thank you.
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Hi Jimmy, DMEM from Sigma (D6171), and I would change the media once on the 3rd day after splitting the flasks. I would split the cells approx once per 5-6 days. Not any more using MIN6 though.
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The field of social network analysis and all its quantitative methods appear to be an interesting way for material culture analysis in anthropology and archaeology. Since I want to gradually integrate this big body of knowledge into my archaeological toolbox, I need to know where to begin. What to learn first. I’m curious to know when in an undergraduate program does this type of knowledge is taught?
I might follow one or two undergrad courses, read books and do some online mooc. But what should I learn first? Basic quantitative sociology, social sciences quantitative methods, programing (and which language), statistics, mathematics and graph theory? It seems to me that there is a big learning curve. In the end, I must be kept in mind that I don’t want to turn myself into a mathematician/statistician. I only wish to improve my archaeological researches with quantitative methodology.
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Hi Olivier,
I would also suggest you take a look at Tom Brughmans' website, https://archaeologicalnetworks.wordpress.com/resources/ he has uploaded some really excellent tutorials there which will walk you through some of the different programmes available for doing archaeological network analysis. Also, do join the Google group, the Networks Network, where you will find occasional posts on the topic and you are free to ask any questions to a community of scholars working on the topics. And do come along to any future Connected Past events! https://connectedpast.net/
All best!
Anna
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Nowadays there is a spark of interest in the types of energy and materials that should be developed in the future. There is developed an extensive discussion upon the future of these two types. However, little attention has been paid to the future of resources. Taking into consideration the latest achievements in industry and manufacturing, such as the 3D printers and 3D scanners, the question is whether these technological advancements' spur will determine the future of resources stocks, including the feeding behavior for human, livestock, and global famine? The future of resources should be merely a nutrition-concerned issue, or a socio-cultural sensitive one?
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I think there should be real alternative energies for oil and gas
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This study is a PhD research on the settlement history and material culture of the Middle-Niger Area of Nigeria.
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Dear Abubakar Muhammad thank you for this "very open question", my answer will not probably give you one direction but anyway...
As Andy Reymann said, it's depending on your artifacts (pottery, glass beads, cowries, and slags). I suggest you look different theories for instance: theory of Central place (Walter Christaller) because your artifacts are movable and can be integrated into a system of exchange. But don't forget: sometimes people moved with their technology and sometimes goods moved without crafters... You can look at the historical materialism of Marx and their criticism. You can also look works of Alain Gallay and his team and McIntosh couples in Niger Inland Delta, the works of Nic David, Judy Sterner and Scott McEachern in Mandara Mounts and Sukur.
Keep in mind: there is no (or not yet) theory can explain the complexity of human society and if you found this theory, be careful it's probably a religious theory...
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Like AI, space technology etc.
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A very wide field of technologies in a variety of sectors, indeed. For example chemical science and industry. See:
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I am looking into people's knowledge to deal with natural hazards in the Pacific Island region. I have come across some materials, but I assume that there is much out there, possibly buried in ethnographies, where the titles give little indiction that it contains such materials......... One particular interest is about cultural knowldege about hazards and its application in the material culture (e.g. house construction, agriculture, food preservation and food security, etc....
I thank you very much for your tips
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hi professor, you might get some info in my publications. please visit my web page. if u need full publications please let me know. cheers, Dr Younus
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I used this broth according to manufacture recommendation in preparing the media 
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i used pure culture of  Salmonella Typhimurium and didnt give any color change after 24h and 48h 
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Has there been a "material turn" in the social sciences? What are the main features of this "turn"?
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The material turn is a reaction to the so-called "discursive turn" initiated by poststructuralism's crises of representation, and basically looks at the roles that objects play in human action as well as signification. Latour and ANT are a landmark, some varieties of Critical Realism address this, but possibly the most interesting take is Graham Harman's work on Object Oriented Ontology and Speculative Realism. Within organization and management studies the realist take fails to get as far as Harman, and is dominated by Information scholars like Orlikowski. Dean Pierides, Jon Roffe and I did a stream at EGOS in 2014 on this - I can provide further references if needed from this and 're:Harman and critics. Should say there's also a body related corporeal turn which is again a response to the discursive but less strictly "objective" than OOO or SR.
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In the past few decades we've lost records pertaining to the manufacture & distribution of products due to Paper Retention Policies. The lack of paper storage & the often hazards of on-line records storage, gives question: How much information will actually be available for future researchers? Take soda bottle caps. There likely have been 30 changes to Coca-Cola bottle caps alone, not counting varieties, since 1970. Is there a record? Can we date each type? Is that information already lost to us?
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Chloe,
Its interesting that when I first started off in archaeology we wanted to send some carbon samples from northern Florida for C14 dating. We were told that the analytical company did not have a baseline for that area. I don't know how familiar you are with the process, but above-ground atomic testing in the 1950s spread radioactive isotopes across the globe in varying amounts, depending on wind, distance, etc. Each area had to be tested to determine the natural background radiation in that area in order to calibrate the results.
Thus you are correct, we do not yet know what come chemical or metallic compounds are doing to archaeological samples or how modern materials degrade into other things. Do certain chemicals bind with magnetic ferric ions, thus nullifying or changing magnetic resonance dating? Are chemical compounds destroying blood collagen that we could extract from projectile points? What about the effects on enzymes we extract from pottery to tell us what was cooked in them? I don't think we can even begin to answer these questions yet. Often, archaeology is about catching up with technology, that is why we reserve samples for future, as yet undiscovered, methods.
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I am doing research into the cuisine of the Mesopotamians and cooking pots and stoves are one of my topics. I would also appreciate it if anybody can provide me with information or a picture of cooking stoves of Mesopotamia. The information on this particular topic is lacking. I do know that in Israel the stoves were made out of broken pottery shards but I don't know if it is the same in Mesopotamia?
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I'd love to know as well!
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I’m writing a research project on Tangible Cultural Expressions (TCEs), in particular on the social, economic and political issues posed by their production, use, commercialisation, and status as intellectual property. TCE include a broad range of folk art, including wood carving, baskets, textiles and folk costumes. The proposed research, taking as axiomatic the importance of material culture in shaping and expressing ethnicity, focuses on the processes through which some objects but not others become markers of ethnic distinction, and through which some of those objects become embroiled in controversies over intellectual property rights.
Much of the research to date on the conversion of cultural expressions into intellectual property has been largely theoretical, based on secondary ethnographies, and concerned primarily with the theoretical, ethical, and practical implications of commodification of the historical past or of intangible cultural heritage. Of the few studies based on observation and real-world data (e.g. Thuen 2004; Eriksen 2004; Chaumeil 2009; Brown & Nicholas 2012), almost all have been limited to one or two societies. To date, all researchers states that has been very limited application of conventional law in the protection of the intellectual property of expressions of traditional knowledge and culture because they generally fall outside the protection of copyrights and patents. ¿Do you know examples of TCE protected by intellectual property rights? ¿How western statute and customary law do or do not protect intellectual property?.
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You will find a lot of information about this on the WIPO website. You may find some useful information on this LibGuide - http://libguides.wits.ac.za/TraditionalKnowledge
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How can I calculate crystal structure? and how do I analyse peaks? How can I smooth the curve obtained in origin?
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perhaps opening a good book on X-ray diffraction could be a good start... You can get a zillion answers from here but it's hard to follow them (or hard to make things always correct) if you don't have the basics of the technique.
Opening another book on experimental data handling is also a good idea. Why on Earth would you need to smooth the curve for the analysis?