Marine Ecology

Marine Ecology – Science topic

Explore the latest articles, projects, and questions and answers in Marine Ecology, and find Marine Ecology experts.
Interested in Marine Ecological research like demersal living resources and their community structrure. Primary productivity, Food chain, etc
Questions related to Marine Ecology
Achmad Muchtar
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i just joined into this group. i work in grouper culture. who want to be my friends and share with?
 
A researcher
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I will be using two 'go pro' cameras in waterproof housings, in a vertical orientation with a line of sight point visible in both fields of view. Cameras will be pointing downwards, at known angles and heights above the tank bottom (to be confirmed), with individuals swimming below.
 
We did a bit of photogrametric work with basking sharks in the Hebrides - paper attached. The main problem with elasmobranchs is that they are so flexible and trying to get a clean shot of a body part which isn't flexing can be tricky. Give me a shout if you have any specific questions.
Fernando Condal
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Seasonal trends were detected on fish distribution along one year sampling in Colls Miralpeix Marine Reserve (Spain). Marine fish biodiversity index also shown an important seasonal trend. Water temperature, light period, spawning movement and some more factor are afecting fish distribution. However, what would be the main factor affecting fish distribution along time?
 
Rebecca Ellul
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I need to categorise a sample of Pinna nobilis individuals according to their approximate size classes (mainly juveniles, young adults and adults). Are there any set criteria like there are for Posidonia oceanica? Or do the classes depend on the population being studied?
 
Thanks for your reply! I am more interested in the size distributions at this stage, rather than the biology of the species.
Paulo Fonseca
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I am seeking help with the identification (at whatever lowest taxonomic resolution) of a few specimens of marine brachyuran crabs encountered among macroalgae on a tropical rocky shore. I have photos which I can send out to anyone willing to help
 
Try Antonina Santos antonina@ipma.pt at the Portuguese Institute for the Sea and the Atmosphere
Dola Bhattacharjee
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I have come across an 'interesting' type of a univalve gastropod (abalone-like) among seaweeds on the intertidal rocky shores of Zanzibar Island. It has a disproportionately large foot, and a small coiled shell. I have no idea what it is, beside being a gastropod. Should anyone know of any person who can help with its identification, I will be willing to send out a photo of the same.
 
You may communicate with Prof. Antony S. Fernando (Retd.), Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai, Tamil Nadu 608502, INDIA. He is an expert in the subject. You may get his details to communicate from the Director of the Centre (director@aucasmbenvis.org ; stbcas@eth.net). Best wishes DB
Valter Amaral
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The main sources of oceanic acidification is atmospheric CO2 whereas for the estuaries sources are diverse. So can we compare the effects of acidification on these two aquatic systems?
 
We now know that there are similar effects of both sources of acidification on aquatic organisms, namely marine invertebrates. We must however be cautious when matching such effects when the underlying response-mechanisms (such as physiological pathways, or gene expression) of organisms are not fully understood. On the other hand, the study of the effects of estuarine acidification may help us scale up from the laboratory-based studies that, so far, characterize the investigation on the ocean acidification topic. In other words, with the proper background, we might be able to use already-observed responses of organisms to estuarine-acidification to predict ecosystem-scale effects of ocean acidification. I've been working on this subject myself and you might find the following papers useful: Amaral V, Cabral HN, Bishop MJ (2011) Resistance among wild invertebrate populations to recurrent estuarine acidification. Estuar Coast Shelf Sci 93: 460-467, doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2011.05.024 Amaral V, Cabral HN, Bishop MJ (2012) Effects of estuarine acidification on predatory-prey interactions. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 445: 117-127, doi:10.3354/meps09487 Amaral V, Thompson EL, Raftos DA (2012) The proteomes of Sydney rock oysters vary spatially according to exposure to acid sulfate runoff. Mar Freshw Res 63: 361-369, doi:10.1071/MF11213
Rodney Forster
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I have spotted something unusual among drifting algal mat (which consisted of red algae such as Furcelleria lumbricalis, Ceramium sp., Polysiphonia fucoides- see attachment). When I brought the sample to the laboratory, the bright colour - or what may cause it- disappeared, through the microscope at 10-fold magnification I observed relatively intact Ceramium sp. What is it? Could it be the mark of slightly decaying filomentous algae and evidence of bacterial activity or something else?
 
It's the orange fluorescence of the pigment phycoerythrin. Not normally visible as photons are absorbed by the light-harvesting pigments of the phycobilisome and passed to photosynthetic reaction centres with high efficiency. Under stress conditiions - high light, thermal stress, grazing - energy transfer is disrupted and the detached phycoerythrin can be highly fluorescent. It can be seen more clearly underwater because there is possibly less ambient light at this wavelength (around 550-600nm). I've seen this at the end of the summer from reds such as Delesseria and Ceramium.
Mark McMenamin
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I am looking for examples where the eggs are deposited in the center of a cluster of pellets.
 
Azubuike Victor Chukwuka
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I am particularly interested in visual acuity at low light levels.
 
A number of cephalopods particularly the squids and octopuses, and potentially cuttlefish, have eyes that can distinguish the orientation of polarized light. This sensitivity is due to the orthogonal organization of neighboring photo-receptors. In comparison, the vertebrate eye is normally insensitive to polarization differences because visual pigment in rods and cones is arrayed semi-randomly, and is thus equally sensitive to any orientation of the e-vector axis of the light. In cephalopods, due to their orthogonal organization, the visual pigment molecules in their eyes have the highest light absorption when aligned properly with the light e-vector axis, allowing sensitivity to differences in polarization. The precise function of this ability has not been proven, but is hypothesized to be for prey detection, navigation, and possibly communication among the color-changing cephalopods
Luis Tito de Morais
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I teach an MSc module in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation and focus on seminar based discussion of influential papers. Interested in recommendations from people as to papers which are emerging as future "citation classics".
 
Hi Brendan, I spent a few moments looking for an anwser to your interesting question. As a first step, a simple query on GoogleScholar using "marine conservation" (with quotes) gives about 20,500 results from which only 1000 can be viewed (the maximum allowed by GS). But I was unable to sort them by "Cited by" numbers. So I used this nice piece of software: "PublishOrPerish" (http://www.harzing.com/). This program uses GS to perform bibliographic searches and allows some index calculations that the online query of scholar cannot do. Using version 3.8.2 of PoP, I retrieved the 1000 papers sorted by the number of cites. Since paper #1000 has 0 cites, being limited to the top 1000 should not be an issue. You will probably only be interested in the top ranking papers. I attach a csv file with the results. It can be opened with any good spreadsheet software like LibreOffice or OpenOffice Calc (and possibly also with MS Excel). Please note that the list requires some "cleaning" since some papers although using the terms "marine conservation", are not specific to the very topic of marine conservation. The "rank" column is the GS rank. It appears jumbled in the sense that the top ranked by GS are not necessarly the top cited. This indicates that the most cited works are not the most relevant to the query. It is caused by search terms that are too wide-ranging (which is the case), or apply to several subject areas, and that therefore catch highly-cited but sometimes irrelevant works as well. Please note also that these are not precisely "emerging" citation classics, but rather refer to already highly cited papers. Sorting by publication year may give an hint, but very recent papers have an obvious disadvantage. Nevertheless, I hope this will still be useful. Thank you for your question that allowed me to look at this ! Tito
Darren Andrew Fa
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It is not a "complete" paper its a simple work in which I tried different approaches for lipid extraction in deep sea invertebrates and evaluated the increase in lipids. If someone could point me some suggestions I would be grateful...
 
How about Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology? I have published methofdological papers there and it has a good ranking
Andrii Tarieiev
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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/232731356_Barcoding_of_the_cytochrome_oxidase_I_(COI)_indicates_a_recent_introduction_of_Ciona_savignyi_into_New_Zealand_and_provides_a_rapid_method_for_Ciona_species_discrimination
 
Joshua, DNA barcoding really is the rapid way to distinguish species, including also cryptic and morphologically similar species. In this way knowledges about morphological features of these species are not necessary for researcer at all. The paper shows that is possible to differentiate such two these species throw barcoding using COI as marker. And I think, that you may to apply such technique in your work Best regards.
Manuel F. G. Weinkauf
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Should each species existing within the transect be counted ?
 
As all the others already mentioned, it depends heavily on what you are planning to do. I assume, however, that you are somewhat interested in species richness. Now, determining the true species richness of an area or environment is well nigh impossible. True, by enlarging your counting areal you will come closer to the real value, but by just counting in one progressively larger areal you are sacrificing replications (and it costs a lot of time). Instead I would follow Maricios suggestion: Count the species in several, randomly placed plots. By doing so you are introducing unconstrained replications, which marvelously offer you the possibility to estimate the true species richness. Several methods have been developed to do so, two of which I know and can recommend: (1) Rarefactioning, and (2) Jacknifing. Rarefactioning draws randomly several subsets from your data and calculates for each one, what the species richness would have been in that sample. The jackknifing approach deletes one whole sample per randomisation and calculates what species richness would have been reconstructed if that particular sample would not have been taken. Both approaches are thus able to estimate the true species richness to be expected in the area, i.e. especially if you have few samples the estimated species richnesses might be much larger than the total number of species you actually discovered.
Annamaria Zoppini
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I would like to improve some old ecopath models that have no bacteria compartments in estuaries where we lack information about bacterial production. I would be interested in your advise about using other data related to microbial activity like enzymatic activity or metabolic rates in order to seek for good data sets.
 
If you are interested we have a set of data on microbial metabolic rates, see Puddu et al. Hydrobiologia 1997 , Zoppini et al Sc Tot Environ 2005, Pettine et al Est. Coast.Shelf Sc, 2001) and more recent data still unpublished on the Adriatic Sea and Cilician basin (Turkey)
Jeffrey Wilcox
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I need details related to observing the nervous system at the cellular level, testing stimulus responses and staining techniques.
 
I would suggest you call Leonid Moroz at the UF Whitney Lab, 904-461-4020, moroz@whitney.ufl.edu, and Google Scholar some of his papers. He does single cell electrophysiology. While he may not be able to help you with staining, much of what he does sounds, at first blush, much like your interest. You should also Google "Invitrogen" and learn some about fluorescent cell staining. If you do any fluorescent microscopy, be religious about eye protection, unless you wish to have your lenses surgically replaced due to early cataracts! Furthermore, you should research PubMed for the many publications there regarding staining neurons for a host of reasons.
Mats Björk
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Coastal areas located in the vicinity of sewage outfall (nutrient enriched) can suffer from eutrophication. Is an increase in CO2 also associated? If yes through which mechanisms?
 
Increased nutrients has been shown to decrease the CO2 levels in productive waters. This is because an increased eutrophication favors microalgae, and thus an increased primary productivity. The high photosynthetic uptake will then lead to a decrease in CO2 and a higher pH. This has been shown by Borges and Gypens 2010, I quote: “..in highly productive near‐shore coastal marine environments, such as the Belgian Coastal Zone, the effect of eutrophication on carbon cycling can counter the effect of ocean acidification on the carbonate chemistry of surface waters (pH, [CO2], saturation state of calcite and aragonite).” Borges, A. V. and Gypens, N. 2010. Carbonate chemistry in the coastal zone responds more strongly to eutrophication than to ocean acidification. Limnol. Oceanogr. 55, 346–353.
Antoni Lombarte
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Last week a new web-based service has been launched that aims at helping marine ecologists - or more precisely ecologists that need to measure fish otoliths (e.g. ornithologists, fisheries scientists, etc.) for allometrics size determination. Might be a helpful resource to some of you. Check it out at http://www.dimsle.com
 
Forresearchers interested in otoliths morphometries is interesting to know AFORO website (http://aforo.cmima.csic.es), an interactive open system to deal with shape analysis of fish otoliths and a classification system based on the mathematical properties of the one-dimensional curves describing the Teleostean otolith contours. The system was created in 2003 and connected a website with a database of complete morphometric (measures and morphological indexes) information, including Elliptic Fourier analysis and wavelets (WT) based in otolith contours of the otolith images of well identified samples. Since 2006, AFORO incorporates an expert system that will allow carrying automatic taxon identification based. In 2009 AFORO was included in GBIF (Global Biodiversity Information facility) databases system, with geographical information of the otolith samples. The AFORO database and public web site (the otolith guide, with its corresponding shape analysis and classification system) keep continuously implemented. At present AFORO includes 4555 images of different specimen from 1381 species, from 216 families, and 36 orders worldwide represented. Nevertheless, Mediterranean Sea is the best represented area (90% of common species, 64% of species sometimes cited in this area, including 50% of Lessepsian species -Red Sea invaders- are showed). The main advance in the last years was the inclusion of videos of 3D otolith objects in 2012, obtained with LED white light-based scanner, which eliminates the speckle noise effect of laser scanners. and the inclusion of automatic morphometric software and numerical information of Fourier and wavelet analysis, which will be used as morphometric bank for researchers that requires precise species identification as paleontologist, archeologist and trophic ecologist.
Rebecca Lynne Williams
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Ideally there is some type of criteria for DO concentration and temporal constraints but any insight would be helpful.
 
Hmmm... This is an excellent and rather intriguing question. I study zooplankton trophic webs in oxygen minimum zones and I can tell you that there are some decapod larvae that can handle the low oxygen concentrations, at least for a little while. There are numerous papers regarding oxygen tolerance of various critters in OMZs (Childress and Seibel are two authors who immediately spring to mind). However, OMZ's are permanent features so the animals living there have had plenty of time to adapt to those conditions. There is also a fair amount of data about how animals have adapted to the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico and that may be more helpful to you since those animals are not adapted for living in low oxygen environments. If I had to guess, unless the tidal creeks in question have always had episodes of hypoxia, I'd imagine that larvae living in them would tend to be unable to cope with low oxygen for very long. In fact, it may actually make them more susceptible to predation if the low oxygen water compresses them into a smaller area or prevents them from reaching depths/areas they would normally go to hide out.
Diego Lercari
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Can we accurately valuate benthic functioning with the limited understanding we have of the complex interactions between taxa?
 
Nice question, but I notice some reductionist bias behind it supposing that if we know the parts (interactions between taxa) we could predict the whole (functioning). Complex systems (such as benthic communities) just not behave in this way. Even implementing complex and well data feed quantitative models we just can have some short-term predictive ability. However, processes are far from being lineal and the occurrence of surprises is the only law…
Alain Ponsero
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Do the specification depend on grain size of sediments? Need to trap sediments in order to determine the sedimentation rate/day in coastal area.
 
This paper may answer your question : http://www.biol.canterbury.ac.nz/MERG/publications/pdfs/schiel,%20wood,%20dunmore,%20taylor%202006.pdf
Reena Sharma
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My thesis is about bioremediation and biodegradation of polloted water by oil and hydrocarbons by alga, now I should choose the type of hydrocarbon. Is there anyone to help me? Thanks
 
your question is not clear. Are you using algae for bioremediation?
Ellard R. Hunting
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I'm quite excited by the boycott by some prominent mathematicians against publishing with for-profit journals (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/14/science/researchers-boycott-elsevier-journal-publisher.html), but I'm having some difficulty collecting info on Open Access (OA) journals in the field of marine ecology (and marine mammals more specifically). I was hoping this community might have some advice. I find the Directory of Open Access Journals a bit daunting to navigate; J-Gate continues to be down; and many OA marine journals (J of Mar. Bio.; JMATE, etc), are not in ranking databases (http://www.scimagojr.com/). Ultimately, one chooses a particular journal over another after a thorough examination of the journal's previous publications, but surely there must be some better online resources, tools, procedures to help find candidates journals and winnow down the options? EDIT: I was just exploring the "Journal Finder" option in Researchgate.net, and it seems very promising, but in my opinion the "similar journals" display is somewhat inaccurate, and I can't see where it states whether journals are Open Access or not.
 
In the end, we want to share our thoughts, even beyond the scientific community and blbliometrics. However, it appears that people are willing to pay a considerable amount of money, just to be in a journal like PloS OnE, thereby enjoying an IF of >4, despite the fact that their own articles lift on mediocre medical, moderately cited articles. This is what concerns me: bibliometrics, irrespective of costs, are more important than the science. It is not the format of publishing which should be under debate, it is our current standard to evaluate the quality of science that requires thorough evaluation.
Azubuike Victor Chukwuka
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If someone has successfully conducted marine ornamental fish breeding,can you suggest a procedure to follow? Did you conduct environmental manipulations or induced breeding? Can you also suggest references I can look up?
 
I dont have a reference, but i have some suggestions. I'll start with the fact that there is no universal method in breeding any fish including marine ornamental fishes without an understanding of the reproductive biology and environmental requirements. First of all you have to have a species of interest, undertake a research on its ecology, habitat range, optimal salinity for mating and ionic nutrient quality of its environment, mating cues e.g. colour of female abdomen signifying gonad stage, foraging preferences and mating seasons and patterns. When this is properly understood, laboratory trials may begin by introducing adult species from the field into culture tanks with predetermined salinity that must be sustained through some flow-through method. Mating trials may even involve the use of hormone injections to the fish but all these are subject to a thorough study on the species of interest.
Simon Greenstreet
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While there are lots of examples of diminutive males (e.g., fish, barnacles, spiders), the only examples I know with diminutive females are from the red algae where it is the common life history model in the order Palmariales. A consequence of this pattern is that the females mature very quickly (days to weeks) whereas the males take a whole year and fertilize the females from the current year.
 
Wrasse: many species of wrasse start life as females. When the local male is lost, it tends to be the largest female in the group that changes sex and becomes the local male. Hence male wrasse tend to be larger than female wrasse. The cuckoo wrasse is a prime example, where this is really obvious. Male cuckoo wrasse are invariable larger than female fis.
Jessica Lewis
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The algae Aphanizomenon flos-aquae formed healthy green flakes (aggregates) early in the summer. The lake where we are conducting our research is aerated. After stopping aeration system and stratification was developed the flake disintegrated into single filaments and changed color. Stratification cut the nutrient supply of P and N from the sediments.
 
Many chain or 'carpet' forming algae will break apart into single cells when they're stressed. I'm more familiar with Pseudonitschia and Alexandrium, but they will not form chains when they are either stressed due to too little nutrients or when the 'pass number' gets high for cultured specimens.
Javier Lloret
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Dear Friends and Colleagues, We are sending you this message with a request but first of all we want to wish you a great 2013! Could you spare 3 and half minutes of your time to answer this survey about a project we are currently working on? It’s about the potential development of a summer school in Lisbon on “Seaconomics”. We also want to kindly ask you if you could share this with contacts that you have that work on this area (Marine Biology, Sea Economics, Coastal Tourism, Fisheries, Ecology, etc…) or even university students, researchers and professors that you think that might have an interest in this. Please click on the link to access the survey! Thank you very much. Kind Regards Diogo Stilwell and Francisco Souza Dias http://seaconomics.blogspot.pt/
 
I took the survey. Fast and easy. Best wishes.
Mauricio A. Urbina
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I would appreciate someone could send me a copy of this study (or a link). I have unsuccessfully been trying to find it. Chelouche, M., Iger, Y. and Abraham, M. 1992. Cell activity in the epidermis of fish during osmotic stress. Abstract Bulletin, World Fisheries Congress, Athens, Greece. Huge thanks!
 
Yijie Daniel Deng
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I have calculated the Shannon-Weiner diversity for coral species and have obtained 2.85, what does this value infer about the diversity of the corals?
 
To make this index number more biological sense, you can convert it into the effective number of species (ENS), which is the real biodiversity and allows you to compare the biodiversity with other communities. A community with Shannon index of H has an equivalent diversity as a community containing equally-common species of exp(H), the ENS. For example, if you got a Shannon index of 2.85, this number can be converted into ENS that is exp(2.85) = 17. This means that a community with Shannon index of 2.85 has an equivalent diversity as a community with 17 equally-common species. In this way you can compare biodiversity among communities. http://www.loujost.com/Statistics%20and%20Physics/Diversity%20and%20Similarity/EffectiveNumberOfSpecies.htm
Dola Bhattacharjee
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I'm interestered in bacteria colonization but I want to start with bacteria-free tissue.
 
Hi Valentina, Following are some commonly used plant surface-sterilizing chemicals: 1) Sodium hypochlorite (upto 0.5 - 1.0%); 2) 70% ethanol; 3) Calcium hypochlorite (upto 3.5%); 4) Hydrogen peroxide (upto 30-35%); 5) Plant Preservative Mixture (PPM) (its a biocide, 0.5–2.0 mL/ L of medium) No. 3, 4 and 5 are comparatively less injurious to plant tissues. Rest all are phytotoxic and a balance between concentration and time must be determined for the type of tissue you are going to expose. Best Dola.
Andrew G. Taylor
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Though the impact of climate change is a long-term process, is there any method by which we can study the impact of climate change on plankton with short-term data (about 5-6 years data)? The data is from tropical coastal waters i.e. Southern Bay of Bengal.
 
That is a very complex question to address. And with such a very short time series you really cannot make any sort of statement/assessment about changes in phytoplankton. In our studies we have 20+ years of time series data and we cannot even make any meaningful statements with regards to long term climate changes. That being said, what types of data do you have? Cell counts, biomass (carbon), chlorophyll, species, functional groups, etc? If you want to read some good literature about plankton time series take a look at the CalCOFI program, HOTS, BATS, and CCE-LTER. Those are all a great place to start to see how others have assessed climate on plankton. You'll find, however, that even these long running programs find that a very difficult question to address. Good luck, and let me know how it goes.
Elham Mohamadian
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Book or reference about marine nitrogen cycle
 
this site may be help you to find ebooks, http://en.bookfi.org.
Ajit K Mohanty
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Which trophic status index would be appropriate for assessing a tropical coastal ecosystem (coastal waters of Bay of Bengal), TRIX or UNTRIX? (TRIX = (Log [Chl-a*aD%O*DIN*DIP])[k]/m). How can the k and m values for the the equation be calculated? Some authors have taken these values as mentioned by Volenweider et al., 1998, however, will it be same for all ecosystems?
 
Yuvaraj Subramani
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Whether a coral reef ecosystem acts as a source of sink of CO2 and to understand the regional climate change and their impacts on the coral reef ecosystem?
 
María Huete-Ortega
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Which multivariate statistics are best to find out the phytoplankton (dinoflagellate) assemblage according to different environmental conditions (in terms of physico-chemical properties of seawater).
 
I would recommend you to use a PCA analysis too, so you can identify which are variables are related etc. But if you want to assess the temporal variability such as seasonal or interannual variability probably you will need to decompose your variables in different componnets...seasonal, interannual trend, white noise etc. You can read more about this in the following paper: Nogueira, E., Pe´rez, P. P. and Rı´os, A. F. (1997) Seasonal patterns and long-term trends in an estuarine upwelling ecosystem (Rı´a de Vigo, NW Spain). Estuarine Coastal Shelf Sci., 44, 285–300
Melanie Bergmann
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The University Marine Biological Station Millport is a unique and irreplaceable marine and coastal biology facility based on the Isle of Cumbrae in the Firth of Clyde (see http://www.gla.ac.uk/centres/marinestation/), west Scotland. For over 100 years the Millport Marine Station has been a crucial part of a network of research stations round the UK and European coasts. In the last 30 years it has also become a leading teaching facility, with over a thousand students visiting each year to experience first hand marine and coastal science: experiences that they take on into their lives and work as researchers and opinion formers. There were even courses run by Heinrich Heine Universität (Düsseldorf) and Carl von Ossietzky Universität (Oldenburg). UMBS Millport not only has a remarkable past - it also has a very positive role to play in the future as a teaching institution, as a key research facility, as a part of a network of marine monitoring sites, and as a major employer on Cumbrae. The future of the Millport Marine Station is at risk because of withdrawal of core funding by the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The University of London has provisionally decided to close the Marine Station, probably within 12 months. This decision is to be considered at a meeting of the University's governing body later this month. The combination of facilities, location and proximity to field sites is rare if not unique, and we think makes UMBSM an important part of the UK's educational capability in marine science. The staff is doing what it can to avoid closure, but the prospects do not look good. If you are able to offer support in any way, I would be very grateful. Prof. Mark Blaxter of Edinburgh University has set up an online petition to the First Minister of Scotland, Alex Salmond: http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/the-scottish-government-save-the-university-marine-biology-station-millport-from-closure-2 The local community of the Isle of Cumbrae have set up a Facebook campaign: http://www.facebook.com/SaveOurMarineStation If you have not already done so, please could you register your support on these sites?
 
Rodrigo Fernando Rivera G.
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I want to culture S.vulgare for some of my experiment. I have found some papers but before beginning I just want to get some expert opinions on if anyone has experience in growing the same.
 
Hi, I have worked with Macrocystis pyrifera, I do not know if this technology could be applicated to the S. vulgarum culture. If you thing it is possible, write me and I can send you some indications. Regards.
Mauricio A. Urbina
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I am studying Biota on artificial substrata. I am interested in literature which has studied species of algae in particular, such as Laurencia sp, Cystoseira sp. , Dictyopteris sp. etc etc in terms of their resilience to wave action or aspect of their habitat, dessication and so on.
 
Hi Leanne, Since no one else seem to bother answering, my poor answer might be helpful. Try finding some articles from David Schiel and his students, University of Canterbury. They have been working a bit on this in New Zealand. I hope this helps!
Lee Bartlett
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Overfishing is increasing in Barbados and current environmental conditions favor of algae proliferation. Lionfish also sighted in Barbados waters and these fish could have a significant impact on already low fish stocks.
 
Mohsen Ghanea
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I use sea surface temperature (SST) from satellites to assess marine mammal and sea turtle bycatch, habitat, and distribution. Recently the primary SST data source that we had been using (Pathfinder SST) has not been updated. So, we are looking for a new satellite SST source. Websites such as JPL's PO.DAAC (http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/) have added lot of choices in the last few years for different SST products, many of which blend data from multiple satellites and often interpolate to fill in areas that would other wise be missing data due to cloud cover. Can anyone suggest which data product would be best? We would prefer products with
 
I suggest you MODIS SST. You can refer to the following publication for investigation and validation of MODIS SST:
Lasse Ruokolainen
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I have 5 sampling sites (throughout the estuary, a small one), and a 8 yrs time-series. My question concerns the effects of seasons vs year-to-year variability. Can I apply a PCA in a matrix 8 yrs (annual average of the 5 sites) x 23 plankton indicators ( were selected based on functional groups, dominance of the taxa sampled, appearance of the seasonal peak, representativeness for each sampling site). For example : Appendicularia summer Chaetognatha aut Nauplii cirripedia summer and spring Nauplii cirripedia spring Marine cladocerans autumn and summer
 
Hi, PCA is an option, for sure. However, it is often the case that there are a considerable amount of zeros in the data, which I guess is also the case with plankton where there is considerable variation in species competition within the season. This means that the ecological gradient of species occurrence is relatively long and under such circumstances PCA is not a good method for analysis (unless the data is transformed prior to analysis, see Legendre & Gallacher 2001 in Oecologia). I would suggest that (given that your data is abundances and not presence/absence) that you first use some dissimilarity index to calculate the ecological resemblance between your samples (i.e., using vegdist in the vegan package in R). Then you can use Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling to gain a graphical representation of the original ecological space in, say 2-dimensions. This can be done using the monoMDS function in the vegan package in R. I hope this helps.
Lourdes Velo-Suárez
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Based on the ability of Parvilucifera to infect several toxic dinoflagellate species its use as a biological agent in the control of harmful algal blooms (HABs) has been proposed. However, the effective use of Parvilucifera in controlling HABs in natural environments will rely on detailed knowledge of the parasite's ecology, both under natural occurrences and as a biological control agent.
 
As far as I know only specific parasites can be considered as a potential control to HABs. However, there is a lot of gaps in our knowledge about this parasites and their host (focusing on HABs species) and we should consider the whole community to be sure about the impact and control of a certain specific parasite on its host dynamics.
Krishna Prasad Pandey
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What is the link between coral bleaching and genetic variability of corals?
 
Thank you for sharing your insights into the research topic.
James Howard Cowan
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Moreover, up-to now, population models for aquatic and terrestrial animals are not essentially different from each other, despite the radically different environment. What do you think, how does the water environment affect the dynamics of fish populations? Can we consider this effect as unimportant?
 
I think the issue depends upon the size of the fish (animals) that you are dealing with . Of course the viscosity of sea water is an enormous issue in low Reynolds number environments, which is why copepods have developed specialized apparatus to generate feeding currents to bring food to their mouth parts. Moreover, larval fish benefit from microscale turbulence in the sea because of motions imparted on both predators and prey increase encounter rates. Diffusion has been studied extensively as it effects plankton patchiness, including patches of fish eggs and larvae as well as patches of their prey. For larger fishes, we know that ocean physics play a large role in large scale patterns of distribution, predator prey interactions, larval retention areas, development of linear oceanographic features (langmuir cells, frontal boundaries, etc) which are important sites of trophic transfer. Water column stability is also important because some larvae require high prey densities that accumulate at density discontinuities to initiate feeding. That said, larger fishes see the world from a high Reynolds number perspective and have adapted to living in a viscous environment. So I say again, physics play a role at all levels, and the connectivity between disparate populations in the sea have been well studied, even if stocks are not managed with this in mind owning to jurisdictional concerns. In recent years, this problem is receiving more attention as we struggle to implement ecosystems based fisheries management.
Rolf Henrik Nilsson
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Dormant stage or alive
 
By targeting RNA as opposed to DNA, I suppose.
Willem B. Van Muiswinkel
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I am trying to challenge Asian sea bass with Vibrio alginolyticus and would be measuring the release of cytokines over a time course within 48 hour period. I am trying to reduce other stressors to the barest minimum to avoid the effect of handling on the experiment. I am thinking of using dipping instead of IP because: 1. My fish samples are small (6-8 g) 2. IP challenge does not mimic the natural mode by which fish encounter pathogens However, in the literature, it seems like dipping takes longer to get the fish infected, meaning I may not detect any noticeable changes in cytokines (TNFa, IL-1b, IL-6) within 48 hrs? Does anyone have any ideas?
 
Dear colleague, It is difficult to predict which approach is the best. You may have to measure the stress response itself (e.g. cortisol levels in blood) to determine which method gives minimal handling stress. It could help to anaesthetize (MS222) the animals before any further handling.
Olivier Radakovitch
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The pollution of the river must have had entrance route for heavy metals, probably through some feeding channels to the river. I want to know if the heavy metal enrichment is from effluent channeled into the river of probably through surface pollution by waste deposition etc.
 
As colleagues already said, fingerprinting the source of metal contamination is not always easy. Looking at the work on the Asa river for example, the variations in concentrations are not really huge and it is difficult to highlight the anthropogenic sources. You can try two thinks at least. First, try to obtain particulate samples representative of the suspected sources: effluents, canals for agricultural areas or surface soils from the same areas, draining from urban areas. Second, normalize all your concentrations with one element not associated to anthropogenic inputs. Al is generally used, but you can also used Cs, Sr or Li, depending on what you get with the XRD technic. This normalisation could be efficient to better highlight spot sources, because it can also take into account grain-size or natural geochemical background variations. Sequential extraction could give you some informations, but they are quite difficult to perform accurately.
Lucie H Salwiczek
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Empirical data collected by ecologists (and also scientists from other areas) are known to often fail to fulfil the assumptions needed in parametric hypothesis tests. After a long history of scientists trying to hammer their data from every side so that they would fit the assumptions, or even ignoring some "mild violations" because the parametric test would still be more robust, we are in a time where everyone has access to (more or less) powerful computers. This has led to an increasing use of non-parametric statistics that are able to test hypotheses and make predictive models based on "real data", which can be achieved either through large datasets or data generation based on simulations, re-sampling, permutations, etc. My question comes from the fact that when I ask for advice on data analysis I often get a lot of answers regarding the fulfilment of assumptions or suggesting the use of parametric tests after data transformations. Of course data transformations are still very important to standardise units of measurement or to reduce the effect of some variables, but do you think normality assumptions are still an issue? Homogeneity of dispersions can still be an issue of course, but it can also be seen as an important feature of the system itself (the fact that one "treatment" has more dispersed or erratic results than another). Are parametric tests becoming the floppy disks of data analysis? Or are there still areas where parametric approaches will always perform better?
 
This discussion seems to start and continue on a high, sophisticated level. First and most of all one needs to look at is the beginning of all analyses: what is the nature of the data? Numerical? Categorical (e.g. type of niches)? Continuous? It sounds trivial but ecologists collect and analyse all kinds of data, and they will continue to do so; in fact in times of 'big data' more and more data are collected and analysed together, that are are suitable for one but not for another type of analyses. Rather than trying to abandon one kind of analyses (parametric or non-parametric), we should better treasure all kinds of data, and think about how best to analyse them - independent of the nature of the statistical approach.
Marc Casanovas
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Marine ecosystem services refer to benefits that people obtain from marine ecosystems, including the open ocean, coastal seas, and estuaries. Some categories of services have been already defined, but this is still a theme under discussion as well as the valuation of these services.
 
An assessment of the non-market value of the ecosystem services provided by the Catalan coastal zone, Spain. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569109001422
Loïc N Michel
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The simplest and cheapest way possible.
 
Hi Federica, I made my PhD on trophic ecology of amphipods from Posidonia oceanica. If you're interested, the dissertation is here : http://hdl.handle.net/2268/95644 I designed two kinds of super-cheap light traps. First light traps were made of transparent 1.5 litre plastic bottles, placed in reverse position. Each trap presented vertical rectangular slits (1 cm wide x 15 cm long) in its upper part. They were anchored to the bottom using a 2 kg lead weight, and a float attached to the top of the trap insured that it remained vertical in the meadow canopy. A diving emergency light stick was fixed in the bottleneck of each trap. These sticks emit light for >12 hours, and the vagile invertebrates, attracted by the light, entered the trap through the slits, and gathered in the bottleneck. Traps were placed at twilight and recovered the next morning. After a few sampling campaigns, I used a slightly different model of light trap. They were made of two nested 1 litre translucent plastic containers. The top container was pierced with slits, and was then inserted in the bottom one. In addition, they were not anchored to the bottom by using lead weights. Instead, I used metal stakes (diameter 3mm) that were directly stuck in the matte. This model was preferred to the old one for three reasons. First, these traps were much more robust, and withstood numerous successive re-uses. Second, since they are made of translucent plastic, the light was only emitted through the entrance slits, thus maximizing the attraction of animals towards the “useful” part of the trap. Third, the presence of an additional bottleneck in the middle of the trap limits the potential escape of animals. I used these traps a lot, they were very efficient devices to catch amphipods but also mysids and cumaceans. They cost nearly nothing, and can be built by anybody in a few minutes... And if you want to keep the prices even lower, get your light sticks from a party supplier instead of a diving one, you can find equally efficient models at half the price... Hope this helps ! Loïc
Alessandro Saccà
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Dear researcher, I am a Post-doc student working at the University of Messina (Sicily, Italy) and I am looking for a research partner who can bring to Sicily a sediment corer to be operated in the meromictic Faro lake, located by the Straits of Messina. Details of the collaboration are to be defined yet, depending on the research partner interests and demands. The core task is basically that shown in this research paper (http://aem.asm.org/cgi/reprint/74/3/624.pdf), but it is expected to be improved as a result of the collaboration. Please let me know if you are interested to join in. Looking forward to receiving your reply. Best regards Alessandro
 
Adrian Toader-Williams
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Please Go to the LINK, JOIN IN and place / POST your comments ON: http://www.researchgate.net/group/Ecology_Economics_and_Non-Monetary_Values_The_Role_of_States_and_Governments/ Please Join the MULTIDISCIPLINARY group: Ecology & Economics and Non-Monetary Values. The Role of States and Governments See you on the group! - See perhaps your contributions as well. Thanks!
 
Ayyappan Saravanakumar
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After completion of my post graduation, I am interested in working with Annamalai University. I will receive my degree in Biotechnology in june 2011. I am seeking for a position as a JRF in the marine biotechnology field. I am also interested in becoming a Research Assistant in the marine research Lab, as it the best in India as visible by publications. My enclosed resume defines the qualifications and skills I will bring to you. I am having less but very good framework of research experience which includes are shown in my resume. I had send my resume to you and soon cuming to visit CASin marine biotechnology. I believe that I am capable to handle all the responsibilities associated with this research position. Pls send me response in my mail id. I look forward for the positive reply from your side. I appreciate for the time and consideration given to me. Thank you, Regards, Tushar Kumar Verma, MSc.Biotechnolgy,passout, SRM University, Chennai
 
Thanks for your interest, i will inform you, we are waiting for mega project of biotechnology, be sure, we will consider for your request. thank you
Ayyappan Saravanakumar
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I am Dr. Saravanakumar from Center of Advanced study in Marine Biology, Annamalai Unviersity, Tamilnadu. In our University having MSc-Marine Biology, Marine Biotechnology, Marine Microbiology and Ocean Science and Technology course available in this year, i request you any one want to join (Bsc-zoology, botany, biotechnology and biochemistry eligibility) Please contact stbcas@nic.in. This is our Director and Dean Mail address. we have very good lab facilities and standard experience teachers.
 
Hai, This is Dr. Saravanakumar from Center of Advanced study in marine biology, Annamalai Unviersity, Tamilnadu. In our University having MSc-Marine Biology, Marine Biotechnology, Marine Microbiology and Ocean Science and Technology course available in this year, i request you any one want to join (Bsc-zoology, botany, biotechnology and biochemistry eligibility) Please contact stbcas@nic.in. This is our Director and Dean Mail address. we have very good lab facilities and standard experience teachers.
Raja Selvaraju
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chitin is extracted from crabs
 
Not only crab some curstaceans such as shrimps and squilla
Bapuji Maringanti
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Worked for about 15 years. Worked on drugs, antifouling agents, fish disesase control agents, enzymes, PUFAs etc from marine and mangrove organisms about 40 publications, 4 Ph.Ds in this area. Basically organic chemist Google search will give my activities I shall be happy to be of use to any individual / group.
 
Nickolai Shadrin
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Is there anyone working on cyanobacteria? I am new to this group tats Y i just wanted to know.....
 
Hi, I and my daughter (Svetlana Shadrina, MSc student of Microbiolgy Dep., St/ Petersburg, Russia) are interested in cyanobacteria study, mostly in hypersaline environment. Her main topic is potentially toxigenic cyanobacteria. I have(with my Moscow and Indian colleagues) one paper in Russian on Cyanobacteria of South India - Tamil Nadu- salt ponds. I have some paper in English, can send you(addresss?) All the best! Sincerely yours, Dr.Nickolai Shadrin, senior researcher, Institute of Biology of the Southern seas, 2,Nakhimov ave., Sevastopol 99011,  Ukraine
Nandha Gopal
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I invite all experts work on decapods fishery, biology, ecology to discuss, to communicate, to exchange scientific ideas or opinions or to participate on proposals preparation
 
I am a M.Sc fresher can u suggest me the best place to work on the molluscs especially on european countries
Unmesh Katwate
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On 30 September, in the event Labelab Ravenna in 2010 was held the workshop "DISPOSAL OF THE ADRIATIC OFFSHORE PLATFORMS: AN OPPORTUNITY 'FOR THE PROTECTION OF NATURE AND THE COASTAL TOURISM". Organized by dr. Luca Vignoli, PADI Instructor, He proposed the idea of using the Adriatic offshore platforms ENI in decommissioning posing them on the seabed (sinking) in order to create a series of hot spots of marine biodiversity and coastal tourism sites accessible to the divers. At the workshop partecipated as Speakers: Ing. Renzo Piantoni ENI div. Exploration & Production, Dr. Attilio Rinaldi, ex Director of ICRAM -Italian National Research Center for Marine Environment- Dr. Giovanni Fucci president of Paguro Association Dr. Roberto Raffaelli for PADI. Like giant metal iceberg emerge from the water, the so-called "islands of iron", offshore platforms for the extraction of hydrocarbons in the sea. Invaluable source of wealth during the period of activity, since ferrous clusters when the deposit is exhausted. And then what is their fate? Along the Italian Adriatic Sea coast actually there are about 80 active methanifer offshore platforms, including 50 in front of Ravenna and Rimini. There would be different possible solutions to dispose these imposing technological structures, like for example:  possible risks to humans or to the environment,  land transportation and dismantlement,  conversion into luxury off-shore marine hotels,  wind-parks,  underwater oasis for marine biology and coastal tourism recovery . But for dr. Vignoli the solution more cost-effective, but also environmentally better, is just one: sink them. The idea, explained in detail in Eni, - freely downloadable from the site www.lucavignoli.it - starts by the following consideration: properly reclaimed, sunken platforms do not pollute, but instead become "hot spots of biological diversity"; true oases of biological marine repopulating, auto-protected from fishing nets and underwater paradise for diving tourists. By law, Eni, once the mining ended, is required to reclaim the mining sites and to dispose of disused platforms. At the moment this means only one thing: backing on the ground to be dismantled. A complex and very costly operation.. How we said, there are a lot of different proposed alternatives of various kinds: from installation of wind turbines on up even to build upon the luxury hotels. … But sinking them would instead make available a permanent solid substrate that will permict to take root colonization, and the biological marine life would evolve quickly into a real marine biological oasis. Experience has already been tried successfully in the United States, Australia and many other tourism oriented nations. And in Italy it is not even a novelty ... But now, returning to the Adriatic, it is good to know that in reality, despite its few colors, the Adriatic basin is extremly biologically fertile, much more of the Tyrrhenian Sea. And this thanks to both the nutrients carried by the Po river than to its geomorphological conformation. The "problem", from the point of view as it were naturalistic, is the sandy bottom. Does not allow organisms to take root and fix themselves, and then to create stable biological communities that were geographically fixed, and that evolve over time. Any other solid surface, however, it becomes a biological “hot spot” in which biodiversity can flourish and, at an exponential rate, proliferate. It is at this point that would come into play the disused platforms, reclaimed and then sunk. Various materials, at different depths and variable degrees of light exposure: an ideal habitat for flora and fauna, and species of all kinds ... from microalgae, to anemones, crabs, .... up to the raven, lobster, sea bream, etc. ... perfect place for sea creatures to hide, hunt, feed, spawn, ... And as we have just said, in Italy it would not even new ... In other Italian coastal towns, following the sinking of ships often local people were mobilized in order to prevent their recovery to the ground by the authorities. A few years after the sinking happens that the catch increases, divers and tourists as well (category that spends, ..edn). Just think of the wreck of the Haven, in front of Arenzano (La Spezia, Italy). The petroleum tanker burned and sank in front of the coast, at the beginning bringing with herself a lot of petroleum pollution. But after a few years later, the wreck cames back to life colonized by sea creatures of all kinds and species; but not limited to: the site now attracts experienced divers tourists from all over Europe. A single dive can cost up to € 100. And yet restaurants and hotels do not cry for this. It is the best known example in the Adriatic Sea have always been under our eyes: the “Paguro” (“Hermit crab”), an Agip/ENI methanifer platform that in the 1965, following an explosion, sank into the sea in front of Ravenna, 12 miles from the coast. 35 years after, the wreck, as the Haven, has become a favorite destination for scuba divers. Think you that it was officially defined as "Site of Community Interest " in the “EU Natura 2000 network” and classified as a official nature reserve area of the Italian State. [ www.associazionepaguro.org ] In 10 years we have reached 40 thousand dives. Think you that the wreck is an hour's sailing from the port of Ravenna and reaches the maximum depth of 32 meters ... Each dive costs from 35 to 50 € per person and is easy to imagine the economic boom in tourism that we would create with an underwater parks net that connects all the platforms Adriatic decommissioned and sunk. An “Adriatic Reef”, an artificial underwater ecological network of the Adriatic, accessible to the diving activities, to nature and sports tourism. A unique park in his gender, which would offer at the Adriatic Coast, an other extremly fascinous attractive with the others like the disco-nightlife and beach umbrellas. Once sunken and stabilized, diving would can begin immediately and, after 10 years from the sinking, we will able to enjoy an environment extremly similar to that of the “Hermit crab” platform wreck. The propose was been very appreciated by ENI (owner society of the Adriatic methanifer platforms), and by the Autorities of the Emilia Romagna region and by Environment and Productivity Minister Officies, but, unfortunatly there are two big problems to resolve in Italy: 1) Actually talian laws do not permit to anyone to sink (or pose on the seabed) anything. 2) They will need minimum other 7 years before to have the first offshore platform to decommission. Currently in the Adriatic Sea are about 80 active methane extraction platforms off-shore: Now, if at the time their disposal they will be transported to the ground and then dismantled, in 20 years instead of platforms there will be remaining 80 residual underwater holes in the sand; if instead it will bew followed this proposal, in 20 years we will able to enjoy 80 marine biological recovery oases so close between them that they will create a real and valuable, marine ecological net. Luca Vignoli
 
its a nice and new way for conservation and ecotourism. As well as this idea may help us to restore our rapidly degrading ecosystem, forming atificial reef platforms for divers is an great and ecofriendly idea to enhance ecotourism.
Revathi Dhanashekar
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how well do the oilzappers clean up the oil spills without much of any biohazardous byproducts??
 
dominique, thanks for the suggestion..but what im really concerned about is that the cocktail of 5 different strains which is commercially called oilzappers which is extensively used in india to treat oil spills..have faced a variety of problems due to which these strains have been successful in some parts but not in others....and more over due to the strong environment mutations are strongly favored..
Mohan Anjaneya Reddy
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Can someone tell me about the effect of ocean acidification on the marine organisms and also the food chain...how will the effect be spread across the different regions of tropics, temperate and the polar regions??
 
Hi the effect of ocean acidification is widely studied on calcifying organisms where as now the studies are going on on cephalopods, fishes and etc.. its effect is still under determined and the synergetic effect with global warming is expected to be unquantifyable. and still the adaptation of organisms to the temperature and pH together is not known as this is a recent phenominon. lot of projects are going on especially in Europe and US based on this still developing tropical countries didnt take much initiation in this research. here is the link for European project on Ocean acidification which is the largest ocean acidification project till today and published lot of papers on it. http://oceanacidification.wordpress.com
Nickolai Shadrin
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biofilms
 
Sathishkumar Arumugam
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I need to know the antioxidants,ROS, free radicals and their pathways. and their contribution to cancer, heart disease. Please anybody suggests/send some papers, textbooks to understand their mechanism in our body. Thank you.
 
Elijah Oyoo-Okoth
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What role do zooxanthelae offer in metal transfers in the oceanic environment?
 
James E Hanson
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why see are blue? if we think about it, we never find, the reason why the sky are blue? and the sky also blue, why the land not blue? to be continued
 
Sea and sky are fairly transparent, but have an apparent blue color. The sky is blue because of light scattering. Rayleigh scattering depends on the fourth power of wavelength, and so is much more intense for short wavelength blue light. There is a good explanation here: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/atmos/blusky.html The sea also has some blue from Rayleigh scattering, but it also reflects the sky. It appears more blue when the sky is blue. Absorption of light by organisms and dissolved salts can also change the color of the sea. Since the solid materials of the "land" are essentially opaque - we see the colors that are reflected, and not the colors of light that are absorbed.
Mahabaleshwar Hegde
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Hey I could not fine any link to join the communities in Research gate web site
 
Sonia Melo
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Sea turtles have been swimming the oceans for millions and millions of years. They have seen dinosaurs come and go, the rise and fall of civilizations, but they may not survive much longer, without our help. Destructive trawls and plastic pollution threaten their lives at sea. Beach erosion and coastal development plague them on land. With six of the world's seven sea turtle species swimming in US waters, we need to be an example to the rest of the world on how to best protect these amazing creatures. Right now take an action with this link : http://takeaction.oceana.org/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=27
 
The "Tamar Project" in Brazil has excelent results in sea turtles conservation! It started in 80's and runs all over the coast protecting five species. The site is in portuguese: http://www.tamar.org.br/index.php
Alessandro Saccà
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Researchers can join and discuss the advance issues in Ocean Sciences, Physical Oceanography,Chemical Oceanography, Biological Oceanography, Marine Sciences, Marine Geology, Marine Ecology, etc. essentially to understand oceans around us
 
Dear Shambanagouda Marigoudar, thanks for your suggestions, I will take them into account in my speculations and I will let you know when I have either a hypothesis to test or an action plan. Please advise on new ideas if you have. By the way, I forgot to mention that a bloom of photosynthetic sulfur bacteria occurs throughout summer in the upper part of the anoxic zone, and that protozoa biomass is remarkably high at the same depth. The highest abundance of Oithona, however, appears to be below that depth.
A researcher
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Please explain sandy shore adaptations in marine invertebrates, add specific comments on their physiology.
 
One of my favorite adaptations which I have seen on both the NW United States coast (blood worm) and on Hong Kong shores (inn-keeper worm) are invertebrates containing hemoglobin, (blood with a high affinity for oxygen, similar to our own), allowing for life in the highly anoxic layers of sandy shores.
Joseph Barney
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Use a sub, with person or unmanned using the liquid stuff from Abyss and/or the liquid used to cool gaming computers that makes it so you don't need a heatsink or fan, and it covers the motherboard and CPU etc directly since it doesn't conduct electricity and short things out. It's the same principle as deep sea fish and would work great....would love to see photos of the deep deep ocean and be able to work there as well. :)
 
Sanjoy Guha Roy
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Hi, I need to collect spore samples from different types of water bodies and shallow aquifers in different areas. As most of these are usually interconnected, how do I find the basin/catchment area (from a map I suppose) so that one whole basin/drainage system is covered? Could someone help by outlining the basic procedural steps in identifying such basins? What resources do I have to consult?
 
Thanks you very much for your help. As the area of interest is however primarily flat land I guess it will be a difficult task. I suppose all ponds, lakes water bodies and irrigation canals within the region defined by the parameter can be referred to as a single watershed area? My primary objective is to not only sample spores but also the routes/channels by which they can spread; thats why I need to find out if the water bodies are interconnected and accordingly sample the strategic locations for spore profile.
John Gallagher
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Hi, I have collected long term samples in a small lake and now I am in the final evaluations of the data for a paper. Is anyone concerned about the interactions between nutrients, zooplankton, esp. Cladocera, Daphnia and the amount of stocked fish? It is a difficult step for me to make the recognition of the hysteresis involved and maybe visible in such interactions. Thanks Albert
 
First try a contrained cluster analysis (or CONNiS) of your data set over time (PAST package) inrder to determine if their are separate regimes over time. Then apply a Change point analysis (eg CUSUM in the Variance package) with respect to the drive of change to detrmine if the change was the result of time or the rapid change in the driver. Thuird look at the possible feedbacks from your data set that may maintain each regime (should be different) I m sure your are familiar with Carpenters papers on defining the regime states, but be also away that it may take time for a change to another stable state and your regimes may may just just dynamic transients of one previous or future state (google the paper by Knowlton on detecting regime changes). I really need to see the data but for the above proceddures google Andersen et al in TREE for methods for detecting regime changes. Second if there has been no regime change then look at the time series periodici relations hips to each other through a cross correlations to identify any lags and a periodogram for the frequency (PAST). If you time series is not complete (missing data blocks) there are a number of options perform a Lomb periodgram (stationary series) over time and apply a series of sinsusoidal models on the resulting data tom idenfy lags. or imputate the missing data in the time series (sIngular spectrum analsyis a PCA in time ) and reppeat the analyis for cross correlation on the reconstraucted data sets if you wish to send the send the data email me johng6@utas.edu.au and I can make a better assessment.
Nickolai Shadrin
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hypersaline lakes
 
Azubuike Victor Chukwuka
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This is my thesis plan. If it is frequent, can I be notified link trade journal?
 
Research in this line is uncommon. But may i ask to what end is your interest in this topic? I ask because in fishes for instance where such studies are carried out, it is with reference to toxicants called endocrine disrupting chemicals.
Periyadan Kadinjappalli Krishnakumar
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What is the response of marine bivalves to environmental contaminants?
 
Thanks. I also suggest you to go through my following publications: Krishnakumar, et al. 1994 Marine Ecology Progress Series 106, 249 261. Krishnakumar, et al. 1995. Marine Biology 124, 251 - 259. Krishnakumar, et al.. 1997 Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 118C, 11 - 18. Kagley, et al . 2003. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 44, 43–52 Krishnakumar, et al. 2006. Ecotoxicol. 15: 347 – 352
Sujan Kumar
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Marine plankton are the primary producers of the ocean. If the global climate change affects the plankton directly then what will be the food source for fishes?
 
Planktons are the producers in aquatic eco systems, remaining all aquatic organisms are depending upon the planktons for their food. Definetely climatic changes will affect the planktons.. If its population decreases co2 levels increases in the oceans and the all organisms will going to extinct, because planktons are trhe absorbers of co2 released by the remaining organisms.
A researcher
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Does the new beach become the place they migrate to to hatch when mature or will they seek back to the original beach. What is the probability of nesting location as a function of distance from the turtles own hatching beach and sea turtle species?
 
Most sea turtle hatchlings will imprint on the beach they are hatched on. They use visual cues such as the distance to the ocean, brightness of the surf and if the moon is overhead (but that is not a key factor since some hatch with no moon at all). They also use meteorological cues such as the texture of the sand particles and the earth's magnetic field because they have magnetite crystals in their tiny brains that will orient themselves to their place of origin. If you take the hatchlings after they are born and move them to be released somewhere else, they will most likely imprint on the beach you transferred them to, not the original beach they were laid on as there is no imprinting done during development. Depending on the species of turtle, they will have a different migrating pattern. Some will migrate far out into the middle of the ocean for a good portion of their life until they are sexually mature and then return close to shore. Others make long distance migrations closer to the coast. If it is a Atlantic vs. a Pacific subspecies, the migration pattern will vary. As far as seeking their original beach when they mature, again it varies per species, but it has been researched that loggerheads can nest anywhere from 5-30 miles from their natal beach. I hope that helps.
Muhammad Yasar
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to study the population of the plant species the software used is the ARC_GIS.
 
hi, Bilijaji.... Find these article useful 1. Reusing Geographic E-Services: A Case Study in the Marine Ecological Domain (from the book: Software Services for E-World: 10th IFIP WG 6.11 Conference on E-Business, E-Services, and E-Society) 2. Application of Remote Sensing and GIS (http://ocw.unu.edu/international-network-on-water-environment-and-health/unu-inweh-course-1-mangroves/Application-of-remote-sensing-and-GIS.pdf) 3. various titles (http://www.mcclungjohn.webs.com/) 4. various bibliography (https://sites.google.com/site/gisinecologyandevolution/) 5. GIS for Ocean Conservation (http://www.esri.com/library/bestpractices/ocean-conservation.pdf) 6. case studies (http://www.gisinecology.com/case_studies.htm) 7. Toolkits and Other Resources (http://www.ebmtools.org/about_ebm_tools/toolkits.html) 8. Marine Geospatial Ecology Tools (http://www.ehow.com/info_8056037_marine-geospatial-ecology-tools.html) Best of luck....
Henrik Juul
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I have been researching seasonal changes in sea turtle nesting patterns and near shore arrival of fish species such as Tuna. When I was interacting with the fishermen in Chennai, India, I heard from them that the seasonal patterns are changing drastically based on the traditional knowledge that was passed on to them. I would like to know the reason behind it. Climate change is one ultimate factor that is being discussed in various forums. However, I would like to know about other fragmentary causes.
 
The Olive Ridley turtles are having a hard time in SE India, since they primarily nest during day time. Their main nesting grounds in India from Chenai and southwards are densly populated and the beaches have become even more polluted with debries and fishing nets washed asore. My guess is that the turtles delay their nesting in order to wait for possible more favorable time.. Various projects have tried to protect them during nesting season, but the only efficient way is to create hatceries and block ceartain stretches of beach during nesting season. This is done in the states of Oaxala and Chiapas on the paciffic coast of Mexico, wher the nesting population of Olive Ridley now is up to an estimated 400.000 yearly - primarily on a 40 km beach where the military are patrolling during season and wild dogs are shot. Olive Ridley are capable of spreading their nesting season over nearly 6 months with the "arribada" occurring over 3-5 weeks.
John Matthew Logan
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Generally fishes do migrate from shallow coastal water to deeper water or to estuaries as a regional migration for feeding, breeding and as salinity response. But season and pattern is not clear and much dynamic to study. We get mostly juveniles in the coastal water all over the season. So I was thinking to study on regional migration of fishes off Goa coast. Would you please suggest me the best way to collect samples for this study..?
 
You might consider using some type of chemical tag. Stable isotopes (C,H,N,O, and S) have been used in other areas to get at similar questions. See general review by Keith Hobson: Hobson, K. A. (1999). Tracing origins and migration of wildlife using stable isotopes: a review. Oecologia 120, 314-326. Here are a few examples specific to fish movements: Hansson, S., Hobbie, J. E., Elmgren, R., Larsson, U., Fry, B. & Johansson, S. (1997). The stable nitrogen isotope ratio as a marker of food-web interactions and fish migration. Ecology 78, 2249-2257. Haas, H., Freeman, C., Logan, J., Deegan, L. & Gaines, E. (2009). Examining mummichog growth and movement: Are some individuals making intra-season migrations to optimize growth? Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 369, 8-16. Rodgers, K. & Wing, S. (2008). Spatial structure and movement of blue cod Parapercis colias in Doubtful Sound, New Zealand, inferred from δ13C and δ15N Marine Ecology Progress Series 359, 239-248.
Carlos Wolfgang Nossa
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I have done with isolating the bacteria with different types of sea weeds
 
It depends what type of bacteria you are looking at. Have you done the bacterial identification with culture dependent, or independent methods, such as sequencing? If you are really interested in studying this deeply, you could do a metagenomic approach by sequencing all the bacterial genomes found on your sea weeds - you could probably do this for as little as $2000 US and get a mine of data.
Azubuike Victor Chukwuka
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What is the relation between ecological parameters and plankton and bacteria in marine ecosystem especially in marine waterbody? If we have like this studies in 3 season only, is it possible to publish in international Journal with ISI and IF? Please help me in this points
 
There is also a phenomenon of nutrient co-limitation which has complex mechanisms in coastal habitats. This also plays a strong determinant role in affecting plankton populations.
Robert William Rankin
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Climate change probably affects plankton and probably influence fish distribution, i.e., fishes may move to colder regions to survive. Fish-eating cetaceans and other top-chain predators are also expected to change their spatial and seasonal occurrence ?
 
Here is a recent paper on the subject of cetaceans and climate change: Lambert, E., MacLeod, C., Hall, K., Brereton, T., Dunn, T., Wall, D., Jepson, P., Deaville, R., and Pierce, G., 2011. Quantifying likely cetacean range shifts in response to global climatic change: implications for conservation strategies in a changing world. Endangered Species Research 15: 205–222. Retrieved January 28, 2012, . As with many other taxa, climate change is expected to result in geographic range shifts of cetacean species as they track changes in temperature to remain within their ecological niches. Such changes in geographic range could have implications for the conservation and management of cetaceans. Here, we propose a bioclimatic envelope modelling approach for providing quantitative predictions of how the ranges of cetacean species may respond to changing water temperatures. This combines predictions from habitat niche and ‘thermal’ niche models for an individual species to determine probable geographic range under specific climatic conditions. However, if this approach is to be used to inform conservation strategies, it is essential that the ability to predict responses to environmental change is validated beyond the period of data collection used to construct the models. Therefore, in addition to validation of modelled current range, we included a step to validate the models’ ability to predict previous changes in range over time in response to climatic changes using independent data. We demonstrate this approach using common dolphin Delphinus delphis data from the Northeast Atlantic. The combined model was constructed with data collected between 1980 and 2007, and validated using independent distributional records collected between 1930 and 2006. The validated model was then applied to predict future range between 2010 and 2069, based on projected water temperatures. Thus, the modelling approach is shown to provide the type of information required to help ensure that conservation and management strategies remain effective in the face of a changing climate.
Sai Elangovan Subramanian
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Whether it is possible to culture sponges using copepods as a feed?
 
instead of copepods we can try with microzoo...............
Jan Strauss
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I wish to extract native retinal from diatom cell cultures for regeneration experiments with opsins. I'd highly appreciate any feedback on general extraction protocols and sample handling as well as personal experiences with similar applications.
 
Luis Tito de Morais
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Hi, dear researchers, I need a list of marine microalgae species which is present in tamilnadu coastal region? Is there any articles which deals this tamilnadu coastal marine microalgae species? PLZ HELP ME FRIENDS?
 
Hi Jayachandru, This may be of interest to you even if it does not precisely answer your question: http://eprints.cmfri.org.in/1270/ http://eprints.cmfri.org.in/7067/ http://eprints.cmfri.org.in/7603/ http://eprints.cmfri.org.in/7026/ http://eprints.cmfri.org.in/5927/ Some other references in the cmfri site may be of interest too, and a Google Scholar search will be useful ! HTH Regards ltdm
Chinnavenkataraman Govindasamy
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kindly join the alumni of this center
 
I am Dr.C. Govindasamy Associate Professor and Head Department of Oceanography and Coastal Area Studies School of Marine Sciences, Alagappa University, Thiondi Campus- 623 409 email: drcgsamy@gmail.com Kindly mail me for further information
Swapnil Yadre
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I am JRF student from CIFE, Mumbai. I want to do Sclerochronological study of Bivalves from Mumbai coast. to look in the growth lines of bivalve shell, is there any technique in India to cut the shell smoothly (Schlerochronology requires undistorted surface)
 
Faye Stringer
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Crowdsourcing experiment to help decode whale song. http://whale.fm/
 
Anne Colville
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Measurement of oxygen saturation under in situ conditions
 
Hi Avik, Increasing salinity will affect the solubility of oxygen in water. The effect in freshwater is usually minimal, but in brackish or saline water you need to correct for the salinity. Many DO meters have a built-in function to do this - refer to the manual for instructions for your particular meter. You have to measure the salinity, and enter it into the meter. Otherwise, there are tables available. I Googled and found the following site, which seems to be fairly comprehensive. Table 6.2-7 gives salinity corrections: http://water.usgs.gov/owq/FieldManual/Chapter6/6.2_v2.1.pdf Cheers, Anne
Tim Beardsley
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Here is a link to a free overview article just published in BioScience by Joseph Pawlik about the chemical ecology of sponges that are now taking over coral reefs in the Caribbean. Link good until 12/31/11 only. (I posted this also on Aquatic Biology/..marine and freshwater, wasn't sure which was most appropriate, apologies). http://www.jstor.org/stoken/ucaltoken/7XJ5hqVAJ93XnmgdrGfa/full
 
Ricardo Leal
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The drift seabound of FMD with theirs origen in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.
 
A study on the drift of FMD with the use of Message in Bottle (MIB). 12.3% of MIB reported back.
Jerald Wilson
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Can anyone please send me the details of in-situ "Coral Incubation Chamber's" design and manufacturing company? Thanks in advance! - Dr. Jerald
 
Hello Ben, Nice to hear from you. Thanks for your information. This is my older message that I have sent before am familiarizing with that chambers in the lab. That chambers are good. Thanks
Kam W Tang
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The understanding about the interconversion of carbon in nature is still beyond the grasp of present environmentalists. Considering the present status of global warming there is a necessity for studying carbon regulation in aquatic systems. The bacteria and their phages being the smallest and most abundant constituents of the aquatic environment, represents an ideal model for studing carbon regulation in aquatic system
 
Bacteria are responsible for remineralization. Phage infection of bacteria will therefore affect carbon remineralization and flux in the ocean. Also, don't forget some phages infect and kill phytoplankton, which of course will directly influence of the carbon cycle. Curtis Suttle wrote a couple of nice review papers on the subject, and you should be able to find them on google scholar.
Ana Villarroya
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From a literature search, I am finding that, in the opinion of international scientists and policy strategists, the implementation of the “new interpretation” of biodiversity offsets is taking on a momentum quicker than the assessment of their ecological value can be quantified. I would value any comments from people who have had experience with biodiversity offsets. I am especially interested in any policy suggestions on how they should be implemented
 
I've just seen this question today although it seems it was posted a long time ago... My work focuses on offsets so if you're still interested in this I'm happy to try and add something to the discussion. Cheers!
Luis Tito de Morais
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Hi, i wanted to study the oyster regarding impact of environmental factors on physiological changes, but all references of these topics are very much old (from 1975 to 1995) if any one can suggest me recent reference or recent topic such as to check effect on protein, enzymes ect. please help me. i will be very much interested in sharing my finding in same.
 
Dear Ajit, If you make a search on google scholar (http://scholar.google.com) using the words : impact of environmental factors on oyster physiological changes and limiting the search to references since year 2000 you get over 16,000 references among which you can choose those that fit you research. Hope this helps, Regards Tito
Ivan Nekhaev
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Three species model
 
It is necessary to know what purpose of this model. The scavanger not directly influence on the populations of both pray and predator populations. But if you study the transformation of energy and organic matter scavenger have the similar role with predator. If you want to study a relationships between population dynamics of pray, predator and scavenger, we need to know is scavenger consume only pray or only predator or both of them. So the population of scavenger will change according to its functional role. Sometimes one animal may be scavanger as well as a predator (for example welk Buccinum undatum). In this case we need to study it mode of live in paticular habitat and then we will estimate their influence on populations of another animals (pray and predators). There are are number of different connections between pray, predator and scavanger, and study of some of them depend only on your purposes.
Dean Janiak
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I have monthly data on intertidal benthic fauna from the west coast of India over several seasons. I want to see the variations in abundance, diversity across monthly and seasonal scales. Can anyone suggest some statistical tests which I can utilize here apart from Dominance, Diversity indices, evenness etc.
 
A good way to start looking at abundances especially with community data (lots of 0's) are MDS plots. Look into Primer, it is a very easy program to use and can run a variety of statistical tests looking at similarity, evenness, etc.