Science topics: AngiospermsMalvaceae
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Malvaceae - Science topic

The mallow family of the order Malvales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. Members include GOSSYPIUM, okra (ABELMOSCHUS), HIBISCUS, and CACAO. The common names of hollyhock and mallow are used for several genera of Malvaceae.
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Currently I don't have the scope of sequencing and DNA extraction.....wet lab facility.
I want to reconstruct the phylogeny of four subfamilies of Malvaceae using matK, rbcL, ITS.
Can I use public data from GenBank, like downloading the genes (FASTA) of different plants, then using software to analyze the clusters (MEGA/Mr.Bayes/other software), then comparing the trees of different genes, to see if there is any similarity/dissimilarity, then drawing a conclusion based on my observation.
Will that flow of work be supported scientifically??
Please help. Sincerely-Sunzid.
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Dear Osabutey Samuel Sir, I have understood the point that you might said, that is, comparison. Comparison between my DNA isolates (suppose I have extracted DNA) and the DNA isolates stored in GenBank. Then building tree for both. Then compare between the two to see the similarity/dissimilarity. You might wanted to say that, if I am not wrong.
As far as I know when proposing new system of classification, authors take few representative specimens to construct phylogeny.
We have Angiosperm Phylogeny IV currently widely accepted. So in that, similarly few representative specimens were taken to build the tree/justify positions of existing clades or to solve previous debates regarding positioning.
So in that sense it is not possible to test different genes (rbcL, matK....etc) at the same time, also intergenic spacers (ITS, rpoC1, trnH-psbA etc). So I wanted to validate the use of matK gene/other genes, if it can justify the systemic position of the members of my working family. Like did they follow the classification or not, if not where are the dissimilarities, are there any morphological variations that can be related with that variation, if yes, then considering morphology it can be proposed to transfer the position of an existing clade.........all these things. The key vital point is that, in the classification they used small set of data, like they took, as for e.g. 5/10 specimens in consideration when they built new tree. But in my family there are more than 40+ members, so their internal variation might not be justified in that sense, in the tree. Also it is not possible to extract DNA and sequence 3,60,000 angiosperms while proposing new system of classification, so I think that in every system of classification there might be some errors and speculations. So if we can justify that using public data from GenBank in a large dataset in my family. That was the objective.
Thank you Sir.
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I am a beginner and studying phylogenetic analysis, for analyzing my angiosperm family Sterculiaceae how should I approach for outgroup selection?? Should it be related closely?? Like members of Tiliaceae/Malvaceae??
I have learned using MEGA 11 to some extent.
Also I need some resources / papers/ slides/ anything that might be helpful for me to start as a beginner.
Thank you so much.
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Any plant from a sister lineage of your study group can be selected as an outgroup. Since you are working on a large group of plants, i.e. a family, it is advisable to use more than one species of a related family or families to be used as outgroups. As Roman Bohdan Hołyński has mentioned, these are used to “root” your phylogenetic tree, and hence very important to use in phylogenetic analysis. There are a lot of papers published over many years, and many lectures and tutorials in youtube that you can use to understand how you should proceed with your analyses. I would however suggest you to use R packages instead of Mega, since they are more flexible and will give you more option to play around with your phylogenetic tree.
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I want to make voucher specimen with Pterygota alata / Pterospermum acerifolium/ Sterculia villosa/foetida/versicolor/hamiltonii etc. >>>>Sterculiaceae (Chronquist) or Malvaceae (APG IV)
Plants are very tall, I can't reach easily, if i only collect leaves with petiole without flower or fruit will it be accepted in the herbarium as voucher specimen? What can I do for those big trees to make voucher specimen out of them? Thanks in Advance
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If you have access to a pole pruner (basically a saw or shears on a very long handle) you may be able to obtain your samples. Or, ask if detached and fallen flowers/fruits would be acceptable as part of the collection.
If you end up using a ladder and/or other equipment be sure to go with at least one other person for safety!
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Please suggest me
How we differentiate family, Genus, species or sub species.
For example Sida cordifolia, S cordata belonging to same family i.e. Malvaceae. But Malvaceae with lot of genera like Abutilon, Malvaceae, Malvastrum etc.
How these genera different from each other. ?
How we designed as genera, species or sub species or variety.
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Jacob Simons
thank you sir for valuable suggestions
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Need of experts suggestions regarding somatic embryogenesis in this plant family. Kindly post your valuable opinions...
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I'm currently working on Malvaceae and need help on phylogenetic studies.
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See for exemple:
A database of PCR primers for the chloroplast genomes of higher plants
de B Heinze - ‎2007 - - However, the essential information on these primer sequences is ... plant genera and species, with a view to analysing intra-specific variation [1]. ... As more and more partial and complete chloroplast DNA genome sequences become available, it is ... An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
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The common mallow is part of the large family of Malvaceae plants that include cotton, okra and hibiscus. It is an edible plant that has been used for medicinal care as well as food. The fruits are round and have cheese-like wedges which give the common mallow its nickname, cheese plant. Mallow stems are flexible and come from a central point, often lounging on the ground. This wild edible is used as herbal medicine in a variety of ways. It is an anti-inflammatory, diuretic, demulcent, emollient, laxative and an expectorant
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following.
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The plant is 20 cm tall. The flowers are some 12 cm long and the collective fruit (the circle of achenes) is 10 mm in diameter. Fruits are covered with soft hairs, the plant has some not dense hairs. Leaves are 15x10 mm, lobate.
It was collected in Split (S Croatia).
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following.
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How do I obtain the full-text of Olatunji, O.A. and Bakare, O.A. (1993). Taxonomic value of the Petiole Anatomy in the genus Sida Linn. (Malvaceae) in Nigeria, Feddes Repertorium 104 (1993) 1-2, 35-39?
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you can use this http://sci-hub.tw/
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Hi 
I am working on Phylogenetics of Solanaceae and Malvaceae and need plant samples that belong to family Solanaceae and Malvaceae. If the related researchers can provide me plant dried samples or extracted DNA, it would be a great help. 
Thanks in advance. 
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I have worked with both plant groups towards similar research goals. I suggest you attempt obtaining accessions from gene/seed banks of local institutes in your country and organize a collection expedition to obtain samples from other sources including in the wild. From experience farmers represent a good source of obtaining germplasm samples for these plant groups while market is least reliable. Obtaining from different sources will improve the quality of the study in terms of diversity.
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In cotton, fruit shedding is a big problem. Any suggestion to improve it.
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In my opinion, the elevated temperature is causing sever shedding in cotton growing areas of pakistan. Follow better crop production and protection practices so that the crop may compensate later on......
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I would love to get your input and ideas! Literature about profiles in cisterns or other man made reservoirs (sedimentology) & literature about dung pellets containing mainly pollen is appreciated.
The facts:
- high pollen concentration, moderate preservation, abundant large pollen, high diversity
- high amount of pollen of entomophilous plants like Malvaceae, Scabiosa, Carduus
- many anthers, but also probably dung pellets (compact mass of diverse, partly corroded pollen)
- fungal remains rare, spores missing, nearly no wetland elements
First conclusion: representation of mainly local plants-herbaceous vegetation with the exception of olives, carob trees and very few pines, runoff water transported pollen, rather low contribution of wind pollinated plants (exception: grasses)
Why so many dung pellets? Interestingly fungi growing on dung are until now missing.
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Hi Frank,
I know nothing about the site but I have reason to suspect you are dealing with herbivorous rodents. Some rats have middens like woodrats. Finding dung spores from these would be unlikely since these pellets would have been deposited in a dry and concealed environments. I hope this helps
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Some plants produce echinate pollen, i.e. pollen grains with spines. Spiny pollen grains are known from many species of the Malvaceae, some species of the Convolvulaceae, Cucurbitaceae and Asteraceae. Due to our experimental tests, bumblebees are unable to collect spiny pollen grains, because they cannot compact them in their pollen baskets; we thus hypothesese that spines serve as a kind of mechanical defence against collection by corbiculate bees. My questions aims at other possible functions of spines in pollen grains and observations if honeybees, bumblebees and stingless bees have problems to collect spiny pollen grains.
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Very good ideas and answers about the spiny pollen question! Thank you very much. However, I know already a little more than I told you.
1. Spiny pollen grains adhere very well to the bristles of the bees' body; following a few visits to Althea flowers bees are completely covered with pollen grains. Another effect may be due to the colour and size of the pollen grains, which are visible very good.
2. Bumblebees and honeybees fail to store the pollen into the corbiculae. One idea was that the spines produce a kind of lotus effect preventing the admixing of nectar which honeybees and bumblebees use to store the pollen in the pollen baskets. Another observation is that the pollenkitt obviously does not cover the spines, which means that pollen grains do not adhere together be ymeans of their tied pollenkitt.
3. In a flight cage we have tested bumblebee workers, that previosly collected pollen fronm flowers of a non-target plants, at flowers with spiny pollen: Most of them failed completely to store pollen grains in the pollen baskets. They used thus only two options which were switching to nectar collection or stop visiting the flowers at all. Noteworthy, some bumblebees were able to collect (small amounts of) cucurbit pollen, whereas all failed to collect malvaceous pollen.
4. The oligolectic specialists like Tetralonia nana seem to possess long bristles on the scopa of the hindlegs and collect pollen grains without compacting them like corbiculate bees do.
Our conclusion is that spiny pollen grains train the bees to restrict to nectar collection and help the flowers to save more pollen grains for pollination.
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I am trying to extract RNA from a non-model organism (Malvaceae) for transcriptome sequencing. I have used Nucleospin Plant RNA kit (MN) together with Fruit-mate (TaKaRa), because of probable high contents of polyphenols and polysaccharides.
However, I still have problem getting the 260/230 ratio up to >1,9 using these protocols. Have anyone used this?
  • Adding the homogenized sample to the RA1 or RAP turns everything to glue, that I either have to cut to release from filter-tip.
  • Using fruit-mate turns the material black and the precipitate is still kind of thick. How does your samples react?
Best regards,
Jonna E.
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Hi Jonna,
I am not an expert of this species, so I will just make some very general considérations. Obtaining a very good 260/230 ratio is more difficult than obtaining very good 260/280 ratio. Therefore, trying to obtain a 260/230 higher than 1.9 is maybe too strict, and you could accept values around 1.5-1.6. According to our experience, these values are usually good enough to enable the obtention of good sequencing or array results.
Concerning the other aspects, I would say that CTAB with LiCl, or with Qiagen purification columns, is a good protocol to start with. Another option could be butoxyethanol, it is often added with difficult species. Problems with 260/230 tend to be related to the presence of polysaccharides, salts, etc...
Last thing: if you think you have a lot of polyphénols, use polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP).
Best regards,
Marco
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Its a Malvaceae, closely related to Cristaria(?). From the arid regions of Yura, Arequipa (2700 m, South Peru). The plant is an annual herb (ca. 30 cm) appeared after extreme record rainfall in the dry zones, not seen during normal periods of rainfall. It could also be a morphological anomaly. The flowers have a lenght of 3 cm aprox. Thanks in advance. 
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Where are the petals?/ A complete image would be helpful! Cristaria is possible, but this could also be Palaua or a related genus.
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Hi, can any body tell how to separate mucilage from crude methanolic extracts of bark and leaves of Malvaceae member.?
Is it possible to use the separated non mucilage part and mucilage part for further pharmacological studies?
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I think this can be acheived by  freez drying
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I still do research about mucilage from Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. leaves but i still lack information about its mucilage.I hope people in here can help me to give literatures about it. Thanks all
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There is link to follow publication:
Tomoda, M., Gonda, R., Shimizu, N, Nakanishi, S., Hikino, H. 1987. A mucilage from Hibiscus moscheutos leaves. //Phytochemistry. Vol. 26. P.2297-2300
I hope it will be helpful for you.
Best regards,
Anatoliy Khapugin
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I want to actually identify those species which have been sequenced in this family to enable me to carry out the bar coding of others.
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Have you tried looking to see if any of the relevant species have sequence information submitted to the NCBI database? Use the taxonomy database to determine which species have sequence information associated with them, then further investigate what these sequences are.
Type in Malvaceae in the search box, the click on the nuecleotide check box to determine which species have nucleotide sequences associated with them.
Alternatively, if you know what gene you will be using for bar-coding, search under the nucleotide database using the gene name, limiting your results to Malvaceae only.
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Is there specific elicitors to increase specific compound or a general elicitor is enough to increase all the secondary metabolites? How can one choose elicitors? Is it plant specific, desired compound specific or something else?
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Thank you Mr. Henrick and Gehan amin for your valuable suggestions....