Science topics: Linguistics
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I want to find how the new pattern of language use in social media is affecting the linguistic ecology and how it is changing the scenario.
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Is this possible to preserve the tribal language, where employment directly affects language shifting?
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Yes, absolutely possible. Culture is linked with tribal language.
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English language centers in the non English speaking world assess the English of their teachers and professors by using tests that are appropriate for U.S., Canadian, British, Australian environments. These specific contexts at times do not match the academic needs of language centers outside the U.S. or Great Britain for instance
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I think that the best of these tests is the IELTS test because of the test's ability to distinguish between the language proficiency of the testers
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Non-native English teachers are often regarded as not as competent as native teachers especially when considering their accent, pronunciation and English language abilities : what do you think about this issue ?
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There are a number of books and articles on this particular issue. I would recommend the following as one of the pioneering works: NON-NATIVE EDUCATORS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING. George Braine (Ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum, 1999.
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Dear fellow researchers,
Do you know of any linguistics or applied linguistics journals that accept research letters, short reports, technical notes or similar, in addition to the standard research article? I know these types of article are used in STEM but I am not sure if they are at all widespread in linguistics or applied linguistics. I would be most grateful to anyone who could tell me which journals in the stated field accept these formats and how much prestige they (the formats) currently enjoy.
Thank you,
Chris Turner
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Applied linguistics journals that accept research manuscripts and short research notes or reports include the following (in alphabetical order):
  • Applied Linguistics
  • Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
  • English for Specific Purposes
  • Journal of Language, Identity, and Education
  • Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development
  • Multilingua
  • Studies in Second Language Acquisition
You could go through the attached guide, referenced below, for more insights.
Editors of TESOL Quarterly. (2017). how to get published in a TESOL or applied linguistics serial publication. TESOL International Association: Information for authors. https://www.tesol.org/docs/default-source/books/how-to-get-published-in-a-tesol-or-applied-linguistics-serial-publication-2017.pdf?sfvrsn=686ee5dc_0
Good luck,
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I am doing linguistic research into the songs of a minority language and would appreciate any suggestions of books/papers covering methodologies for conducting such research. I have audio recordings of songs with transcriptions and translations and would like to start detailed analysis. Thank you.
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You are welcome, Jonathan; I was happy to help. Feel free to contact me at any time.
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How do you research and bring work together?
You may use the technique of consilience without knowing it.
Read this definition and then let me know how you use consilience in your work.
Highlights:
In science and history, consilience (also convergence of evidence or concordance of evidence) is the principle that evidence from independent, unrelated sources can "converge" on strong conclusions. That is, when multiple sources of evidence are in agreement, the conclusion can be very strong even when none of the individual sources of evidence is significantly so on its own. Most established scientific knowledge is supported by a convergence of evidence: if not, the evidence is comparatively weak, and there will not likely be a strong scientific consensus.
The principle is based on the unity of knowledge; measuring the same result by several different methods should lead to the same answer. For example, it should not matter whether one measures distances within the Giza pyramid complex by laser rangefinding, by satellite imaging, or with a meter stick – in all three cases, the answer should be approximately the same. For the same reason, different dating methods in geochronology should concur, a result in chemistry should not contradict a result in geology, etc.
The word consilience was originally coined as the phrase "consilience of inductions" by William Whewell (consilience refers to a "jumping together" of knowledge).[1][2] The word comes from Latin com- "together" and -siliens "jumping" (as in resilience).[3]
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Dear Colleague Michael Marek,
Yes, this is so often the case. My husband who is an active observational planetary scientist says how often the "devil" is in the details of data analysis.
Our short story collection, Children of Steel, is being considered by Wayne State UP, BTW. It is a collection of short fiction by people who grew up in steel mill towns. I just noticed where you retired from teaching.
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There is a concept in Soviet and Russian linguistics such as "speech culture" or "language culture" which means possession of the language norm of oral and written language, as well as "the ability to use expressive language means in different communication conditions". The same phrase denotes a linguistic discipline that is engaged in defining the boundaries of cultural (in the above sense) speech behavior, developing normative manuals, promoting the language norm and expressive language means. (wikipedia).
What is the American equivalent for this concept or is there similar discipline in English-speaking or other countries?
Also there is a similar concept but slightly different concept- "speech culture" which is defined as a set of knowledge, skills and abilities of oral and written speech used in a certain situation of communication and in compliance with the ethics of communication to achieve the desired effect in achieving the goals of communication. I need to find a synonym to this concept too.
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In the Arabic language, the term language culture refers to the sufficient linguistic skill and the limited amount of linguistic knowledge that enables the educated person to express in an easy, straightforward and sound language and to know the secrets of the language in expressing the subtle meanings affecting the recipient, such as artistic, aesthetic and creative expression. Moreover, its integrity from defects and its purification from the impurities that scratch the personality of the addressee, respecting it and not underestimating it, because it is the nation’s heritage and history, so there is no good in a nation whose intellectuals underestimate its civilization, heritage and history represented by language.
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Teaching BA classes
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Kindly see also the following useful link: http://ejournal.unp.ac.id/index.php/selt/article/view/6834
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Hi everyone,
I have collected a set of experimental data regarding the strength of a composite material. Besides quantitative data (dimensions and mechanical properties of the materials), linguistic variables, such as the type of composite material, are also included in data as the parameters affecting the material strength. I am trying to use ANN/ANFIS to predict the strength based on the mentioned variables. How is it possible to train a neural system with linguistic inputs included?
Any comments are appreciated.
Regards,
Keyvan
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The collected data of the researchs are heterogeneous which may consist of different representation forms. In general, crisp values, interval values and linguistic terms are most likely to be included. What is the proper way to transform each representationa to fuzzy numbers?
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Dear Dr. Hamit Erdal,
If you want to fuzzify crisp data, fuzzify it based on the nature of data like wether the values are rounded off, or they are ceiling values or floored values. If you want to fuzzify interval data it can be easily taken in the form of fuzzy numbers, let say, for a triangular fuzzy number [a b c], 'a' can be taken as the lower limit of interval and 'c' as the upper limit of the interval and 'b' can be taken as any value in between. For linguistic data let's say you associate young with a professor and young with the postgraduate student then the age of 'young professor' can be expressed in terms of triangular fuzzy number as [30 45 50] years and that of young post graduate student as [16 19 20] years.
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Could someone please recommend a journal that accept very long papers (approximately 50 pages) in language, literature and linguistics? I've been looking through my local publishing houses, and majority of them have very low acceptable word counts (<8000 word) while mine 14,000 words.
Should I reconsider splitting this paper into parts? I don't intend to, but only if it works...
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Would you mind checking MDPI journals
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Should one analyze only one field's abstracts or combine more than one? If combining/comparing is better, which is the most appropriate field to compare with Linguistics/Applied Linguistics?
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It depends on the goals of your study and the research questions. In other words, what are you trying to accomplish with your study? Answering that question will tell you what data sources you need.
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What are methods of elicitation of linguistic data from native speaker informants during field research? and what are its condition for a successful research?
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self-reports
interviews
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Hi everyone. I'm doing a study about the relationship between voice pitch and fatigue. I decided to do the analysis in PRAAT, since it seems the most user-friendly for a newbie in voice research. However, I'm not quite sure what pitch range to use. I was thinking of a pitch range of 100-500 Hz for females and 75-300 Hz for males. Will this be sufficient or shall I set a lower pitch floor in case of a creaky voice?
And is it better to get the average pitch of full phrases or do I have to get the pitch per word? (I want to determine the average pitch of a file of about 15 phrases).
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Yes indeed.. I cite your paper in my own research! Thanks for this
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Hello,
We are working on a review regarding the relationship between language and the mutiple-demand network. You will be responsible for addressing the reviewer's criticisms. Please leave your email address if you are interested.
Best,
W
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I hope you get it... Best of luck. Commenting for better each for you...
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I am interested in knowing what significant contributions to the field of Linguistics have come from various countries around the world. The following PowerPoint traces the history of linguistics from an American perspective, but I need help in finding out the contributions of other countries. Thanks.
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What an unusual question to ask for any science in the 21st century. The scientific project doesn't ask in which place or by whom knowledge was produced. It asks whether this knowledge is sound and reliable. Science stands above nations, states, countries, or an individual researcher's native language. I don't think we should emphasise this betwee-nations/who-has-contributed-what perspective in Linguistics at all - if will artificially create divisions between people where there are none. We are all contributing to the same enterprise.
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Please be free to brainstorm about this topic. The game industry is booming but there is a gap.
Very few games were designed and evaluated for supporting the learning process of students, especially of those with other linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Gaming among children is a way of communicating inclusion and we should respond to that. We can design games with cultural and inclusive elements and portrait the diversity by digital representations.
If you are interested in co-writing an article to provide a guide to the game industry or brainstorm on this topic, please do so. If you are interested to find a funding together with me for a project like this, email me. Kind regards.
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Results indicated that students who were exposed to the game-based learning within problem-solving method, obtain positive effect on cognitive and affective aspects. Through this research, it provided evidence that the use educational games could support and increase the mathematics learning outcome.
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I tried to install Linger but it doesn't work. I'm accepting suggestions for another reliable software for self-paced reading experiments. Thanks in advance!
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Not yet. But I am going to try it :) Will get back to you.
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I want to know the latest linguistic theories, which have been applied to many natural languages. The name of the theory, its most important terms, and some other information about it.
I will be very happy to read your answers.
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As a faculty at a language-oriented university, I have seen numerous scholars in linguistics and world languages are currently looking at or adopting AI (Artificial Intelligence) and hybrid their research into STEM and ICT or even Educational Technology. Language museums have adopted these practical concepts to develop phonetics along with cultural globalization and language policy development. Linguists today have been working or embarking on their archeological and anthropological research projects to protect or conserve minority languages. AI and ICT can articulate their scientific works.
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I am interested to partake in researches targeted at aiding certain speech deficiencies. I have a passion in community work, and being a linguist, I will be willing to participate in works or projects that might require the assistance of an Applied phonologist who can assist speech impaired children. I am currently working on Tongue-tie, among children in Southern Nigeria. Keep me informed if there is any such research I can help out with.
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How wonderful to have you take an interest in applying your expertise to aid people with communication challenges! It would be great for you to pair with one or more speech-language pathologists. I suggest you contact the Speech Pathologists and Audiologist Association in Nigeria:
Of course, if there's any way you could gain your clinical credentials in speech-language pathology, that would be terrific, as there is so much need in your country (as you know, I am sure). There are great programs all over the world for you to consider, and many offer funding.
I note short courses being offered through SPAAN.
These are not courses to lead you to be an SLP but might help you see more connections for your work.
I wish you the best!
Brooke Hallowell
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Following up on the previous question, linguists are still disputing how languages are organized in bilinguals’ minds: whether a speaker’s native and second languages are separate entities or whether they form an entity in their minds. Nobody can deny that both schools had empirical evidence to back up their claims. On the other hand, many linguists argue that the location of the language has little bearing on the production and recognition of words. The relationships between words in the mental lexicon are more important. Do you agree with this viewpoint?
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Given that the issue is the structure and organization of languages in the minds of bilinguals, the location of language in this context refers to whether L1 and L2 are located together or independently in a certain area of the mind. As mentioned in the discussion, there is a considerable body of literature on the topic, but no agreement has been reached. In addition, some scholars claim that this issue is peripheral, as it isn't important to the production and recognition of lexical units.
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Referential and model-theoretic semantics has wide applications in linguistics, cognitive science, philosophy and many other areas. These formal systems incorporate the notion - first introduced by the father of analytic philosophy Gottlob Frege more than a century ago - that words correspond to things. The term ‘2’ denotes or refers to the number two. The name ‘Peter’ refers to Peter, the general term ‘water’ refers to H2O and so on. This simple idea later enabled Alfred Tarski to reintroduce the notion of ‘Truth’ into formal logic in a precise way, after it had been driven out by the logical positivist. Willard van Orman Quine, one of the most important analytic philosophers of the last century devoted most of his carer to understanding this notion. Reference is central to the work of people such as Saul Kripke, David Lewis and Hilary Putnam and many others.
Furthermore, the idea of a correspondence between whole expressions between, sentences or propositions and states of the world or facts drive the recent developments in philosophy of language and metaphysics under the label of ‘Grounding’ and ‘Truthmaking’ where a state of the world or a fact is taken to “make true” a sentence or a proposition. For example, the sentence “Snow is white.” is made true (or is grounded in) the fact that snow is white obtains. [1]
Given that this humble notion is of such importance to contemporary analytic philosophy, one may wonder why the father of modern linguistics - and a driving force in the field ever since the (second) cognitive revolution in the nineteen fifties - has argued for decades that natural language has no reference. Sure, we use words to refer to things, but usage is an action. Actions involve things like intentions, believes, desires etc. And thus, actions are vastly more complicated then the semantic notion of reference suggests. On Chomsky’s view then, natural language (might) not have semantics, but only syntax and pragmatics.
On Chomsky’s account, syntax is a formal representation of physically realized processes in the mind-brain of an organism. Which allows him to explain why semantics yields such robust results (a fact that he now acknowledges). What we call ‘semantics’ is in fact a formal representation of physically realized processes in the mind-brain of an organism – us. [2]
Chomsky has argued for this for a very long time and, according to him, to no avail. In fact, I only found discussion about this by philosophers long after I learned about his work. No one in a department that sides heavily on philosophy of language, metaphysics and logic ever mentioned Chomsky’s views on this core notion to us students. To be fair, some in the field seem to begin to pay attention. For instance, Kit Fine, one of the leading figures in contemporary metaphysics, addresses Chomsky’s view in a recent article (and rejects it). [3]
The main reason why I open this thread is that I came recently across an article that provides strong independent support to Chomsky’s position. In their article Fitness Beats Truth in the Evolution of Perception, Chetan Parakash et al. use evolutionary game theory to show that the likelihood for higher organisms to have evolved to see the world as it is (to have veridical perception) is exceedingly small. [4]
Evolutionary game theory applies the formalism originally developed by John von Neumann to analyze economic behavior and applies it in the context of natural selection. Thus, an evolutionary game is a game where at least two types of organisms compete over the same resources. By comparing different possible strategies, one can compute the likelihood for a stable equilibrium. [5]
Parakash et al. apply this concept to the evolution of perception. Simplifying a bit, we can take a veridical perception to be a perceptual state x of an organism such that x corresponds to some world state w. Suppose there are two strategies. One where the organism estimates the world state that is most likely to be the true state of the world. And another where the organism estimates which perceptual state yields the highest fitness. Then, the first strategy is consistently driven into extinction.
Now, compare this with reference: Some word (here taken to be a mental state) refers to a thing or a state of the world such that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the word and the world. It seems that this is an analogous situation. And thus, it should be equally unlikely that we have evolved to have reference in natural language. Any such claim needs empirical evidence and this is what Chomsky provides.
Chomsky’s main evidence comes from a test. I frame the test in terms of truthmaking. Consider the basic idea again:
  • The sentence A is made true (or grounded in) the fact that A obtains.
Now, if this is true, then one would expect that the meaning of A changes because the world changes. We take a fact to be something that our best scientific theories can identify. In other words we take the objective reality to be whatever science tells us it is. Then we systematically vary physically identifiable aspects of the world and see how the meaning of a term that is supposed to pic out these aspects changes. The hypothesis is that if there is reference or correspondence, then the changes on one side should be correlated with changes on the other side. If this is not the case, then there is no one-to-one correspondence between words and things, and thus, natural language is not related to the physical world.
I give three examples, often discussed by Chomsky, to illustrate how this works: Consider the term ‘water’, embedded in the sentence “The water flows in the river.” Then, what flows in the river should be H2O. Suppose there is a chemical plant upstream and suppose there is an accident. There may be very few H2O molecules left, but it is still a river, it’s still water. So, we have enormous change in the world, but no change in meaning.
Or suppose you put a teabag into a cup of water. The chemical change may be undetectable small, but if you order tea and you get water, you wouldn’t be amused. So, virtually no change in the physical world and clear change in meaning.
Last, consider a standard plot of a fairy tale. The evil witch turns the handsome prince into a frog, the story continuous and at the end, the beautiful princess kisses the frog and turns him back into the prince. Any child knows that the frog was the princess all along. All physical properties have changed, but no child has any difficulty to track the prince. What this suggests is that object permanence does not depend on the physical world, but on our mind-internal processes.
This test has been carried out for a large number of simple concepts, in all cases, there is no correlation between physically identifiable aspects of the world and words. Notice that the test utilizes a dynamic approach. Only if we look at changes we see what is going on.
So, counterintuitive as this may seem, the evidence from the test supports the argument from evolutionary biology that developing concepts that correspond to the world is no advantage at all. And so, we shouldn’t be surprised that this is what we find, once we look closely.
On the other hand, does this conclusively prove that there is no relation between our concepts and the physical world? Not really, after all, the logical structure of language is there, but it suggests that we should look at the mind for a connection between words and the world. If we want to show that language has reference in the technical sense.
Sven Beecken
  1. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/338557376_Ground_and_Truthmaker_Semantics
  2. Chomsky, Noam (2016). What Kind of Creatures are We? Columbia Themes in Philosophy. Columbia University Press.
  3. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/338549555_The_Identity_of_Social_Groups
  4. http://cogsci.uci.edu/~ddhoff/FitnessBeatsTruth_apa_PBR
  5. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/game-evolutionary/
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I'm sorry I can't say anything about Chomsky's claims, but I'd like to try to add a few things to the discussion. Frege did not establish that words correspond to things but that it is possible to differentiate, within the meaning, between sense and reference; that is, "the morning star" and "the evening star" are two expressions that have different meanings (for example, because one alludes to morning situations and the other does not) but name, designate or refer to the same object or referent (the planet Venus). It must be said, however, that in order to metalinguistically affirm that these two expressions designate the same object, it is necessary to assume an ontology according to which what is seen in the morning and in the afternoon is the same thing; that is, when Cicero wrote De natura deorum, alluding to the morning star (Phosphorus, Lucero or Lucifer) and the evening star (Vesperus or Hespero) as two different entities, the Fregean distinction could have been made but not with these examples. What Tarski does - which to me has little to do with this semantic distinction - is to provide a criterion for any definition of truth in the "material" correspondence sense (in the sense of correspondence to extralinguistic reality), using a formula for expressions different level linguistic sentences (for a metalinguistic sentence and an object sentence): "X is true if and only if p", which is typically exemplified by the famous sentence "'Snow is white' is a true sentence if and only if snow is white". However, in the text itself, where he states that "truth" is a semantic term, he refers to "the truth" as if it were some kind of substance or entity and -fundamentally- as if it were the same as speaking of a term or a definition, which in my opinion rather obscures his claims. But, furthermore, since it can also be said " 'Nothing nothings' is a true sentence if and only if nothing nothings", it seems to me that the formula has much the aspect of a circular or tautological logical device and that, most importantly, which is to explain why a "material" sentence is true and what exactly it means to correspond to a fact precisely remains unexplained.
Also -and despite Chomsky's affirmations-, one must not confuse the thesis that natural language has no reference with the one that it does not describe in the material sense (that it does not describe facts that actually exist), because these affirmations are not equivalents. To speak of reference is to speak of language, and only of language. It can be said that a term or a sentence refers and that does not commit one to the affirmation that this referent exists beyond language, that it can be sustained or not. On the other hand, when it is affirmed that a thing exists or that an event occurs, we are not talking about language, but about a part of the extralinguistic reality that is assumed to exist. For example, and given the Fregean distinction, it can be said that the phlogiston theory refers, because the phlogiston theory is language and the reference is a semantic relation: the phlogiston is the object to which it alludes (its referent), and that in her the term "phlogiston" has a certain meaning, and to say at the same time that her affirmations do not describe any fact or any entity of the world (that phlogiston does not exist), and in the first case, from our metalanguage something is affirmed about a language object (the phlogiston theory) but when it is said that there is no entity in the world that is phlogiston, one is not talking about language and, therefore, nothing is being said about semantic relations. Now, the thesis that natural language does not have a descriptive function, or does not describe extralinguistic facts or entities and properties, has been confuted in various ways, fundamentally assuming different assumptions about its nature, for example, by pragmatist, neopragmatist arguments, by those who maintain that languages ​​are acts or actions, etc. In an article on the beginnings of the Vienna Circle, Carl Hempel says that the thesis that there could be a correspondence between language and facts was already rejected because they were things of a different nature between which there was an "abyss". Perhaps a quick way to express it is to say that there will always be an insurmountable metaphysical difference between the word table, with its meaning, and table, and for some authors that means that "correspondence" is impossible. If you want to complicate things further, a Kantian or neo-Kantian might say that correspondence with facts is impossible because at best there may be a correspondence with what appears to us as facts in the mind.
If we are talking about language, reference and correspondence with facts, it can be problematic to offer arguments that speak of perceptions or words as mental states, since there are several arguments that have opposed the thesis of the mental or internal nature of language natural, from the sciences considering that it is a system of (physical) signs that responds to certain rules and is intended for communication between speakers, and from philosophy authors such as Reichenbach or Carnap have considered that it is not mental, and even Karl Popper has been emphatic about it, considering that it is abstract in nature. Another way of understanding it is by thinking that natural language is a collective evolutionary product of a species of animals, that words and meanings existed before any of us, that we have simply learned to reproduce it in consciousness and use it. That is, is this a philosophy of language debate or a philosophy of mind debate? Thank you.
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Sociolinguistics is defined as the study of language in society so as to know how language fulfils in our lives, One of the first branches of sociolinguistics is variationist sociolinguistics that applies quantitative approach to data analysis. Earlier variationist studies were not concerned with statistical methods and tend to relate two or more variables, for instance certain linguistic forms and social class as well as focusing on social variation in language than in regional variation.
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Exactly Dr. I appriciate your answer , i do agree with you
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Dear colleagues,
I'd be grateful for your thoughts on the following contentious issue:
Linguists disagree about the structure of languages in the minds of bilinguals. Some linguists believe a speaker's first and second languages are separate entities in their mind, whereas others believe they form a unit in the mind. This has naturally influenced their explanations and assumptions about the relationship between the first and second languages.
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Neurobiological studies show that adult bilingual subjects have a more opaque gray matter, especially in the area responsible for language functions and communication operations. This effect is most pronounced in persons who have learned a second language before the age of five. The above studies provide an opportunity to suggest that bilingualism, mastered in the early period, significantly affects the brain structures.
Although the term "savant" usually refers to an individual with a natural and / or innate talent in a particular field, people diagnosed with savant syndrome tend to be people with significant mental disabilities who exhibit profound and amazing abilities and / or abilities beyond that which is considered normal, including the ability for languages. State is associated with increased memory capacity, which can aid in storing and retrieving language knowledge. In 1991, for example, Neil Smith and Yanti-Maria Tsimpliali Christopher, a man with a non-verbal IQ of 40 to 70, who learned sixteen languages. Christopher was born in 1962 and was diagnosed with brain damage about six months after his birth. Despite being admitted to a hospital due to the fact that he could not take care of himself, Christopher had a verbal IQ of 89, could speak English without any disruption, and learned other languages ​​with obvious ease. This means of language and communication is considered unusual among scholars.
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In linguistics, literary criticism, and in many other fields of study, the FORM vs. FUNCTION dichotomy is interesting, and fundamental. For instance, in linguistics, this distinction opposes the British and Russian SYSTEMIC-FUNCTIONAL grammars (Jakobson, Halliday, Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech, Crystal, etc.) to the American STRUCTURAL-TRANSFORMATIONAL grammars (Chomsky, Gleason, Fries, Pike, Bloomfield, etc.). There has also been a strong semiotic tradition in linguistics (Saussure, Barthes, Derrida, Eco, Sebeok, etc.) that has claimed that language is ENTIRELY systemic, rather than functional. And recently, I have claimed that language is fundamentally temporal/rhythmic, with rhythmic qualities being the foundational of form. This series of related, but distinct grammars, it seems, gets very close to the essence of things, philosophically. Ontologically, things can be rhythmic, and/or formal, and/or functional, and/or systemic, with the most pervasive things, such as language, being ALL of the above, simultaneously. So my question, I guess, is this: What is going on here? What is the best way to deal with this issue? For instance, the great Quirk et al. COMPREHENSIVE GRAMMAR OF ENGLISH, alternates chapters, first one on form and then one on function. It also has a large section, later on, that addresses discourse, and so things that are more systematic than formal and functional. It also has an appendix that addresses things like prosody and rhythm, and so flushes out all four of these concerns, but in a kind of disjunct, chaotic, if not incoherent, way. In the end, I think, it seems evident that, on these issues, the authors know not what. But they are trying. Oh well.
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interested
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I googled a lot and found some journals but I decided to ask my question here to get the most accurate answer.
can someone please introduce some Q1 free-to-publish linguistic journals (cognitive & etymology related) ?
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You can also search the Scopus/WoS websites (listed below) for the most recent Q1 journals, but you must check each journal's website to see if there are any publication fees.
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Andrew Neil, a TV presenter here in UK has just used a word, ultracrepidarianism, the roots of which are attributed to Pliny the Elder.
ne supra crepidam sutor judicare ‘let the cobbler not judge above the sandal’
The current Covid-19 pandemic has given rise to ultracrepidarianism on a colossal scale, particularly here on RG.
Ultracrepidarianism is the act of giving advice or opinions on subjects one has no knowledge or experience of.
This is all too common on RG and the cause of most of the disputes between academics and scientists who participate on the threads. What is it makes people so enthusiastic about formulating opinions on subjects they know little or nothing about?
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In my case as a Venezuelan internal displaced person with no job, what makes me an expert on the Venezuelan still ongoing crisis (despite I am a physicist) is the lack of real information on what is happening, the need to understand why many of us are very malnourished & we are dying in a country, where 20 years ago, sweet bananas & delicious mangoes were free to take almost in any square. Now there aren't even pigeons, buzzards, fat toads, and lizards in the squares, we ate them all :((
Best Regards.
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I would like to know how each linguistic school of thought studied and explained suprasegmentals.
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thank you very much for your answer, what I would like to know is that how each school of linguistics deal with or think about suprasegmentals (prosody).
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Dear Colleagues,
Has anyone used a composite score based on the LEAP-Q?
I work with bilingual data and I would like to apply a LEAP-Q composite score. However, I have not found any studies that would apply an aggregate score for LEAP-Q results.
Thank you,
Monika
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LEAP-Q is great for assessment of each of the multilingual’s languages, but w/out composite score.
Potential alternative instrument to consider for dominance score:
Bilingual Language Profile, BLP (Birdsong, Gertken, & Amengual, 2012)
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I hope to be entering a doctoral program in 2022, but while waiting, I would very much like to improve my understanding of applicable statistical uses and methods for use in the social sciences. My knowledge stops at coefficient of variation and does not solidly extend to ANOVA and chi-square. Much-needed leg up here in finding a self-paced, affordable, online stat package for social sciences (linguistics in particular). Thanks!
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Excellent! I will follow up on this! Thank you!
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Is not the term anti-Semitic, as it is used today to refer to bigotry against Jews, used loosely and erroneously? “Anti-Semitic” literally and technically means being opposed to someone who speaks a Semitic language (e.g. Arabic and Hebrew). My question is: why then was the term “anti-Semitic” coined in 19th century Germany to refer – rather confusingly – to a phenomenon of hatred of Jews in Europe who, however, did not speak a Semitic language at the time? Do we know with any certainty and rigour how much knowledge of philology and linguistics Wilhelm Marr, the German writer who coined the term “anti-Semitic” in 1879, had?
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The University of Bristol has sacked David Miller, a sociology professor who was accused of making antisemitic comments...
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I have completed my PhD course work and also passed the Comprehensive Exam. Now I want to do research work from abroad. My subject is Islamic Studies. Studying religions, ethics, gender studies and linguistics are my area of ​​interest. Please give me information and guidance in this regard. Can you tell me exactly about such opportunity?
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Salam.
However, I do not know how can I answer such a general question, but as far as concerns to my studies, I have a historical work on the oldest schools of moral thought at the era of the prophet's companions (a Persian book) and also some articles on the same field.
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I’m using Mann Whitney test in a linguistic study to compare the frequencies of a linguistic feature in two collections of texts. One collection includes a lot more (x10) texts than the other one. Ive Read that Mann Whitney can be used to compare groups of unequal size, but the examples usually given are smth like 224 vs 260, not 224 vs 2240.
Can I still use this test? Does it make sense to thin the bigger sample to match the smaller one? They’re both random samples representative of a certain genre, so conceptually i think downsampling is possible.
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There is No need to thin the bigger sample. The test can be conducted on samples of different size.
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Hi,
Is there anybody who is interested in collaborating with a project regarding neuropsychology of language mechanisms. This work would be a review including papers using fMRI and EEG. We hypothrize the the mutipled demand cortex may play an role in language, but its role is more executive rather than linguistic. Leave your email address if you are interested.
Thanks.
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Please have look on our(Eminent Biosciences (EMBS)) collaborations.. and let me know if interested to associate with us
Our recent publications In collaborations with industries and academia in India and world wide.
EMBS publication In association with Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago, Chile. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33397265/
EMBS publication In association with Moscow State University , Russia. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32967475/
EMBS publication In association with  Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology,, Mount Sinai Health System, Manhattan, NY, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
EMBS publication In association with  University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30457050
EMBS publication In association with  Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with  ICMR- NIN(National Institute of Nutrition), Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
EMBS publication In association with  University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth MN 55811 USA. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852211
EMBS publication In association with  University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
EMBS publication In association with  Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30693065
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Publication Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31210847/
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  University of the Basque Country  UPV/EHU, 48080, Leioa, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852204
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  NIPER , Hyderabad, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Alagappa University, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950335
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University,  Hyderabad , India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  C.S.I.R – CRISAT, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237676
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Karpagam academy of higher education, Eachinary, Coimbatore , Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Ballets Olaeta Kalea, 4, 48014 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29199918
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad - 500 016, Telangana, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28472910
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  School of Ocean Science and Technology, Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies, Panangad-682 506, Cochin, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964704
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  CODEWEL Nireekshana-ACET, Hyderabad, Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770024
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Bharathiyar University, Coimbatore-641046, Tamilnadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27919211
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  LPU University, Phagwara, Punjab, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31030499
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Department of Bioinformatics, Kerala University, Kerala. Publication Link: http://www.eurekaselect.com/135585
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Gandhi Medical College and Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad 500 038, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450915
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  National College (Affiliated to Bharathidasan University), Tiruchirapalli, 620 001 Tamil Nadu, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27266485
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  University of Calicut - 673635, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030611
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  NIPER, Hyderabad, India. ) Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29053759
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  King George's Medical University, (Erstwhile C.S.M. Medical University), Lucknow-226 003, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579575
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579569
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Safi center for scientific research, Malappuram, Kerala, India. Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30237672
Eminent Biosciences(EMBS) and  Dept of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25248957
EMBS publication In association with  Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic Diseases, Osmania University, Hyderabad Publication Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26229292
Sincerely,
Dr. Anuraj Nayarisseri
Principal Scientist & Director,
Eminent Biosciences.
Mob :+91 97522 95342
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Studies on information structure have traditionally been made, considering assertive speech acts, since Prague Linguistic Circle. Is there any systematic approach to information structure considering non assertive speech acts, like interrogatives, for example?
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How about the following?
Knud Lambrecht & Laura A. Michaelis. 1998. Sentence accent in information questions: Default and projection. Linguistics and Philosophy 21 (5):477-544.
Happy to discuss it!
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As alluded to in Kissine's (2021) Language paper and others, autistic individuals are egocentric language learners and users, because of “the difficulties in mind-reading that are inherent in the autism diagnosis” (cf. Andrés et al. 2017; Geurts et al. 2020). To compensate, autistic people seem to resort to self-sufficient mechanisms to acquire their grammatical competence and IPC (i.e., abstractly executing pure thought and processing communicative tasks. Cf. Mao 2020; 2021). In this case, what is a proper perspective to view the divergences between constructionists and nativists in terms of language acquisition and its use?
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To Hasan:What is the basic view of Greta Mazzaggioa et al.2010?
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Noticing hypothesis is a theory within second-language acquisition that a learner cannot continue advancing their language abilities or grasp linguistic features unless they consciously notice the input. The theory was proposed by Richard Schmidt in 1990. Interaction, on the other hand, states in L2 acquisition input, intake and output are needed. The question is if noticing hypothesis comes under interaction hypothesis or is it something different?
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Noticing is the first step towards learning (Richard Schmidt)! It is needed in interaction: we need to notice weaknesses in the input and output. When noticing them we can learn and try to overcome them!
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I know this question is difficult as their proverbial or idiomatic status implies that they can only be detected once they have a certain degree of currency in a folk group. Still, do you know of any phrase (idiom, collocation, proverb -- anything) that is at the beginning of its life or might "catch on" in the near future?
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See the attached proverb.
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I have been working in the field of the morphosyntax of child directed speech (CDS) and keep noting that relatively little work has been carried out over the last 30 years despite relatively little being known about the grammatical structure and overall reliability of CDS. Many questions were posed decades ago and remain unanswered. Does anyone have an idea for the reason that this field is not of greater interest to linguists?
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It is an interesting area of research in Linguistics. Though Noam Chomsky has pointed out an internal grammar in his TG Grammar, CDS is to be studied with much care. It is the way by which an adult speaks to the Child and the interesting fact is that the child enjoys and understands the same too. CDS is different from culture to culture, therefore it is necessary to know the patterns they use for CDS. I am from Kerala, India. Here the adults speaks to a child with a musical pattern of talking and even they modulate their voices and diction.
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I am interested in French language corpora of classroom discourse to analyze teacher-student and student-student linguistic interactions in L1 French. Would anyone be able to recommend available corpora that would lend themselves to this type of research?
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Thank you for the reply, Dejan! I am not familiar with the E-CALM project. I will contact Myriam Bras.
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I want to write my thesis sociolinguistically about a new linguistic phenomenon, but the main contribution to my study is to solve speaking anxiety.. my thesis will include a question, after explaining the phenomenon from the sociolinguistic perspective, about "how this phenomenon solve the problem of anxiety">... *MY QUESTION IS: does this type of research refer to sociolinguistics or to Language learning and teaching????
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well it refers to both, but you can shed light on the sociolinguistics field more than the other field.
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The majority of my research involves linguistic analysis. I'm looking for new variables and coding systems to expand my toolkit.
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Take a look here: Analytical Text Programs
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Recently i'm working on a project of sociolinguistics to identify the relationship between social change and linguistic change amid COVID-19.
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a synchronic investigation of language deals with a language or its parts studied as a fixed phenomenon existing at a given moment of time, whereas a diachronic investigation of language concerns the development of language or its parts over time. The synchronic / diachronic distinction was introduced by Ferdinand de Saussure in his Course in General Linguistics (1916/1959) and it is a standard part of a linguist’s conceptual armoury. Among philosophers, on the other hand, this distinction is scarcely known and it is rarely used by them in practice
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I am not a specialist in the field, which is why I am asking this question. My readings have led me to have the impression that the importance of structural linguistics in the twentieth century until the 1960s and 1970s overshadowed a lot of the pre-Saussure thinking on language, especially in Europe. I am looking for specific references that defend this idea or, on the contrary, that would allow me to refute my impression.
Thank you for your help.
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The scene of the 19th century, before the emergence of Ferdinand de Saussure, displayed significant contributions of linguists who studied the psychology of language. The influential linguist of the 19th Century is Wilhelm von Humboldt whose interests, unlike those of most of his contemporaries, were not exclusively historical. He stressed the connection between national languages and national character: this was but a commonplace of romanticism. "More original was Humboldt’s theory of “inner” and “outer” form in language. The outer form of language was the raw material (the sounds) from which different languages were fashioned; the inner form was the pattern, or structure, of grammar and meaning that was imposed upon this raw material and differentiated one language from another. This “structural” conception of language was to become dominant, for a time at least, in many of the major centres of linguistics by the middle of the 20th century. Another of Humboldt’s ideas was that language was something dynamic, rather than static, and was an activity itself rather than the product of activity. This idea was taken up by a German philologist, Heymann Steinthal, and what is more important, by the physiologist and psychologist Wilhelm Wundt, and thus influenced late 19th- and early 20th-century theories of the psychology of language."
For further details, please see the following link:
History of linguistics: The 19th century - Britannicahttps://www.britannica.
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We are Dutch BA students looking for participants for our Thesis survey on intercultural communication. If you are a US-American with work experience we would love for you to fill it out and spread the word!
Many Thanks!
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Myriam Bedoya , this reminds me of a remark I made years ago in Costa Rica when I saw the name of a university called something like "Universidad Americana". I was surprised to have a US-owned institution in the town. My host quickly replied that we ARE americans! I felt stupid and try ever since not to mix up "America" with the United States of America!
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I have a research and i should analyze the types of code-switching. however, i can't use Poplack's theory because my instructor said that it is too old. Any suggestions of new theories?
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Garcia or Cangarajah's concepts of translanguaging might help you.
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I am writing a paper on the linguistic landscape in Palestine and want to publish it. What Open Access (preferably without publication fees) journals accept papers on this particular topic? Would appreciate any suggestions.
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You may also consider Lenguaje, as they have published on this topic in the past. https://revistalenguaje.univalle.edu.co/index.php/lenguaje
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I'm beginning to think that this distinction is not as clear-cut as it has traditionally been taken for granted. Consider the following example: "She may like this one" (uttered by a friend who is helping you find a dress for your girlfriend). Many would say that this is a case of epistemic modality (no speaker's commitment to the truth of the modalized proposition). However, in this context, the utterance of "She may like this one" counts as a suggestion, this notion falling, in my view, within the domain of deontic modality.
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Semantics is long-term and theoretical; pragmatics is here-and-now, practical, applied. There are many different types of context, linguistic, musical, geographical, historical, cultural, etc., and Pragmatics deals with these contexts in terms of HERE AND NOW. Semantics is able to transcend from the here-and-now to deal with these issues in a broader sense. Here is a PowerPoint on "Semantics," and one on "Pragmatics." These PowerPoints illustrate this distinction.
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Hello,
Are there any studies in linguistics about the average information density per character according to language (in the written form)?
Actually, I'm looking for data (rankings, for instance) on the average information density per character (or for 100, 1000, etc. characters) for languages like English, French, Japanese, etc. (in their written, not spoken, form).
Thank you very much.
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I was trying to determine whether there are differences in the frequencies of words (lemmas) in a given language corpus starting with the letter K and starting with the letter M. Some 50 000 words starting with K and 54000 words starting with M altogether. I first tried using the chi-square test, but the comments below revealed that this was an error.
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Did you try Python word count?
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To what extent do you think the use of learners' linguistic landscape as a pedagogical resource for second and foreign language learning is useful?
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Language is culture and culture is language. However, using the interlinguistic approach to teach a foreign language (EFL/ESL) can be used to a certain extend if there are effective results (production of written/spoken discourse) especially if L1 and L2 are cognates (French/English for instance). So all is fair to learn a language.
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Would like show me university that will conduct research about
Language, linguistic, ethnic of culture, women emancipation, human-right,& education research ? I need information about that , thanks
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As language is central to human nature and culture, and is an expression of identity, issues surrounding language are particularly important to linguistic minority communities seeking to maintain their distinct group and cultural identity, sometimes under conditions of marginalization, exclusion and discrimination.
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The purpose of this question is to examine and compare the concepts of linguistic colonialism and cultural alienation in University textbooks for teaching English as opposed to the theories about culture in the decolonial turn. Dichotomous categories were established based on the analysis of the cultural component of texts for the teaching of English. The corpus consisted of six textbooks produced by foreign publishers and used in Colombia during the years 2006-2018. Documentary analysis procedures were used to discuss emergent themed contents in relation to cultural components from a critical perspective that unveiled imperialism practices. Results showed that textbook contents dealt with high levels of alienation burden, superficial cultural components and instrumentation to the submissive person who favors the dominant culture of English and does not offer possibilities to embrace interculturality in ELF teaching contexts.
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Colonialism is a very risky concept in the context you exposé about English. In Latin America, decolonial studies intend to overgeneralize the situation towards minority ethnic groups to other situations. About English, if there could be colonialist behaviors in discourses but I would prefer using the concept of "imperialism" which has more consistent bibliography (Phillipson, Pennycook).
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La diversidad lingüística y cultural está presente en cada país ¿Consideras que en tu país se fomenta la Educación Intercultural desde las escuelas?
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Es muy importante respetar la diversidad cultural en el ámbito escolar y de hecho en este país se realiza ya que en los institutos se imparten como asignatura optativa la religión y puede elegir si estudiar religión católica, islámica, judía...
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I have noticed that most of the linguistic studies tend to the new branches of applied linguistics ,or pragmatics ignoring the basic branch which is historical linguistics!!!!
is it because every thing have been tackled in it? or because of the emergence of new more important branches of linguistics ?
according to me I do believe that historical linguistics still has much to study and discuss.
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Diachronic studies require much deeper knowledge of the subject compared with synchronic research. Refraining from historical studies may be viewed as economy of scholarly effort. Speaking about Germanic historical linguistics, Old English, Gothic, Old Norse may appear incomprehensible for an average scholar. Here lies the biggest challenge for the investigator. But diachronic studies possess incomparable explanatory power, enabling the scholar to answer the question "WHY?' Eg. why there are so many synonyms in English? Answer: because narrowing of meaning has for centuries been the main semantic change in English as opposed to widening, elevation, degeneration, metaphor etc. Why we say 'eleven' and 'twelve', but not 'oneteen, twoteen'? The Gothic language gives the answer. Or where did 'went' come from as a second form of 'go'? Old English gives the answer.
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What program is best for the computer-assisted phonetic comparison of dialects? We would like to compare several phonetically quite close dialects of a more or less well-documented language (with the respective protoforms available in case they're required for comparison). The aim of the comparison is to see how close the dialects are to each other and if maybe one stands out against the others, as well as to possibly get input for solving the questions of how the language and / or its speakers spread across the area where the dialects are currently spoken (within the possibilities, of course).
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Praat could be practically useful for doing various tasks of phonetic analysis by computer.
More info:
Good luck,
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Hello! I am looking for Spanish, English and Chinese native speakers to participate in my final survey for my PhD thesis.
This is the direct link.
Thank you for your participation.
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Interesting
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In fact, I need to know the analytical tools related to discourse analysis that might be used to tackle a literary discourse (precisely poems). I also need the names of the prominent linguists who pioneered the concepts in discourse analysis that are suitable to analyze a literary discourse.
Thank you in advance.
Rafik
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PROJECT
A NEW BOOK ON CONCEPTUAL METAPHOR THEORY BY ZOLTÁN KÖVECSES
Here is a brief description of the book:
The phenomenon known as metaphor is an extremely complex mental event - we cannot capture its complexity if we tie ourselves to existing standard views on metaphor. This book offers fresh insight into metaphor, updating an established theory, conceptual metaphor theory (CMT), in the context of current cognitive linguistic theory, and clarifying many of the issues that researchers in the study of metaphor have raised against conceptual metaphor theory. Starting with an introduction to CMT, the subsequent chapters set out propositions for Extended Conceptual Metaphor Theory, including a discussion on whether literal language exists at all, whether conceptual metaphors are both conceptual and contextual, and whether they are both offline and online. Providing a fresh take on a constantly developing field, this study will enrich the work of researchers in areas ranging from metaphorical cognition to literary studies.
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One of the goals of the scientific platforms, including Research Gate, is to help researchers to update their knowledge regarding the recent developments in research in their area of study. We can help new researchers by suggesting titles or topics for research and in this way we can promote spreading knowledge and it would be another way for connecting researchers all over the world. Moreover, some researchers may co-author some topics as well as brainstorm ideas in their areas. I'll start with some topics that might be interesting for some researchers in the field of "translation" and I expect others to contribute. Thanks a lot in advance for your contribution. And I think you will get lots of thanks from such researchers.
1.Metonymy as a pragmatic style for politeness in religious texts with reference to translation.
2. Naturalness in translation: advantages and disadvantages.
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Definitely we should help each other
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I need recommendations for a course-book for teaching Manipulative Discourse and CDA to BA level students of Translation.
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I would go for one of the books below:
1. Critical Discourse Analysis (2020) by Michael Farrelly (Sage)
2. The Practice of Critical Discourse Analysis: an Introduction (2013) by Meriel Bloor and Thomas Bloor (Routledge)
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I'm doing a research in linguistics. the study is on synthetic speech rate, the participants (30) listened to the speech rate at 4 levels (sentences in normal rate, then accelerated at 10%, then 20%,then 30%) each level had 5 recordings which the participants had to evaluate it's speed at 7 point Likert scale.
the aim of the study is to find out if individuals perceive the normal speech rate as slow or not? also what speed rate would they perceive as the "most normal"?
I figured it's a repeated measures since the same participant will listen to all 4 speeds "levels?" of the stimuli. but I couldn't figure out how to run it or how to organize the data in SPSS
please find attached the SPSS file
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For repeated measures, the HLM is preferred with between-person variables at level 2 and within-person variables at level 1. Hope it would be helpful.
Best wishes
Zhang Zhenduo
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I am looking for any resources which may be useful in a study I am conducting on the impacts that language may have on our perception of crimes. I will be using headlines which convey a particular crime in a variety of lights; one which may appear to justify the perpetrator's actions, and one which portrays the crime in a neutral, non-biased way. I am looking for sources/previous studies which may back up this idea.
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Yes, it can. I would also suggest using CDA methodology. A word's dictionary and contextual meanings may be used as a starting point.
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I am working on school reform. The work is not having the full desired effect. I am trying to do my analysis of this subject under the concept of “organizational stroke.”
In your opinion, why we have not obtained the results we want, in the general and specific terms of reform and studies for the school. ?
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Most people do not realize how hard this is. For a comparison, look at the efforts of Ignacz Semmelweis to get doctors to wash their hands. It took him over 30 years...
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I'm searching for relevant studies on 'Linguistics Interference' (interference at a lexical level - borrowed words - grammatical interference in terms of word order, use of pronouns ..etc.).
Linguistics Interference from\between English & Arabic.
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I need to cross check several words that appear in subtitles of a movie with what is spoken out in a movie - a word in English or Hindi. A list of words in time order is provided. Is there anyone who would have a capacity to help?
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Hi, I am from India, doing research on subtitles (AVT) in foreign language like Chinese, English. If you have done any research on same, may share with me also.
Thank you! @Agata Bednarek
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If I’m looking at language variation, and expecting a gender difference between ‘style’ and ‘content’, and how does that interact with different meanings of a specific terms used by male or female? i.e. one would be more content-ful than the other?
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Jinan F. B. Al-Hajaj Thank you so much! :)
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How to track language change?
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My offering has been in relation to: "The Surname - Where has it gone?"
Has it died or simply become obsolete?
My observation is in the medical context when conversing with patients
Using first names outside of the confines of family and friends creates an erroneous sense of intimacy and social equivalence which seems to pervade everyday professional and business activities but may have some limitations in the patient - doctor relationship.
Guy Walters' offerings in the Nov 2020 issue of 'The Spectator' magazine may be more generally applicable.@
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Could we call published papers from all disciplines as SCIENTIFIC PAPER or just we say it for physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics, engineering, medicine or related things whereas linguistics or i.e. history is same?
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Sometimes, we have a paper that is relevant to many areas. For instance, green technology refers to any technology intended to reduce the impact of humans on the environment; it is related to solar, wind, and hydroelectric dams, to name a few.
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Check out this Call for Papers
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The complex interconnectedness of the playing variables in SLA and/or TLA process does not allow a preference between explicit and implicit instruction. However, through a practical perspective, it seems that FOFs may be the most applicable interface between these two.
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From the perspective of linguistics in general and sociolinguistics in particular what are the affordances of collaboration between linguists and sociologists?
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There is already found marriage between linguistics and sociology in such sociological methodology as ethnomethodology, which considers not only routine practises, but ordinary, daily language. If there will appear more daily life research of celebrities', ordinary or marginal groups, certainly, more marriages between linguistics and sociology will appear.
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I am trying to find some websites that list "call for book chapters" in applied linguistics or relevant areas (linguistics, language education, etc.). Can anyone give some suggestions? Thanks.
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The LinguistList Mailing list has these all the time.
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I am a Postdoc in Linguistics and Communication; and my publication is really thin, so I am wondering if it will be inappropriate to list the following in my CV and publication list:
1) my non-academic book chapter - one about moving to Singapore (I suppose this will prove that migration and cross-cultural topics are my interests)
2) blog articles (some are about language use and PhD life)
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These can be included as publications with a subheading- Special interest. In this way you will be able to communicate work done by you also and though non academic but will be included as publication also.
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What kind of research tools that are suitable to be used in conducting this research topic apart from critical discourse analysis (CDA)
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Hi, Fatin Ilia Ahmat ! To analyse the language behind their reasoning for not reporting, I suggest doing interviews/focus groups among people who have been sexually harassed. It might be difficult to conduct a data collection that requires going to a field work, but perhaps there is a way you can do this virtually?
You can perform discourse analysis, and as you analyse your data, some themes will emerge. You can decide which aspect of language and linguistics to focus on from there. Perhaps narrative analysis if you do interviews/focus group discussions? That way, you can particularly look at their experiences and examine the factors that may influence their decision in not reporting their sexual harassment encounters.
Hope this helps. :)
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Hi guys!
I have a question on a framing effect-like issue. Well, everyone of us has the immediate feeling that there's a huge difference between saying - for instance - "you should respect the environment" and "we should respect the environment", or also "the environment should be respected".
The difference might lie in how such sentences are interpreted by our minds and of course it affects the compliance to the described behavior (i.e., "respect the environment").
I'm convinced that I'm no genius and there must be a huge literature behind such an effect; but I'm not skilled in these themes, so I'm calling for help. Any clues?
P.S.: I know that nudge units and behavioral interventions teams in general promote the "make it personal" magic recipe to increase compliance, but I wonder where such strategies come from. I'm particularly interested in understanding the differences between "you should /we should", that is how grammatical phrasing (i.e., switching the person in the phrase) affects the interpretation and the relative compliance.
thanks in advance for any help
all the best,
Alessandro
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(1) You should do X / (2) we should do X / (3) X should be done — note that this is about deontic utterances, which are performative. They have no truth value but have variable speech act force. That FORCE stems from the authority that backs up the speaker in context. In (1), the back up is, basically: "...because I say so!" = personal authority. In (2), there is a collective morality behind the speaker. And in (3), there is an appeal to rationality, so the speaker speaks in the name of what he thinks is best according to impersonal logics and knowledge.
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Collecting acoustic data during the pandemic faced me with a challenge that I need to overcome. I have to upload some audio files and scripts, and the subjects are required to answer the questions and record their speech to be uploaded. Any information regarding online facilities would be appreciated.
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