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Lifelong Learning - Science topic

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Education seems to embrace the whole life for many, and training is a part or linked to lifelong learning.
Many authors also think that we can not shape someone, but help him or her to give herself or himself his/her own shape.
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Education gives you knowledge, But Training gives you experience.
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What are the differences between adult and child learners with regards to any of the following:
  • learning style
  • information processing capabilities
  • view of the purpose of education
  • ways of utilizing knowledge
  • etc.!
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Adult expect what they are learning to be immediate useful whereas children expect their leaning to be useful in the long run and career.
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In addition, what are some of the most exceptional qualification schemes in use across the world?
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To complete your information, try to look it research artile.
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I am proposing a study to be conducted for an engineering class I am currently handling composed of sixteen (16) individuals. The objective of the study is to determine the enhancement of Outcomes Based Teaching and Learning (OBTL) to the ethical, professional responsibility and lifelong learning competence of the students. I originally proposed a single group design but the examining committee insisted on having a control group. I'm wondering how can this be done since the class is only small and the platform of delivery is online which as I see it poses high risk of contamination among groups. Is there a need to split the class into an experimental group and a control group or is there a valid research design based on the size of the class that will eliminate the need for a control. Thanks in advance for your responses.
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As you don't have a benchmark to measure against you will need to measure one group against another. Thus having a control group would seem to be a good idea. If you are measuring scale data then a t-test can still provide a significant result provided that your effect size is large. However, you should still test its assumptions. Otherwise, if your data is categorical, it is probably wise to reduce it to two categories with approximately equal frequenciees. You can then either carry out a Chi-squared test or a Fisher's exact test. Please see my study guides on independent t tests and the chi-squared test.
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Hello everyone,
Do you have any suggestions for specific theories on lifelong learning or continuous education? What interests me most is lifelong learning in the context of post-graduate students and adult learners.
Thanks!
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Dear Ms. Olmoguez!
You spotted a major point that is absolutely essential in these days of COVID-19
1) Editorial (2020). "Online learning cannot just be for those who can afford its technology-The dramatic shift to online learning as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic risks widening educational inequalities. Nature 585, 482 (2020), 23 September 2020, doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-020-02709-3 Open Access:
2) A case-study: Peter Ainsworth, Tom McKenzie (2020). On the benefits of risk‐sharing for post‐COVID higher education in the United Kingdom, Economic Affairs, Volume 40, Issue 3, 4 November 2020, Citation: "Combining the competitive imperatives of a risk‐sharing system with the accessibility and lower costs of a hybrid (part remote, part in‐person) delivery method has the potential to generate better employability outcomes for a wider share of the population while saving the government money. " Open Access:
3) Lisa M Sullivan et al. (2020). Graduate public health education in the post-COVID-19 era, THE LANCET Public Health Volume 5 Issue 9, Open Access:
4) Sarah J Prior et al. (2020). Delivering a work-integrated learning postgraduate course during COVID-19: Experiences, challenges and strategies, Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development Volume 7: 1–5 , Open Access:
5) International Literacy Day 2020 (2020). let's work together to help to break the cycle. 8 September 2020, © 2020 Emerald Publishing Limited, Open Access:
Yours sincerely, Bulcsu Szekely
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What will be the core research issues of public interest in lifelong learning in 2019?
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I'm not sure about 2019, but I suspect the core issues in lifelong learning in 2020 will be related to the COVID-19 pandemic. I suspect E-Learning will be a strong topic as will collaborative learning in online environs. Maybe topics including perseverance, gratitude and resilience may also be core research issues.
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How can disadvantaged groups "learn" their way up the socioeconomic ladder, and how can advantaged groups "learn" the value of facilitating that mobility?
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Thank you for informing me ! Gosh- I remembered something from 1971-amazing- but I think the ideas are still relevant, salient and germane to our discussion and I think you for bringing these ideas and references up ! I sincerely appreciate it.
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Dear All,
I am writing my dissertation about how kindergarten teachers and primary school teachers promote children's lifelong learning process. I've searched on Scopus, Google Scholar and in our library too, but didn't find any theoretical model on how to improve children's lifelong learning.
Can you suggest me any literature related to this topic?
Thank you very much in advance!
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Dear Ms. Takács Nikolett
that may give you a theretical base for lifelong learning and focus in curriculums that supports lifelong learning and met the criteria for this.
hope that helped you
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I am seeking expert review and feedback on my qualitative research questions. The topic is related to Lifelong learning in nursing programs. If able to assist please let me know and provide contact information.
Tonia Manley
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I can try and help but need more information. I did grounded theory for my PHD on ECMO transport nursing and am clinical, but also have a background of education and practice development. What paradigm, and methodology are you proposing ? need to know this before advising
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As we known, there must be knowledge in lifelong machine learning system. But most of them, the knowledge are implicit (Can't be directly understood by human). So, should the knowledge be explicit? Should the knowledge generated from lifelong learning be shared with human society?
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Yes explainable AI may have high value in several domains.
Explicit decision process is needed where transparency is required.
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Although I am working on NLP, I still wonder how to define knowledge and start lifelong learning in vision field.
NLP based on characters that created by human, so is easy to understand. But vision is composed by pixels, we don't know how we recognise an image. Is there any possible way to explain it?
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A key to understanding how mental representation of images works is the working memory capacity, which is limited to about 7+-2 items.
This limit applies to images, too. Otherwise a person would be able to create a mental image containing additional items. So the basic data structure for images must be a tuple of n symbols (items), n being 1 to 7+-2. How the mental 'renderer' works is a different question.
Regards,
Joachim
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I need the articles for discussing my finding in a research project; I find the findings lacking related literature support. So please if you have articles in the three skils or competences kindly send them to me. email: bdkinyaduka@mzumbe.ac.tz
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Hi Thomas
Thank you very much
Bryson
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In the Research Gate, I see many questions regarding the methods of didactics and its perspectives. There is a platform to discuss these questions – two-day videoconference (with the possibility of remote participation from anywhere on earth). “Challenges and Opportunities in Education of the XXIst Century” (29-30.11.2018) with the call for papers. Information about the conference is here:
The key questions/problems of the conference:
General questions:
1. How will education change within a millennium?
2. How should education change within a millennium?
Exemplary particular problems:
3. New possibilities and dimensions of collaboration between industry and academia
4. Perspectives to use new technologies in education:
- three-dimensional visualization technologies
- interactive programs (for example, Minecraft)
- new media (like YouTube)
- new social media (for example, Facebook)
5. New technological possibilities for remote education
6. Globalization and new paradigms of cross-cultural education
7. The impact of artificial intelligence on education
8. New prospects for lifelong learning
9. Artificial intelligence in education
10. Virtual and augmented learning environments
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Hi Jan! Interesting conference, and innnovative form. However, I cannot find any info about Call for papers and deadlines for submission - probably passed by now?
On the question itself: Curriculum! What should we teach, more than how to be critical? The Philosopher on Information, Luciano Floridi, suggests "the languages of information" as one good suggestion - all from human languages to concepts in sciences to programming languages and the like.
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I want to write my thesis on self-regulated learning as basis for lifelong learning and I am still not sure how to start. Thank you! Kirsten
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I am immensely grateful for the contribution. I will certainly follow the publications and keep in touch for any contributions from you.
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The current international debate at faculties of teacher education about introducing and redesigning learning programmes by including supportive structures has emerged as an imperative for self-directed and lifelong learning approaches. It is clear that emancipating and transforming teacher education programmes for a quality education system needs creative and innovative strategies to empower student teachers for the classroom of the future.
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I agree with Kelli. There is more work in distance education. So we need to find strategies and practices to help students learn and help us give substantial feedback.
Creating a collaborative environment can involve students, instructors and teachers in the teaching and learning process. I think it is necessary at the beginning of courses to teach some self-regulation strategies.
Have a look at this article: The Impact of Self-Regulation Strategies on Student Success and Satisfaction in an Online Course (https://eric.ed.gov/?q=self -regulation + strategics + in + learning & id = EJ1131874).
Best regards.
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I would like to know more about the very reasons why people do involve in social media and online games. Can I get research evidence demonstrating how this media habit can be used to facilitate lifelong learning?
Thanks
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Social neworks are great to expand communication on different topics of ones' interest. They can be used for LLL as people get together and can mutually learn, discuss, ask questions and give answers. It doesn' t need to be formal learning...
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Any one from universities, colleges etc
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Depends on your definition of a sense. How many senses are skin senses? Is pain a different sense than light touch? 
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Improving lifelong learning is an important objective as a result of multiple social and economic implications, given the positive influence, among other factors, on the career development and employment, the individual productivity and competitiveness growth of the company.
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Thank you everyone for the interesting opinions and views about lifelong-learning in SMEs, as well as for the very useful links and documents that you have provided (Phil, Arpita, Sarah, Gabriel, Leonidas, Fatima).
Having in mind the complexity of the “lifelong-learning” concept, I appreciate that everyone made an effort to tackle it from their area of expertise and thus highlighted key areas of this field. On the other hand, I have to elevate Mr. Leonidas who was able to basically give a full literature review on “lifelong-learning” and then pin point its application in SME’s by giving some very interesting techniques of analysis, through game theory methods based on the “win-win-win” perspective.
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Following your answers 
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Thanks Liqaa! 
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I’m working on a funded research project that aims developing an inventory of innovations and solutions in non-formal education and lifelong learning in #ASEAN and #SEAMEO. Therefore, I’m looking for case studies of education innovations and solutions in non-formation education and lifelong learning in some Southeast Asian Countries. It can be any individuals or organisations, either on the supply or demand side that have been successful in non-formal and/or lifelong learning.
Thanks in advance.
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Dear Zakir Hossain,
I hope that these books are helpful for you.
Governance and Civil Society in Myanmar Education, Health and Environment (Routledgecurzon Contemporary Southeast Asia Series)
The Political Economy of Educational Reforms and Capacity Development in Southeast Asia: Cases of Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam
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I'm looking for meaning of the theoretical assumptions of the lifelong learning for adults with intellectual disabilities. 
Would you share a references, authors or inspiring ideas ? 
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 This is a gut level answer - not one based on having thought much before about the concept of lifelong learning, never mind its relationship with disabilities.The first sentence below may indicate that I have taken the concept of lifelong learning pretty much for granted and with too little thought, but here goes.
'Lifelong learning' is just what the term implies - learning for all from the beginning of life until it ends. Such learning can take place both with and without the help of educational systems. At some stages of life, and for some areas of learning some of us without disabilities are more pro-active in learning and some of us need more support and encouragement. Educational systems are there to provide support and encouragement to both the more pro-active and the less proactive. Reasons for needing support and encouragement include different social and domestic backgrounds, attitudes to learning, self-beliefs, prior knowledge and understanding - the list could go on. When people come to our educational facilities with such variations, we have to try and support them as required. It is difficult to generalise what that support should be because it is different for different people.
Gache's contribution I think reinforces that point for those with disabilities.Disabilities cover a wide range, including some we may start life with - autism, for example. Others which may hit us later in life, such as dementia. As Gache points out, the effects on intellectual abilities are very different. However, we have to be optimistic that problems can be solved. There seems to me, (from contact with people working in the field, not direct experience) that progress is being made in how to better support the learning of people on the autistic spectrum - people who in the past might not have received much (or as effective) support and encouragement. From what I understand, that often entails individually tailored support - or elements of that in a more collective setting.
The important point is that the educational systems should not 'write anybody off' as not being able to learn, but should instead seek ways to support them in learning. This will be very challenging at times and we may not always have the required knowledge  of, or expertise in, how it can be done, but that does not excuse not trying and not trying to develop such knowledge and expertise 
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I am looking for subjective and objective factors that could be predicted by an above average disposition towards learning (self-directed learning, lifelong learning, etc.) in adults.
In your mind, what those factors could be ?
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So, I have a question for you, because my current side project is marginally related, how are you measuring an "adults propensity for learning"  What is your population of interest? I don't readily see using an experimental approach, so it will all be observational, correct?  Instead of asking what such a propensity might result in, just ask what are some important qualities that are valued by society or by individuals (it seems that you are having problems here, which makes perfect sense, because there are no obvious outcomes).  So you study those that are either values and or easy to measure, then you'll have to tackle how you present and handle the predictor variables. Also. This sounds like a panel data analysis, so you'll have to address autocorrelatio.  The chicken egg problem can be controlled.  You just don't have a researchable question yet. One (very rich and surprisingly counterintuitive) option is to perform an exploratory study of university professors who are also still publishing.  And see if they possess some unusual characteristics (I can suggest a few, but don't want to bias you)
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Looking for any research on children's with EAL settling in/ transition process from home to nursery. How do we support them in this process as parents or practitioners and by working together. Thanks
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We have just looked at this as part of a wider research evaluation for the European Schools. We were looking at upper secondary but many of our recommendations about language instruction and bilingualism also apply to nursery and primary, I think. One of the key things we found is the need to teach explicit vocabulary and phraseology. I have just today uploaded our final report for the project into my profile which might give a few ideas - it's pretty technical but I think there's some good material in there which you might find helpful. 
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Do you use this approach? What are the opportunities, threats, advantages, restrictions associated with it? We started a combined learning method for adults, which is similar to flipped learning. So I would like to ask the community to share their experience and contribute to the brainstorming.
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Hi Danil. I'll offer my two cents, for what they're worth, and I hope that I might address your concerns. First off, I strongly believe that flipped learning is not wholly reliant on technology. If passive instruction is occurring away from the learning space (i.e., classroom) in preparation for deeper level fortification in the classroom (review, practice problems, etc.), then flipped learning is occurring. Even if this passive learning is no-tech, such as readings, this is still flipped learning, as long as the passive instruction is truly being completed by the students and there is strict accountability for student participation in these 'out of class' activities. Tech is not needed for a flipped classroom to work. That said, the risks associated with using a flipped approach are in its implementation. Poorly implemented flipped classrooms can rapidly become disasters. But when implemented effectively, flipped learning environments become almost magical in their efficacy.
I've just completed a fairly exhaustive study of flipped learning, its requirements and benefits. I'll spare you the details, but the bottom line appears to be that the most important (if not only) ingredients for flipped learning to be successful are (1) effective pre-exposure to background material, (2) individual student reflection on what was understood and not understood from that background material, with appropriate feedback from the instructor, and (3) student application of the background material with instructor feedback provided during that application. That seems to be all you need for effective learning to be possible. Where all of that occurs (in the classroom versus at home) seems to be less important than some of us once thought... What is most important is that it's all done, and done under the supervision of, and with personalized feedback from, the instructor.
I'd recommend you focus on those three components - solid, effective introduction of material, student reflection of comprehension, student application of that material - and you should see some good learning outcomes. But, remember, it all rests on the effectiveness of the implementation. Spend your time and resources perfecting the implementation, and the rest should take care of itself.
I hope some of this helps. And, thanks Leona for the kind words.
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Part of my research concerns the study of self-directed learning (SDL). And in that context, I am very interested in trying to understand better how this field has evolved in the past, and where it is heading at the moment. Thirty years ago, it was common to find articles on self-directed learning in some of the top educational journals. Nowadays, such articles have become rarities, especially outside of medical education. It is as if SDL has almost entirely disappeared from the radar screen, at a time when, paradoxically, more and more learning, at all levels, happens outside formal classrooms. Medical journals still publish articles that mention SDL, but even there, very little research is done about SDL itself; the focus is more on how to train physicians so that they will be able to continue training themselves later on.
I would be curious to hear from anyone on this issue, and especially to hear peoples' views on why SDL research seems to have receded into oblivion. Is it because of the inherent difficulty of the topic, because there is no money at all to study it, because universities are not receptive to the concept, or for some other reason?
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Interesting point you made last, James.  In the years in and after my PhD program at Florida State some 40 years ago now, I watched with fascination how names of important concepts seemed to change overnight -- either professors borrowing from their students' insights and questions or giving us grad students the chance to invent something new ourselves.  
What I think happens is profs over the years expand their research agendas in direct proportion to the creativity and curiosity of their grad students.  They get a following or not and I've seen the prices that were paid when we got the ire of a struggling assistant or associate prof on his or her way to full professor.
Getting the traction needed for practice and policy in my opinion is political and happens through strategic relationships and deals made at cocktail parties or conferences -- with publishers, the media, political figures, etc.  My prof organizations wine and dine these folks to push through new applications of social science research to critical issues of the times like bullying, mental health issues, etc.
The autonomous or SDL learning issue is raising its head higher these days for several reasons.  I believe the most important is the movement toward child-centered, whole child, personalized and learner-centered education models.  Blended learning, open source quality resources for teachers and students are beginning to change the paradigm.
Would you agree?
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I am researching education and training regarding middle-skilled workers and what it takes for them to survive in the work place in the 21st Century.
Please take 3 minutes to complete this 3 question survey.
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Yes! i'm interested in it as my professional interest is in the area of adult professional learning. I should greatly appreciate if you share the results.
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Recently, some teachers and lecturers were told to take charge of our own professional development. We were told to organize our own courses and workshops. How is it with your organization?
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There is very little direction in CPD at my institution and some colleagues actually feel the concept is an insult to their expertise. We do have voluntary training sessions on a number of topics but it tends to be the same people who attend these sessions. At my previous institution were given 2 days per year and each individual was given the choice about what they did during those 2 days. In neither case was the university very directive in regards to what staff actually did as CPD but I have found it is not what the university tells you to do but the value that the university places on CPD that matters. So if your institution can promote the message that it values CPD and that it wants staff to take personal responsibility for it, then I think this can work. But if the university do not project the message that CPD is important then it will not work out. So it's not the system but the value that the university places on CPD that matters.
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The divide of pedagogy and andragogy always felt forced to me. If we are now living in a world of constant learning and relearning, do we need to redefine teaching and learning?
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I was browsing ResearchGate when I saw Erik's question, what a good one! I have worked in many aspects of education and have mostly been working with post Web2.0 models of learning for the past 7 years. Just recently I thought that we had under-appreciated just how much e-learning is an andragogic process, ( not least because I have focussed a lot on heutagogy recently). Andragogy not so much in terms of Knowles narrow definition of "adult learning" but focussing more learning to learn, as mentioned in discussion, through negotiating learning and discussing subjects. As part of the Learner-generated contexts Research group we developed the Open Context Model of Learning in which we talked of a PAH Continuum. That Teaching and Learning exist in a continuum in which learning is co-created, summary here in The Craft of Teaching; http://www.slideshare.net/fredgarnett/the-craft-of-teaching-2011.
So Andragogy as 'brokering' leaning as I call it is more useful in a lifelong learning role as part of redefining the professional skills of 'teachers'
As Vitor highlights in terms of Lifelong Learning and EU strategy we also took these ideas and applied them to the i2020 goals of integrating informal, non-formal and formal learning and developed the Emergent Learning Model (attached), which reconceptualises the roles in teaching and learning, and starts with social processes rather than institutions, which is where we are in 2013. I have developed 2 learning projects based on this Ambient Learning City & WikiQuals, both ongoing and exciting, if very hard work. (See my uploaded paper on CROS & WikiQuals).
Incidentally Stewart Hase (Mr Heutagogy) has a book on Self-Determined Learning, which is what I think we are discussing, published by Bloomsbury on September 26th