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Many people have same question, how to get inactive/discontinued master journal list of web of science? It is very useful in various studies. I'll very pleased, if anybody can help me to get it.
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You can download the JCF from WOS home page.
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There are several journals with varying impact factors. Still we find journals having no impact factor. I want to know whether the impact or importance of a researcher becomes less to a scientific community when he/she publishes a paper in a journal with low impact factor or no impact factor?
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Dear All, I may be old-fashioned, but in my personal opinion publishing in high-ranked and high-IF journal is the best way to make your valuable research visible to exopert colleagues in your field of research. Please see in this context this closely related RG thread entitled "How do you increase the visibility of published article?"
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Do to the development in ICTs, the role of libraries is also changing. In line with this, we need to revisit the traditional Library Science curriculum. What are major major changes expected in the curriculum?
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In the Age of the Internet, the new learning outcomes that syllabuses in library and information services should deliver have to do with (a) learning and innovation skills (e.g., critical thinking and problem solving; creativity and innovation; communication and collaboration; visual literacy; scientific and numerical literacy; cross-disciplinary thinking; and basic literacy); (b) information, media, and technology skills (e.g., information literacy; media literacy; and information, communications, and technology literacy); (c) life and career skills (e.g., flexibility and adaptability; initiative and self-direction; social and cross-cultural skills; productivity and accountability; and leadership and responsibility); and (d) 21st century themes (e.g., global awareness; financial, economic, business, and entrepreneurial literacy; civic literacy; health literacy; and environmental literacy).
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Do to the development in ICTs, the role of libraries is also changing. In line with this, we need to revisit the traditional Library Science curriculum. What are major major changes expected in the curriculum?
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As question raised "What changes do we need in the traditional Library Science programmes?".
There are many things related with this:
"# First of all we need to prepare our course curriculum as per the need of the hours.
# Due to advancement of ICT and it's associated technologies many things have been changed.
# Accordingly users expectations are also changing as per library resources types and formats.
# What I feel, libraries must focused on new technologies which can boost up the library activities as well as services.
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Due to the development in ICTs, the role of libraries is also changing. In line with this, we need to revisit the traditional Library Science curriculum. What are major major changes expected in the curriculum?
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Dear Prof. Lessa!
You raised a crucial issue! COVID-19 forces academic libraries to take into consideration open science, and supply chain open innovation:
1) Belli, S., Mugnaini, R., Baltà, J. et al. Coronavirus mapping in scientific publications: When science advances rapidly and collectively, is access to this knowledge open to society?. Scientometrics 124, 2661–2685 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-020-03590-7 Available at:
2) A case -study Muhammad Rafiq et al. (2021).University libraries response to COVID-19 pandemic: A developing country perspective, The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 47, Issue 1, January 2021, Open Access:
3) A webinar on the BrightTALK - platform - a free of charge portal to join:
b) The webinar: Professor David Baker, Dr Lucy Eliis, Diana Chan,Caroline Williams, Melissa Fulkerson (2020). COVID-19: The Future of Digital Information for Libraries - Partnership, Supply, October 27, 2020, available on demand, further details: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/18191/450620/covid-19-the-future-of-digital-information-for-libraries-partnership-supply
Yours sincerely, Bulcsu Szekely
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I want to make a tool that indexes a wide range of newspapers and then allows you to search for articles based on certain attributes.
How do newspaper indexing databases usually work? Do you have to ask the various newspaper for permission to index their content? Do they offer an API? Or do you have to build some kind of scraping tool, to generate the article abstracts yourself?
Thanks very much.
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You may need to follow the same living systematic review. A review that is updated as soon as new information becomes available
more information are listed here
The online link for
Living Evidence on COVID-19
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Hi there,
Is there a way/tool/ search engine that would allow me to search for multiple variations of the same phrase at the same time?
For example, I want to search for "revealing his true belief". But I also want to search for all the phrases that have the same or similar meaning like"betraying their real opinion".
The total number of words here is 8 but there are many different ways to combine the words so there are many different potential alternative phrases: "revealing his true opinion" "revealing his real opinion" "betraying our real opinion" etc….
Is there a way to accomplish this in two conditions?
1- I determine the alternatives. So I specify that for "word 1 word 2 word 3 word4", the alternatives for word 1 are: Only revealing or showing.
2- Use all the possible synonyms or even antonyms for "revealing" in word 1.
A very useful tip I got is the use of asterisk so "revealing * true opinion" would yield "revealing your true opinion" and "revealing their true opinion".
But for some reason when I combine two quotations with each other with OR, some results are omitted. For example, "revealing * true opinion" OR "betraying * * real" yields results for the latter quotation but not the former even though the former would generate results if it's on its own.
Regards,
Hashem
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Thesaurus.com would be a good partner/resource if something like this would be developed from scratch.
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I want some information about the Korean public library for a part of my project.
would you mind helping me?
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Sir
The article "Libraries in the Republic of Korea" written by Margaret Adolphus may help you and here is the link https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/archived/librarians/management/viewpoints/korea.htm
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Due to the spread of Coronavirus, what is the role of libraries as information centers? or what services, actions, and activities can libraries perform? Please share your experiences/comments.
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Providing informative leaflets and signposting to encourage handwashing and public health guidelines
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When I use Hiscite to analyze the retrieved results, it shows that the 356 items I've searched for are totally irrelevant, which seems quite unlikely. I noticed that the LCS column of these 356 items are all "0" (Capture1), and the export buttom of "including the references cited" are missing (Capture2). So I was wondering do they stop providing the service of Hiscite or is there a solution in this case?
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Here includes a download of the software. It is no longer in development, but according to a people a few years ago above, it was working then. https://support.clarivate.com/ScientificandAcademicResearch/s/article/HistCite-No-longer-in-active-development-or-officially-supported?language=en_US
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Hello i am keen about being a co-author on any library science and library related topic.
Thanks
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I am also available for collaboration. Just let me know your specific research area.
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We have just implemented an application that will enrich worldcat records with keywords and abstracts that we have in our local systems, concerning certain OCN’s.
This works quite good, except for abstracts that contain non latin1 characters. Being a life science library we offer abstracts that contain scientific characters. When we enter these manually, using record manager this is no problem at all. Just works fine.
When we use the meta data api to do exactly the same, we get an error response saying “The data must use valid Latin1 characters”.
To make sure we are offering UTF-8 we have explicitly said in the http PUT header, that we are offering UTF-8, but this does not help.
Does the metadata API validation not accept UTF-8 at all or is there another way to tell the api we are sending UTF-8 ?
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No
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Dear RG community,
I'm currently working on a literature review and I'm looking for information literacy conceptual frameworks and standards. I'm looking for contribution proposed in the scientific literature in information science (or related fields) or proposed by educational institutions or information professionals institutions (e.g SCONUL, ACRL...). I'm interested in any contributions that defines/describes the nature/scope/levels of competences/skills/knowledge/etc...that should be mastered by individuals to be "information literate". I'm also interested in any contribution from other fields (e.g media literacy, digital literacy...) if they are related in some ways with questions of human-information interaction. I'd like to discover contributions from any country if an english/french version is available.
Thanks in advance for your help,
Jerry Jacques
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If scientists got some money, what they will do with it?
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Research in comfort
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How we can evaluate the performance of libraries? Is this topic related to commerce or library science?
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Before you can evaluate performance, you need to identify big-picture goals for the institution, followed by objectives that structure the goals into measurable objectives.
I doubt that all libraries have identical goals and objectives, so it is hard to generalize.
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I’ve just been thinking about where library science has been, where library science research is today, and where library science research is heading in the future.
I wonder what big problems have been solved, what big problems are we working on today, and what problems can we dream to solve through future library science research?
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Library Science is the study of librarianship. The future of Library Science is simply digital libraries where information can be stored and retrieved electronically; where there will be no access to brick-and-mortar libraries.
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Open science is advocated by science funders, policy makers, and increasingly scientific communities. Yet, it seems there is little research on the effects of making data and code available, publishing open access or reaching out to the public (e.g. citizen science).
Do you know of studies that measure what effect open science practices have within academia (e.g. increase in citations) OR outside academia (e.g. commercial use of data)?
Please help me collecting hard evidence for the assumption that "open science" is in fact beneficial for scientists, science, and society at large.
Any source recommendations, studies, grey literature on the topic would help.
Thank you very much!
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Have a look at scientific productivity, internationalization and impact of open science. My former collegue now works at DZHW and does research in bibliometrics --> Aman, Valeria (2016). How collaboration impacts citation flows within the German science system . Scientometrics. doi:10.1007/s11192-016-2092-1 She might give you some pointers
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While digital libraries have information systems as subsystems inside them, their behavior may not be of an information system. If this claim is true, then we can not assess the digital library using methods that are useful for IS, like CSF(critical success factor) or TAM(technology adoption model).
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Digital libraries are information systems with input/process/output functions.
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How does your library (or institution) deal with foreign language information (as well as bi-, tri-, multilingual materials and resources) in terms of organizing it? Have you had any issues? Have you found solutions? I would most welcome a discussion, anecdotes, and pointers to the instructional materials on these issues or sources for standards and best practices would be most welcome. Thank you!
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There are a number of points in the life cycle where challenges manifest, notably acquisitions and cataloguing. Different institutions have strategies in place to cope with the challenges. But the common fail point I am most interested in is the Web catalogue. The basic principles of Web internationalisation have been available since 1998. Yet most library catalogues fail. Thsee failures also tend to be failures of a number of Web accessibility sucess criteria.
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Since academic libraries are considered non-profit organizations, one needs a special way to evaluate this kind of a library. Any suggestions ?
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Libraries often conduct surveys of their users to determine their satisfaction with
library services, either overall system or with specific types of interactions (interlibrary loan,reference, etc.). The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) sought to develop LibQUAL+‘,  a research and development project in collaboration with Texas A&M University and with financial support from the U.S. Department of Education's Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education for defining and measuring library service quality across institutions and creating quality-assessment tools for libraries.
This tool uses a web-based method of administration and analysis to ease the burden of administration locally and creates a scaleable and replicable protocol. It also makes readily available large normative data on user perceptions and expectations of library service quality.
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I am scoping a potential research project based on the library of Dmitrije Mitrinovic and his circle, which is held at Bradford, following on from the recently completed cataloguing of his archive.  The library includes complex multi-lingual annotations and other engagements with books as artefacts, which we believe will offer further insights into Mitrinovic's work in politics and culture.  Most of the books are mainstream C19 and C20 titles from standard publishers.  Has anyone worked on similar annotated libraries?
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That is an interesting question. I think there is an important bibliography on the topic of annotations; you will find it here:
Doing Digital Humanities: https://de.dariah.eu/bibliographie
And perhaps you will find further information here:
Mapping the Landscape of eReseach:Text - Image - Annotation
Best regards
Anne-Katharina
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How to set up a commodities collection - books, ebooks, journals, ejournals and databases - in a business library?
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Hello Balbinder, Are you looking to identify a classification scheme to manage these resources ? It would be helpful to know.
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I just looking for the comprehensive definition of embedded librarian. Please share include the information source/references, Thank You.
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Hi Thoriq, find here a list of relevant literature.
Mónica Marchant
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Libraries work in this direction
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We are not digitizing newspapers in the library I work, but I know that the National Library of Austria does it (see http://anno.onb.ac.at/ ... I'm afraid the page is only available in german language). If you need more Information, I'm sure the collegues over there will answer your questions.
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I am wondering how others use Bruce's informed learning approach to information literacy in their instructional work/programming. This could involve using one of the models that are part of informed learning, such as the 6 Frames of IL, or GeST Windows, or something more holistic. 
Bruce, C. (2008). Informed learning. Chicago: ALA.
Bruce, C. S., Edwards, S. L., & Lupton, M. (2006). Six frames for information literacy education: A conceptual framework for interpreting the relationships between theory and practice. ITALICS (Innovations in Teaching and Learning Information and Computer Science), 51(1), 1–18.
Lupton, M., & Bruce, C. S. (2010). Windows on information literacy worlds: Generic, situated and transformative perspectives. In A. Lloyd & S. Talja (Eds.), Practicing information literacy: Bringing theories of learning, practice and information literacy together (pp. 4–27). Wagga Wagga, N.S.W.,: Centre for Information Studies, Charles Sturt University.
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Hi '
It seems that a library or library systems are organizing their training according to actual needs rather than according to training theories. It could help a lot if the existence of informed learning models will be brought to their attention.
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I read an article within the last few months that mentioned that RA recommendations that don't match the patron's needs form a barrier to future requests for service.  I cannot find this article again.  Does it ring any bells for anyone?
  1. The mention about incorrect matches was a paragraph or two at the most, not the main thrust of the article.
  2. It would have appeared in a trade publication or professional magazine or journal related to libraries.
  3. The scope of the article was about general Readers Advisory, probably specifically in public libraries.
  4. I read it in August or September of 2015, but it may have been published anytime within the last 5-7 years.
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Thanks, Keren.  I feel like what I read was a published article (I think I remember reading it in print) and I want to say there were statistics from a study included to support the  statement.  If you know of any articles that talk about this topic and include a stat, can you suggest them?  thanks!
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Research library services that strenghten the library position within the organisation.
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I think the answer varies from library to library.  In academic libraries in the United States, the key factor at the moment is information literacy and our role as teachers of information literacy.  I still believe other services, such as reference, are also important, but that requires more marketing these days because users think that Google will provide whatever information they need.  Whether any of our services is sustainable depends on budget.  As libraries are "cost centers", we must market to our administrations as well as our users in order to ensure we have the resources to provide whatever services we deem critical for our institutions.
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Hello,
I think an example would be the easiest way to be clear: if I were to go to the URL (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26644394) and then want to have an excel spreadsheet - or I can go outside excel, though it is my comfort zone - auto populate with certain portions of the page, how would I do it/set it up? For instance, I might have a column for pubmed ID (26644394 for this paper, it is in the URL or also always re-listed in the bottom left hand side of the Pubmed page for each entry), another column for the full title of the paper, another with author names listed, one with year published... and maybe things that would require 'clicking' such as under the drop down 'Author information' section or maybe the full name of the journal (note that the URL gives the abbreviated name, so that might be complex/require matching the standard abbreviation the Pubmed URL lists to a database at a different URL and taking the full name from there).
The desire is that I could automate the process so I only specify the pubmed URL and the other entries automatically populate. Many programs do this for certain entries so I am sure in principle it is not difficult, but I don't know how to do it so that the specific information the user wants is easily generated - rather than a pre-set version from a program like Mendeley which might simultaneously generate more information fields than you need while at the same time not collecting certain information you'd like - once you set up the initial protocol.
Does anyone know how one might go about this - Excel or not, and requiring a software download or other work around, this would be really helpful to me and perhaps other users on this site. So thank you for your suggestions!
Please have a good day.
PS - if you can figure out how to also collect total number of citations a paper has, and the impact factor of the journal at the time the article in question was published, i.e. through a workaround via a separate source, that would amaze me and I would appreciate thoughts on that too! Thank you
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My http://bibliometri.wikidot.com/bibliometry-toolbox includes a number of programs able to convert tagged file formats to TAB-format, including PubMed's MEDLINE-format:
The page is In danish, but Google Translate makes it readable. Please contact me, if you have any questions or suggestions for improvements.
The most recent version is:
Program: MEDLINE to TAB - extracts and compile the following datafields:
PMID: PubMed-ID - searchable in SCOPUS og WoS (Advanced search)
DP: Date of Publication - for both e- og p-version, e.g.: 2015 Mar; 20141017
AU: Full author name(s) (if available: FAU)
TI: Article title
DE: MeSH-terms
DT: Document type
Source: Full journal name, volume, issue, pages and/or article number: JT VI[IP]: PG
ISSN: all ISSN's in record
AID: article-DOI
AD: Collects all (full) author names + all affiliations: Format: First author (full name) ¤¤¤ Affiliation 1 === Affiliation 2 (if present) /// Second author (full name) ¤¤¤ Affiliation 1 === Affiliation 2 etc.
AB: Abstract
TT: Article title in original language (if not american-english)
The program "SCOPUS PMID Search" and "WoS PMID Search" creates search profiles for any number of PMID's if you want to colllect citation data from these sources.
Please note, that the programs will crash if you try to overwrite your input-file
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i want to compare some countries published articles on the issue of library and information science from scopus database. so how can extract this information?
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Hi Ali, you will have to perform in Scopus a query with keywords and country affiliations in order to get such data. If your institution does not have a subscription to Scopus, you might want to check SCImago Journal and Country Rank website, which you can access with no charge in this URL http://www.scimagojr.com/countryrank.php
SCImago might give you some indicators based on the sources indexed in Scopus. Hope it helps.
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Dear colleagues, These days I am reading my Ph.D. I need to read some existed literature about methodologies, criteria selection procedures, and model setting about Library ranking systems before start my proposal on "Multiple Criteria Decision Modeling for Library Ranking". I have limited access to some databases. therefore, needed your help asap. Thanks a lot.     
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Hello Saman,
If I understand your query, you are looking for criteria to rank libraries. There is not much in the literature, so your research is worthwhile. You can adapt this criteria used from this link: http://www.libraryranking.com/rankingsfulltext.html
Another credible source is to use library performance indicators based on ISO 11620:2014. Please check this link: http://www.iso.org/iso/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=56755
All the best, Kwasi
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I'm organising 2 events (half day seminars) for International Open Access week and have read some literature around evaluation.  I'm hoping to publish my findings. Specifically I'd like to measure whether the seminar 1) increases peoples awareness of OA and 2) influences them to promote OA in their organisations.  I'm also interested in demonstrating that collaborative events between the academic & health sector leads to better outcomes.  Any advice appreciated.
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Hi,
The SurveyMonkey service offers evaluation forms that you can convert according to your desired purpose. The link is:
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My research purpose to measure the relationship between the implementation of knowledge management on the academic libraries with the librarian's communication skills. I read some books, they were to general to describe 'knowledge management', I just looking for the indicators of 'the implementation of knowledge management specific on the academic libraries'. May be any one can help me? Thank You.
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Dear Thoriq
These sources were of particular help for me:
Borgman, C. L. (2007). Scholarship in the Digital Age. MIT Press
Borgman, C. L. (2003). Personal digital libraries: Creating individual spaces for innovation. NSF Workshop on Post-Digital Libraries Initiative Directions, June 4, 2003.
Glushko, R. J. (2013). The discipline of organizing. MIT Press.
for the Journal Article below.
Regards, Ulli
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Do libraries have a future? Is there a role for librarians?
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Yes libraries have a future but the image must be transformed to meet the expectations of the user.  Each entity must seek to build its own brand.  Libraries must realize that they are in the business of educating.  Libraries equate to education/research.  The traditional librarian is now the information specialists/research assistant  and the title involves more than the traditional concept of sitting at a desk and shushing the public.  One must be savvy with the use of technology, research and the gathering of information.
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I'm setting up a digital archive of the hardcopies in our library archival collection, which were donated to the library over many years. I'm currently writing a paper on this activity.
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Thanks for your responses Shabir and Enrico. To communicate about your research is a stimulating therapy - it motivates and directs. The possibilities are endless and hereby lies a decision to be taken. Which is the most prominent material in the archives and what interests the researcher most? The Librarian/ Information Scientist/Archivist is exposed to a wide field of information - I'm lucky to be an 'Architecture'-librarian with a given subject. It takes focusing on a particular topic to narrow it down. The 'Ariadne's thread' (thanks Enrico!) even if it lead to a different 'lover' - it provided direction to the searcher. Yes, I understand :)
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Sometimes we found difficulty to breakdown the theory into the points or indicators. Then the indicators will be arrange to be a questionnaire. The fastest way to solve it only use the similar past research questionnaire, but sometimes the questionnaire was not appropriate with the current condition. So I would like to ask, is it possible if I improve the the research instrument from the past research to adapting with the current condition?
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Yes, it is possible but it wll be easier for you to look at your conceptual framework and construct your questionnaire from there. The questions that you will ask in  your survey instrument should provide answers to the questions in your research.
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Do you know examples of libraries that serve the youngest children? I'm currently researching European libraries and every answer about places and literature would be very helpful for me.
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There's also a Bookstart program in the Netherlands. Its effectiveness has recently been investigated, leading to a PhD dissertation at Leiden University:
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A few years ago S. Nicholson and J. Stanton defined "bibliomining" as "application of DM tools to large amounts of data associated with library systems". I'm looking for implementations of this concept (from the last 10 years): information about research, projects, tools, algorythms etc.
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Thank You Haleema for your answer. I found some literature, more of them is listed in my other Q&A: Look for 1st link for details.
A few days ago I get information about experiment provided by my colegues from PIONIER Network Digital Libraries Federation (Poznan, Poland). Look for 2nd link for details
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Subject analysis is a fundamental and cruicial step in the identification of  the subject of a work or resource. What steps are part of the subject analysis process? What cognitive aspects are included in subject analysis by the cataloger, indexer or classifier?
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To this question:  What steps are part of the subject analysis process?
In my experience, the cataloguer must read and revise the content of the work to define the main and related subects, as well as those which must not be included as a subject.
 On this other one: What cognitive aspects are included in subject analysis by the cataloger, indexer or classifier?
Let's consider first that: "Cognitive processes (which may involve language, symbols, or imagery) include perceiving, recognizing, remembering, imagining, conceptualizing, judging, reasoning, and processing information for planning, problem-solving, and other applications" (Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology, 2001); then, in order to comprehend the activities for these 3 different type of jobs, we need to understand that those three are conducted to a similar end: organize one or several collections of information sources in order to be used for a specific type of patron that may look and retrieve it.
In one hand, the cataloger and the classifier usually work for a specific collection, both have to think in which "space" those different sources will be arranged, so, the users know how to locate things easily. In the other hand, an indexer must to think the best way to represent the content in such way there's no way to misplace the source.
The three of them needs to create a learning curve on which they will depend how to apply the decision to asign certain subject or category. Also they need to define the importance on any given subject, depending the community they are serving. For those decision-making process the cognitive process to recognize and judge are essential but in the case of the indexer, they also need to think in the technical implications that are involved to recover the contents when a subject or category is applied. So, the imagination as a cognitive process is involved as well as how to mix conceptualization among different lines of knowledge.
For sources like academic articles it is easier when the autor display the main subject ideas on his /her document. But even in those ocassions, there are many other factors that might influence in the final decision to which subject word is the best when cataloguing or indexing.
I hope  my ideas are well explained. All of the mentioned above are based on my own comprehension on the matter and my experience in the area.
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The question is regarding library classification systems, like DDC, UDC, LoCC, etc.
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Shifting sands of change---->knowledge changes------->the science of classification changes----->the techniques proposed need to be at its very frontier; moving away from indexing to Big Data mining techniques/latent pattern extraction: the future of classifying for the classification of knowledge (library science)... fellow RG resource/work
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For example through the circulation statistics and through questionnaire. 
but both of them have limitation, like many library do not have LMS Software especially in India, to get the circulation statistics, and majority of the libraries do not maintain the "inside use" of books statistics.
for questionnaire how to chose the right user to get right feed back about the library. pls comment.
if any one of you have done a study on use of library resources, pls share it will be a great help
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Hi, the first tool that comes to mind that my library has used and what many U.S. libraries use is the LibQual survey instrument:.  If you're not familiar with it, it is similar to Servqual, (now called Rater or the Gap Model) which compare service quality performance with customer service quality needs. While Libqual looks at service quality in Libraries I belief you are able to survey library patrons about use of different library resources. I'm not sure if this is what you're looking but, take a look at the link to see if this tool will meet your need.
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Topic Maps (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topic_Maps) have three main elements: Occurrences, Associations and Topic). Its tree like structure connecting nodes with its related sub nodes.. 
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During my research study, i worked on application of concept maps and information visualization to enhance user experience over DSpace by using comparing many tools such as VUI, SpaceTree, etc. A prototype model also build on this.
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Having moved from a large to a small library I wonder about the effectiveness in terms of resources of face to face information skills teaching. Is there a better way? Is the concentration on teaching a distraction form the real business of delivering a Library and Knowledge Service? Do you agree? 
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I have noticed that those who have little experience in using a variety of search tools and databases struggle with longer sessions. Short, problem specific sessions are certainly good and always appreciated. Drawing together different search strategies in a longer session can leave the less experienced students confused. When students are travelling in for a session you try to make it worth the journey with the risk of overloading the student.
Is anyone doing enquiries live online, skype or adobe connect for example?
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I am particularly looking for role of libraries in not just preserving indigenous knowledge and but also helping the original people of the land to benefit from it.
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Queensland State Library has done a lot of work in this area.  Have a look at  http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/resources/atsi
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We maintained our library catalogue with Koha. We would like to catalogue open access journal/book in our resources so that users can access online all records through our OPAC. Can we add all open access journals/books in our library catalogue? Is it any copyright issues on this act?
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Metadata is not protected by copyright law. So you can catalogue every item, those still under copyright as well as those out of copyright protection.
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One of the challenges of writing strategies in small (health care) libraries is being able to look outside the library and see what forces might shape the Opportunities and Threats we face in the future. In other words the PEST analysis (Political, Economic, Societal and Technological factors) that underpins the strategy writing process. What are they and by what mechanisms do they effect our services? This year I have been brave and put it in a public space in the hope of constructive criticism and inspired contributions. See the link below. Note that there are some factors here that may have a geographic / cultural context for the UK.
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It seems to me that one of the most important issues for small health care libraries - and I'm thinking hospital or clinic - is the tension between high-tech and high-touch.  Many organizations are  moving to centralize services within a larger organization (eg: a health authority) and supply them in e-format, instead of having small libraries.  In health care, much of the content is available electronically, so high-tech seems to be the the most sensible answer.  However, we also know that most health professionals are time-starved people who work in a world one-on-one contact and at some level value that kind of service for themselves.  They love high-tech when it works, but when it doesn't they want to talk to a real person who can fix the problem and get them what they need.  
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Please advise the program for WinOS as a file manager that allows to create and store groups of downloaded papers and other references, so that it was possible to group them on multiple labels (tags)? Eg, sort by the author, and other categories: theoretical works, experimental, a methods like A, a methods like B... . The folder tree structure allows you to group only by one parameter. But ideally, I would like to do more than 10 categories.
I think, any databases allows to do that, but maybe exist simple solutions specialized for researchers?
I see there are a large variety of solutions
first of all, I need:
  • quick and easy access to the already downloaded papers that are in folders on my PC (multiple PC?)
  • grouping and sorting them by label
  • the ability to quickly export citations to bibTEX
  • convenient access to citations for each paper in Google-scholar
What programs do you use?
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Hi Nikolay, 
maybe www.mendeley.com would be something for you. I am using it myself and it helps organizing the papers. However, it does not track any citations. 
Best wishes, 
Kosta
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How can one specify the number of remote electronic resources in the annual report of the library? In what units is this measured? Do I need to add their numbers to the total library collection?
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If the library budget pays for electronic resources, and they're made available from the library/information services website or VLN, then they ARE part of the library collection.  You need someone to administer them, monitor stats, and train students and colleagues in their effective use. For information searching, you can't beat a professional librarian!
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Most student in library science field came up with such question.
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Pl. find out the survey conducted on readership survey in your country.
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I am interested in articles on the history of LIS studies - especially in Spain and Poland.
But also in European countries. Do you have any brilliant suggestions?
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Dear Professional,
Please find some information in the book details are given in below: 
Bibliographic information
QR code for Historical Studies in Information Science
Title Historical Studies in Information Science
ASIS monograph series
Editors Trudi Bellardo Hahn, Michael Keeble Buckland
Edition illustrated
Publisher Information Today, Inc., 1998
ISBN 1573870625, 9781573870627
Length 326 pages
Subjects Computers › System Administration › Storage & Retrieval
Computers / System Administration / Storage & Retrieval
History / Reference
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IS SciVerse Scopus and Scopus Indexing are same? If not how to check wheather a journal SCiVerse Scopus indexed?
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Most repositories provide statistics on the number of views and/or downloads of papers.  Some, like those using the Digital Commons software as platform, also support altmetrics.  I am interested to know which subject repositories, offering this functionality, are preferred/used .
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In addition to the excellent examples which Stacey has provided, I would add that currently in Australia altmetrics is a very hot topic. And not just because Heather Piwowar (Impactstory)is doing a national speaking tour ;-) Many of our university libraries are discussing how to add value to our institutional repositories by providing statistics based on altmetrics. Some, such as Queensland University of Technology, provide these: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/46920/
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This BBC reportage (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-27281414) says a London (UK) school has 600 children with 42 different languages among them. Is it that unusual? It made me think of a local Canadian public school which I personally witnessed (as a parent). The school is also amazingly multi-cultural, perhaps on a smaller scale (around 250 kids and fewer languages). I'm sure in other countries there is no less diversity, even with a single (official) language as a common denominator.
So, the question the BBC reporter asks is "what are the implications for education"? I ask a question from an information scientist perspective "What does it mean for such schools' libraries and and their online resource management?"
In their words, what is a school librarian to do (assuming there is one) in such environments to support learning, reading, and information seeking across languages?
Your thoughts, experiences, pointers to similar situations and best practices are very welcome! I'm also looking for research on this topic (from case studies to robust stats). Much appreciate it!
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Thank you for that thought, Nadim.
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I have a data set consisting of several heptapeptides, I want to create a non-redundant library out of it, there several are tools such as cd-hit which are reported to perform well but due to lack of expertise I am unable to use this tools.can anyone guide through setting up parameters in the cd-hit online server? 
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Hi Ankit,
If you have access to matlab you can use this command. It will pull out all unique peptide and store them in a list.
unique_peptides=unique(all_your_heptamers)
Job done.
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Libraries have a major function to use digital technologies (the internet) in order to provide bibliographical information services to the net community.
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I am strongly agreed with the answers of Dr. Nizar Matar.
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It is yet to be investigated.
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 I certainly agree with you Caryl, Nemajovsky,  In the future, the management of cataloging services will most probably develop through a shared platform via a consortia or state systems.We already have, The Nassau Library System (Long Island NY), which serves as  a centralized consortia for all the member libraries.
Leslie Brown,, you are right in saying "... the level of readiness in academic libraries across the United States varies". This is true because a lot of issues are affected, and usually, everything revolves around the budget, patrons and staff.
Fuziah M. Nadzar, all the core courses you mentioned are also being taught in our undergraduate programs here in the US, and they do continue into the graduate level. There may be "less emphasis" in some courses at the graduate level if  the most significant part of the course has been done at the undergraduate level.What i would like to see , is a more varied/modern approach to teaching some of these courses. :)
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The research aims at looking into how library design and architecture has changed over the period of time and what role did textures play in that. Since texture is closely related to light, the amount of light in the built mass also affects the texture of the building.
Furthermore, I am trying to look into ancient libraries of the world till the most modern and sophisticated library designed today. In earlier times, libraries were a place to store information and where elite group of people were allowed. Eventually notion of public library developed and how then, different materials and play of light played role in the design of library to make it more "Public". 
What eras of architecture should be considered and which prominent library of different eras could be selected for the study?
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Thanks Peter, I will definitely look into your suggestion.  
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Pubmed is now with minimal staff, due to the lack of finances from the US government. Why does not the publishing industry, which makes profits with articles selling and journals subscriptions (that are mainly accessed via PubMed), pay for NCBI essential services?
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Should we really pay for journal articles at all? I did not ever receive a cent, neither a thank you (except some generic auto responder message - "thank you for your submission.... bla bla..")  from any paid journal I've ever published in nor reviewed for. There is an exception - the editor of "The Journal of Energy in South Africa" sends personal thank you messages to each and every reviewer.
What one gets from the large Journals is a form with which you cede all copyright to the Journal, then it is sold to members and casual readers. I don't even know of a single reviewer that is paid for reviewing the paper. 
What is the added value of the paid journals to the actual content? Do the journals make money from this? - you bet ! Is this profit shared with the authors and reviewers? - not a cent !
Researchgate most certainly opened up a new world to me, as my friends here can legally mail me interesting articles, which otherwise would have been prohibitively expensive (i.e. mostly out of reach) for us here in the developing countries.
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TC, that is the abbreviation for thin or terminal client, has been in use for more than a decade but I've got familiar with the technology about five years ago. From that time I've used three generations of the technology for different purposes. I believe that despite its drawbacks it has many promises for small and rural libraries in reducing the costs of maintenance, energy consumption, upgrade, viruses infection etc. Have you ever used it? What is your idea about it? What are the drawbacks?
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I think the efficacy of a thin client environment is dependent on the role and software specifications you wish to place on it. The more requirements that the thin client needs to fulfill the less viable it becomes. I admit my experience is a little dated with thin clients. I have not worked with thin clients since 2011. Since then Virtual Machines (VM) and thin clients have matured by leaps and bounds (Some scenarios even have autodesk/autocad working in a thin client environment).
An example where a thin client shines is a boxed limited scenario e.g. an OPAC (open public access catalog) station, password reset station, or a place to check web e-mail. On the other hand, if you want a multi-media workstation with apps requiring local resources the end user may run into issues and the client has only a small amount of local hard drive space and memory available, ideally everything is supposed to be handled on the server but there are always outliers.
The other challenge one runs into with thin clients is there is a bit of a learning curve for any newer technician or volunteer that you may expect to be able to handle some minor administrative tasks. You will need to develop a greater amount of documentation for a thin client than a more traditional PC. On a more positive note if you expect your space allocation to grow then the thin clients will scale well.
If this an applied scenario instead of an academic query then I wish you the best of luck on your project.
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I´m looking for information about search strategies in medicine databases like Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central in order to select information about one topic in a prefesional way.
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Hi Tomas, talk to your Librarian [ http://www.udc.es/biblioteca/servizos ] they may be able to take you through the process in person which will help you to do better searches. Guides of course help as well. BW Matt
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A Quick Response (QR code) is a two-dimensional barcode. QR codes are being used widely for the promotion of products in different areas. In Brazil, the use of this instrument is still under-explored. I would like to know more about its usage by libraries.
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We use the QR code in the library introduction for new students. It is included in a kind of quest. The student use their own smartphones to scan the QR code.
This is what we do: They get a paper with 10 questions. The answers to these questions are coded in QR and are spread throughout our library. When scanning the QR code they read the multiple choice answers combined with a word from a slogan. They pick the right answer and therefor pick the right slogan word. If all questions are answered correctly, they will find the correct slogan.
The students like it because they can 'play' with their smartphones. And it is less dull than a guided tour.
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We are collecting suggestions for planning the work of Tomsk State University Library. So, researchers point of view is very important.
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In the past paper libraries used to be the all the information we usualy had, now students go over all the electronic facilities and only a few look at 'books'.
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I am looking for information (and publications) about projects (especially European ones) of designing the study programmes in LIS field. I know about "European Curriculum Reflections on Library and Information Science Education", initiatives of EUCLID, and Euroguide LIS, but maybe you could recommend something more? I am interested in international initiatives, but also in national ones like the spanish "Libro Blanco - titulo de grado en Información y Documentación".
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In the UK CILIP have their Professional Knowledge and Skills base [ http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/jobs-and-careers/professional-knowledge-and-skills-base ] It is protected behind a memebership wall but if you contact them they may be able to help. Interestingly the latest issue of their magazine Update, features Future Skills, for information professionals. Again look at the website.
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What if we merge these two different software's rather than using them separately. Kindly suggest if we can make it possible and how ?
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They can be integrated and some Integrated Library Systems already have that capability. We use LibrarySoft and it has that capability.
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Over one hundred years several of the researchers had developed a set of different expectations about the future of the librarianship, some of these expectations have been achieved but also others did not. I hope that people in this group who are interested in this topic cooperate with me to: (1) provide some of these expectations (2) define the analyzing method that had applied by these researchers to conclude these expectations.
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what I am try to work in it is highlighting a previous predictions in the field of librarianship over the past years. From the standpoint, this will help in determining the appropriate method to predict. such as; some research in 1960s predicted that the amount of information will increase other see that library will replace by digital library.....
also I aim to Communicate with whose expatiation`s has been achieved to learn from them .
This work can not be accomplished by one person, but needs to be set by a group of people have different interests in the librarianship.
who find this work is interested and would to participate in the work add his add thier name than we will work in it as project.
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I have unfinished business: to improve my articles’ citation metrics. The idea that currently exists in academia, if you want to do something and not just stand still and be passive, is to obtain citations. It’s a process to follow with your papers, during the drafting of the paper, before and after publishing in journals to get the coveted citations.
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Rafael - I'm highly cited and I can truly say that I've never written a manuscript with 'how many citations might it get' in mind. I always like to think that my submissions are citable - and most are. However, it's not an exact science. Some of my most highest cited publications are a surprise to me; some of my lowest a surprise as well. I'm not sure that, currently, anyone can predict how citable their articles will be. Reader audiences can be 'fickle' - so there is no way of predicting response. That said, the higher the citation to an article the more that it is seen 'seminal' over time; and once and article is viewed as seminal then it has a popularity and energy of its own.
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My team has recently conducted a bibliometric analysis in Medicine in Latin America, but It took us quite a time to develop it. Now we are exploring new areas to investigate more in our conclusions, but we are curious as to whether there is any training available in bibliometric methods and tools in order to optimize our work.
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Dear Andrés,
I can recommend you papers published in the following journals: Journal of Informetrics, Scientometrics and Research Evaluation. You have to check also journals from the field of medicine.
You have free access to proceedings papers:
1) Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Science and Technology Indicators „Translational twists and turns: Science as a socio-economic endeavor” http://www.forschungsinfo.de/STI2013/start.asp
2) Proceedings of ISSI 2013 Vienna. 14th International Society of Scientometrics and Informetrics Conference [on-line]
You might be also interested in online trainings by Scopus and Web of Science.
For processing data from Web of Science you have free software: Bibexcel and Pajek
Here are some basics:
Good luck :-)
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For a paper in university I had to look for blogs made by scientists. Although I searched under "scholarly communication" I mostly found blogs made by journalists. I found only very few blogs made by scientists and I also found very few blogs made by scientific librarians who treated topics in library science. I found no such blogs in German.
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Nearly all blogs who are treating topics in library science are listed and can be read at: http://plan3t.info/aggregator/
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Either free or paid- whichever you think is best!
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Hi,
I can succest Piwik (http://piwik.org/) as webometric software. Piwik is open source and available in nearly 50 languages.
Hope this is of use!
Best, Antje
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Most readers pay attention and read a research paper when its 'Title" generates interest. However, exact statement of the main finding as 'Title' educates the 'in-field' researcher.
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The title must present a clear idea of what the reader can expect from the article. Whether it is narrow or broad, depends on the context/content of your report. If you work with mice, you should place mice in your title. If you work with mice and elephants, mammals might be a better choice.
Anyway, a good editor will be part of the process to state a catchy but truthful title for your paper, since they are interested in generating citations.
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I am using Ubuntu from long back and now want to try cent OS for creating server for KOHA (i.e Library automation Software) but really don't know how good Cent OS is. Will KOHA effectively run on cent OS as it does with Ubuntu?
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The question is what you mean by "effectively". The performance of all major Linux distributions is roughly the same and depend mor on the know how of the administrator and the architecture of your setup than on c/perl/java-benchmark results.
CentOS is a stable enterprise distribution, as is mostly Ubuntu. Some say, rpm is inferior to deb based packaging of apps, but as always some have bad experience here and good there.
If you know one distro well and your main app is supported best in that distro and you want to lower your efforts and you have to maintain it - go with that.
Having read through piles of comparisons myself I just gave in - there is no "best distro", only good admins who (have to) know their tools:)
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From the 1990s so many DLs have been designed and implemented around the world. According to T. Sarasevic, there have been a few projects on assessment of DLs. I am examining the literature for some evidences for and against Sarasevic's statement.
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Hi,
There is some work in the area. For a good overview of evaluation in DLs see Fuhr (ref below). DELOS had a work package on evaluation in the mid-00s. See http://dlib.ionio.gr/wp7/
Fuhr, Norbert, et al. "Evaluation of digital libraries." International Journal on Digital Libraries 8.1 (2007): 21-38.
Best regards,
Adrian
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What are the incentives in place (if any)?
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A good question, but the answers will probably by as many and varied as there are universities and faculties. At least in Sweden, there's no national strategy, and even at the university level, this varies among faculties.
In my case, there are no direct incentives for the individual reseacher, but the department receives some of its funding from the faculty/university based on the collective publication by reseachers at the department.
The incentives at the personal level are only indirect, but none the less important. Publishing is a key element in the academic promotion process, something which then alsoleads to salary increases for the individual.
Many of the previous answers quote the "publish or perish" dogma. While true, I feel that this is not so related to the question, as the publish or perish mechanism is mostly a question of obtaining funding from the large funding agencies such as reseach councils.
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I'd like to compare the circulation rates of print books received as gifts against those that we purchased. I know that the usage rates are not normally distributed, so using common methods based on normal distributions (e.g. t-test) would not be appropriate. But I'm not sure that the rates are Poisson, either. I've found a few articles that mention other distributions, such as binomial, negative binomial and beta binomial, but I'm not that knowledgeable about these distributions.
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What makes the difference, did you class such books as gift or purchase for easy identification, before lending, if so it is achivable, if not it will be problematic, however the value of any book is how many times it is being used, which means there must be adequate record before the research can be valid.
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I'm going to submit a research article to a journal. One has an impact index (4.57) while another journal has an impact factor (0.785). So I am a little confused about the impact index and impact factor, can anyone suggest which one of the journals is preferred for submitting my research article?
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I found these définitions from Buela-Casal (2010, http://www.ugr.es/~aepc/articulo/scientific.pdf)
Journal impact factor: This is calculated by dividing the total number
of citations made in one year to the papers published in a journal during the
two previous years, by the number of papers published in the journal during
that same 2-year period. Usually, this indicator only refers to the journals included
in the Web of Sciences (Buela-Casal, 2003; Garfield, 2003).
Advantages: Without doubt the most used and best known indicator in all
fields of scientific research. Used for assessing researchers, journals and institutions
in the majority of countries in the world.
Journal impact index: The same as the impact factor, except that it
also takes into account journals not included in the Web of Science.
Advantages: It is very useful for assessing and classifying many journals
not included in the Web of Science. It is particularly useful for cataloguing
national journals. See, for example, IN-RECS (http://ec3.ugr.es/in-recs/).
Disadvantages: The same as those described for the impact factor.
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The revised RG Score uses the reputation of those who view, comment or interact with you to calculate your score. The higher their score the greater the impact on your score will be. However, where disciplines traditionally score lower in citation counts, journal impact factors etc. they will start with a lower base. This would be true of social sciences and humanities and whichever category Librarianship and Information Science currently resides. Should RG introduce discipline norms so that your score is greater than XX% in discipline A, as well as your score is greater than XX% in ResearchGate?
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Hi Walter, the topic of the RG Score was extensively discussed when it was introduced. Most of the comments seem to be in this thread [ https://www.researchgate.net/post/ResearchGate_RG_SCORE_inclusion_in_the_personal_Curriculum_Vitae_CV ]. It was actually re-based and scores appeared to be more representative of the standing each person. My point is that historically in many metrics, including IF Social Sciences and Humanities score lower. In fact one of the many criticisms of IF is that people use it indiscriminately without reference to the disciplinary context. I just think that it would be easy for RG to produce across discipline averages for RG. rather than a whole RG average. On the other hand are we taking it too seriously!
Best Wishes
Matt
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In Bahrain, healthcare organizations encourage healthcare professionals to advance their knowledge to facilitate introducing change in the care of patients. One of the free services provided to nurses is the accessibility to the library of healthcare resources such as the digital library. The statistics obtained by librarians show a decline in the number of nurses using DLS resources. Any suggestions?
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Tracee, I agree.
As a doctoral student, I've had several courses in biostats and even more helpful, in epidemiology. Those classes taught me how to read and understand research articles. From what I can see, there is little education on how to read research articles in the undergraduate courses. There have been several articles addressing the inability of nurses to use, read, understand and apply evidence to improve practice (see below).
The most disturbing finding (to me, at least) was that nurses don't value research to improve patient care.
The articles by Pravikoff & Tanner are eye-opening....that there are still institutions where nurses aren't permitted to access the Medical Library, where the library doesn't have any nursing resources (such as CINAHL), and the nurses don't have Internet access on the nursing units (they would probably just go shopping online), so they can't look up evidence if they did want to. These are a few years old, but from what I know, little has changed. (My husband is a charge nurse in a hospital where staff nurses and charge nurses are not given access to the Internet.)
I think that the issue is probably much more than the nurses are not aware of the DSL services.
Just a thought....... --- would you be able to reach out to nursing educators about this? (Either unit or hospital based - or in Schools of Nursing?) Perhaps offer to teach a class in the SON or on the nursing unit in how to find literature, how to use the databases, etc.? You could address the library information, the nursing educators can address the need for evidence-based practice?
This is probably part of the culture change required to really accept and apply and use evidence to improve practice.....and it is a process.
As stated in the article:
"According to this study, RNs in the clinical arena generally acknowledged that
they need information for effective practice. Yet according to their own
responses, they weren’t prepared to use the information resources available to
them, however adequate or inadequate. They received little or no education or
training in information retrieval, didn’t understand or value research, and were
generally unprepared for a practice built on evidence." (Pravikoff & Tanner,
2005, p. 48)
"Some of this can be attributed to the technologic changes that have
occurred over the last 10 or 15 years. Some of it, however, has to be blamed
on the failure of nursing education programs to prepare students at all levels
to understand and value the importance of maintaining a practice based on
more than tradition, intuition, and experience. These are important
components of nursing practice, of course, but searching for and reading
current literature, including research, are essential." (Pravikoff & Tanner,
2005, p. 50)
Pravikoff, D. S., Pierce, S., & Tanner, A. (2003, May). Are nurses ready for
evidence-based practice? American Journal of Nursing, 103(5), 95-96.
Pravikoff, D., Tanner, A., & Pierce, S. (2005, September). Readiness of U.S. nurses
for evidence-based practice. American Journal of Nursing, 105, 40-50.
Hope this helps --- I think this is such an important topic - thanks for your willingness to help!
Melissa
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I'm looking for an expert in library science to have a chat (by skype or face-to-face) about the pros and cons of pre- and post-coordination approaches to library classification. I'm currently working on methods to automate such processes.
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Thank you very much for your answer! I actually solved. I just went to a couple of departmental libraries and had a chat with people working there who clarified my doubts.
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For instance, when we offer a library workshop, how do we show adminstration that our work is valuable in aiding the goals and purposes of the community.
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I recommend Megan Oakleaf's Value of Academic Libraries -- Executive Summary Report. P11 on Areas of Library Value and Potential Surrogrates. Excellent Summary of 10 major points and their example would be useful to you.
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