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Landscape Change - Science topic

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I try to evaluate butterfly responses to landscape changes due to habitat fragmentation. Also, the effect of competition for resources and multi-trophic networks. But there is literature that illustrates general models of adaptive response assessment. Is it possible to define the number of generations needed to test predictions?
Thank you for your time!
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minimal of 4 generations will be needed for any conclusion in this regard.
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I have tried several empirical models to understand the landscape trend e.g. CA Markov and Earth Trend Modeller. But I need some suggestions about some more advanced models where I can input different environmental variables of Landscape change as well as can understand the spatiotemporal change.
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According to your research, you can use the following techniques:
- Cellular Automaton,
- SLEUTH (Improving Calibration with a Genetic Algorithm),
- Fuzzy Coincidence,
- The NASZ Model,
- Multilayer Perceptron (MLP),
- Multi-objective Land Allocation (MOLA),
- Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Analysis,
- Weights of Evidence.
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I am looking for studies dealing with either the impact of forest fires (or other disasters) on individuals and communities connections to the landscape; or the role of landscape for re-establishing well-being after forest fires (or other dramatic landscape change)?
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This study is interesting to understand the impact of suppression policies on wildland-urband interface fire risk across the boreal forest
Parisien et al., 2020 - Fire deficit increases wildfire risk for many communities in the Canadian boreal forest - Nature Communications 11, Article number: 2121
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Africa is a highly vulnerable continent as it regards climate change. It is interesting how fluvial processes from about 542 million years ago to 251 million years ago must have structured the land surfaces of Africa and how the forms that ensued have led to the more recent ones which affected both biodiversity and societies with all the migrations (bearing both magnitude and direction in mind). Response to this question could be in the following order (if necessary):
1. What findings if any do we have already to answer this question?
2. What methodologies are available to explore?
3. Who has the capabilities to help answer this question?
4. Who is interested in collaborating to answer this question?
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Dr DMSLB Dissanayake sorry your link was not helpful at all, it is not related to this discourse
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I need to detect areas, where land cover has changed between 2000 and 2017 across Baltics. I need to identify location of areas where change has taken place. For analysis, I was thinking of using CORINE land cover maps for 2000 and 2018, or satellite imagery. How can I find areas where changes happened using open source software?
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Hi Dennis. You can use open source softwares like R and GRASS to do change detection.The idea is to get the raster stats for your study area for different years and compare them.In R raster package can easily do this.In grass you can use r.stats function to do this.You can use r.stats function from Q gis toolbox as well.You can also use the ESA CCI landcover time series to do the change detection.The maps are at 300 m resolution from 1992 onward and have many land-cover classes.
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I am looking for a framework to evaluate the aesthetic evolution of a scenic landscape through the Objectivist (physical) paradigm.
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Many thanks for your usefull answers !
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In statistics, Cramér's V is a measure of association between two nominal variables, giving a value between 0 and 1 (inclusive). It was first proposed by Harald Cramér (1946).
It is actually considered in many papers I came accross that a threshold value of 0.15 (sometimes even 0.1) can be considered as meaningful, hence giving hints of a low association between the variables being tested. Do you have any reference, mathematical foundation or explanation on why this threshold is relevant ?
Regards,
Roland.
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Hello Roland,
There are guidelines, of course, but these may well be useless for many variable sets or contexts. I don't know of any mathematical reason to suggest that .15 (ir any other value) is magically better as a threshold for a relationship being judged as noteworthy.
Jacob Cohen, in his 1988 text, Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.), proposed these levels for the simpler version of V, the phi coefficient (in which one of the two dimensions has 1 df):
"Small" effect size = phi of .10; "medium" ES = phi of .30; "large" ES = phi of .50.
However, Cohen would be the first to admit that such guidelines may be meaningless in specific data/variable/population contexts; there is no substitute for intimate understanding of these features.
Here's a simple example of how a very low correlation can still be useful: Consider a correlation of .01 between a no-cost, one-question cancer screener and the subsequent occurrence of cancer within a year. Sounds useless, right?
(With these hypothetical values from 100,000 cases: screen+/cancer+ = 6,472; screen+/cancer- = 57,922; screen-/cancer+ = 3,356; screen-/cancer- = 32,250; the chi-square = 10.114, and phi = .01). In this scenario, the one-question screener would potentially save nearly 6,500 lives. So, is it useful?
Good luck with your work.
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Hi all,
For those of you which had a previous experience with Idridsi TerrSet (from ClarkLabs), I am considering working with LCM (Land Change Modeler) to model land use change over a rural watershed of 40 sq km in the sahelian climate (west africa).
I am considering three different types of land uses. I have the strong belief that all the land uses are being changed under the influence of the same set of driving variables. Amongst them, I have cultivated areas, which are continiously increasing, based on land use demand, which is closely (I believe) related to climate and population size.
Say I have annual population census (or density) values, as well as cumulative annual rainfall values over the whole simulation period. However, these values does not change spatially over the whole area,. They are rather constant in space, but time varying.
How can I input them in the modelling process, using a Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) ?
Roland.
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Dear Prof Gil Mahe,
Much thanks for the recommendation. I actually know well that paper, as well as the previous developpement made by Pierre Diello in his thesis work (2007) on Nakambe basin.
I actually got some interesting insights and ideas from this. However, in this work, we are highly interested in the mapping, modelling and forecasting of spatial distribution of LULC changes, we went in a different direction, that is LULC modelling.
Ultimately, the problem has been "solved". I believe I might share the approach we used in another writeup, hopefully soon.
Thanks again.
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Many researchers use scenario planning as a way to explore alternative futures with citizens, but how far ahead should people be asked to consider? Too far ahead and the problems under consideration become subject to the SEP engine of Douglas Adams' Hitchhiker's series (Somebody Else's Problem). Too close and panic may ensue, or at least fear-driven System 1 responses. What is the 'sweet spot' of both personal stake and cognitive capacity? Are there demographic or cultural differences in temporal thinking and risk perceptions? Do you have an example of a successful scenario planning exercise, and can share your time horizon and rationale? Or do you have a reference to recommend that explores this question? Thanks in advance.
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Thanks, Richard and Andrew.
Richard - I think time always feels so different looking back than looking forward, but I don't think we ever learn from that experience to do anything but discount the future. I think it is a solid suggestion, however, to anchor scenarios in an event rather than a time: i.e. when sea level rises by X amount, rather than in year Y. This may also get past some of the challenges in setting year Y without wide uncertainty bars.
Has anyone else found the sweet spot, or have clever ways to establish it? In spatial analysis there is a rule that you choose a raster cell size at least half (in each direction) of the smallest thing you want to be able to resolve. Is there a temporal corollary for 'resolving' the future.
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There are many aspects to consider when managing agricultural landscapes: biophysical processes, human intervention and socio-economic processes. How do all these processes play together and how can this be modelled? What are the main feedbacks to consider from your own research or application perspective?
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The question starts with 'modelling', the explanation introduces 'managing' and one of the answer raises 'design'. Starting the later, few farming landscapes have been designed. Examples of designed farm landscapes are polders (e.g. NL, DE, IT), irrigated lands downstream of reservoirs (e.g. Mariental, Namibia), land consolidation projects (landscape redesign) and post-revolutionary land reform (e.g. kolchoz) . The next level, managing seems largely fictitious for private land.
As a working hypothesis, designed agrarian landscapes show (i) more separation of planted tree, crop and grass, (ii) larger blocks of each component and (iii) little land reserved for spontaneous vegetation and wildlife developments. The latter needs more systematic attention from my perspective as practitioner.
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Already done DOS1 atmospheric correction through semi automatic classification plug in inQGIS and converted to surface reflectance values. But htis thin layer of cloudy patch is causing problem in classification. Picture attached
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Hello Again,
I am the person who developed the COST and DOS1 atmospheric correction methods and wanted to follow up with a short comment (you can see papers related to these in my research gate profile).  Keep in mind that most, probably all, atmospheric correction methods apply an additive, and in some cases like the COST method also a multiplicative, correction using the same value for the ENTIRE image.  They are NOT pixel-by-pixel corrections so the thin clouds will NOT be removed.  Since the correction methods are entire image based ones they generally will not change the relationships of the various spectral clusters in the image and will basically just move the clusters around in a linear fashion.  Since the swir bands (bands 5 and 7 in Landsat 5 and 7 systems), and somewhat the nir band, will penetrate thru this type of thin clouds I still recommend that you investigate using these bands only to see what kind of results you will get (i.e., do not use the visible bands in the analysis).
Pat
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We are dealing with repeated photos. They are not orthophotos, just simple pics taken with common cameras from the ground. We compare photos taken at the begginging of the 20st century, or evven sometimes taken in 1990.
Until now we have been doing some research from a qualitative point of view, but we wonder how to add some quantitative analysis to our work. 
Any suggestions (software, papers...) will be more than wellcome!
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You're welcome Pablo Fraile
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I am looking for articles that provide in depth explanations about the Landscape Dynamics.
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Well, there is a classical book: Turner, M. G., & Romme, W. H. (1994). Landscape dynamics in crown fire ecosystems. Landscape ecology, 9(1), 59-77. I also recommend you a not commonly referenced : Farina, A. (2006). Principles of landscape dynamics. Principles and methods in landscape ecology: Toward a Science of Landscape, 229-266.
Anyway it is a very wide topic. Are you interested in recent landscape dynamics? (Hernández, A., Miranda, M., Arellano, E. C., Saura, S., & Ovalle, C. (2015). Landscape dynamics and their effect on the functional connectivity of a Mediterranean landscape in Chile. Ecological Indicators, 48, 198-206.) In historical changes? (Peringer, A., Siehoff, S., Chételat, J., Spiegelberger, T., Buttler, A., & Gillet, F. (2013). Past and future landscape dynamics in pasture-woodlands of the Swiss Jura Mountains under climate change. Ecology and Society, 18(3), 11.)
In techinques to evaluate it? Rephotography (Strand, E. K., O'Sullivan, M. T., & Bunting, S. C. (2012). Time series aerial photography can help land owners and managers understand local aspen dynamics. Rangelands, 34(5), 21-29.), satellite (Ghosh, A., Sharma, R., & Joshi, P. K. (2014). Random forest classification of urban landscape using Landsat archive and ancillary data: Combining seasonal maps with decision level fusion. Applied Geography, 48, 31-41.)...
Are you phocused on a specific topic? Agricultural (Ghosh, A., Sharma, R., & Joshi, P. K. (2014). Random forest classification of urban landscape using Landsat archive and ancillary data: Combining seasonal maps with decision level fusion. Applied Geography, 48, 31-41.), vegetation (Abel-Schaad, D., & López-Sáez, J. A. (2013). Vegetation changes in relation to fire history and human activities at the Peña Negra mire (Bejar Range, Iberian Central Mountain System, Spain) during the past 4,000 years. Vegetation history and archaeobotany, 22(3), 199-214.)...
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Hi all,
I am looking for more information about " Use game engine for exploring vegetation change".
I will be thankful for any help..
My Regard
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Thank you Matheus. I will look.
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Any helpful suggestion will be appreciated.
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In GIS, can assess change called change detection between two georeferenced images.  Also various approaches to classify and estimate land use from images.  If these type coverages are not already available, suggest you contact a GIS professional, who will probably share or find this type information for you.  If the spectral images have no past assessment history for your area, then you will have to decide how much ground checking you are willing to do to help validate. 
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We need to know how we can choose the trees which grow with water deficiency in restoring landscape.
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Dear Abdelghani and All
This is a very important question. It relates to the selection of a water resistant trees deficiency linked to drought for the reasons you mentioned. Provide timely responses on my part would be indecent because it takes its specific proof that require time. Given that I live in Algeria I have traveled through a north-south transect that crosses our bioclimatic. Many of our regions are deficient in water especially in semi-arid Sahelian bioclimatic zones. Each of our regions have a specific feature not only on the rainfall map but also heat. It is important to note in each region indigenous and even introduced species that are resistant to drought. In general I noticed that the Pinus and Cupressus genera are quite resistant in many of our regions with a large water deficit. I think particularly of the species Pinus halepensis, the Cupressus sempervirens variety pyramidilis and horizontalis. What do you think of Cupressus dupreziana very drought resistant lives endemic Tassili N'Ajjer. This is one of the world's threatened species according to the IUCN, not because of drought but especially overgrazing. I can cite other kinds Olea and Acacia represented by the species Olea europea and Acacia horrida.
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I'm working with the science department of the Leysin American School in Switzerland. We're setting up a long-term project for students to monitor landscape changes (particularly ecology) to observe species movements and phenology as the climate changes. We hope this will be a decades-long study that educates students at the same time. We're looking for advice, resources, and potential collaborators.
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You may use also: NADIG: Die Orthopteren. In :NADIG - SCHWEIZER - TREPP: Die Verbreitung der Heuschrecken auf einem Diagonalprofil durch den Alpen. Jahresber. Naturf. Ges. Graubünden, N.F. 106, 2. Teil, 227-380.
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I kindly need your visual opinions and comments as visitors of Waterfront (joggers, artists, etc).
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Dear Majid,
I think that one of the main issues is the continuity of the waterfront public promenade, its urban quality and its connection with the neighbouring programmes of commercial and residential urbanism as well as with public transportation. In such contexts, the work of urbanists, planners and architects has to integrate the micro-dimension of daily uses and trajectories as well as the more macro-dimension of the connection with the rest of the city. It is in my opinion this ability to play on both scales that allows (among other factors like the negociation with private developers of the extent and nature of public spaces) a project to acquire a specific value in terms of urbanity.
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Looking for people's perception on landscape change considering the introduction of water in usually dry mediterranean landscapes
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The Institute of Planning of Landscape and Urban Systems (PLUS) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH) (http://www.irl.ethz.ch/plus/about/index) has a long experience in this topic in Switzerland, which of course has nothing to do with Mediterranean landscape. But it could be useful when comparing results and approaches.
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Terraces are one unique landscape created by human on unfavorable terrians. What are the functions beyound increasing food productions? any leads are appreciated.
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Great!Great....
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I am looking for topographic maps of Bratislava which I can use in analyzing landscape changes in different periods of time.
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I do not know help you for historical maps of Bratislava but for now the the Corine Land Cover is a good idea, also because is free. 
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I am trying to show change in land cover using landsat mss tm etm+ and high resolution images. I know that it is a must to perform atmospheric correction in multi temporal data to classify and detect change. Is it possible to perform atmospheric correction of landsat tm etm+ and high resolution images. If it is possible, then how?
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Integrated land form relation with vegetation (both the habitats) studies are not so popular in the Indian subcontinent, though are very imperative for landscape planning, wild life conservation and overall developmental planning processes. They are especially important for the Himalayan terrain where development is needed with parallel inputs of both the disciplines for better planning.
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In my opinion it is very appropriate to use information geobotany as a layer(s) in the GIS to plan and/or manage natural resources. It's not widespread in protected areas, but I think it is an excellent idea.
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We are planning a EC medium scale project on landscape change in Europe and we are seeking potential candidate partners within EU and EU-candidate countries.
In particular, the project would focus on the analysis of factors and the mapping of hot spots in Europe as concerns typical landscapes which are vulnerable to climate change forcing, with special reference to geomorphic processes, hydrological processes, and ecosystem dynamics.
The project should attempt to single out specific landscape change hot spots, to select representative case studies, and to perform dynamical field-based, lab-based and modelling analysis of recent past, present and future change scenarios under the climate change forecasting patterns derived from IPCC and climate models. At the end, the results of the research would be to formulate a first-stage, regional-scale mapping of landscape susceptibility to change for the whole Europe territory.
The focus will not be on climate change models, but rather on landscape responses and resilience to them.
We endeavor the setup of an interdisciplinary group with partners from at least 3 different EU countries. Participation of non-EU countries may be possible under specific circumstances which will be clarified after the selection by the working group of the most suitable call-for-proposals.
A tentative deadline for the project submission is in next autumn, 2014.
Write me here or use the RG message system for further info.
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Yes, it will be under Horizon 2020.
And yes, I hope that participation will also be open to non-EU countries. Even though this is not very likely at the moment. That is, participation is always possible and welcome by EC. It is funding that is usually not possible.
We will have to look at the next available calls.
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I intend to carry out a cross-comparative study. If somebody could help I'd appreciate.
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Dear Luca,
See the last number (4/2013) of the journal European Countryside: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/euco.2013.5.issue-4/issue-files/euco.2013.5.issue-4.xml
Possibly, you can find some inspiration for your work.
Best regards,
Antonin
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How the climate change affect the landscape pattern of the islands especially small islands, the most vulnerable land features?
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Using the Change detection analysis, we can able to study changes in landscape pattern