Science topic

Laboratory Medicine - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Laboratory Medicine, and find Laboratory Medicine experts.
Questions related to Laboratory Medicine
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
3 answers
Hi folks,
A niche question, but does anyone have a recommendation for scientific journals with a focus on the place laboratory medicine holds within crisis/disasters/global health apart from the traditional larger journals?  
To be precise, I am interested in those that air thoughts and research at the intercept of diagnostic laboratory medicine and health systems/policy/preparedness in the context of crisis and disasters.
Relevant answer
Answer
It depends on what are your objectives? Do you intend to publish a paper?
My advice here is to use the following tools:
1. Jane Journal Estimator
2. Springer Journals Tool
3. Elsevier Journal Finder
Just get your abstract copied into their tool, and you may look at the suggestions and scope of the journals that you intend to submit.
If you intend to get articles for reviews with scope specific journals only, use Scimago Journal Rank finder.
Good luck!
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
6 answers
I've been wondering whether there are any new manufacturers around who make reliable, affordable PCR machines. The Chinese now make great smartphones, may be they now make good cyclers, too (that cost way under $5,000...) Any suggestions?
Relevant answer
Answer
Is OpenPCR worth it? Have either of you used it?
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
2 answers
I am looking for resources/ publication on systems model please; anything of that sort I'll greatly appreciate. Thanks, Nellie
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks Gulzar I'll have a look
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
2 answers
I want to know the allowable CV for the hormone assays.
Relevant answer
Answer
CCV for each analyte is the lowest CV obtained form determinations of analyte during first two years of the external quality assessment.
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
8 answers
Hello,
We are centrifuging fresh blood to obtain serum. The blood is collected in plain, uncoated vaccutainers and allowed to clot at room temp for 30-45 mins.
Several method papers have suggested 1.0-1.3 RCF (1,000-1,300 g), including a consensus paper. However, other labs i have asked go up to 2.0-3.0 RCF on a regular basis.
I was wondering what procedure everyone else used and what considerations go into determining centrifuge speed (haemolysis, sample separation and so on).
Relevant answer
Answer
The difference betwen low g force and high g force applied to whole blood samples is that with higher g force you have "cleaner" plasma/serum. By "cleaner" I mean free of cells/organelles as leucocytes and platelets. The clotting factors will still be present in plasma. For example, up to 5000g - hard spin - no haemolysis is expected. Interface willbe very defined (buffycoat- platelets+leucocytes) and the upper fase will be quite "clean". I hope this helps.
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
4 answers
Dr. I. Trowbridge (Immunobiology Research Center, Departments of Laboratory Medicine/Pathology and Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA) is not part of the university staff and the TTO cannot locate the hybridoma
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks Kalle - hope everything is good with you !
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
3 answers
Hi, I'm trying to fractionate blood components by density centrifugation. I've been able to clearly isolate the monocyte/lymphocyte layer, however the granulocytes tend to drift off into the packed RBC layer. The protocol includes using 100 ul of blood in a glass capillary tube and centrifuging the sample at 1500 RCF for 5 min.
Any suggestions on how to prevent this from happening without the addition of density gradient medium? Is it because the the centrifugation force is too high or the centrifugation time is too long?
Thanks for your help!
Relevant answer
Answer
The speed seems too high . i think reducing the speed will help. use a collect centrifuge that is designed to separate blood components. do this at different levels and you will finally get there.
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
10 answers
Colorimeter/spectrophotometer, autoanalyzer, and immunoassay changed the field of diagnosis when introduced. What are the current advances in the use of mass spectrometry in diagnosis and what is the future of this important technology in Clinical Chemistry.
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks sir  Edoardo Cherubini. It was really helpful
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
6 answers
The dose is standardised in animals in mg/kg.
i just wanna extend the same treatment to cell lines and was trying to find a way to convert Drug dose from mg/kg to mg/ml ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you Tushar for this discussion. Thanks to Rafik too for sharing valuable article. It is helpful for all. Thank you Alain and Sagar.
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
1 answer
Preanalytics
Relevant answer
Answer
EDTA would be the best sample-type for peripheral blood.  Of course the tube-type could be laboratory-specific, pending on their testing model / requirements.  I believe Transgenomic offers this testing..?  
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
1 answer
In a collection of human blood chemistry data the complete lipid profile and atherogenic index shows residue of obesity. Along with this I found detectable changes of their electrolyte values too. My question is how I can correlate edema with obesity of their data?
Relevant answer
Answer
The Atherogenic Coefficient (AC) = (TC -HDL-C)/HDL-C
Atherogenic Index of Plasma (AIP) = log (TG/HDL-C).
Now it is needed to correlate this index with the chances for developing edema in the body.
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
4 answers
Can the remaining platelet number in plasma be the reason?
Is there a way to avoid completely clotting activation when thawing plasma?
Relevant answer
Answer
To get platelet free plasma, spin at high speed (20 000 g) in polycarbonate tubes.
If you observe turbidity after thawing, it might be due to lipids, a well known peoblem in preparation of control plasa or serum.
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
7 answers
A report by the FDA difference hsCRP and cPCR for their requirements. Do you think that this difference is real?
Relevant answer
Answer
There is no fundamental difference between hsCRP and CRP. It is the same protein and the assay technique essentially the same (turbidimetric immunoassay). hsCRP is just a term for CRP assays with a much lower detection limit which are capable of producing a quantitative result in the range below 3 mg/L. Currently, the routine CRP assays have limits of quantitation that way go below 1 mg/L. So, in theory, a sensitive assay for CRP should give the same results. But, as mentioned above, standardization is an issue that needs to be abswered.
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
5 answers
I am asking this because there is a significant differences between plasma & serum in electrolyte assay, can anyone help me? I am using fish.
Relevant answer
Answer
By what method? if you are measuring osmolality by the freezing-point depression method, I don't see why it would make a difference--the fibrinogen or the heparin itself contributes a munuscule fraction of the osmolality. If the measurement method involves any kind of semi-permeable membrane, then there might be interactions whose effect you need to systematically measure.
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
4 answers
For metabolic evaluation of kidney stone formers 24 hours urine collections are still needed.
How do you suspect 24 h urine collections are not appropriate? With a formula?
Does anyone add a commentary in laboratory reports, if the collection is not appropriate ?
Relevant answer
Answer
Nowadays, it is best to measure the analyte from given urine sample and give result per creatinine.
As we all know creatinin excretion is constatnt so it is alwas better to give report in this way till it is possible.
In many cases, clinicians wants report in 24 hours form than we can ask patient or the concerned sister in the ward. by asking him/her that how did u collected the 24 hour sample? questions to them sometimes give us idea about the quality and quantity of the sample.
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
3 answers
I need information about the right amount of the reagents and sample
Relevant answer
Answer
I have sent you a link where you can find materials and method to measure IMA.. we have published paper on it.. Hope it will help you to measure with less cost..
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
10 answers
New national guidelines on the diagnosis of diabetes advocate the use of HbA1c as the test of choice. A levels of >48 mmol/mol is consistent with diabetes. The guidelines state all positive tests should be repeated within 14 days to confirm result. We are seeing quite large disparities between first and second test result (much bigger than can be attributed to analytical variation). This could be regression to the mean or genuine rapid shifts in glycaemia (being told you may have diabetes leading to changing eating/ exercise habits etc).
I would be very interested to know the biological variation of HbA1c and what change we would expect to see due to normal physiology. Any thoughts would be appreciated!
Relevant answer
Answer
There is an excellent paper by several studies in Clinica Chimica Acta 411 (2010) 1606-1610 of Braga et al: biological variability of glycated hemoglobin. It shows that it is difficult to answer your question precisely because this variability seems different in the individual free from disease and diabetic patients
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
19 answers
Do you use in your laboratory practice specific reference intervals for laboratory tests made ​​from capillary samples or apply the same reference intervals that you use for samples from a vein (serum / plasma)?
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Jasna,
here now the complete RILIBÄK. Hope that you understand sufficient German to read the text or have someone who does.
many greetings
Sighart Golf
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
2 answers
Biological variability
Relevant answer
Answer
I agree with Francisco Freitas. Biological variability of plasma ammonia still not availabe. Available is only output ammonia in 24 hour urine: Ammonia (output, 24h, urine): within-subject biologic variation: 24.7; between-subject biologic variation: 27.3; desirable specification for imprecision: 12.4%; desirable specification for inaccuracy: 9.2%; desirable specification for allowable total error: 29.6%. (Avaliable at: http://www.westgard.com/biodatabase1.htm).
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
3 answers
There are many minerals, vitamins and other food constituents that we need for optimal health. Sufficiency or excess of many key nutrients and other aspects of human nutritional status can be assessed through the analysis of biological samples. If you want to know about the nutrition status of your research participants, patients or clients, which nutrients and nutritional conditions are most important to you. To make it clear, the goal here is not to assess one or two specific nutrients because of a particular research question or prompted by clinical symptoms. This is strictly for global, non-targeted nutrition assessment. The preferred portfolio of assessment indicators will obviously depend on the target group and area of interest, so it would be helpful to hear about the rationale for the selection.
Relevant answer
Answer
We have Anthropometric measurements, clinical examination for signs and symptoms, Biochemical analysis for any biochemical indicators, and Diet history or dietary assessments to help you find out the deficient nutrients from ones diet.
Under Anthropometric assessment, we need to find parameters like, Weight, height, Age, Waist hip ratio, %body fatness, Skin fold thickness and many more. This helps us find the current nutrition situation and status of this client.
Clinical assessments: this will provide detection of nutritional deficiencies by examining the different body organs like eyes, nails, fingers, tongue, muscles bone stomach and so on..
Biochemical assessments help us find specific biochemical makers relating to specific nutrient deficiencies or toxicities. For example serum, albumin, urine.
Dietary assessments: From the previous diet records of the patient, we can tell the missing or excess nutrients in the diet, these methods include, FFQs, 24 hr recall, food records etc.
From these, just pick the most relevant to your study according to your target population and which condition you are investigating. But you can't miss to have some few anthropometric measurements in you study if your dealing with nutrition status.
Goodluck!
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
11 answers
Is there a central phlebotomy service provided by the department of laboratory medicine?
Relevant answer
Answer
At least in France and most european countries, blood draw is performed by nurses, and , of course in ICU they use the arterial lines available in almost 6O% of the patients and 100% of those suffering from shock.
In the 8O's i worked in an hospital in which atrerial blood gas samples were drawn by a "phlebotomist", even for our ICU, but the delays may be very long....
Furthermore, if nurses did not draw blood samples, they will not get used to,and will have just a "pills distribution and toilets work"......
In My ICU, nurses drawn blood samples and in the midnight run they look on computers for the results and trasmitted them to the physician on duty. interestingly, they comment the results or ask "why"... I think that they will be very disappointed if blood drawning will be done by phlebotomists..; moreover, somme ICU have their own deported lab, nurses doing the job for all the biological data ( ph, Pa02, ...Na. BUN, lactate and so on) or only for research. They appreciate to participate and it is a very good way to obtain their "good participation" for a clinical study.
For a 500 beds hospital with multiple blocks, how many phlebotomists on duty in the day and at night to avoid delay?
Blood drawn by nurses induce cost saving, lower delay, increase patient's care since nurses are aware of the results.
I will not change for a central phlebotomists units
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
6 answers
How important are biobank facilities for your particular research? If you request biomaterial: do you have to pay any access fees?
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you for your quick answer! Do you also have academic (f.e. hospital based) biobanks in your area and would you have access to their samples?
  • asked a question related to Laboratory Medicine
Question
7 answers
I want to use ibuprofen as Non-Steroidal AID in dosing experiment for Oxidative stress. Need help how to dissolve it.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Abid Ali Sir!!
The solubility of ibuprofen in 15 different solvents including water and at temperatures ranging from 15 to 60 degrees is given in the article given below. This large volume of very useful data is plotted so that it is easy to compare the solubility in one solvent to that of another solvent. Hope this article solve your quarry.
Lee, T.; Kuo, C. S.; Chen, Y. H. Pharmaceutical Technology, October 2, 2006
This article can be found at