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Invasive Species - Science topic

A forum for research on invasive exotics, non-native plants and animals
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Dear Fellows/Researchers,
Since collecting raw Sargassum can be a hard job in the winter, I'm looking for some dried Sargassum muticum for experiments with alginates. Ideally from Europe.
I will be working based in Portugal and Netherlands.
Thank you!
Best regards,
Carolina Delgado
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Dear Carolina,
I am really sorry to be unable tu fulfill your requirements !
To obtain 2 kg of dry seaweed it is necessary to process 15 to 20 kg of fresh weight and unfortunately I don't have the possibility to do it. On the other hand the place where I can harvest the seaweed is located in an unhealthy area so there is risk of bacterial contamination.
Hoping you will find another supplier !
Best wishes
Auguste
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I don't see much literature on this topic, but the Great Lakes and Lake Michigan, in particular, have experienced rapid change in water levels over the past decade. Have these changes facilitated invasion? I don't see much literature out there on this topic. This attached paper eludes to NNIP facilitation, though.
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Thanks!
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We reassessed the vegetation of Mormon Island, the largest contiguous tract of wet meadow and lowland tallgrass prairie remaining the Central Platte River Valley of Nebraska 40 years after its initial inventory and examined species invasion, climate change, and restoration as drivers of community change. It is on the long side at just over 8,000 words of text, not including the citations. I have been considering a number of journals, but feel like most journals oriented toward a priori research questions don’t publish inventories, and we would love to include the plant list at least as an in-print appendix. However, it goes beyond the traditional scope of a straightforward inventory because of the long-term nature of the data and the theoretically grounded questions we ask. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
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I second Tom's suggestion: Vegetation Classification and Survey. It's a new journal, and one of the official ones of the International Association of Vegetation Science. Here is its website: https://vcs.pensoft.net/
You could give it a try!
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Hi, and thanks in advance.
Can you think of any alien invasive plants, conspicuous enough and commonly seen along roads, that could be targeted for road surveys? In particular using Google Street View (GSV), i.e. using photos taken from the road. It can be plants only distinguishable in some seasons like when flowering.
I know a few like Acacia dealbata, Cortaderia selloana, Ailanthus altissima, Eucalyptus globulus, Arundo donax. A study conducted in Canada using GSV also suggests several other target species (Mazerolle 2010). I was interested in knowing potential target species from other regions. Can you add some?
Thank you!
Ernesto
Mazerolle, D., and Blaney, S.: Google Street View: a new online tool with potential application to roadside invasive species detection and monitoring, 5th Biennial Weeds Across Borders Conference, Shepherdstown, USA, 2010, 77-83, 2010.
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Actually, It depends on the region for which you are working.
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I am working with tuta abusoluta, testing eficcacy of several pesticides. My challange is on finding the artificial diet for the insects. What type of artificial diet which can be used to rear Tuta absoluta?
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I think you do not need to rear this insect on the artificial diet. This insect pest can be reared well on healthy tomato plants (2-3 weeks old) using 50 x 50 x 50 cages with replacing the plants every week or 10 days.
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If you've worked on islands, especially islands that have never been connected to continents, you've probably noticed that new construction projects often lead to an increase of invasive species in the area. As a scientist, what measures can you suggest to mitigate increases in invasive species abundance in recently disturbed habitats? I'm thinking especially about terrestrial invertebrates (I work mostly on ants and land snails), but it would be interesting to hear people's thoughts who work on different systems as well. If you have any references that you think would be relevant, I'd love to see them! Thanks!
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In French Polynesia, to reduce the spread of Wasmannia auropunctata, they ask to clean the construction equipments (excavators, backhoe loaders) when they move to islands free of little fire ants. The dirt and soil you can find on the engines can bring a lot of invertebrates, of course a lot of invasive ants. And check the material such as the wood, to stop the spread of introduced saproxylic beetles.
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" Pitfall trapping is the standard method for collecting ground-dwelling arthropods and soil fauna in studies of ecological and agricultural entomology " ( Ruiz-Lupión et al. 2019).
In my current research assistant position I am working on analysis of macro-fauna in forests. We use pitfall traps to assess the abundance of macro-fauna in a given area. I'm curious to learn more about other methods used for this sort of analysis.
  • What methods for pitfall trapping have you used, if any?
  • What were the advantages/disadvantages and what would you have changed about the method you used.
Our methods are as follows:
  1. Briefly, we plant a plastic cup in the ground with a cover on top (to make sure mammals or larger animals do not enter the trap but only macrofauna can enter)
  2. we leave the cup for several weeks
  3. The macrofauna fall into the cup and are preserved by antifreeze, which are then taken into lab for identification and abundance counts
  4. By measuring the area of the cup's top, and how many bugs have fell into said area, we can then gain a better understanding of the abundance of macrofauna in the area
In a study reviewing pitfall traps, Ruiz-Lupión et al. (2019) states the factors which should be considered by ecologists using pitfall traps. They state, "the capture rate of arthropods in pitfall traps is proportional to their activity, and the number of individuals that each trap catches may or may not reflect their true abundance, and instead just their activity. Thus, the rate of capture is proportional to the joint effects of abundance and activity, something that has very often been overlooked by ecologists for a long time... [Nonetheless,] activity estimates from pitfall trap catches can still be biased because of multiple factors such as the surrounding habitat structure or the environmental conditions such as temperature and water availability. Additional factors could be the vertical distribution of the soil and leaf litter layers, as well as the attraction or repulsion of preservative fluids, detergents, or baits, the effects of which vary according to the taxon, sex, season, and environment. Specifically, if a trap retains excessive amounts of water, it could act as an attractor for the fauna, especially during drought periods, therefore biasing the estimates of activity. "
References:
Dolores Ruiz-Lupión (2019). New Litter Trap Devices Outperform Pitfall Traps for Studying Arthropod Activity. Insects 2019, 10(5), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10050147
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This is on RG now. Fitzgerald L.A. 2012. Finding And Capturing Reptiles. Pp.77-88. In R.W. McDiarmid, M. S. Foster, C. Guyer, J. W. Gibbons, and N. Chernoff (eds.), Measuring and Monitoring Biological Diversity: Standard Methods for Reptiles. University of California Press, Berkeley, California.
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Hi all,
I was wondering if you know of any case in which breeder/floater ratio in birds is monitored over the years while observing changes in nest-site availability. Floaters in one of my focus populations are very abundant and I would like to discuss to what extent this could be an indicator of nest-site restriction.
Thank you,
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Hi Ulises and Michael et al. It is really unusual when raptor floaters can actually be counted in the field and compared with occupancy data. That's an interesting graph. Another example of temporal variation in territory quality and its effects on floater numbers may be the effect of jackrabbit cycles and drought on territory occupancy in golden eagles in the deserts of western North America. The idea is that some territories may become temporarily unsuitable for occupancy (no food), forcing the territory holders into the floater pool. Jim Watson et al. has an interesting recent paper that reflects a bit on that issue (Watson et al. 2020. The Journal of Wildlife Management 1–10). I think what you are both seeing what might be relatively stable populations with adults moving in and out of the floater pool depending on temporal variation in territory suitability, i.e., availability of a nest site or enough food within the territory to sustain its occupancy. In a study of a resident golden eagle population (PLoS One 2017), I radio-monitored 51 floaters over a long period and only two acquired territories. Breeder numbers were meanwhile stable.
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We are looking for feral hemp seeds to use in our ongoing experiments on invasion risk of hemp in Florida (https://programs.ifas.ufl.edu/hemp/). There seems to be a lot of 'wild' populations in the Midwest, U.S., leftover from the industry in 1940s.
Any suggestion for sourcing/ collecting these seeds?
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Hello Susan; I'm very curious to know what finally came of your question. Did you learn what you needed to know? Were you able to act on it? Best regards, Jim Des Lauriers
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A recent poll on Twitter showed that 52% of respondents believe that COVID19 will speed up and/or improve Bioinvasion Scientists' efficiency to communicate the importance of addressing Biological Invasions. The three options to vote were: YES, NO and I don't care. (https://twitter.com/Ale_Bortolus/status/1254144480502046726?s=20 )
To me, the most important result was not the shy 2% by which the option YES won the poll. The best result was that the "I don't care" option received zero votes. That's unprecedented. It means that people care about this serious problem. Let's remember that although biological invasions are now considered by IPBES as one of the top 5 major causes of biodiversity loss, some years ago most people (including *many* scientists) wouldn't even know what "biological invasions" and "invasive species" meant.
The COVID-19 pandemic has made clear that the introduction of exotic invasive organisms (such as the SARS-coV-2 ) may not only affect the landscapes and/or the biodiversity around us, but they can also have fast deadly effects on people worldwide. But, will our societies learn fast enough to see the big picture? will COVID19 speed up and/or improve Bioinvasion Scientists' efficiency to communicate the importance of addressing Biological Invasions? Does that depend solely on the skill of the Bioinvasion experts or of our society's? we´ll see.
Share your thoughts here, if you have one.
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Before addressing the proposed topic, which incidentally, we have been studying for years with other pandemics and epizootics in my laboratory, it should be noted that the hypotheses to understand their origin in humans have a lot to do with the thought of the landscape ecology.
These hypotheses, structured as landscape sciences do, but under the thought of rhizomatic ecology, tell us about how all animals are connected; hypotheses that serve to remind us of our animal condition and that shout at us, because they cannot say it louder, that as much as we live in artificial environments, we continue and will continue to be animals on the planet; a planet called earth which is our holistic environment.
Regardless of the origin or the time we have been together, some animals with others, the pandemic is the result of a zoonosis that may well be direct or indirect, in this case, as of May 2020, the way in which we are transmitted: Hypothesis 1: bats transported to the Guangzhou market were the original source for direct transmission of CoVid-19 to humans; Hypothesis 2: Pangolins (the most trafficked animal on the illegal market worldwide and widely consumed in China and other Asian regions) or a domestic animal such as dromedary or cat, could have been infected with CoVid-19 by bats and be the intermediary vectors of the virus to reach humans; Hypothesis 3: Pangolins could have directly infected the human. As can be seen, the crazy conspiracy idea that it was a virus created in the laboratory by either North Americans or Chinese and deliberately released or accidentally escaped into the environment is discarded biochemically.
Now, to understand this pandemic, we must remember that rhizomatic ecology tells us that humans are immersed in an ecosystem (holon) within larger ecosystems until they reach the Holo (Earth), and that each system has subsystems that directly influence adjacent or remote holons.
Bats are a very special group of mammals because their ability to fly allows them to have very high thermal regulation. Its temperature rises a lot during flight and drops considerably during rest. Their metabolism is more intense than that of the rest of the mammals and their immune system is much stronger, in such a way that they can have viruses, bacteria and parasites without causing apparent damage, but transport them long distances (zoocoria). The tangle of the rhizome extends indefinitely since where the bat reaches, it can infect endemic organisms such as the pangolin or dromedary, or common domestic animals, such as cats. It can even infect people when they are crowded into a market to trade and move more from there; huddled in a refugee camp or crowding into migratory groups to escape environmental catastrophes, dictatorships, famine, for example.
The natural migrations of fauna are becoming more extensive every day in the sense that the borders and the breeding or feeding sites are widening, covering more geographic area, interacting more with humans. A human population from a site that, if it did not previously have contact with said animal, can be infected more easily than people from populations that have lived with this animal for centuries. Likewise, consequences of the recent climate change and the illegal trafficking of species is the favor of this dispersion of pathogens, since the trafficked animals lack a clinical certificate, are transported in poor conditions, increase their stress, and therefore are more susceptible to suffer more pathogens and infect the fauna that accompanies them on their journey and final destination, including humans, of course, since we are also accompanying fauna. Climate change, on the other hand, encourages migratory behaviors in animals that are increasingly longer in their days of searching for places to reproduce, feed, hibernate, etc. The rhizome of the Earth has no territorial beginning or end, lacks a center and has nodes with vanishing lines and nodes with convergence lines, which can change, appear more or disappear; They can also modify their arms and nodal extensions, but it will always remind us that the whole planet is oneself and that humanity belongs to this planet as well as a bat or a pangolin, caring for them is caring for ourselves.
Avoiding the introduction and translocation of biological species is a pending subject of landscape ecology that now tries to give us the same teaching as in the time of the black plague (1347-1353), of cholera (1817), of the Spanish flu ( 1918) or the Asian flu (1957), the numerous cholera pandemics (1961, 1991, 1992 ...), swine flu (1976, 2009 ...), avian flu (1878, 1997, 2003, 2005, 2006 ...) and of course, by CoVid (2003-2004).
The next question is, are we ready to learn and apprehend the teachings of the earth? This question is the same as the beginning of the forum, and although I tried to answer it with historical facts, I think I did not reach a favorable conclusion for us. We will soon forget what happened and the whole rhythm of life will remain the same, only with the memory of these bad days of humanity.
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I haven't done habitat use studies, analyzing which local and landscape-level factors best explain bird species occurrence. for several decades, and am wondering if CCA (canonical correspondence analysis) is still considered valid (and used). Looks like most of the references are from the 1980s and 1990s, so I'd be interested to hear if some other method is used instead. 
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Dear Irene Zweimüller and
Rob H.G. Jongman
,
would you please clarify where the correlation coefficients of data analysis are represented in Canoco 5 results notebook?
looking forward to hearing from you
T. Talebi
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I am looking to understand how different native trees with different functional traits compete against Japanese knotweed.
The traits I want to consider include:
1. Species with different light requirement( e.g light demanders versus shade tolerants)
2. Species with different nutrient requirements (e.g species that do well in nutrient rich soils versus those that perform well in poor soils)
3. Species with different growth rates (e.g fast growing versus slow growing)
4.Species with different root forms (e.g deep rooting versus shallow rooting)
5.Species with difference in seasonal adaptation (e.g evergreens versus deciduous trees)
What tree species, native to Northeast America, should I select to compare for each functional trait I am considering?
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Sure, I will be glad to share the progress and results. I just started harvesting my knotweed rhizome buds for propagation. Thanks for the luck.
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Dears,
Do you know where it is possible to find reliable datasets on crop pest occurrences reporting also the exact coordinates? I have tried to download the CABI pest distribution data. However this reports only the coordinates related to the centroid of the region where the pest is present.
Many thanks for your kind support.
Best regards,
Giorgio
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Dear colleagues,
Many thanks for your kind support.
I will go through the papers and links you have provided.
Best regards,
Giorgio
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Some literature defines "provenance" as the original source of invasive plant propagules used in an experiment or study (e.g. {Liu et al. (2017). Provenance-by-environment interaction of reproductive traits in the invasion of Spartina alterniflora in China. https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.1815}
{Zenni et al. (2014). Rapid evolution and range expansion of an invasive plant are driven by provenance-environment interactions. Ecology Letters, 17(6), 727–735. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12278})
But what is the specific definition of "provenance" in invasion biology? Is it the original source (native geo-range) of an invasive plant propagule? Or Can the term provenance mean sources of propagules of a certain population of an invasive plant which can also be in the invaded range?
And Smith et. al. (2005) in their paper on "the effect of provenance on the establishment and performance of Lotus corniculatus L. in a re-creation environment" , discuss new terms i.e. "geographical" and "ecological" provenance. Are these two terms also adopted in invasion biology especially when studying alien plant species? If yes, how can we defferentiate them?
I thank you in advance for your responses.
NM
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If we are talking about "alien species", it seems clear to me that the "origin" is to be understood in a (bio) geographical sense. European examples are, among others, the Opuntia and Agave (American tropics), the invasive Robinia pseudoacacia (United States and Canada), Ailanthus (SE Asia). The ecological conditions for the survival and expansion of aliens must fall within the ecological potential of the invader
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I am currently looking for Invasive Alien Plant Species (IAPS) Occurrence-Data for mainly the Tropics including Africa, South America, & Asia tropical regions. If you know any research-networks or sources (published and/or Unpublished) of this data, please point me to it. The data would be mainly used for IAPS - Species Distribution Modelling.
NB: I have already gone through most of the data from International Databases (e.g.GBIF and GISD), however.. it is abit lacking.
I thank you in advance for your responses.
Sincerely,
NM
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GBIF provides data worldwide https://www.gbif.org/
Look also to previous analogous question's answers
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I already know about Freude's "Die Käfer Mitteleuropas".
Are there any other out there?
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Now you can try to use the Danish beetle bank
I think it includes a lot of northern Europe species.
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I am part of the Weed and Invasive Plant Ecology and Management lab at Montana State University, and we are looking for papers that discuss whether or not to include the target species in analysis. It seems that if the impacts of the species on the rest of the community are of interest, one would exclude the species from the data set, however when considering biodiversity, should it be included?
Thank you for any input.
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You need to investigate the impact of the invasive plant on native flora, so you would not include it in biodiversity
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Anyone has field experience on eficiency of using this type of casting traps (image attached) versus more "traditional" pots ? If applied to the blue crab, would be optimal.
The idea would be to use these casting traps to cover a wider geographical area (also more replicates) on a much shorter time period. And avoid the trouble of going once to deploy the pots and having to go back one or two days later to retrieve them.
Any thoughts or knowledge on any study carryed-out with such casting traps would be well appreciated.
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Hi João ,
The crab rings are widely used in brackish waters of India, especially from south-west coast for mud crab. Since this fishery is sustenance level, reports is very limited. Currently, we working on traps and pots of India, a review article on this underway. I'll share you once its published.
Best wishes,
Chinna
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Water hyacinth is a menace for the waterbodies of Kolkata, and therefore its recycling is important. How can the extraction be done in a crude way?
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Aquatic hyacinth are indeed a menace to aquatic environment, thinking of how to recycle them is a good idea. However, a typical aquatic hyacinth has higher water content than every other elements. It may therefore be tedious since a very large quantity may give just a little of the elements sort for. We may wish to look for other better ways of recycling them that are cost effective.
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The species is highly aggressive invader, but the research interest seems to be quite poor.
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Please take a look at this useful RG link.
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Apparently most records of introduced/invasive marine species place them in shallow waters from intertidal to around 40m. I think that species might be introduced into deep water (>100m), although there would likely be fewer vectors transporting them. However, I remain unaware of species introductions detected in deep water. Can anyone shed some light on this topic?
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Here is another that addresses the concern expressed in the paper just cited in my last answer. So I wonder, are there documented cases of deep water introductions?
Thale AD, Freitag A, Bergman E, Fretz D, Saleu W. 2015. Robots as Vectors for Marine Invasions: Best Practices for Minimizing Transmission of Invasive Species Via Observation-Class ROVs. Tropical Conservation Science 8(3): 711-717; https://doi.org/10.1177/194008291500800308
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Invasive Species Control
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Good assesment by using models, but i am interested in biological control of such invasive species.
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Hi, I am looking for a picture of ants attacking seabirds, do you have that? It is for a biosecurity presentation explaining people the risk of invasive ants. I will put the copyright off course. Thanks for your help
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Hi.
I don't have any picture about the subject, but I know there are several recent papers on predation of pelagic seabirds by invasive ants in the Macaronesian archipelagos. I attach one of such papers on it, which perhaps may be of help in order to contact with authors.
Best regards, and good luck.
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The concept exotic or invasive species some time controversial. What do you think.
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All invasive species are exotic (e.g. Eichhornia crassipes, Lantana camara & Parthenium hysterphorus) but all exotic species are not invasive (e.g. Acacia auriculiformis, Grevellia robusta & Psidium guajava).
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What is the limit between an invasive and exotic species. For me the impact on the ecosystem, but many scientists foreign species qualify as invasive.
What do you think?
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Both exotic and invasive species are non-native species. Generally the harmless non-native species are termed as exotic species. When non-native species becomes harmful to the ecosystem, are termed as invasive species.
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I'm slightly confused as to what inferences can be drawn from these two data of invasive species.
Another set I have is 70% variation is between populations however there is very very high gene flow between the populations.
My initial thought with the data set is that the results are incoherent?
Would appreciate some advice.
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You need to understand the basics of what Fst actually means. Fst is the average inbreeding of the subpopulations relative tot the total population, and it is calculated on the basis of the (average) expected heterozygosity of the subpopulations (Hs) and the expected heterozygosity of the total population (Ht), like Fst=(Ht-Hs)/Ht=1-Hs/Ht. In other words, it is the standardized variance in heterozygosity among subpopulations. Nothing more, nothing less. Under very specific circumstances, it can tell us something about gene flow. Don't make the mistake of interpreting every Fst as a measure of gene flow: only when you a wide range of strict assumptions are met (which they never are), can you tell anything about gene flow from FST. See Whitlock & McCauley 1999 (Heredity). When your studied populations are not in migration-drift equilibrium, FST will strongly mislead you in terms of gene flow.
If 98% of the variation is found within subpopulations, this means there is extreme genetic differentiation, nearly complete fixation among subpopulations.
It would be better to show us the actual data, not your intepretation of gene flow. A good start would be hierarchical F-statistics and basic summary statistics (Fis, Fit, Fst, He per population, Ho per population, He of the total population).
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Do you know any published paper focusing on feeding interactions (predation, competition, niche partitioning) between alien/invasive top predators originating from different areas when they co-occurr in a new area?
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Is this the kind of thing you're looking for ?
Mesopredator Management: Effects of Red Fox Control on the Abundance, Diet and Use of Space by Feral Cats. Robyn Molsher, Alan E. Newsome, Thomas M. Newsome, Christopher R. Dickman. 2017. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.016846
There's quite a lot of literature on this combination (cats and foxes in Australia) and also foxes and dingo. This paper will get you into that literature.
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There is evidence of Corbicula (in this case fluminea, an invasive species i.a. in Europe and North America) that the species is "moving" upstream in small rivers and streams where the usual suspects shipping (i.e. ballast water) and transport of dredged materials (gravel extracted from the river bottom or from already "infested" gravel pits) are not acting. What other "agents" might be responsible for the upstream migration of the Asiatic clam? Any ideas or proofs of alternative ways for spreading of Corbicula (as larvae or adults)?
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I found some data on mucus threads which may help anchoring Corbicula on movable objects (fish, birds, etc.) - in sense of downstream or inter stream transportation, but I suppose upstream transportation is also possible: "Transport/dispersal using drifting threads has been observed in adults of the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea (Prezant & Chalermwat, 1984 [ actually they wrote about small individuals]), but not so far in the post-larvae of any freshwater/estuarine Corbicula." - Kimura T, Soutome Y, Sekiguchi H (2004) Larval Development of the Brackish Water Clam Corbicula japonica (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae), with Special Reference to Morphological Comparison with Concurrent Tidal Flat Bivalves. Venus 63:33-48
Prezant RS, Chalermwat K (1984) Flotation of the Bivalve Corbicula fluminea as a Means of Dispersal. Science 225:1491-1493
Also Haag (2012) indicates, that juvenile Corbicula may be transported by "mucilaginous byssal" threads which tangle to fish (Haag WH (2012) North American Freshwater Mussels: Natural History, Ecology and Conservation. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge)
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In the Canary Islands the presence of Pluchea ovalis has been confirmed on Tenerife, where it is an invasive species, mostly in the southern side of the island. This plant is spreading very fast from its introduction in the southwest (Adeje) some years ago, and at present is occupying even some protected areas. In any case, its main habitats in the mentioned island are road edges, small gorges, borders of ponds and dams, etc., but it shows a little expansion to good preserve sites also, and for this may supposes a big threat to natural vegetation. 
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Hi again.
Only some lines to say that, fortunately, local authorities are dedicating time and effort to control the populations of Pluchea ovalis growing in the south of Tenerife Island. It's a hard work, and (probably) the species is impossible to eradicate from the island, but in any case we need such measures to avoid the invasion of good-preserve natural areas, especially the protected ones.
Best regards.
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For example,  Dichrostachys cinerea is highly invasive in Cuba (introduced range) and also very abundant (aggressive) in South Africa (center of origin).
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The lake is c.6.3 hectares and <1m deep. The lake has slightly elevated TP and TN concentrations and there is a concern that removing the invasive water soldier could cause a phase shift from a clear macrophyte dominated state to one that is turbid and phytoplankton dominated. Any comments or experiences about how to approach the issue are welcome. Also how realistic is it to fully remove water soldier so that it does not return?
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It has been a while, but I thought I would provide an update about management actions undertaken to help control the water soldier situation on the lake of concern. A phased removal of the water soldier using Truxor machines began in October 2016 and happened again in September 2017. In September 2017 a boom was also inserted to prevent its spread back in to the removed area. It was our intention to have the boom in from the start of the first removal phase, but limited funds unfortunately prevented this. In total c.20-25% of WS has been removed. Monthly monitoring has been taking place to inform chemical and biological responses, with the boom allowing differences to be observed between open water areas versus those dominated by WS. It would also allow us to observe whether any desirable submerged macrophyte species, which used to dominate / be present, will re-establish. We will continue to monitor the situation and assess the changes in the lake prior to deciding whether further WS should be removed again later this year. I have attached some photos showing the inserted boom (0991 & 0992 are September 2017 and 1019 October 2017). The red buoys are some of the monitoring points.
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World's urban tales had been told many years ago that polar bears are wandering through Polish country. It was never true in historical times, however Alfred Jahn has written in his "Ice and glaciations" (PWN 1971): "In Poland, snow begins to fall mostly in December, and in January and February already covers the earth with a thin layer. This happens when the air temperature drops below 0deg, when the water freezes and the earth is covered with a hard, soggy clod. The change takes place in March. Just a few days of thaw ..." This winter we have here up to 9degC and a thin layer of snow was with breaks for... four weeks no more. In late December I've found the willow flowers at the walk. Daisies bloomed on the lawns. It's a rule now. However, it is not question in plant biology. We start to enjoy with a mediterrenian climate, now. And the mediterrenians? Now it is hard to stay there in the summer time. We also are the most calm country in the Europe with longest white-and-yellow sandy sunny beaches at the seaside. Will Poland be the best place to live for next few centuries?
This winter season the first thin layer of snow occurred here on 5th January 2020.
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In Greenland the Inuit home rule government has a policy to install hydropower in every town tapping the energy from the meltwater. So far they have build six. Each city supplied has ceased to use their diesel generator power plant.
The second photo is of the Sisimut plant close to my universities Sisimut campus.
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I mean awareness about  both invasive  plants and animals is low in the people who should living in those ecosystems.
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Of course! I agree with Ruben!
Regards
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I'm trying to identify some Didymozoid trematodes and it would really help if I could access some of the original descriptions in Satyu Yamaguti (1970) 'Digenetic trematodes of Hawaiian fishes'; however I can't find it anywhere. Anyone know where I could find a copy? Thank you.
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A used copy in "fair" condition is available at Abebooks.com for $25.51, free shipping in the U.S.A.: https://tinyurl.com/y9k6523q
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I am looking for samples for a running project on the molecular phylogeny and historical biogeography of freshwater limpets of the family Acroloxidae (see the following link to the RG project)
Our current sampling in Europe is moderate (see attached maps), but some important regions are still missing (western, central and northern Europe).
Please, contact me if you could provide fresh (recent or max. 10 years old) ethanol-fixed specimens (shells including tissue).
Best regards
Björn Stelbrink
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It would be rather easy to collect samples for you in summer. Byt winter time is not the best one for sampling Acroloxus in Latvia.
I remember about 5 years ago we sent samples to Ch. Albrecht - can you ask him? Be sure we can try it again, but not sure how easy it will be to dig them out from under ice and snow.
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Hello,
I'm a Master student looking for an interesting applied ecology problem to investigate in my thesis project.
I've been considering to deepen the possible use of parasitoids in fighting invasive macroalgae species but i couldn't find much literature about this. Does anyone know of published papers about the relationship between parasitoids and algae? Thank you very much!
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Hi Ginevra,
I know that in commercial cultivation there are some diseases causing really important problems. Check this article and see if it can be useful for you (I think that the ice-ice disease is caused by a virus, but maybe you can find something interesting).
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Invasive species threaten the biodiversity of native species communities. Their importance is expected to increase with climate change. The invasibility of plant communities is furthermore increased by extreme drought. Do you have any idea whether the presence of invasive species put additional pressure to grassland ecosystem functioning in the face of drought events?
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The habitat type is a matter. For example, the roadside habitats (native, ruderal) well resistant to drought, invasives do not get advantage in these habitat types, but in wetland types invasives with drought for longer period can explode and get substantial advantage even change the habitat type.
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Invasive species are foreign or non-native organisms that infiltrate an ecosystem. I mostly here of these species causing more harm than help. I was wondering if there some cases that these invasive species would help the ecosystem that they are in. 
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Hi.
I fully agree with the view that invasive species have, in general, negative effects on the natural ecosystems, but in some cases invasive plants can have positive effects in several native insect species, like in the case of Calotropis procera (Asclepiadaceae) in the Canary Islands. The introduction and expansion of this plant in some islands (Fuerteventura and Gran Canaria) has facilitated reproduction of the African Monarch butterfly (Danaus chrysippus). In any case, this is not a justification for the introduction of alien plants in any territory of the world...
Best regards.
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Channa is a genus of fish in the family Channidae, commonly known as snakehead, native to Asia. I am reviewing its status and how to prevent, eradicate, manage this alien in European waters. I would greately appreciate if anyone has some good suggestions for me on this interesting and beautiful alien.
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Dear Philip thanks for your interest in the Channid Snakeheads of Europe. They could enter, spread, invade.  I have been reading up on them. But its not too late to stop them if bans on aquarium trade, live-food trade, aquaculture etc are put in place and implemented. They could spread in the southern half of Europe - in the cold-winter eastern half Channa argus did not spread - even though the USSR russians made many attempts (even in Slovak and Czech republics). So fortunately the situation is not like in the US.
Keep fish'n,
Stam 
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Within the city of Dnipro (steppe zone of Ukraine) the invasive species Ulmus pumila forms massive thickets in decommissioned areas. The investigated site is located on the watershed on the site of the abandoned construction site. There buried building debris, the thickness of fertile soil is no more than 15 cm. Sometimes concrete slabs come to the surface. In young thickets (about 5-6 years), Ulmus pumila completely dominates. There are rare instances of Ulmus minor. But within the thickets there are young trees with outgrowths on branches (usually 1 order). I have never seen such outgrowths in Ulmus pumila before and did not find any references in the literature. They can be in our native species Ulmus suberosa (permanent sign) and rarely at Ulmus minor. But the leaf buds of these specimens are smaller than Ulmus minor buds and have 4 renal scales. Help clarify the form of the elm.
 Thanks for the help
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Ulmus pumila and U. minor hybridize freely, there's lots of literature on this.  Therefore, in any area where both occur there will be many hybrids, and backcrosses of hybrids. Individual elms in such areas will have mixtures of characteristics.  You'll find morphological 'pumila' that nevertheless have these corky 'wings' on twigs,  you'll also find morphological 'minor' that nevertheless have small buds.  These individuals cannot be assigned to any nominate species.  DNA sequencing shows individuals to be complex mixtures (e.g. Biological Invasions 15(12) · December 2013).  Indeed, where hybridization is so frequent, it's an open question whether nominate species like 'minor' or 'pumila' are really phylogentically distinct.  Incidentally, these corky outgrowths are common on U. minor in the areas I know (France, Germany, UK).  
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get a list of butler jp or butler james p to potentially add to publication list
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Once you have logged into ResearchGate, you can manually add your work by clicking at "Add new Article" on your page or by clicking at contribution category.
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In the Lesser Antilles, Triphasia trifolia has been importated from Asia for ornemental purposes. This shrub forms now thickets and monospecific stands in natural coastal forests. These stands are most often lower than 1 meter high but with some individuals reaching more than 3 meters ! This species re-sprouts from stumps and roots (like Leucaena leucocephala) therefore it appears necessary to re-treat former removal sites. The only long-term solution I found in the literature was to dig around and remove all the vegetal material with heavy machinery, which is impossible in remote locations, too expensive and imply too great impact for other species.
Do you have a tried and tested solution ? or some advices to deal with this species ?
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I don't know this species, but two non-chemical methods which might be worth investigating are mechanical control like Lever and Mulch(TM) (see http://www.highlandbirchwoods.co.uk/userfiles/file%5CIntro%20to%20Lever%20&%20Mulch.pdf) and use of cut and cover techniques like Buckthorn baggies (http://www.buckthornbaggie.com/).
In Scotland, Lever and Mulch has been used against rhododendron, which is difficult to control, as it layers, and re-sprouts from buds around the root collar.  This method includes a variety of manual techniques, but is based on using the trunk as a lever to break the plant up as much as possible, with the dead material left as a mulch to smother remaining layers.  I don't know whether the structure of Triphasia would be suitable for these techniques, but it might be worth trying.
Cut and cover is useful for plants that resprout from a stump - you basically zip-tie thick plastic bags over the stumps to kill the plant.  It has been used in America against buckthorn, and we are testing it in Scotland against beech, but only on small sites where the bags can be collected up again.  It should be possible to develop something like this using a biodegradable material.  However, this is unlikely to be useful for something that spreads via rhizomes.
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I'm referring to the spread of freshwater species that are attractive aquarium/angling fishes such as the sunfishes, catfishes and snakeheads in European waters (aliens!!!). Europeans will continue to keep them in captivity and will use them as angling attractions or to stock their big mouth bass fishing areas. Please, any innovative ideas would be very much appreciated!
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 Showing the damage caused by invasive species can educate and convince many people.
I work as technician in the conservation project LimnoPirineus (http://www.lifelimnopirineus.eu/en). We are removing invasive fish from eight high mountain lakes in the Pyrenees. After three years of work we are getting some nice results such as the recovering of the natural transparency and the increase of abundance or the natural recolonization of many species of amphibians, invertebrates and crustaceans.
I have experienced that showing these milestones to the local people and pupils in local schools and high schools is convincing most of the audience.
Also, I have to recognize that a few people is not convinced anyway. However, I can see a very good progress at community scale.
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I'd like to know if it is one of the species you can plant, as phytoremediator or ecological restoration of the landscape.
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Hi 
For my experience with this genus, Leaf relative water was maintained stable whatever the drought stress lever was.
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We have been discussing within our group the question of what to do with individuals of invasive species caught during projects, which for us are in preserves and national parks. I am also curious if you think it makes a difference if it is in a preserve or not.
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Since the information you provide suggests that the invasive species is not a target of your project, then not releasing it back into the wild will not bias your results.  I am sure your project is guided by ethical rules (established by your host institution), but the Ethics Board may not have specified what must be done with bycatch or indeed injured target species.  It is in the best interests of the park for invasive species to be eradicated, but as individuals your group might have issues with euthanising animals on an ad-hoc basis.  My approach would be to discuss first with the park authorities - perhaps by highlighting this question, it will at least draw attention to the issue of invasive species in the park (and might even be adopted as a pilot eradication project) if these invasives do indeed have a serious negative impact on the native fauna/flora.
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invasive species management in Indian forests.
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nvasive species can harm the values for which land is conserved. Natural lands are not fully protected unless they also are managed for the features that first motivated preservation. Invasive species can change community structure, composition, and ecosystem processes on these lands in ways that may not be anticipated or desirable. Careful management can minimize these negative impacts.
This guide is designed to assist landowners and land managers, including municipalities, land trusts, homeowner’s associations and watershed organiza-tions, to develop and implement a management program for controlling invasive species.
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Hi,
After finding out about it, I'm using the k-core decomposition method to visualise/analyse the seed dispersal network of Aldabra Atoll as part of my PhD project. It's a great tool to visualise details that are otherwise difficult to grasp with standard plots. I love it that you are providing examples with published networks and I was wondering if you could include some ecological interpretation of the data along with the figures? For example, does it coincides with what was found in the studies/what additional details can we learn from the ziggurats?
Thanks very much for this interesting approach of looking at mutualistic networks (and the k-magnitudes!).
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Hi Wifredo,
I am not an ecologist so any interpretation in that sense would be very daring. From the point of view of network science and mutualism, we found that k-radius is a measure of compactness (how far are species from the generalist core). In this sense, it resembles nestedness, and both magnitudes show a high correlation.
Regards,
Javier
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Freshwater mussel taxonomic order is one of the most endangered groups of animals on the planet, but the nomenclature used in current literature seems to be unclear: order Unionoida or Unionida?
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Hi Karel,
In my opinion the name of the order is "Unionida J. Gray, 1854". And this name is valid and should be used. "Unionoida, Stoliczka, 1871" appeared later. For more details I can recommend you this article: Nomenclator of Bivalve Families with a Classification of Bivalve Families. 2010. Malacologia 52(2):1-184. https://doi.org/10.4002/040.052.0201
Best regards, Ania
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What about its occurrence in Brazil?
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 This paper confirms its presence in Brazil
Composition and spatial distribution of subtidal Decapoda on the "Reef Coast", northeastern Brazil, evaluated through a low-impact visual census technique
Best regards
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According to distribution maps (IUCN, http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/183882/0) this species has been restrictively allocated to specific sites in the eastern Pacific including the Gulf of California (Mexico), Cocos Island National Park (Costa Rica), Galapagos (Ecuador) and Lobos de Afuera Island (Peru). I was wondering if there is any other unofficial/unpublished report for H. fossatus in the eastern Pacific
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Many thanks for that information Arvind
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Help me to find out some literature related to mutation breeding or effect of different mutagenic agents on Impatiens balsamina for different flowering and dye attributes.
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You can check my database at
I am sure there will be several more paper dealing with mutagenesis.
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Aquatic Biodiversity International Conference, Sibiu 2017
The conference will aim to communicate recent advances in the aquatic biodiversity: assessment, monitoring, conservation and management, aquatic habitats - biodiversity interrelations, aquatic biodiversity and alien species, aquatic microbial ecology, food web interactions and aquatic productivity, wetlands biodiversity, research methods in aquatic ecology/biodiversity, ecologic reconstruction and the biodiversity, human impact and the aquatic biodiversity, global changes.
Information about this conference can be found at
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Thank you. May be in 2019?:)
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 I'm working on Mormyrids fish from niger River at malanville. i don't think i have all the documentary available that is why i am making this request
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The following papers may be of interest:
King, R. P. 1989. Distribution, abundance, size and feeding habits of Brienomyrus brachyistius (Gill 1862) (Teleostei: Mormyridae) in a Nigerian rainforest stream. Cybium 13 (1): 25-36.
Kouamélan, P. E. et al. 2000. Habitudes alimentaires de Mormyrops anguilloides (Mormyridae) en milieux lacustre et fluvial d'un bassin ouest-africain. Cybium 24 (1): 67-79.
Mérona, B. de 1979. Écologie et biologie de Petrocephalus bovei (Pisces, Mormyridae) dans les rivières de Côte d'Ivoire. Cahier ORSTOM Hydrobiologie 13 (3-4): 117-127.
Okedi, J. 1964. The biology and habits of the mormyrid fishes... Annual Report EAMFRO 1964: 58-66.
Petr, T. 1968. Distribution, Abundance and Food of Commercial Fish in the Black Volta and the Volta Man-made Lake in Ghana during its First Period of Filling (1964-1966) . I. Mormyridae. Hydrobiologia 32: 3-4.
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I am searching for a nice photo in dorsal view of the "samurai crab" Heikeopsis japonica to illustrate a text for scientific disclosure in a non-profit Brazilian website. If anyone has an image that I can use, or known who has one, I would much appreciate.
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Good
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Hello everyone 
I have not any information about the distribution status of Lernaea cyprinacea in Turkey. I assume that this species is alien (nonindigenous) parasite species of Turkey. Does anyone have or find out any information this topic?
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Lernaea cyprinacea has a cosmopolitan distribution, but has been introduced to Australia and N and S America :)
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Dear all,
I'm looking for an example of a country that possesses both the source and the recipient habitat of an invasive species, except Israel and Egypt..
It may be marine, terrestrial, faunal or floral organism.
I'm mainly interested about the conservation management-actions taken by the country.
In other words, how to protect a species in one place, and cull it from the other.
Thanks in advance,
Nir Stern
Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research Institute
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Also the snakes I metioned from Spain meet your requirements.
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This Psocoptera (Psocidae: Thyrsophorinae) in the genus Poecilopsocus sp. from Colombia may grow up to 1,4 cm in length. They live in small colonies beneath a gossamer blanket spun with silk from their labial glands.  
I think the species in the anexed photographs is the largest bark louse in the world. Does anyone know what the species is?
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Thank you André:
At least the species  P. iridescens agrees with the original description of Enderlein 1901. Zoologische Jahrbücher (Abteilung Systematik) 14:544
Best regards,
Luis Miguel
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In Madagascar island, 6 unknown eaten pleurotoid occur in native humide forests or plants material wastes.
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Interesting project
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The fish Hypostomus plecostomus, commonly known as the janitor fish, is not a native fish of the Philippines. Decades ago, it was accidentally introduced to one of the countries' rivers. Since its introduction, it became an invasive species. It became predators to other species native to the river like that of catfish and milkfish. There presence disrupted the river ecosystem and biodiversity. Thus; I have this question of whether or not its removal could help restore the river's ecosystem back to its normal state (pre-introduction of the janitor fish).
Thank you.
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The first thing that you have to do is check the taxonomy, many so-called Hypostomus plecostomus are not of that species at all,but belong to other genera. Secondly, do you have evidence of predation on the native species as many (most?) species are algal or detritus feeders. We have an invasion of Pterygoplichthys paradalis here in Jamaica. 
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Would the world’s ecosystems (coral reefs, rainforests, etc.) be significantly different were it not for the detrimental effects of the war, specifically World War II? And how so? Would the effects of climate change not be such a problem / hasten the process? Would we have less extinct and endangered species? 
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In the Pacific, rats were introduced to Midway, causing the extinction of Laysan rails, transplanted there; Palmyra Atoll, Baker Island. Brown tree snakes were accidentally released on Guam, extinction followed for 13 spp. Defoliation on other islands, and re-seeding created plant diversity loss. Introduction of African snails as starvation food caused local land mollusk extinctions, etc. See Isles of Amnesia, my 2016 book on these factors.
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A species needs a name. It can be described as new species but literature suggests that it has a nomen nudum. So my question is that can the nomen nudum be reinstated for this species? Is it better to reinstate the nomen nudum? Will the new describer be the authority of the name reinstated or the original author? thanks in advance
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First of all I am giving the explanation of nomen nudum from the Glossary of the Code.
nomen nudum (nom. nud.). A designation of a new taxon published without a description or diagnosis or reference to a description or diagnosis (Art. 38 Ex. 1, Rec. 50B).
In this case  "The first author just wrote the species name on some specimens". So the name was never published and cannot be nomen nudum.
So the manuscript name can be validly published by citing 'name of the original author who proposed the name ex the name pf the author who will validly publish the name '  or  just name pf the author who will validly publish the name. Both type of author citations are acceptable.
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I have some identification books but it's super out-of-date. Even the content might be still relevant, but I just wonder, whether there are other references for tropical understorey plant identification which are newer?
If you know, would you mind to mention the title and the author of the identification books?
Thanks
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I agree with Andrew Paul Mckenzie Pegman. The other way to identify the plant is by using the local/regional flora.
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Hi Luke - Check our Indian fox distribution map published in Mammalian Species (Gompper and Vanak 2006). Similar to the IUCN map, but slightly different.
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 Hi Luke,
No the RedList map has not been updated. 
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Does there anyone know how to sexually distinguish the 4th-instar larva of Aedes albopictus by morphological feature?
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Tnaks again for your kindly help! Please don't say sorry, actually it's my carelessness. I have downloaded the article you provided and it maybe very helpful to me.
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This week I was asked in a talk about the name change of Aedes aegypti. I think from the population point of view this is very complicated and can make it difficult for us to have the support of the population, so important in vector control programs.
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It seems to me that the 'chaotic situation' is being created by the taxonomists. We now live in a world where common names of plants and animals are more stable and reliable (and therefore sometimes more effective for communication) than are the scientific names. The remaining advantage of the scientific names (since their greater stability is now dead) is that they attempt to more accurately reflect phylogenetic reality. But even this is a mirage, since virtually all taxa probably arise paraphyletically (the old cladistic naming dilemma). Enforced monophyly depends on our ignorance (lost species, insensitive genetics), and hence, the constant renaming
Interestingly, the rest of the scientific world is beginning to rebel against this never-ending nomenclatural revision. The recent 'codified' name changes within the genus Acacia have been almost uniformly rejected by non-taxonomists. Fully ten years after the decision, the genus survives in the scientific literature, in a kind of grass roots rebellion.
It is not just the public that is confused. I can guarantee you that the vast majority of scientists have no clue what you are talking about when you use these new names. Even journals are beginning to recommend use of 'traditional' scientific names (Flora, for Acacia; and Journal of Medical Entomology, for Aedes).
What is the answer? The scientific community will need to decide. My own opinion is that we will need at least partly disconnect nomenclature from taxonomy, before all species are put in the Kingdom Archaea.
Meanwhile, if you must use a new name, at least report it in a way that does not lose most of your audience, like "Stegomyia (Aedes) aegypti".
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Me and my partner, Jack Ramos, are currently conducting a research on the effects of invasive Mahogany trees on native soil bacteria. Any idea, comment or suggestion would be most appreciated. Thank you so much,
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The root exudates in the rhizosphere of the Mahogony tree and litter quality will increase or decrease the activities of the micro flora of the soil depending on the nature of the micro flora of that soil.
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A different perspective on IAS (Invasive Alien Species) since detrimental effects of have been extensively studied.
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Invasive European carp in the Murray-Darling Basin Australia have become an important food source for native fish-eating waterbirds such as cormorants, herons, pelicans and darters. High abundance of carp after flooding has led to increased breeding activity of some of these birds.
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Are there any publications or unpublished data on pheromones available for Boris schneideri (Insecta: Coleoptera)?
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Thank you for information, Dmitry
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Recently, our team interested in Scincella huanrenensis in Korean peninsula. So we are collecting papers about the species. However, It is really hard to find two papers from Sichunan Journal of Zoology, China. I will give the information of two papers. If anyone have them, we are asking to share the papers. 
1) D Bing-jun. 2005. Current Status and Protection of Scincella huanrenensis. Sichuan journal of zoology.
2) B Dong et al. 2007. Research on Reproductive Behavior and Strategy of Scincella huanrensis. Sichuan journal of zoology.
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I have 2005 paper. Which email to send it to you?
Let me know.
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Coecobrya tenebricosa is a small collembolan species noted at least from North America and Europe (data eg. from www.gbif.org). The species was described from USA (Washington D.C.) but actually is known also from at least a few Europen countries. I am looking for information about its original distribution (is it native for N America?) as well as about its actual species range.
Thank you in advance for your comments and help.
Regards,
Radomir
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This species is absent in Latvia, consider http://leb.daba.lv/40-ju1.pdf 
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I am a wildlife biologist in the US and interested in this region and may be moving to Seoul. I'm interested in potentially doing graduate research at a Korean university in ecology and conservation, which is a sub-discipline that seems to be new in a South Korea or at least I don't see many research departments focused on it. I'm specifically interested in migration ecology, conservation biology, and design of protected areas, marine and terrestrial, for highly migratory species.
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hi
I think Seoul is a good place for your work. it is high rank university. They have section or faculty for the natural sciences & they have graduate school called " environmental studies" [search this link  http://gses.snu.ac.kr/eng/]
all the best
Regards
Dr. Kumara
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What factors may affect the relative abundance of  Agaricales? Does the presence of Agaricales indicate some environmental  characteristics?
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This question just came to my mind after reading a paper by Andreone et al. 2016, where they study the distribution of Chamaeleo chamaeleon in southern Italy. They say that the species occurred naturally in Sicily (where it is now extinct), and found that the remaining populations in the country are a result of introduced individuals (apparently from outside Italy). So should we now call Chamaeleo chamaeleon a non-native species of Italy?
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I agree with Pedro.  "Non-native" implies a biological organism that is "exotic" to a historical distributional range (a historic distributional range being a geographical one in which the organism occurred, evolved or dispersed naturally).  "Non-native", as in the language of ecology, does not include arbitrary or fluid political and/or governmental boundaries that may or may not contain the organism in question.  However, one can assign a respective area or range as applicable for political and/or conservation goals (for instance, providing protection to an organism over the entire country versus just one island of that country). Therefore, Pedro's statement that the lizard is "non-native to continental Italy" would be correct in application.
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Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG)
Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM)
Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP)
Somebody can recommend some research group?
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See also very classical article of
-Benzing DH (1990) Vascular epiphytes. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, p 345
-Zotz G. & Hietz P. 2001. The fisiological ecology of vascular epiphytes: current knowledge, open questions J.Exper.Bot. 52(364):2067-2078.
 
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I am interested to know if you will be looking at southern Sierra Nevada populations of porcupine and the effect on tree spacing after their extirpation. I am curious to know if there is any research on the forest tree die-off was made worse by this missing ecological link that used to thin trees naturally?
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Hi Alison, good question. We are not studying the southern Sierra Nevada populations. I'm not sure if there's enough historical data on porcupines in that area to compare their role in tree thinning before and after population decline, but I am not that familiar with the system. Would