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Intonation - Science topic

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I want to know the relationship among pitch, fundamental frequency (F0) and tone, intonation of voice? Who can give me more details about this relationship and some reference materials? Thanks.
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A little more detail to add to Clara's excellent explanation.
First, physically, the resonant portions of the speech signal (as opposed to the noise of consonants) are generated by the vocal cords, and the frequency of vocal cord vibration is called the phonation rate, in articulatory phonetics. The signal is then transmitted through the air (or other media), where the frequency of the vibrations is referred to as the fundamental frequency (F0), in acoustic phonetics. The transmitted signal is then partly analysed in the ear and referred to as perceived pitch by the brain, in auditory or perceptual phonetics. Sometimes 'pitch' is used sloppily to mean 'fundamental frequency'.
Second, from a linguistic point of view, these three perspectives on the same property of the speech signal function as tones (if they distinguish words, as in many African and Asian languages), or pitch accents (if they point to lexical items in a sentence, as in English), and as intonation if they relate to the structure of phrases and sentences (e.g. phrasing, emphasis) and discourse (e.g. speech acts like question-answer patterns). As Clara indicates, intonation may also be superimposed on the tones of languages like Chinese, or the pitch accents of languages like English.
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I am researching about spanish prosody. I want to download an annotated corpus about prosody. Does anyone know something about it?
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I don't have access to the corpus. The website didn't work for download it. If anyone have it, please let me know.
Thanks to Christina E. Valaki and Camilo Enrique Díaz Romero
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The mapping of word-level accentual phenomena and musical prominence and melody in text-setting is well-known. This leads to the question as to whether higher-level prosodic constituents are also mirrored in music, and if so how.
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Here’s a paper on prosodic structure and musical structure: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01962/full
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Could you recommend any convincing studies about positive or neutral impact of listening music in 432 Hz intonation (in comparison to 440 Hz) to human health. What is your opinion in this area?
The difference between 432 Hz and 440 Hz is relatively small, but more and more artist (and scientists too) suggest that this kind of intonation would positive influence to relaxation and even health. Maybe its only marketing?
There is a very nice sample:
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The real problem with this question is that the expression "music tuned to 432 Hz" (or "to 440 Hz") hardly makes sense. First of all, it should give a note name. One probably must understand "music tuned to A3=432 Hz", but it would be better to say so. Then, suppose that A3 indeed is tuned to that frequency. What is the frequency of the other notes? This depends on several factors:
-- What instrument?
-- In what tuning or temperament is one tuning?
-- How long after the tuning does one measure the effect?
-- What kind of music is played?
It must be realized that an orchestra may have tuned to any pitch standard to start with -- say A3=432 Hz -- and neverteless may play at some other pitch standard -- say A3=440 Hz -- after half an hour, if only because of the increase in temperature in the room.
The French Government decided in the mid 19th century that the French standard pitch should be A3=435 Hz. Then the Austrians wrongly believed that this pitch had been measured at too low a temperature (around 15° centigrade) and estimated that pitch would raise by 5 Hz between 15° and 20°: this is the origin of A3=440 Hz.
Most instruments do not tune from A; D often is considered a better choice. But then the frequency of A will depend on the size of the fifth tuned in the particular temperament (or tuning system) considered.
Also, it is well known that choirs singing a capella (without instruments) tend to lower in pitch. The cause is often believed to be that the singers get tired, but it has been shown that the effect of tonality is much more important, because it entails harmonic progressions in one direction. Tonal music tends to lower in pitch, and the effect may be quite more important than the difference between 440 and 432 Hz (32 cents, only about 1.5 comma).
To sum up: this whole affair about playing at 432 Hz is nonsense. It is probable that a lot of music has been played "at 432 Hz" throughout history, and that nobody ever noticed. (Ellis, it the late 19th century, was able to document hundreds of historical pitch standards.)
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I am interested in how prosody helps disambiguate sentences. Studies that focus on that may (1) ask a speaker to produce the same sentence with different intonations, (2) directly manipulate the signal (e.g. by adding a silence), or (3) both. Does anyone know of a study that actually compared these methods?
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Maybe informative though not related to sentence disambiguation: Chen et al (2007, please see link) who compared natural and synthetic speech in a study on information status perception. A side note, you will be aware of anyway: the choice of natural vs synthetic stimuli of also depends on the research question: with natural stimuli one can do pretty much the same as in a production study, e.g. 'is the production/perception of sentence structure B related to a longer pause than of structure A?' For such a question a production study might already be sufficient (if you don't assume a production/perception mismatch). Synthetic stimuli in addition allow for creating acoustic continua by which one can find discrimination thresholds and fit psychometric functions, e.g. a GLM mapping pause duration to the percentage of B perception.
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We are conducting a study of the assessment of teaching stress and intonation for university students
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Marking stress and intonation depend on different situations. The intonation varies from context to context. The rules are not fixed.
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Its true that the rules for marking stress and intonation keep changing. as far as my knowledge concern its because the pronunciation of any language does not depend on any particular rule. Its dynamic. Due to this reason the rules keep changing.
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I have decided to work on this topic as my thesis; however, I really do not know which sources are best and helpful to study, since I need to gain a full knowledge; then start my job.
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Hello all
I really appreciate all your support. 
Regards
Fateme
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 Intonation pattern in regarding declarative questions, yes/no questions, and wh-questions, as well as declarative Statement.
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You may well find this kind of comparative information in : 't Hart, Collier & Cohen (2006). A perceptual study of intonation. An experimental-phonetic approach to speech melody. Cambridge: University Press. This approach has applied the same analysis method to different languages (Dutch, English, German, Russian) so that there is potential for sensible comparison.
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The proposed study focuses on female linguistic styles used by university teachers.
The main focus will be on stress and intonation
Any useful or related articles?resources?
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The following paper won't directly answer your question, but it shows underlying principles of gender difference in prosody. Note, however, actual voice strategies used will depend on the demand of the situation.
Xu, Y., Lee, A., Wu, W.-L., Liu, X. and Birkholz, P. (2013). Human vocal attractiveness as signaled by body size projection PLoS ONE 8(4): e62397.
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We are working on a proposal for PhD that deals with teaching stress and intonation.
Should they be taught at an early or late stage of education/schooling?
Should they be taught separately or integrated with other skills?
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At an intermediate stage and integrate with other skills such as listening and speaking. When learners are at an intermediate level, they may be able to understand stress and intonation in context. I learned about stress and intonation when I was in the MA program. My MA was in TESOL and currently getting my EdD. While studying English as a second language, I don’t recall having a lesson on stress or intonation in any of my ESL classes. Finally, out of curiosity, what are the methods used to collect data? What is the purpose of the study? And what is the theoretical or conceptual framework of the study? What do you hope to find?
Excellent topic and good luck on your proposal defense.
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I am facing some difficulties to make the indicator of someone who having good stress, rhythm and intonation why they are speaking and reading.
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Dear Suciati Anandes,
First, you have to make an inventory of certain targeted statements that carefully pose the suprasegmental features you want to investigate . Subsequently, ask the participants (the selected sample) to read them. Naturally, you record their voices in this particular stage. Finally, ask three native speakers of English to rate them based on the accuracy and appropriacy of their production of suprasegmentals. Good luck with your research.
Best regards,
R.Biria
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Do neurolinguists have any suggested model for phonological transfer direction ?? I want to know if there is any neurological support for the process through which phonological transfer happens.   To be exact i want to know how different parts of brain work when phonological transfer happens?? Any idea? Any model??any sources?? 
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Hallo Sorour,
I am not sure I understand you correctly (whether you talk rather about phonology in general or intonation or both). Transfer in learning ?
The things I have in mind (and which at least I found exciting) for intonation and neural models are these papers here:
But I am not sure they speak to your topic.
Best Susanne
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 I have difficult time to find refrences for my paper . Thanks
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There is a very interesting study about the intonation of questions and social elicitations in: The Communicative Value of Intonation in English by D. Brazil (CUP 1997). This study is based on the analysis of real data and shows how the state of speaker/hearer convergence influences speakers' choice of tone. Brazil states that there is no one to one correspondence between type of question and intonation. What detemines tone choice is whether the speaker is seeking to find out what he ignores or simply to check information.
A similar work on the intonation of elicitations in the Spanish of Argentina was carried out by L. Granato. You can find the text in Revista RASAL Lingüística, number 1, 2005.
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I am studying how the shape of intonation contours affects the perception of emotions. I would like to have some quantitative (and measurable) parameters to be able to make claims about the shape of the contour (e.g. differentiating rounded from linear contours). Any suggestions?
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Intonation transcription conventions using discrete elements, such as ToBI, RaP, INTSINT or Polytonia, are not suited for the characterization of emotions expressed by intonation contours. For this purpose you need continuous features, such as pitch slope, pitch interval, slope change, pitch range, duration, etc. Most of these features are specified in relation to the phonetic alignment. Such features are provided by the Prosogram tool.
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I'm looking for articles about the effects of tonal crowding in intonational languages (tone truncation, tonal compression, schwa epenthesis...). If you've published anything about this subject, I'll be grateful if you let me know.
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Paolo, I have tonal crowding in Pescara, two pitch accents having to be aligned with the same (nuclear) syllable, the outcome being anticipation of the first to the pretonic syllable.
I remember reading about a comparative (I think English/Dutch or English/German) work on final crowding, the outcome being truncation in one language, compression in another...as soon as I find the reference I'll tell you
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Hi everybody. I'm working in intonation and I'd like to know what you think about recording with a wireless recorder. Do you think that I could lose valuable information on my recordings? Should I take account anything about wireless signals? I'm using a TASCAM DR-40 recorder and my micro is a electric condenser micro Shure pg30 and its frequency response is 60 Hz to 20,000 Hz and it's cardiod (Output impedance 1200 Ω@ 1Khz) and I also use a wireless microphone system Shure SVX (details in the attached file). On the other hand, are there papers about suitable microphones (or suitable microphone systems) that I should use in intonation (or in phonetics, at least). Could anybody help me? Thanks for any information.
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From the experiences in our studies and recordings, I can agree to the answers. We used head-mounted mics / headsets (e.g. from Sennheiser) and achieved good results in automatic (emotional) speech recognition. Since we are also analysing pitch, f0, etc features, I would state that wireless mics could be used.
The signal-to-noise-ratio is usually quite good. The best idea is to perform some test recordings and analyse these to estimate the quality of your recordings. Usually, data collection is influence not only by mics but more by the environment.
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Hi everybody. I'm working in intonation and I'd like to know what you think about recording with a wireless recorder. Do you think that I could lose valuable information on my recordings? Should I take account anything about wireless signals? I'm using a TASCAM DR-40 recorder and my micro is a electric condenser micro Shure pg30 and its frequency response is 60 Hz to 20,000 Hz and it's cardiod (Output impedance 1200 Ω@ 1Khz) and I also use a wireless microphone system Shure SVX (details in the attached image). On the other hand, are there papers about suitable microphones (or suitable microphone systems) that I should use in intonation (or in phonetics, at least). Could anybody help me? Thanks for any information.
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Eddy Brixen's advice is very good. To add to it, you can consult advice offered by Bartek Plichta, e.g. on the companion website of the excellent Data collection in sociolinguistics (http://sociolinguisticdatacollection.com/teaching-tools/), and on his own Akustyk website (http://bartus.org/akustyk/, look under "Microphones" and "Reviews").
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see above
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Intonation falls under the paralinguistic features or elements that help in analyzing a discourse
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I am looking for any theoretical and fieldwork studies dealing with the relation between linguistic rhythm (primary and secondary stress, syllable constituency, segment prosodic distribution, metrical feet, prosodic phrasing, intonational contours, etc.) and rhythmic patterns in poetry and folk music, so that evidence of a link between prosody and several types of codified oral production could be eventually found. I am very interested in data covering as many typologically different languages as possible.
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Joao, this week I published a book comparing the whole of Spanish poet Federico Garcia Lorca´s poetic corpus to the whole of Spanish composer Manuel de Falla´s music: "Lorca in Tune with Falla" (Toronto: U. Toronto Press, 2014), 300 pp. They knew each other intimately and shared the same portion of the audible universe, Granada, Spain, from 1920 to 1936. To make my poetry-music comparisons (which include theatre-music comparisons), I rely on Juan David Garcia Bacca´s "Filosofía de la música" (Barcelona: Anthropos, 1990). Garcia Bacca holds that music employs a type of language composed of notes, and it uses organs of expression, the instruments. In the same way, literature, including philosophy and poetry, makes use of words and of conventional syntax. Garcia Bacca analyzes patterns of musical motifs, and recommends the same analysis of motifs in poetry. In addition, I occasionally employ stylistic analysis of Lorca´s sounds, comparable to guitar-playing, when he resorts to onomatopoeia. Falla too would use the orchestra as a giant flamenco guitar.