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Intergroup Relations - Science topic

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I need a non-experimental tool in the form of scale to measure trust between two social groups. If anyone have relevant article, please refer.
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hi,
There are some references, also see the cross-references:
Wu W. Personality impressions predict intergroup trust behaviour of Southern Chinese. Int J Psychol. 2022 Jun 24. doi: 10.1002/ijop.12868. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35748070
You can search for scales from
Prasad Psychological corporation
Agra Psychological Corporation
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Dear fellow researchers, I am Edita. I am currently conducting a longitudinal international research and collaborating with other researchers about forgiveness.The goal of this research is to better describe distinctive presentations of forgiveness in various cultures, contributing to greater understanding of what it means to forgive. Part of the research involves these instruments: "Cultural Motives for Transgression Resolution" (39 items) and "Intergroup Forgiveness" (was created by Noor, Brown, & Prentice, 2008). My questions are do you know the reference and how do you score and interpret the "Cultural Motives for Transgression Resolution" scale? In addition, how do you score and interpret the Intergroup Forgiveness scale (e.g. any total score)?
Please kindly share it with me if you know about it! Thank you in advance!
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Edita Kristofora I am not sure if you are asking about one of these references:
Noor, M., Brown, J. R., & Prentice, G. (in press). Prospects for intergroup reconciliation: social psychological predictors of intergroup forgiveness and reparation in Northern Ireland and Chile. In A. Nadler, T. Malloy & J. D. Fisher (Eds.), Social Psychology of Inter-group Reconciliation: From violent conflict to peaceful co-existence- going beyond victimization, guilt and distrust. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Noor, M., Brown, J. R., Gonzalez, R., Manzi, J. & Lewis, C. (2007). On positive psychological outcomes; what helps groups with a history of conflict to forgive and reconcile with each other? (Manuscript submitted for publication).
Please check the toolbox prepared by Dr. Masi: http://theforgivenesstoolbox.com/
Other, possibly more familiar scales of intergroup forgiveness that I have seen are the ones that were adapted from interpersonal forgiveness( i.e., Takaku, Weiner & Ohbuchi’s, 2001), and community forgiveness (i.e., McCullough et al., 1998).
Best wishes,
Gulnaz
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I am interested in studying the minimal group paradigm (MGP; introduced in 1970s by Henri Tajfel) in the context of social categorization and prejudice. I was reviewing literature for the same. Is there any literature available on the topic that is in an Indian context or written by an Indian author(s). If not, could you suggest any studies from Asia, in general?
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I'm searching for innovative approach in order to explain discimimation versus non family members, going beyond intergroup relations theory (ingroup vs. outgroup, that is family members vs. non family ones) within family firms.
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thank you so much for you very very interesting suggestions!
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I study motivation for French as a second language learning in Montreal, Canada. Intergroup relations between Anglophones and Francophones are not easy for historical and legal reasons and it affects motivation. 
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To those interested by this question/topic, here is a chapter focussing on the impact of intergroup contact (Allport, 1954, Pettigrew & Tropp, 2011) on attitudes toward outgroups between undergraduates Francophone students (future teachers) in Montreal and new immigrants. The experiment shows that the contact done by the experimental group had a significant positive impact on "sensible variables" (prejudice, sense of identity threat and empathy) but not on "stable variables" (beliefs and deeply held representations (sense of national identity as Quebecers, endorsement of the ideology of social dominance, acculturation orientation towards immigrants)). The chapter is in French.
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Research demonstrating the role of self-deception in racism, and the prevalence of racism? Any leads would be appreciated. 
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Also interesting, and closely related to the question: Frederick Rhodewalt and Benjamin Peterson, "The Self and Intergroup Attitudes: Connecting 'fragile' personal and collective self-concepts', in Joseph P. Forgas, Joel Cooper, and William D. Crano (eds.), The Psychology of Attitudes and Attitude Change, vol. 12 of The Sydney Symposium of Social Psychology (New York, 2010), 263-82.
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Suppose two people attempt a task, and both fail. One is an ingroup member, and one is an outgroup member. Is there research suggesting that people perceive that task to be more difficult, and potentially even recruit more cognitive resources in attempting it, when it is an ingroup member vs. an outgroup member who attempted it?
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Hi Jason, somewhat related might be an article we wrote some years ago; Here we found that that the classic black-sheep effect is mediated by cognitive resource allocation, such that information about an ingroup deviant (someone "failing" to adhere to ingroup norms) is processed more deeply than the same information about an outgroup deviant. Maybe that helps.
reference: Reese, G., Steffens, M. C., & Jonas, K. J. (2013). When black sheep make us think: Information processing and devaluation of in-and outgroup norm deviants. Social Cognition, 31(4), 482-503.
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I am developing a brief educational intervention for recently arrived refugees into the U.S. and would like to norm an evidenced based instrument for pre/post test purposes.  I have come across a few, like the Quick Discrimination Inventory, but wold like to know what other options are out there that may not be popping up in the literature.  Any suggestions would be great.  Thanks!  
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Are you wanting to explore the discrimination they feel once on arrival (point 1) and then a while later (point 2)? Or are you wanting to measure the perceived prejudice they think the dominant culture has toward them at these two points in time?
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Integrated Threat Theory (ITT) argues that when e.g. US citizens perceive Hispanic immigrants to compete for limited ressources (realisitc threat) or to undermine American values and change America's culture (symbolic threat), the perceived threat causes prejudice.
Stephan, W. G., & Renfro, C. L. (2002). The role of threat in intergroup relations. In D. M. Mackie & E. R. Smith (Eds.), From Prejudice to Intergroup Emotions: Differentiated Reactions to Social Groups (pp. 191–207). New York: Psychology Press.
Stephan, W. G., & Stephan, C. W. (2000). An integrated threat theory of prejudice. In S. Oskamp (Ed.), Reducing prejudice and discrimination (pp. 23–45). Mahwah, N.J.: Psychology Press.
While I really like the theory, I was wondering if noone ever tried to challenge the ITT or if anyone has ever questioned its additonal use beyond classical Social Identity Theory assumptions?
Could anyone refer me to a critical article?
Many thanks!
Silke
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I have. I tested ITT, Aversive Racism, and Ambivalent Amplification Theory is a paper titled "Reactions Toward the Stigmatized: Disjunctions in Affect and Cognition (2006) J of Applied Social Psychology. I used Platt's (1965) Method of Strong Inference by creating an experiment where each theory predicts a different outcome. ITT was not confirmed. I attached the paper.
Best of luck and let me know if there is anymore I can do!
Gregg
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I am interested in seeing to what extent, if any, attitudes to the student evaluation of teaching even if purportedly for formative purposes are influenced by academics' attitudes to the new public management
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Many thanks Krishnan, it's a very interesting article indeed.
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I am trying to manipulate the acceptance of a social norm in a survey experiment (the social norm is measured like an attitude).
Because of the high acceptance on the baseline level of the participants, I tried to reduce the acceptance and not to enhance it.
But nevertheless, it seems to be pretty difficult to achieve an effect. So the question is, if anybody has some experience in succesfully manipulating a social norm in a survey experiement?
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Anchoring might work. Ask participants first if they think that most of their peers (or another reference group appropriate to your research question) would answer higher or lower than a given value on the response scale. By varying that value you should be able to influence participants' own responses.
For an application, see
Eyssel, F., Bohner, G., & Siebler, F. (2006). Perceived rape myth acceptance of others predicts rape proclivity: Social norm or judgmental anchoring? Swiss Journal of Psychology, 65, 93-99. doi: 10.1024/1421-0185.65.2.93