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Interculturalism - Science topic

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As interculturality is opposed to multiculturality, a distinction between these two frames is pivotal to cast light upon linguistic colonialism practices and other forms of power-knowledge colonial matrix in some curriculum designs. Interculturality suggests interaction, respect, and recognition among cultures, while multiculturality involves the co-presence of several separated cultures, competing to hegemonize or control other cultures. Although, the former has much more acceptance, the decolonial critique to interculturality might offer a problematization of a widely restrictive view of mainstream interculturality. With awareness of these counterforces, this discussion might center on how interculturality can be used to decolonize the only English curriculum to give other senses to the bilingual curriculum.
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Certainly, multiculturalism can effectively promote and enhance intercultural exchanges and practices. This can in the long, ensure tolerance not only amongst people of diverse cultural practices but of races.
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Hi RG colleagues,
I am looking for resources and activities for my class on cross-cultural studies. In particular, I am looking for resources for a module on the intersection of race and gender and how that impacts intercultural anxiety. Any leads would be super helpful.
Warm regards,
Gulnaz
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Hi Gulnaz, I think this could help you more:
Nusbbaum, M. (2000). Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach, Cambridge, NY: Cambridge University Press.
Hope you do well!
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La diversidad lingüística y cultural está presente en cada país ¿Consideras que en tu país se fomenta la Educación Intercultural desde las escuelas?
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Es muy importante respetar la diversidad cultural en el ámbito escolar y de hecho en este país se realiza ya que en los institutos se imparten como asignatura optativa la religión y puede elegir si estudiar religión católica, islámica, judía...
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We invite you to prepare a text in English on intercultural education. We are interested in experiences from different countries, theoretical and practical solutions.
The texts will be published in the journal Intercultural Education
you
We collect texts until 1 March 2021. You are welcome to send in your texts:
edukacja.miedzykulturowa@us.edu.pl
What are the practical arrangements in your country?
What problems do you face in a culturally diverse environment?
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Good. The topic will provide opportunity for contributions that will propel greater understanding of peculiarities and realities in different multicultural countries.
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I am writing an article about the perception of laughter in different cultures and how it has to be taken into account when working in an intercultural team
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Culture
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Could you recommend any literature on the intercultural aspect of prosody in women's political speeches, please? It can be in English, German, Russian, or Spanish.
Thank you!
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You can read: Hughes, Linda K. The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women's Poetry || Prosody, 2019.
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Update: OUT OF DATE, NOT RELEVANT
Our team is conducting an intercultural study on the psychological predictors of preventive behavior in Covid-19. We have reached 700 respondents so far, mainly from Hungary and Romania, but several other countries as well, but we still need to largen our sample with respondents from other countries.
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Hi, I can contribute from Bangladesh! Thanks.
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I am currently working on my dissertation of understanding intercultural challenges in Key Account Management (Global Account Management). Is there any literature in KAM available integrating intercultural challenges. Any recommendations for a quantitative method to analyze intercultural challenges in GAM.
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Not that I am aware of. Do not forget that KAM has been unfortunately interrupted few years ago for obscure reasons
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India is a diverse nation and the social, economic and cultural differences in all the regions (North India, South India, East India, and West India) of India implied to miscellaneous cultural differences. Is there any research conducted to study internal cultural differences in India?
P.S I'm also interested to take a glance at how other countries argue the intercultural challenges that they faced while working with India firms based in India.
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I am not in position to response to your question -1.
However, all companies conduct cultural sensitivity awareness training for their employees when they go to other country to minimize the conduct error due to cultural difference.
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We are a research group of people working in multimodal digital literacies. After a three-year project (please see http://www.eumade4ll.eu/ ), we produced the "Common Framework of Reference for Intercultural Digital Literacies" by analysing digital materials produced by students in the project (i.e. 'about us' webpages, blogs, fanvid/mash-up videos, promotional videos, video interactions) and designing tools for assessment and self-assessment.
We are very much interested in receiving feedback on our work.
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Thank you Maria. I will look into it during the weekend.
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After WWII and with regard to some causes like intercultural philosophy, the multiculturalism and poststructuralism , comparative literature has been distinguished from its previouse situation, which was known American school and has tended to cultural studies. Some scholars like Susan Bassnett and Jonathan Culler have criticized this tendency. What about you? Do you think that this tendency is usefull or not?
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Comparative literature may be part of the cultural studies, or the contrary, if the literary text reflects really its cultural origins.
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In my opinion, important issues in the issues of international project management are as follows:
- The impact of economic, information globalization etc on international management projects.
- Improving information technology management systems on a supranational basis,
- computerized standards and management systems used by transnational corporations in the field of international project management,
- Sociological, intercultural conditions for the management of international teams implementing projects in enterprises operating internationally or globally,
- Security of data transfer and processing performed for the needs of the enterprise management process in the context of international project management.
In what other areas of science, research on specific aspects of the economy, business, art, technology development, etc. should be created interesting research topics in the field of international project management?
Please answer
Best wishes
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Time issue in construction project... as I think
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My research is about the relationship between level of cultural knowledge and development of intercultural communication.
My problem is, items in my questionaire reflecting IV which is level of knowledge is true false question which are factual questions.
Eg: Gambling is allowed in Islam religion. (Yes / No)
My DV items which is intercultural development is in likert scale.
So, i cant make correlations using spss to analyze the data. Therefore, I would like to ask whether I can transform the dichotomous question to likert only for analyzing and make correlation.
Tq.
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Hello Ahmad,
You certainly can correlate the scores in their present form, using either Pearson or Spearman correlations as you see fit (Pearson assumes interval strength data, which would be a relevant concern for the DV items). It doesn't matter that one variable has only two possible values, whereas the other has more.
Further, any attempt to reexpress the dichotomous item into a "Likert-type" scale would not change that correlation (since it would be some form of linear transform).
Good luck with your work.
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I have written a draft review paper entitled " Role of Internal Marketing in Creating Successful Intercultural Service Encounters: A Literature Review " and got some advice from one of the editor and professor at Concordia University. Now I would like to improve it to be good enough to publish at SSCI journal.
if any scholar in the same field is interested please let me know.
Regards,
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It's better to publish a review on your own. It is simpler and there is less likelihood of your work being stolen
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Would be great to hear from you!
Best wishes
Andreas
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Intercultural capital as I understand it, includes intercultural communication and dialogue. In addition to our research at IFLAC: The International Forum for the Literature and Culture of Peace, on both these subjects, I edit a daily IFLAC Digest, on the Internet, that contains intercultural communication of researchers, scientists, writers, poets, from various cultures around the world. As our goal is to create a world beyond war, the use and spreading of intercultural-ism is of capital importance, as it creates bridges of understanding among cultures.
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In intercultural research, Hofstede finds huge intercultural differences, while Schwartz postulates universal similarities. Their models are highly appreciated and working into different directions. But some of the categories they use seem quite related (like Individualism and Hedonism). How could it be, that the one finds cultural universalities while the other one finds culture specific patterns in these related issues? Is it only a matter of the question type (value vs. experiences orientated)?
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Hofstede tried to be very brief where as schwartz generalised the idea
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We have just started ReCreaDe a 3 year project investigating the ways that informal and nonformal learning can widen the scope for understanding the relationship between democracy, diversity and education.
The question is to help us add examples of practice and strengthen our literature base.
The aim is to support skills development, social inclusion and critical thinking through different activities and innovative pedagogical actions, as well as dialogues with various stakeholders on the role and nature of democracy within education and the critical relationship between democracy and diversity. Participatory and intercultural approaches to heritage, as well as educational initiatives fostering intercultural dialogue involving educators and young people are being undertaken. This will also include critical case studies addressing the experiences of excluded communities and the implications for educational, democratic and civic engagement.
Thanks.
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Not sure how to answer. India and the United States are touted as the world's largest democracies. Yes people are free to vote for whoever they want, but their minds are being manipulated by the media and by religious leaders and top politicians in different ways by constant bombardment with slanted interpretations of reality to move their thinking in a specific direction. In short "leaders" in "democracies" have gotten very creative in using the media in moving such societies towards acceptance of more authoritarian rule.
Nevertheless, those who are able to resist this onslaught have the capacity to be very very creative and are therefore a danger to the authorities.
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Beyond common topics taught in cross-cultural management courses, what do you think are the current challenges our field in confronted with?
I am working on the draft course outline of "Advanced Cross-cultural management" and I'd be glad to hear the topics you would suggest to deal with in such session.
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Topics should include an understanding of culture as a set of shared values, beliefs and practices that change across time based upon a variety of experiences and changes in sociocultural context. There is always as much variation within any particular group as there is between any two groups. Thus, effective communication requires cultural humility - a clear understanding that one's own values, beliefs and practices are not inherently 'right' nor necessarily shared by the person with whom one is communicating. Awareness of one's own cultural values, beliefs and practices is best achieved by honest conversations with a trusted diverse group (management team) about the values one was raised with, one's personal understanding of what constitutes an ideal adult, etc. Cultural humility necessitates approaching communication with an attitude of 'not knowing, but being eager to learn' in conversations with others.
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I am interested to learn about any publications and thoughts about the way indigenous knowledge systems and processes were disturbed and marginalised by the colonisation,imperialism and modernity in the colonised global periphery?  What responses social scientists and other activists are taking to address the situation?  I am familiar with the work of Connell, Santos, Comeroff and Comeroff (focusing on Africa), Alatas, Chen (focusing on  E.Asia) but like to know about other writings as well.
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india and othere countries in south asia WERE colpnized
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I am completing an article based on my empirical study and was wondering where to submit it.
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Thank you All so much.
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I am doing a research on students values
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A couple of comments. With the PVQ-RR, there are 3 items per value for 19 values. When used to measure the 10 values, there are from 3 to 6 and 9 for universalism. The PVQ-RR has shown quite good reliability for all or almost all 19 and 10 values in every country studied thus far (30). It is available in 46 languages. The average time for completion is approximately 6-8 minutes. Reducing the number of items has very little effect on the time required because it takes about 3-4 minutes to respond to 20 items because respondents take more time until they get used to the format.
Whenever possible, I recommend measuring all values. Some reasons are:
1. Attitudes and behaviors are influenced by the trade-off between opposing values. Measuring only those values expected to either promote or to inhibit an attitude or behavior is likely to miss a significant part of the causal/explanatory association.
2. The scales are all balanced so that values expected to receive similar ratings are separated to reduce automatic responding. Changing the order by dropping items can affect the levels of response to the other items.
3. Value responses are quite sensitive to framing by other questions. The full value scales cover the full range (circle) of motivational goals so they have little or no biasing effect on other questions. Hence it is desirable to administer the value scales first. However, if values not of interest to the researcher are drop from a value scale, that scale may bias subsequent responses.
Contrary to what Dante ... writes above, in my article on Basic Personal Values and the Meaning of Left‐Right , values were good predictors of political orientations. As we and some later work have found, the meaning of left-right in former communist countries differed from its meaning in the West. For some respondents in those countries, the meaning of this distinction is reversed, for others it is ambiguous. Consequently, value orientations do not predict left-right because it is not a meaningfully clear concept.
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I wish to do a research paper on Elif Shafak's The Bastard of Istanbul which is based on Intercultural relations between the Armeninans and the Turks. Please suggest.
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Dear Sethi,
I highly recommend you check this book:
-The Grandchildren: The Hidden Legacy of 'Lost' Armenians in Turkey
By Ayse Gul Altinay
Kind regards.
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I conduct research on intercultural education in Ecuador, I would like to see the impact it has had on discrimination against indigenous people in schools and colleges in cities.
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Hi Sofia,
To collect evidence in support of your research questions you can conduct both qualitative and qualitative study. For qualitative research, you might be interested in doing interviews, including focus group interviews. self-reporting social survey can be a important means of collecting peoples' perceptions about ethnic discrimination. In dong so, you may want to identify some of the potential areas of discrimination, such as unequal access to opportunities such as employment, education, healthcare. You might also intend to look at if there is any structural violence from the part of the state or society on the whole when you will analyze your data.
Hope, this will give you some ideas to move forward!
Good luck with your project!
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Hi,
I'm looking for social psychology databases, free or paid. I'm mostly interested in databases containing results from intercultural studies focused on prosocial behavior, history perception/narratives, intergroup behavior, moral reasoning and emotion regulation. If you know about a usefull one just let me know !
Thank you !
Gabriel
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Mr. Sauter,
After a few attempts trying to open the document I finally understood how to open it but I forgot to indicate it here ! As you point it, using Data Import Wizard it's possible to correctly open the document. Moreover, for specific files sometimes you have to change import options. I post a useful article just in case : https://www.ablebits.com/office-addins-blog/2014/05/01/convert-csv-excel/
Thank you for your help,
Best regards !
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Human rights have emerged in Europe, considering universal European values. So would they be against multiculturalism or not? What is the relationship between multiculturalism and human rights?
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Querido Diego,
Great question. I am critical on both sides of the equation.
First of all, I am critical of the notion of human rights, along with many of the leading theorists of international law. I'll mention just one example, David Kennedy of Harvard who is quite critical of human rights. My own perspective as a global health specialist and cultural psychiatrist is that human rights are only as useful as one's ability to exercise them and that is dependent upon power and privilege. So it's all very nice to assert rights as a principle, quite another to ensure them as a matter of policy. And only a very few nations in the world ensure the rights of their citizens and even fewer the rights of foreigners, visitors, migrants, and refugees.
A broader critique is that human rights and their allied concerns is a kind of sop for neoliberalism, hiding the real horrors of hegemonies and monopolies and dressing up their injustices with a humanitarian face. That is why the serious left is critical of human rights.
I am for pluralism and living with difference - I am for the notions of porosity, divergence, syncretism and other ideas that argue for many, divergent voices in any society and in the world that enrich us and edify us. I am not comfortable with multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy or in any other country. I am not comfortable with multiculturalism when that means privileging one group of people against another such as affirmative action due to past injustices. This engenders strong reactions and is ultimately self-defeating. That is why I believe that, depending on how one defines the two key terms - human right and multiculturalism - they are either not in conflict or very deeply so. For example, if one sees human rights as universal then some interpretations of multiculturalism could be seen as tipping the scales in favour of one group against others. If one sees multiculturalism as a way of rectifying and redressing past omissions and commissions such colonization and Eurocentric assumptions, then one may be tempted to ironize the notion of universal human rights.
I do not hold by such self-serving definitions and am equally uncomfortable with each of these terms on their own and believe they are destined to be in conflict. We need new ways of imagining a better world, not new ways of continuing and maintaining parochial, partisan views of the world. This won't make me popular with anyone but it's what I believe to be true and good.
Warm wishes for the season from southern Brazil,
Vincenzo Di Nicola
Université de Montréal &
The George Washington University
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If the realist framework assumes that international relations are necessarily conflictual, thus, they can only be resolved through the distribution of power and material capabilities, is it possible to argue that such framework can only be sufficient and workable when caltural variables are integrated in the conduct of international relations?
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Joseph Nye advanced the concept of smart power to explain the complementary role of soft power(culture, values, institutions policies) and hard power (military, economic sanctions and aids). With that being said states have been known to use their cultural power as propagandist tools but this is not to say that culture can only be used to extend the influene of hard power.
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This project seems very interesting, which is a bit similar to my thesis project but only in the management standpoint. 
My current thesis is about a comparison of management practices between Japanese firms and their units located in European Economic Area and during my first year, I focused my preliminary literature on the Japanese organizational model, defined by Western scholars as a jungle with practices underlying under three social essences such as long run planning career horizon, commitment to lifetime employment and collective responsibility. And from those underlying essences, have emerged a lot practices, subject to western analysis. I am also conducting an article about strategic diplomacy of Japanese organizations, in accordance with the business model.
The main question posed in this project is whether or not these practices can be applied in Europe the same way it is in Japan, without changing what makes their identity. In better meaning, how it will take for a Japanese unit to apply its practices like in Japan when it is facing the EEA first that has its own rules, norms, regulations, and then national business models that also have their own rules, norms and regulations, and in addition to issues related to the business model it came from.
Those issues kept on coming, because it affects the inner structure of Japanese subsidiaries, despite the willingness for local governments to respond to economic needs.
Based on that, my question to you is this: Did you encounter intercultural issues related to practices transfer between both actors (Japanese to British business environments)?
For more informations about my research, i enclosed in attachment more details related to my project. If you are interested on, please do not hesitate to contact me.
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Hi,
The topic you have chosen is quite interesting and yes of late we have seen an increase in the Japanese participation, especially when we look at developing economies like India. One way in which I can relate to your question is the fact that India being a former colony of Britain still maintains the old practice in many domains, the most prominent being railways, law and education.
Going by my current project on High Speed Rail Corridor, what I infer is the rich technology experience that Japan has developed and nurtured over the years and this is what drives Japan forward. In a competitive global environment, inter cultural differences do not have an impact on the economic prospects that the country is to offer. Because the relation is carried on a very professional line and in such circumstances, it is unlikely that the intercultural differences would act as a deterrent against the strategic partnership. I hope I have been able to answer your question
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Details of such a task would be greatly appreciated.
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Hi Kirk - from the sound of it you are working in a higher education context but I believe that the structures of a really good global education performance task designed for young teenagers equally applies to undergraduates - simply applying analytical, research, and project design and evaluation skills at a higher level.
Six steps to the attached 'Get Global!' programme created by ActionAid, OXFAM and other UK charities nearly 15 years ago now (see below):
Get asking questions! Get an Issue!  Get more information!  Get planning!  Get active! and Get thinking about it! [Review, Reflection]
I would also ask your students to embed exploration of at least two or three key global education concepts within their 'make a difference' projects -  I'm sure these will be central within your programme (e.g. interdependence and globalisation; identity and cultural diversity; social justice and human rights, conflict resolution; Sustainable futures]
Best wishes.
        Peter
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I am interested in works written in any european language (from the first arrival of europeans to America up to the 19th century), which can be useful as valuable primary historical sources for an intercultural History of Psychopharmacological Botany and Hallucinogens. 
Examples: 
-Nicolás Monardes (1508-1588) y su obra: Primera y segunda y tercera partes de la historia medicinal de las cosas que se traen de nuestras Indias Occidentales, que sirven en Medicina (1574, Sevilla: Alonso Escribano)
-Hernández, Francisco. 1651. Nova Plantarum, Animalium et Mineralium Mexicanorum Hístoria... Roma: Deuersini y Z. Masotti. Historia de las plantas de la Nueva España. Editorial Ochoterena. México, D. F. 3 vols.
- Ruiz de Alarcón, Hernando. 1629/1892. “Tratado de las supersticiones y costumbres gentílicas que hoy viven entre los indios naturales desta Nueva España.” In: Francisco del Paso y Troncoso, ed. Anales del Museo Nacional de México, ep. 1, VI, pp. 123-223. México, D. F. Imprenta del Museo Nacional;
-Spruce, R. (1873). On some remarkable narcotics of the Amazon Valley and Orinoco. Ocean Highways. Geographical Magazine, 1, 184-193.
etc... ....
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If you are interested in North America, Robert Beverly in The History and Present State of Virginia (originally published 1705)  describes accidental datura consumption by English militia stationed at Jamestown, Virginia and use of datura root infusion in the Algonquian coming of age ceremony, the wysoccan. A new addition of this book was recently published by University of North Carolina Press.
Not a primary source, but interesting nonetheless, theobromine, caffeine and ursolic acid biomarkers of Illex have been identified in residues from Mississippian Period beakers (ca AD1100-1200) from the site of Cahokia in western Illinois: P Crown, T Emerson, J Gu, WJ Hurst, T Pauketat, and T Ward, 2012. Ritual Black Drink Consumption at Cahokia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109(35):13944-13949.
I am interested in the use use of psychoactive plants (other than tobacco) in pre Columbian  Eastern North America. Was not aware oft he Cotton Mather reference. Thank you for calling it to my attention.
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EFL students find difficulties in interpreting idioms because they are culture-specific. 
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Hi,
It can be done by overriding socio-pragmatic difficulties between languages in question. 
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Indian child rearing is self-exploratory rather than restrictive. Indian children are generally raised in an atmosphere of love. A great deal of attention is lavished on them by a large array of relatives, usually including many surrogate mothers and fathers. The child is usually with relatives in all situations. Indian adults generally lower rather than raise their voices when correcting a child. The Indian child learns to be seen and not heard when adults are present. In-school conflicts may arise since most educators are taught to value the outgoing child. While an Indian child may be showing respect by responding only when called upon, the teacher may interpret the behavior as backward, indifferent, or even sullen. Teachers may also misinterpret and fail to appreciate the Indian child’s lack of need to draw attention, either positive or negative, upon himself or herself.
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This is emic type of practice of child rearing, which is culture specific not comparable.
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I am doing research on intercultural workplace romances. There are many research on this subject in the States, but not much internationally. I am interested in more on international cases and research on this subject. Please exchange what you have. 
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Thank you very much Shilpa!
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Dear all 
I request your help to know say if you already have to meet a qualitative paper which tried to highlight cultural differences between country?
Can you please send me references ? 
Do you think we can conduct an intercultural study with qualitative approach ?
Best 
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There is no reason why you could not use qualitative methodology in an intercultural context. Beforehand, il is recommanded to master the language and the social codes of each culture. Observations, interviews, focus groups, case study are possible...
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I'm studying the influence of context on intercultural face-to-face meetings, between international students at the university level.  I would like to use the Double-Swing Model and would love to share some ideas with researchers interested in that model/subject.
Thank you!
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Thank you Jason!  I will definitely look into it. Sounds interesting!
Best,
Karine
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Personally or in virtual environments?
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Research under the intercultural approach should consider various methods. however, in certain areas of knowledge required to propose new methods that integrate diverse perspectives about social problems.
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How can conform ourselves to the current era of 'one thought of unanimity' (globalisation)?
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Culture does point to particularity, whereas globalisation does certainly mean uniformity.
The history of the west has been the theft of many other particular histories, ever since around 2500 years ago.
The complexity of life consists in the plurality of meanings and perspectives, of meaning and approaches.
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Today, June the 16th, is Bloomsday, the day during which the entire events of James Joyce's Ulysses take place.Bloomsday events take place in several countries around the world.
Those who have read the novel deeply over several times may have become saturated with its spirit.
For example, I have written a short story that turned out to be an intercultural homage to Joyce (among others,) I was wondering if anybody else is noticing influences of James Joyce's intercultural writing in fiction that they have either been reading or writing.
Respectfully,
Gloria McMillan
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Thanks, Alexander, for your input!
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I would like to do a preliminary research that can give me a panoramic result of the state of intercultural education in the university in wich I'm professor.
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Attached you will find a framework that I like.  It is not an instrument, but it might form the basis for developing an instrument.
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I live in a small urban community north of Detroit, Michigan where there are growing multicultural communities. It is my desire to create a program that will change the dynamics from Multicultural to Intercultural. Has anyone done this before and what model can we use?
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Contemporary societies are complex and the role of education is changing as a consequence of societal Change.  Multiculturalism describes the existence, acceptanceof multiple cultural  traditions within a single jurisdiction usually considered in terms of the culture associated with an ethnic group. Many people living within multicultural and plural societies are pluricultural. Pluricultural individuals are people with the competences of knowledge, disposition and linguistic and behavioral skills required to function as a social actor within two or more cultures.. Interculturality refers to the capacity to experience and analyze cultural otherness, and to use this experience to reflect on matters that are usually taken for granted within one’s own culture and environment. Interculturality finally involvesevaluating one’s own everyday patterns of perception, thought, feeling and behaviour in order to develop greater self-knowledge and self-understanding. Interculturality thus enables people to act as mediators among people of different cultures, to explain and interpret different perspectives. Interculturality does not involve identifying with another cultural group or adopting the cultural practices of the other group. Interculturality entails a number of underlying cognitive, affective and behavioural competences. These include knowledge ( knowledge about other cultural groups and their products and practices and knowledge about the ways in which people of different cultures interact), attitudes (such as curiosity, openness, respect for otherness, and empathy), skills of interpreting and  relating (for example, interpreting a practice from another culture and relating it to practices within one’s own culture), skills of discovery (such as the ability to search out and acquire new knowledge about a culture and its practices and products), and critical cultural awareness (that is, the ability to evaluate critically the practices and products of one’s own and other cultures). An intrinsic aspect of analyzing intercultural social activity is the reflective process of relating new knowledge to one’s own self-understanding and values. Sensitivity is an important element in attempting to understand another's way of life, but part of the reflective process is to relate new understanding to one’s own values and beliefs with tolerance and respect for those of others. It involves a positive attitude towards diversity, seeing the meeting between people with different beliefs and cultural practices as enriching for all, and seeing one’s own individuality as being developed through meeting ‘otherness’. This is the process of intercultural dialogue which underpins the achievement of social cohesion.
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Cultural appropriation is all around us.  We often take elements from another culture and adapt them to our local needs.  
In America, we have Mexican, Chinese and Italian food which is rarely authentic. In China I ate a "Texas Steak" which was not served anything like it would be served in Texas. 
How do we decide which cultural appropriation is OK and which is undesirable?
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There's a great deal written about this - and numerous criteria ought to be considered.
For starters, there is a difference between "cultural consumption" and "cultural appropriation." Appropriation is the use “of one culture’s symbols, artifacts, genres, rituals, or technologies by members of another culture—regardless of intent, ethics, function, or outcome” (Rogers, 2006, p. 476).
Rogers (2006) classifies appropriation, which I think is helpful to answer your question. 
(1) exploitative cultural appropriation – in which members of the dominant culture  appropriate without substantive reciprocity, permission, and/or compensation. In the US, and example of this would be Elvis Presley's appropriation of music originated by African Americans. 
(2) Appropriation as cultural dominance, in colonized contexts, is the use of dominant culture’s element by members of a subordinated culture in a context in which the dominant culture has been imposed
(3) Appropriation as cultural exchange reflects reciprocal exchange of cultural elements between cultures with roughly equal levels of power.
(4) Appropriation as transculturation describes a situation in which cultural elements created by multiple cultures, such that identification of a single originating culture is problematic.
In addition to Rogers' (2006) 4 forms, Cooper (2014) differentiates between code-switching and appropriation (with respect to African American culture): code-switching is operating in the cultural and linguistic norms of another culture, with the goal of successfully navigating a world hostile to Blackness, but with minimal damage to communities, and rooted in love and respect for both cultures.
I think this could be a start to developing some criteria to judge appropriation. Here's a few thoughts I would have, but I suspect members of the RG community will come up with far better ones. In the spirit of getting the convo going, here we are:
- What is the purpose of the appropriation? Who benefits?
- Does the appropriation acknowledge cultural marginalization and systems of oppression? If no, then it's problematic. An example of this would be the criticisms of Iggy Azalea (who is alleged to appropriate a certain type of hip hop out of context) verses the accolades Macklemore receives (he appropriates a certain type of hip hop, but in his lyrics openly discusses social position and his own privilege, and acknowledges the act of appropriation and so many - not all - consider his rapping acceptable. Similar things have been said about the Beasty Boys). For a powerful example, see Chang (2014) below.
- Are culturally or racially racially coded styles, symbols or products reduced to commodities or experiences without context? If yes, then this is a problem.
- Does the appropriation compromise cultural sustainability?
Refs...
Chang, J. (2014, December 26). Azealia Banks, Iggy Azalea and hip-hop's appropriation problem. The Guardian. Retrieved from: http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/dec/24/iggy-azalea-azealia-banks-hip-hop-appropriation-problem
Cooper, B. (2014, July 15). Iggy Azalea’s post-racial mess: America’s oldest race tale, remixed. Retrieved from: http://www.salon.com/2014/07/15/iggy_azaleas_post_racial_mess_americas_oldest_race_tale_remixed/
Rogers, R. A. (2006). From cultural exchange to transculturation: A review and reconceptualization of cultural appropriation. Communication Theory, 16(4), 474-503.
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The focus of current research I am involved in is connecting processes of intercultural communication to the learning that takes place (or doesn't) as a result of intercultural interactions. I find that while there is much written about IC communication there is far less on IC learning.
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Hi Fran,
Thanks for starting an interesting conversation topic. I am currently working on my PhD which looks at how young people engage with interculturality in their everyday lives. My understanding is that intercultural communication is mainly dealt with in the fields of applied linguistics and sociolinguistics and intercultural learning is studied in the field of education. So my impression is that scholars of intercultural communication focus on language use whereas it is conspicuously absent from discussions of intercultural learning. With regards to the distinction between intercultural communication and intercultural learning, I am dealing with something similar. I’m working with the term ‘thinking diversity’ to describe critical understandings of self and Other that don’t necessarily involve interpersonal interaction, and ‘living diversity’ to describe interacting successfully with Others that does not involve the kind of critical reflection and understandings generated by ‘thinking diversity’. When the two are enacted simultaneously I think of it as ‘doing interculturality’. I’d be interested to hear your thoughts on this.
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I am conducting a study on intercultural partnerships/marriages/cohabiting couples, and I am wondering where can I go to find participants? They need to be two individuals from different cultures or of different nationalities (e.g. Chinese-American, Colombian-Peruvian, Russian-Mexican...), preferably living in Florida, but will also consider anywhere in the world if they have access to Skype. I am putting out flyers in different places and an online add, but would appreciate any suggestions. 
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Hello Lucia,
For cohabiting couples I think universities will be an effective way to reach intercultural couples. In particular universities in Eastern U.S. and Canada will likely get you significant numbers of potential participants. The Central Canadian Universities below have both high levels of international students and are multiethnic populations - student associations, depts. of Psych etc. are first line contacts: 
Carleton University: www.carleton.ca
McMaster University: www.mcmaster.ca
University of Ottawa: www.uottawa.ca/welcome.html
Queen’s University: www.queensu.ca
Ryerson University: www.ryerson.ca
University of Toronto: www.utoronto.ca
York University: www.yorku.ca
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When evaluating the pollen diversity of a species in one location. I select more than one colony? Or just one nest it is necessary to estimate the diversity pollen site?
Some reference?
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I agree Arif Jawaid.
many thanks.
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I am interested in knowing of the practices, challenges, processes, benefits, outcomes, dynamics, etc. of those who have engaged in developing , or who have an interest in, international partnerships/networks, especially in relation to social justice/democracy/education. I am finding that there are many challenges, including language, technological synchronisation, funding, physical meetings, work distribution, groundwork in bringing people together, alignment of objectives, methods and means, dissemination of ideas, among others. However, the need and the potential for tangible, meaningful, critical work is enormous if the partnership/network can be effectively established, notably in relation to bringing into the fold disparate voices that may not be heard within the broader context in isolation. In other words, the partnership/network may value much more these local, contextualized concerns than the contrary, and the partnership/network may also be more effective in collectively moving the respective fields of study forward. Despite the factors mitigating against such work, the outcomes could lead to a much better understanding of broad, contextualized, comparative issues, research, realties, etc., and help connect the dots on such concerns as neoliberalism in education, social inequalities, and democracy in and through education. As I am working on developing such a partnership/network, I would be most interested in the insight and experiences of colleagues around the world.
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I'm not certain how fruitful it would be, but I wonder if the Humboldt Foundation might be a means to get a network going, since it could facilitate connections in the EU and elsewhere, AND provide funding for the necessary travel recommended in an earlier post? https://www.humboldt-foundation.de/web/humboldt-kollegs-en.html (also, they have Canadian "alumni associations" that might be helpful)
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Research demonstrating the role of self-deception in racism, and the prevalence of racism? Any leads would be appreciated. 
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Also interesting, and closely related to the question: Frederick Rhodewalt and Benjamin Peterson, "The Self and Intergroup Attitudes: Connecting 'fragile' personal and collective self-concepts', in Joseph P. Forgas, Joel Cooper, and William D. Crano (eds.), The Psychology of Attitudes and Attitude Change, vol. 12 of The Sydney Symposium of Social Psychology (New York, 2010), 263-82.
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Often 'Internationalisation' focuses on the international student experience, but how do the 'home' students experience diversity on campus? There is an opportunity for intercultural learning to occur, but is the opportunity taken? What facilitates or hinders intercultural learning between students of the 'host' country, and those coming from elsewhere?
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There is a need to establish exactly what is meant by 'internationalisation', whether this be of experience, of curricula and so forth. The concept remains slippery and ill-defined. So, I think first of all ensure you have a clear operational sense of what it is you are asking about. Internationalisation is not necessarily synonymous with diversity.
Ricardo makes a good point in stating that there is much to learn from Europe but this does not negate the value of international experiences at home or abroad, nor of learning about a diverse range of cultures and nationalities. I think, Ricardo, you are perhaps arguing from a particular discourse that you feel is in danger of being overlooked. I don't believe it is and think that wider AND deeper experiences can enhance scholarship and understanding (but it does need both).
In my university we are following the almost sector-wide trend towards internationalisation (and again find it ill-defined, complex and slippery). As for learning that is both intercultural and transformative - two points that again require separate debate although have overlaps for learning - we have found that international experience is second to none and that home experiences are considered more in the abstract - see the following:
Baba, I., Ashencaen Crabtree, S. and Parker, J., 2011. Future indicative, past imperfect: a cross cultural comparison of social work education in Malaysia and England. In: Stanley, S., ed. Social Work Education in Countries of the East: Issues and Challenges. New York: Nova, pp. 276-301
Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Parker, J., Azman, A., Masu’d, F. (2015) Typologies of learning in international student placements, Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development. Doi: 10.1080/02185385.2014.1003393
Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Parker, J., Azman, A., Masu’d, F (2014) Sociological examination of student learning in children’s services in Malaysia. Journal of Comparative Research in Anthropology & Sociology. 5, 1.
Parker, J. Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Azman, A., Carlo, D.P., Cutler, C. (2014) Problematising international placements as a site of intercultural learning European Journal of Social Work, advance access, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13691457.2014.925849
Parker, J., Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Chui, W.H., Kumagai, T., Baba, I., Azman, A., Haselbacher, C., Ashkanani, H.R. and Szto, P. (2012) WAVE: Working with adults who are vulnerable – A comparison of curricula, policies and constructions, Revista de Asistenţă Socială, anul XI, 3/2012, 1-18.
Parker, J., Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Baba, I., Carlo, D. P. and Azman, A., 2012. Liminality and learning: international placements as a rite of passage. Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development, 22:3, 146-158.
Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Parker, J., Azman, A. & Carlo, D. P. 2012. Epiphanies and learning in a postcolonial Malaysia context: A preliminary evaluation of international social work placements. International Social Work. Advance Access doi: 10.1177/0020872812448491
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How do you choose what terminology/concepts to use when writing about race/ethnicity/visible minorities? Does it depend on who you are (to which group you identify with)? 
In USA media people use white/black race, but can researcher use it, knowing that there is "one human race" ? But how can we discuss/explain/ educate this matter if we don't take the "old therms" and explain them? For example- if race is social not scientific concept?
But if I would use them ( as in the research I mentioned another question of mine) we somehow help to create the construct of it and justify it. (Example": "Africans", "Asians"), Even if we use it by justifying that our " audience divides migrants like that".
Additional: What confuses me, is that if person with darker skin writes about race/ethnicity it goes under "Black studies", similar like- if women writes about gender, then it goes under "feminism".  Why/Is it is still like that? Or do you feel it is changing?
Is there "right" terminologies?
Does political correctness somehow trig the ability to discuss these issues openly?
Could you advise me some readings on this matter?
Thank you!
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Laura,
Your last question is the key to unraveling  the conundrum you have encountered in addressing the subject of race from a country like Latvia which has not been as dominated by these issues: "Does political correctness somehow trig the ability to discuss these issues openly?"
Essentially you are asking: If we are being told that races don't exist, that we are all members of the same human race, why then do researchers use racial categories which distinguish or identify certain segments of the population as "black", "Asian", or "white"? The fact that you  noticed that these issues are being framed in a politically correct manner, means you sense something is wrong. The answers you have gotten so far do not address your questions, but simply add to the confusion, such as the ones offered by Glenn Jones, which are strictly bureaucratic. So let me be straight with you about what has been going on in the United States as well as Canada and other European places.
We can use racial categories and distinguish humans along racial lines so long as it meets the following criteria: i) if you identify blacks, or any other non-white minority, it has to be for purposes of identifying them as "victims" of racial discrimination; ii) you can identify blacks and other non-whites but only if you are affirming something "positive" about these races, and they can affirm their race for purposes of pride and a sense of racial cohesion; iii) you can identify whites but only if you want to point to "white racism" or "white supremacy", but you must never iv) identify whites in a positive way, say, talk about white achievements in history, that whites created the modern world, or, for example, that 97% of the greatest scientists in history were European; no no, that is not acceptable; v) you can identify races for medicinal purposes as it is becoming apparent that there are genetic differences between the races, that one can determine the race of someone just by examining bone structure, but you must never say that there are any other racial differences outside medicinal purposes.
There you have it, that is the way the academic world operates; full of double standards, confusions, misleading claims, and anti-white propaganda.  
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The contemporary European model of nation-state is based on the ideology of one state, one nation and one language, so we can follow many conflicts involving nationalism and multiculturalism. How can we overcome this contradiction and to ensure equal rights for all? After all, multicultural environments, today and in the past (before the European model of nation-state), are a reality.
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My answer may seem to be unusual since I'll approach the subject from a chemist's bird's eyes. In chemistry, we used to classify catalysts into (2) types: (i) Homogeneous (which means that the catalyst exists in the same phase as reactants). (ii) Heterogeneous (which indicates that the catalyst exists in a phase different from the phases of the reactants). This classification went on for years & is still adopted in general introductory courses.
Recently, progress in the field of catalysis increased the types to (4). The two additional types are: (iii) Homogeneously heterogenized catalysts. (iv) Heterogeneously homogenized catalysts.
Now, apply types (iii & iv) to answer the question about co-existence between nationalism and multiculturalism within a national state setting and there ought to be a way out from what appears to be a paradox. Human intelligence can work out a satisfactory resolution which is good for all provided that earnest intentions prevail.  
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Directly or indirectly, Globalization fosters the development of intercultural researches in different areas. This fact implies exchanging of different kind of knowledge, usually developed in different languages (Chinese is the language most used, followed by Spanish, and in third place English). Taking this in consideration, by the time translating processes are more and more important. In consequence, when the "term" or "concept" used is not well translated the effects could be terrible. This is especially relevant in social sciences, psychology, epidemiological studies, or public health. Here I mention an example from English to Spanish:
Ex: "professionalism" to "profesionalismo". In Spanish (according with the Royal Spanish Academy, RAE), "professionalismo" means "Practicing a sport or other activity as a profession or mode of living". On the other hand, "profesionalidad" means "Characteristic of the person who performs a job with skill, application, reliability, honesty and effectiveness, or work well performed." Both could be used as synonims but not necessary, especially if there are some ethical aspects involved (as it happens in the area where this term is usually used: medicine). While profesionalismo does not have any ethical implication, profesionalidad has an explicit ethical connotation: accountability, respect, and honorability.
Do you know about other examples like this. Please, share them with us.
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Most of the above answers have already said what could happen if a concept is mistranslated. Let me, however, add to the examples from South Asian Muslim civilizations as these have not been mentioned. The first  six examples are from Pakistani English and are also used in Urdu and other Pakistani languages (for details see my book Pakistani English 1990).
1. In Pakistan 'Sir' is used not only as a deferential or polite form of address but in place of a title. Thus, a person called Sir Tariq has not been knighted by the Queen of England but is simply placed above the person using this apparent title in authority.
2. University students are often called 'bachhe' in Urdu which is translated as children. This is often misleading in texts where young adults are mistaken for pre-pubescent children.
3. A 'colony' means a housing estate in Pakistani English.
4. the word chips is used for crisps as well as potato chips.
5. A shopper is a plastic bag.
6. The word teachers is used for school, college and university teachers so that academics gets translated as 'academicians' with no real understanding if what it means in world English.
One major misunderstanding which occurs in the translation of Urdu classical poetry is the word for the  beloved. In Urdu it is mashuq (from Arabic one who is loved) but the pronoun used is masculine and 'he' is described having down on the cheeks (khat) which is taken as a sign of beauty. In short, the beloved is often portrayed conventionally as a beautiful adolescent boy (an ephebus).  To consider this phenomenon as homosexuality as understood in the modern West is misleading. However, since the related terms are translated in the modern vocabulary of being 'gay', one finds that the classical poets of Persian and Urdu are categorized as being 'gay' in some unsophisticated Western writings. I have used the word ephebophilia for this phenomenon rather than the modern term 'gay' which is misleading in this context.
The beloved is often described as a woman too. Her breasts and other feminine attributes may be described. However,  the pronouns and verb endings are still masculine. This too is a source of confusion for translators. That it is a convention goes unnoticed. In such complicated cases one needs an explanation and any attempt at mere translation will be inadequate and misleading.
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Our planned exchange fell through, so we are waiting to find another class for 30 Japanese first year university students. We are using the smartphone app BAND (iOS & Android) to connect. We need a partner class ASAP. Thank you for reading!
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Dear Simeon,  
This could have been easy when I was managing the distance learning center but I need to introduce some of my colleagues to this however, our students are on vacation now and will be back late September.  I will also check with one of our senior secondary schools who are still in session the possibility of their joining.
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How can a teacher be able to get international students engaged in a class if they are a minority, especially if the course is deeply on a culture completely different from theirs? Has anybody tackled the relationship between teaching and anthropology? 
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Let it not be an assumption that international minority students are lacking something in their lives and need to be engaged only for them to 'catch up' with their home national counterparts. In fact, the question should rather be, how can we translate the rich experiences of international students into their new environment to help us--faculty and students learn from them? In fact, international students already possess many of the 21st century skills required for the job place which many of us don't possess. Some of the listed skills are, for example, cultural resilience, adaptability, cross-cultural communication, and critical analysis. It demands a lot of resilience to leave one's home; being in a foreign country demands adaptability; cross-cultural communication is what is a challenge to every international student; and, it takes critical analysis for the international student to navigate through life daily in a foreign country. So, now back to your answer. First, we can engage international students by respecting the skills that they possess and making them to know that we're willing to learn from them, that is, we're willing for them to engage us in learning because they have a lot that we don't have. Secondly, nobody learns from a stranger who does not respect your integrity and therefore it's left to us to stop being strangers to our international students, that is, we should let them know that we care for them and we respect their integrity. So, it's time for us to start learning from international students.
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The notion of race is contentious, and, yet, with the manifestation of racism it is clear that researchers cannot pretend that the social construction of race--peoples' lived realities based on race, not the biological configurations previously used to create a scientific hierarchy--does not exist. How should researchers address this sensitive conundrum? Should researchers identify their racial affiliations, and underscore the pertinence of such demographic information, or should they just ask for the information without providing such background? Or should the topic be avoided, and no data gathered? What are the ethical, moral and professional responsibilities of researchers conducting research on race or on topics that involve a racial dimension, which includes most social science research? Having conducted several studies related to the experiences, perceptions and perspectives of educators in relation to democracy and education, in which I and the research group have included demographic questions on gender, birth place, parental occupation, educational experience, and racial origin among other variables, we have found that it would be irresponsible to not try and understand how racialization may or may not play a role in how one experiences democracy, for example, regardless of the context. Our research has confirmed that the usually 15% or so of each sample (of which there have been many in Canada, the USA, Australia and about a dozen countries around the world) which is non-White presents us with some interesting insight into experiences with normative, relativistic and hegemonic notions of democracy. I would be interested to know how colleagues address this issue, and the importance of signifying racial positions, identities and postures.
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Dr. Carr:
I think that in general research is risky.  We can rarely know the consequences of our questions and types of assessment on our participants.  
You might consider using qualitative narrative methods to assess how a sample of your intended population would perceive "race" related inquiries (e.g., focus groups).  It is likely that the consequences would relate to the meaning of race for a particular cultural or race/ethnic group.  Qualitative data related to your question with two or three focus groups might give you more useful information.
In general if you ask about "race" make sure to ask whether or not participants actually identify with a racial/ethnic group as well as to list some specific groups or have them write in the group(s) (if any) with which they identify.  In this instance, you are not referring to biological definitions but recognizing that racial self-identification is often socially constructed and is likely to influence your findings; particularly for those who do view themselves as belonging to a particular group or groups.  
These are a few of my thoughts.
All the best,
S. Harris
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I'm searching for papers, bibliography about intercural acitivities in which the stress is on similitarities and not on differences.
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Some critical researchers address the problem that intercultural education often focuses to much on cultural differences. Mecheril f.ex. presents different approaches to difference in social work: neglect of the other, recognition of the other (by emphasizing the necessity of identity) and the deconstruction of differences.
Mecheril, P. & Plößer, M. (2012). Neglect – recognition – deconstruction: Approaches to otherness in social work. In: International Social Work, Heft 55(6)/ 2012, S.794–808.
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I am looking for ideas on testing socialisng and intercultural awareness skills at tertiary level.
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Hi Mary
I address sociocultural testing under the aegis of acculturation in "Hearing a Different Drummer"
where I refer to "self analysis of progress in endogenous approaches" (Haverkort and Rist 2004) and "sociocultural adaption scales" (Ward and Kennedy 1999)
I hope these help
Dr John Studley
Haverkort, B. and S. Rist (2004) Towards co‐evolution of knowledge and sciences: no shortcut in integrating local and global knowledge. In: Proceedings of Compas Conference Bridging Scales and Epistemologies:Linking Local Knowledge with Global Science in Multi‐Scale Assessments. Alexandría, March 2004. 25p.
Ward, C. & Kennedy, A. (1999). The measurement of sociocultural adaptation.
International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 23. 659–677.
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Support your answer with arguments if yes how and if no how?
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I have always wondered why this idea of "third world countries" and "a third world culture" have become thought of as a homogenious intercontenential culture? When in-fact there are many cultures, diverse peoples, ideas, and landscapes.
Secondly from those who have used that term in my presence there is a sense of romanticism,   
As far as I can tell the term "third world" has two originans, one economic and one derogatory. So whenever I hear the term I always wonder in which context is the word used in.
Last, the word interculturalism. This word to I have the same questions as to the context the speaker is using it in. It appears to me that an idea of culture having not already been affected by other cultures, intermingling, and modernization is a naive. Could it be a hope by some that we have not exported the inhuman way we act toward ourselves and others as "first and second worlds"?
To answer the question directly, death and exploitation.
Douglas
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Some cultural scholars have used perception of similarity scales or adapted Phinney's measure for intercultural research.
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Co-national identity measures--any suggestions?
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How we can realize inter-cultural competence in research, i.e. What are the main issues regarding learners' inter-cultural competence?
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Thank you for the comment. Global media is a great phenomenon to show the interrelatedness and hybridization of cultures. Supporting Yingchi' argument, producing and receiving culture is connected in a web of meanings. This suites pretty well with a relational hermeneutics view of culture. Additionally, I also think that "interpretive meaning negotiation between cultures" (ibid.) is the fundamental basis of a so-called cross-cultural communication.
In literature there is a great diversity of different terms depending on the context: "global competence, cross-cultural effectiveness, cross-cultural adjustment, cross-cultural competence, cross-cultural communication effectiveness, intercultural sensitivity, intercultural effectiveness, intercultural
communication competence, cross-cultural communication competence, cross-cultural adaptation, cross-cultural success, personal adjustment or personal success" (Source: Taylor. E. W. (1994): Intercultural competency: A transformative learning process. In: Adult Education Quarterly 44, 154-170 (here: pp. 155f.).
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What makes emotions so powerful in intercultural communication, or in any communication? How can emotions in intercultural encounters be recognised and studied?
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Part of the reason is to help us understand to which extent emotion recognition is influenced by social and cultural factors as opposed to "innate" ability. This could lead to insights regarding the nature of affect and emotion and its role as an evolutionary adaptation.
Take a look at these publications:
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In other words how far, narrow, long, short, etc. is a subject's capacity to believe/ give credence to ideas. (perhaps this features alongside (?) dogmatism after Rokeach et al.?)
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You should check this link:
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In South Africa, many children are born in multilingual families, how do we then determine their first language for early education and even language intervention should they have a language impairmant.
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Well, I think the same, even for the familly comunication healthy. But, in our days, specially in big cities and urban towns the kids are almost day out of home, and, sometimes, at school, the main language is not the FL of the student, so, we must be very carefull to say wich is wich in language impairment. In my case, I have kids with Tagalo (Phillipines) as familly language, at school thay are learning in Portuguese language all day and all subjects, out of school they only hear cantonese(chinese). Even we know that they talk Tagalo at home, is the short time they talk and hear a language. So, wich language is the first one? Really hard to understand. And look, I'm talking about small kids of the kindergarten and elementary school.