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Intercultural Communication - Science topic

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Coming from Translation (and Interpreting) Studies (TS or T&IS), I must admit I don't know much about Intercultural Communication (Studies), despite the two fields having a lot in common. While TS isn't very well known as an academic (inter)discipline, it is extremely dynamic and its researchers are strongly attached to the field. My question to ICS scholars is how would you introduce the field to someone who is not very familiar with it? How do you refer to the discipline? Who are the leading authors, what are the pivotal texts? Are there "maps" of the field? What are the best introductions to the discipline? And so on and so forth! Thank you!
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The field of Intercultural Communication (IC) has long been discussed. One of the prominent and clear ideas about the field is an 'emerging' and 'Interdisciplinary' field. A prominent IC scholar Steve Kulich and his colleagues have reviewed the historical roots of IC. Simply put, by using an interdisciplinary approach, IC scholars can contribute to various fields of the humanities, arts, and social sciences such as Global Studies and Comparative and International Education that deal with cross-cultural adaptation and acculturation patterns or cultural conflict issues among migrants, sojourners, or international students and their families.
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How is the notion of "cultural distance" perceived/defined/employed/researched/tackled in current business/management/trade/etc. studies?
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You will likely find the (recent) work of people such as Oded Shenkar, Sjoerd Beugelsdijk, and Douglas Dow very useful. A good starting point might be: Beugelsdijk, S., T. Kostova, M. van Essen. V. Kunst and E. Spadafora (2018) Cultural distance and the process of firm internationalization, Journal of Management 44(1): 89-130.
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In teaching Intercultural Communication to university students, what activities and sources of information/references would you recommend?
Thank you very much in advance for sharing your knowledge and skills. I really appreciate it.
Kind Regards,
Alexandra Shaitan.
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Soyhan Egitim Sounds great! Please do let me know once it has been published and I would be happy to use it in my teaching.
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Due to COVID-19 restrictions, my project got postponed for one year. My sociolinguistic research focus is on face to face\focused group interviews to examine identity construction + accent\sound production. Unfortunately, I don't think I'll manage to conduct face-to-face interviews anytime soon (apparently COVID 19 restrictions is still developing) and postponing my project is no longer an option. So, I intend to replace face-to-face interviews with online interviews. I'm looking for recent studies that used online interviews - I hope you can recommend some.
Thanks in advance!
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We are Dutch BA students looking for participants for our Thesis survey on intercultural communication. If you are a US-American with work experience we would love for you to fill it out and spread the word!
Many Thanks!
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Myriam Bedoya , this reminds me of a remark I made years ago in Costa Rica when I saw the name of a university called something like "Universidad Americana". I was surprised to have a US-owned institution in the town. My host quickly replied that we ARE americans! I felt stupid and try ever since not to mix up "America" with the United States of America!
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in spreading the culture of native speakers ,
what kind of films and videos ? ,
how much EFL learners need to know more about the english culture ?
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Besides what has been suggested, you may check out the following recent articles.
Haapsaari, M. (2021). Video games and language learning: a match made in heaven? The effects of video games in learning English in a Finnish context. https://jyx.jyu.fi/handle/123456789/73528
Halimovna, K. S., Nurilloevna, M. O., Radzhabovna, K. D., Shavkatovna, R. G., & Hamidovna, R. I. (2019). The role of modern pedagogical technologies in the formation of students' communicative competence. Religación, 4, 261-265. https://www.neliti.com/publications/331688/the-role-of-modern-pedagogical-technologies-in-the-formation-of-students-communi#cite
Hasanova, G. H., & Samandarova, M. B. (2020). Formation of language communicative competence of students. Theoretical & Applied Science, 82(02), 574-579. https://doi.org/10.15863/tas.2020.02.82.95
Stratilaki-Klein, S. (2021). Intercultural communicative competence and virtual encounters through telecollaboration: an empirical study. Language Education and Multilingualism – The Langscape Journal https://doi.org/10.18452/22333
Good luck,
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We are starting the project CultSense - Sensitizing Young Travellers for Local Cultures (www.cultsense.com). The project seeks to find a new approach to increase understanding and valorization of local cultures by the people that visit these places. We are in first instance thinking of young people.
  • What is for you the most important challenge in making this bridge of understanding between (young) tourists and the local cultures they visit?
  • Any ideas of how to communicate ways to tackle this challenge?
Thank you for sharing your views and the challenges of the places you live and visit!
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Great project! Congratulation to the whole group!
I would approach such an issue starting from the actors that create foster and communicate tourism in the first place. What makes the (young) tourists decide where to go and what to do there? What strategies are in place that aims to attract tourists?
I think about the infamous Amsterdam case, we have now a generation of people who have been to the Netherlands so many times in their life without trespassing the Coffee Shop quarter.
Also, what is the role of the "new" media in tourists' decision making? My hunch is that Instagram and influencers in general play a paramount role in developing tastes and hence tourists' behaviours.
Another level of attention could be one of the local businesses. Do shops and entrepreneurs play a role in that? Jane Jacobs would say YES, and others such as Gehl architects say that retail plays a crucial role in the experience of a city/public space.
Let's talk more!
All the best,
Valeria
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I am using three scales in my study, two of them are five Likert Scale, while one of them, Self-perceived communication competence (SPCC) developed by McCroskey & McCroskey, 1988) is a percentage scale measuring the percentage of perception of people about their own communication competence from 1 to 100.
Can I convert the scale using, 1-20=Strongly disagree, 21-40= Disagree, 41-60= Neutral, 61-80=Agree and 81-100= Strongly Agree.
Is there any way to convert scales?
Thank you in Advance
PS: Scale is attached.
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Muhammad Adnan, I'm pretty sure you could go ahead and obtain correlations without worrying about converting your scales.
However, in regression you might need to consider standardized rather than unstandardized coefficients.
You should be able to find information about that in stats textbooks, on the web and/or in YouTube presentations.
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I believe, L2 communication willingness can be regarded from several aspects, considering such factors as stress, lack of motivation, basic social/linguistic context and a few more. Given the factor you want to highlight, you can choose a relevant theory, or even a combination of such.
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Could you recommend any literature on the intercultural aspect of prosody in women's political speeches, please? It can be in English, German, Russian, or Spanish.
Thank you!
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You can read: Hughes, Linda K. The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women's Poetry || Prosody, 2019.
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I'm looking for articles about nonverbal and paraverbal means in intercultural communications. It would be great if they deal with this topic in connection with politics. The article can be in English, German or Russian.
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Are these of any help; they are in English (and some other languages)?:
Rusu, O., & Chiriță, M. (2017). Verbal, non-verbal and paraverbal skills in the patient-kinetotherapist relationship. Timisoara Physical Education and Rehabilitation Journal, 10(19), 39-45.
Vitezslav, V., & Yu, M. T. (2019). A Model of Non-Verbal Communication Means Structuring: An Intercultural Aspect (On the Material of the Czech and Russian Cultures). Вестник Волгоградского государственного университета. Серия 2: Языкознание, 18(3).
Староста, Г. А. (2019). Specific aspects of intercultural and interpersonal communication in the system of education.
Shirmova, T. E. (2017). Problems of intercultural communication and their causes.
Wawra, D. (2009). Social intelligence: The key to intercultural communication. European Journal of English Studies, 13(2), 163-177.
I have not seen the full text to this and cannot find it on ResearchGate:
Good luck with this,
Mary
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I am a Japan based TESOL professional looking to collaborate with other educators from around the world on research into the emerging paradigm of telecollaborative learning.
Many see technology in the classroom as a teaching gimmick, and rightly so if it is used without any pedagogical framework. However, technology provides great potential to enhance learning in many pedagogically sound ways. The use of technology to connect students from around the world in collaborative projects has been shown to help students develop not only knowledge of a particular subject matter, but also language skills and intercultural sensitivity. Use of technology to connect students from different geographical locations in such collaborative learning projects is commonly referred to as telecollaborative learning. Current technology (such as the Google Apps suite) provides powerful, easy to use, and a quite often free interface for connecting students and teachers interested in pursuing telecollaborative learning.
I have already begun the groundwork for such a study through three preliminary Japan based studies. One study demonstrates that motivated Japanese university students can teach each other the technological skills necessary to complete a complex term-long multimedia intercultural project with minimal teacher input and little or no prior experience. Another study reveals social pressure as being the strongest factor motivating the completion of such collaborative projects among Japanese university students. And a third study quantifies the development of intercultural sensitivity among Japanese university students through online cultural exchange. If you are interested in joining me in a project to connect university students from your country with university students in Japan in a study of telecollaborative learning, please contact me and we can discuss the details of setting up such a project.
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I would like to take part . Paraskevi Mentzelou (teaching undergraduate and post postgraduate courses) e-mai: pmentzelou1@gmail.com
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My thesis is about Miscommunication, confusion and impoliteness in second/foreign language classroom. For this research, I need to gather data from classroom interaction. Here are three questionnaires about interaction in the classroom of English/Spanish and Italian as FL/SL. Please could you share them with language students? Your cooperation is highly appreciated. For any question, please do not hesitate to contact me: cristina.gadaleta@hud.ac.uk English: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdIQyN4ikkpIQ7eNM7il6vTxNP78SltxQlo4Z7SloQacGJNvw/viewform?usp=sf_link Spanish: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf9Ib2iPNXhgzDNgKriwbiODAXweLNAkyVv48Al_0sAIo0KoA/viewform?usp=sf_link Italian: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScRediqYPWzdV2Yj4WqUpGFUxDlZ1Yo6c_3Sq7kCVapXjsHZw/viewform?usp=sf_link
Acknowledge: Mugford, G. (2019). Addressing difficult situations in foreign-language learning : confusion, impoliteness, and hostility. New York, NY: Routledge.
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Really,highly,valuably needed.
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I am currently working on my dissertation of understanding intercultural challenges in Key Account Management (Global Account Management). Is there any literature in KAM available integrating intercultural challenges. Any recommendations for a quantitative method to analyze intercultural challenges in GAM.
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Not that I am aware of. Do not forget that KAM has been unfortunately interrupted few years ago for obscure reasons
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My thesis is about Miscommunication in second/foreign language classroom.
For this research, I need to gather data from classroom interaction.
Here are three questionnaires about interaction in the classroom of English/Spanish and Italian as FL/SL. Please could you share them with language students? Your cooperation is highly appreciated. For any question, please do not hesitate to contact me: cristina.gadaleta@hud.ac.uk.
Italian: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScRediqYPWzdV2Yj4WqUpGFUxDlZ1Yo6c_3Sq7kCVapXjsHZw/viewform?usp=sf_link Acknowledge: Mugford, G. (2019). Addressing difficult situations in foreign-language learning : confusion, impoliteness, and hostility. New York, NY: Routledge.
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I think miscommunication originally based on the indivual differences among those learners.Some are at a high level of language development mastering all the fundamental skills fully while on the other hand some are so poor and inexperienced concerning the basics of lang.
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India is a diverse nation and the social, economic and cultural differences in all the regions (North India, South India, East India, and West India) of India implied to miscellaneous cultural differences. Is there any research conducted to study internal cultural differences in India?
P.S I'm also interested to take a glance at how other countries argue the intercultural challenges that they faced while working with India firms based in India.
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I am not in position to response to your question -1.
However, all companies conduct cultural sensitivity awareness training for their employees when they go to other country to minimize the conduct error due to cultural difference.
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My research is about the relationship between level of cultural knowledge and development of intercultural communication.
My problem is, items in my questionaire reflecting IV which is level of knowledge is true false question which are factual questions.
Eg: Gambling is allowed in Islam religion. (Yes / No)
My DV items which is intercultural development is in likert scale.
So, i cant make correlations using spss to analyze the data. Therefore, I would like to ask whether I can transform the dichotomous question to likert only for analyzing and make correlation.
Tq.
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Hello Ahmad,
You certainly can correlate the scores in their present form, using either Pearson or Spearman correlations as you see fit (Pearson assumes interval strength data, which would be a relevant concern for the DV items). It doesn't matter that one variable has only two possible values, whereas the other has more.
Further, any attempt to reexpress the dichotomous item into a "Likert-type" scale would not change that correlation (since it would be some form of linear transform).
Good luck with your work.
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Hello all,
There are various theories abut Intercultural Competence. Can someone please suggest which elements of ICC did you use in your research?
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Hello Fariya, please find attached 3 papers I wrote and that are linked to your question. Best regards, Anne
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Would be great to hear from you!
Best wishes
Andreas
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Intercultural capital as I understand it, includes intercultural communication and dialogue. In addition to our research at IFLAC: The International Forum for the Literature and Culture of Peace, on both these subjects, I edit a daily IFLAC Digest, on the Internet, that contains intercultural communication of researchers, scientists, writers, poets, from various cultures around the world. As our goal is to create a world beyond war, the use and spreading of intercultural-ism is of capital importance, as it creates bridges of understanding among cultures.
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It is said that language and culture are inseparable and learning language is void without achieving an awareness of its culture. Language is the carrier of culture and without culture languageis of nonsense. On the other hand, many communities consider learning a foreign culture as a kind of cultural invasion and prefer to expose their children to foreign language but not to its culture… What do you think we as EFL teachers should do in our classes? And should our teaching of English be culture-free or culture oriented??
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I teach English and language awareness i.e., not only one English but Englishes especially the varieties they speak and/or need to learn, so not necessarily British or American English but International English, the one spoken and understood by the nonnative speakers (EFL/ESL). World Englishes proponents & supporters respect all varieties.
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I (Japan) and colleagues from the Philippines and Vietnam are conducting a survey on the English language and culture.
We would like to open this to any other interested parties.
We are all teaching EFL students who are English majors.
It is a simple survey that questions how long students have been studying English and how culture effects their foreign language learning.
We would like to expand this to a wider base of countries, not necessarily Asia with instructors who are teaching EFL English majors.
Thank you, for any who are considering
Harry Carley, Matsuyama University, Ehime, Japan
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I'm very interested. I will support the feedback from Indonesia, if you need.
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Hi everyone, what do you think how functional and complete individualistic and collectivistic categorization of cultures around the world is while studying intercultural communication among different countries respondents?
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Dear Muhammad Yousaf,
Individualism-collectivism is an important but perhaps over-emphasized dimension of cultural difference. See the work of Geert Hofstede for a multidimensional scheme. He has a recent review Dimensionalizing Cultures in Online Readings in Psychology and Culture. There is a link to it on google scholar.
Best, Pete. 
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Indian child rearing is self-exploratory rather than restrictive. Indian children are generally raised in an atmosphere of love. A great deal of attention is lavished on them by a large array of relatives, usually including many surrogate mothers and fathers. The child is usually with relatives in all situations. Indian adults generally lower rather than raise their voices when correcting a child. The Indian child learns to be seen and not heard when adults are present. In-school conflicts may arise since most educators are taught to value the outgoing child. While an Indian child may be showing respect by responding only when called upon, the teacher may interpret the behavior as backward, indifferent, or even sullen. Teachers may also misinterpret and fail to appreciate the Indian child’s lack of need to draw attention, either positive or negative, upon himself or herself.
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This is emic type of practice of child rearing, which is culture specific not comparable.
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I'm studying the influence of context on intercultural face-to-face meetings, between international students at the university level.  I would like to use the Double-Swing Model and would love to share some ideas with researchers interested in that model/subject.
Thank you!
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Thank you Jason!  I will definitely look into it. Sounds interesting!
Best,
Karine
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Hello everyone. 
Basically, I will be looking at domestic violence against women, with specific reference to help-seeking and stigma. I use an ecological framework / ecological systems perspective as proposed by Bronfenbrenner.
That being said, my research questions are, in a nut-shell:
a. How does cultural stigma create institutional stigma?
b. How do both cultural and institutional stigma effect felt stigma at the individual level and ultimately, prevent help-seeking.
So here is the thing. The plan is to spend some time (around 6 months) overseas volunteering at an NGO in the field. In doing so, I would like to conduct ethnographic research, inclusive of interviews with key stakeholders: shelter staff, activists, psychologists, law enforcement, perpetrators, domestic violence survivors etc. No issues so far, but then I run into some confusion...
Does ethnography really suit my attempt to look at help-seeking from an ecological perspective, or is ethnography more about zooming into specific micro-cultures so as to understand the point of view from the people on the ground? 
Basically, would there be a way to demonstrate the way in which the macro shapes the micro/community, and subsequently the way in which these forces impact upon the individual? 
By speaking to domestic violence survivors I will be able to see how cultural and public stigma effects them directly, but as I see it, it would not be possible to look at the way in which the culture shapes the institutions this way? 
Would some kind of multi-sited ethnography be good? Where I would interview so-called experts to get an idea on the cultural and institutional aspects, and then interview domestic violence survivors to see how this effects the individual? 
If anybody has some ideas or tips / alternative methodologies / sub-types of ethnography to think about that would be great :)
Thank you so much.
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The stigma is a robust theme to an ethnografic study. I recommend you to read Discipline and Punish of M. Faucault in order to reinforce your theorethical framework as well as the works of Basil Bernstein. A movie named SING STREET treats this theme with a great dignity. Good luck.
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I am working on the impact of intercultural communication competence on the performance of multicultural teams :the role of conflict management,.i need so badly to read more about intercultural communication competence,the conflict management and the performance of multicultural teams ,so i think that any interesting article or book or a measuring scale of one of those concepts can really help me.
So far i have found  an inetresting study of Alexei V.Matveev ,2002,The perception of intercultural  communication competence by American and Russian managers with experience on multicultural teams.
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There are many aspects of communication which differ from culture to culture, including how loud we talk, the directness with which we speak, how much emotion we express in various situations, the rules for turn taking, the use or avoidance of silence, and many non-verbal aspects of communication like posture, eye contact, proximity, touching, tone of voice, etc. that occur almost totally beneath our conscious awareness. It is clear that communication patterns develop very differently in individualistic and in group-oriented cultures. With the increased globalization of workplace settings across most industries, today’s managers need a more precise understanding of intercultural communication in an effective management strategy. it is important to have a plan in place and keep these points in mind:
1 Know Your Team: 2. Do Your Homework: 3. The Platinum Rule:
Skilled professionals who are leaders in their field can provide not only the knowledge, but the personal experience to make the concepts come alive.
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An example was given by C. L. Kausel .  The two English words ingenious and ingenuous are often confused, even by English speakers.  Ingenious means (briefly) clever or possessing genius, which Ingenuous means innocent (the word ingenue usually means an innocent young woman, esp in theatre). 
Are there pairs of words in your language which have the same curious mix of meaning?
Or:  In learning a language, there are many times when you think you know the meaning because your language has a word that sounds alike.  These are called "false friends".  So many examples:  For instance in French, the word "libraire" sounds like English "library", but really means a bookstore.  "poisson" (fish) sounds like "poison".  Which reminds me, in German "gift" is "poison" in English.  I'd love to hear some other ones from from as many languages as possible.
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Instead of saying "Would you please bring me
a pint of beer?" a German very likely will
order "I become a glass beer".
Kommen means (to) come, but bekommen isn't
become. Bekommen means to obtain, to get.
Regards,
Joachim
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Suggest some background literature.
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Howdy, all,
   No one has mentioned the old Italian pun, "traductore, tradittore" (translator, traitor). I recall a comment by an interpreter at the UN on interpreting a speech by Kruschev. When he told a traditional Russian story to illustrate a point, the interpreter realized that the story would make no sense to English hearers, so he quickly realized this and substituted a completely different story which would be familiar and make the same point. 
  Research has shown that, even at a literal level, different languages "pack" different kinds of information in, for example, verbs. Both English and Spanish have a general verb of motion, "go"/"ir", but Spanish has a verb "salir", which would be translated by the Verb + Particle combination "go out", which separates the motion and direction. Translations of novels from English to Spanish and vice-versa show differences in the amount of information omitted or added. 
  Even in technical translation, people working in a field have standard expressions which a translator unfamiliar with the field would be unfamiliar with. A professional translator hired by an archeology journal to translate article summaries into Spanish produced odd literal translations because she was unfamiliar with the field. Literary translation, of course, is vastly more complex because it includes a great deal of cultural and emotional content, and poetry in particular requires a complete re-casting. I have heard it said that the English translation of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam is better than the original. 
  Pedagogically, translation provides an important "boot-strapping" which speeds access into the target language. Learning a second language in a school setting can be likened to gaining familiarity with another country and its culture by looking at pictures in a book, or reading descriptions. Only by gradual steps does one gain greater sociolinguistic and cultural knowledge, but only living in the other country gives one the experiential and existential sensibility for deeper knowledge. (Even then, of course, no one can ever become a complete native of a second culture.) All second language learners necessarily begin with translation, overt or covert, until their linguistic competence reaches the point at which they can use the L2 without conscious awareness, but even then, psycholinguistic research shows that the L1 is being activated, suggesting that translation is still taking place subliminally.
   Rudy Troike
   University of Arizona
   Tucson, Arizona, USA
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Today, June the 16th, is Bloomsday, the day during which the entire events of James Joyce's Ulysses take place.Bloomsday events take place in several countries around the world.
Those who have read the novel deeply over several times may have become saturated with its spirit.
For example, I have written a short story that turned out to be an intercultural homage to Joyce (among others,) I was wondering if anybody else is noticing influences of James Joyce's intercultural writing in fiction that they have either been reading or writing.
Respectfully,
Gloria McMillan
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Thanks, Alexander, for your input!
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I would like to do a preliminary research that can give me a panoramic result of the state of intercultural education in the university in wich I'm professor.
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Attached you will find a framework that I like.  It is not an instrument, but it might form the basis for developing an instrument.
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Materials used for learning English play a pivotal role in making learners' inter-culturally competent; however, some domestic or national coursebooks for learning English mainly address the domestic or national culture as the criterion. In other words, they try to localize the coursebooks. Thus, controversies might arise. On one hand, we might need to have a clear definition of localization:  is it focusing on the domestic culture for learning English or being able to introduce or maintain our own cultural values in intercultural communications via English language? On the other hand, what the consequences of setting the international culture or national culture as the criterion for materials development are. 
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What I am looking for are empirically defined outcomes in intercultural communication that highlight such sensitive cases and provide possible suggestions concerning the way they can be controlled.
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I investigated the aspects that influence intercultural communication and also occurring emotions. I propose to evaluate emotions using computer-aided approaches. 
There are also other determinants of intercultural communication such as personality, culture, social factors etc. influencing interaction. You might be also interested in possible scenarios of social interaction that take place in the context of globalization.
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I live in a small urban community north of Detroit, Michigan where there are growing multicultural communities. It is my desire to create a program that will change the dynamics from Multicultural to Intercultural. Has anyone done this before and what model can we use?
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Contemporary societies are complex and the role of education is changing as a consequence of societal Change.  Multiculturalism describes the existence, acceptanceof multiple cultural  traditions within a single jurisdiction usually considered in terms of the culture associated with an ethnic group. Many people living within multicultural and plural societies are pluricultural. Pluricultural individuals are people with the competences of knowledge, disposition and linguistic and behavioral skills required to function as a social actor within two or more cultures.. Interculturality refers to the capacity to experience and analyze cultural otherness, and to use this experience to reflect on matters that are usually taken for granted within one’s own culture and environment. Interculturality finally involvesevaluating one’s own everyday patterns of perception, thought, feeling and behaviour in order to develop greater self-knowledge and self-understanding. Interculturality thus enables people to act as mediators among people of different cultures, to explain and interpret different perspectives. Interculturality does not involve identifying with another cultural group or adopting the cultural practices of the other group. Interculturality entails a number of underlying cognitive, affective and behavioural competences. These include knowledge ( knowledge about other cultural groups and their products and practices and knowledge about the ways in which people of different cultures interact), attitudes (such as curiosity, openness, respect for otherness, and empathy), skills of interpreting and  relating (for example, interpreting a practice from another culture and relating it to practices within one’s own culture), skills of discovery (such as the ability to search out and acquire new knowledge about a culture and its practices and products), and critical cultural awareness (that is, the ability to evaluate critically the practices and products of one’s own and other cultures). An intrinsic aspect of analyzing intercultural social activity is the reflective process of relating new knowledge to one’s own self-understanding and values. Sensitivity is an important element in attempting to understand another's way of life, but part of the reflective process is to relate new understanding to one’s own values and beliefs with tolerance and respect for those of others. It involves a positive attitude towards diversity, seeing the meeting between people with different beliefs and cultural practices as enriching for all, and seeing one’s own individuality as being developed through meeting ‘otherness’. This is the process of intercultural dialogue which underpins the achievement of social cohesion.
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One Indian Lecture teaches the course intercultural communication, mainly introduces Landeskund of southeast Asian countries and its neighboring countries. The aim is to improve students' cultural communication competence and their speaking skills. The other lecture from Canada teaches the course Culture Around the daily life, using a course book "People like us". The aim of the course is to improve students' speaking skills and have students know more and understand more about culture. Both small c culture and Big C culture are introduced in the lesson.These two courses are English language courses. I would like to probe into the effects of the teaching of two lectures on developing students' cultural awareness or cultural sensitivity. Could any research help me sharpen my idea to have some research questions? Thanks a million!
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Hope attached one is useful for your investigation. 
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The focus of current research I am involved in is connecting processes of intercultural communication to the learning that takes place (or doesn't) as a result of intercultural interactions. I find that while there is much written about IC communication there is far less on IC learning.
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Hi Fran,
Thanks for starting an interesting conversation topic. I am currently working on my PhD which looks at how young people engage with interculturality in their everyday lives. My understanding is that intercultural communication is mainly dealt with in the fields of applied linguistics and sociolinguistics and intercultural learning is studied in the field of education. So my impression is that scholars of intercultural communication focus on language use whereas it is conspicuously absent from discussions of intercultural learning. With regards to the distinction between intercultural communication and intercultural learning, I am dealing with something similar. I’m working with the term ‘thinking diversity’ to describe critical understandings of self and Other that don’t necessarily involve interpersonal interaction, and ‘living diversity’ to describe interacting successfully with Others that does not involve the kind of critical reflection and understandings generated by ‘thinking diversity’. When the two are enacted simultaneously I think of it as ‘doing interculturality’. I’d be interested to hear your thoughts on this.
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Currently, some political candidates in the United States have done their best to further alienate the world-wide Muslim Community.   What can we do as social scientists (and U.S. citizens) to neutralize the effects of crazy candidates like Donald Trump?
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I appreciate your concern in this regard . Just as Donald Trump does not represent  all Americans , the extremists don't represent all Muslims, I wonder why it needs to be emphasized so much. Its not that complicated . I really loved the way Pres.Obama expressed his concern on the issue during his recent visit to a mosque, that's how other enlightened social scientists can reach out as well.
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I am interested in knowing of the practices, challenges, processes, benefits, outcomes, dynamics, etc. of those who have engaged in developing , or who have an interest in, international partnerships/networks, especially in relation to social justice/democracy/education. I am finding that there are many challenges, including language, technological synchronisation, funding, physical meetings, work distribution, groundwork in bringing people together, alignment of objectives, methods and means, dissemination of ideas, among others. However, the need and the potential for tangible, meaningful, critical work is enormous if the partnership/network can be effectively established, notably in relation to bringing into the fold disparate voices that may not be heard within the broader context in isolation. In other words, the partnership/network may value much more these local, contextualized concerns than the contrary, and the partnership/network may also be more effective in collectively moving the respective fields of study forward. Despite the factors mitigating against such work, the outcomes could lead to a much better understanding of broad, contextualized, comparative issues, research, realties, etc., and help connect the dots on such concerns as neoliberalism in education, social inequalities, and democracy in and through education. As I am working on developing such a partnership/network, I would be most interested in the insight and experiences of colleagues around the world.
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I'm not certain how fruitful it would be, but I wonder if the Humboldt Foundation might be a means to get a network going, since it could facilitate connections in the EU and elsewhere, AND provide funding for the necessary travel recommended in an earlier post? https://www.humboldt-foundation.de/web/humboldt-kollegs-en.html (also, they have Canadian "alumni associations" that might be helpful)
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Can anybody please suggest me any study examining the relations between ethnic identity components (i. e., commmitment, exploration) and acculturative stress? I prefer studies focusing on early, middle and late adolescents but also suggestions regarding emerging adults or adults are welcome.
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Sometimes, a general lit review  can (or must be done) to get at the specific, more focused issues, such as what you are looking for, especially since one study or one researcher may do more than that; case in point, I recognize the names of the first 4 authors.and did make use of their work and findings. Also, some of the  measures available do address those specifics.
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international communication
international connections
or intercultural communication.
thank you in advance
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Journal of International and Intercultural Communication may also be of use
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I am particularly interested in research that focuses on the dialogic interactions during intercultural communication that aims to understand on the intercultural rather than communicative aspects of such conversations. 
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Thank you Alexander - I have a copy of his book, but have not seen the interview before.
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If you could, specify the context of your teaching (country, target language, Lg. level);
Have you undergonne any training in this respect?
Do you use specvial materials (education packs)?
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I try to work on our stereotypes , to not judge or analyse other culture through our own culture. Furthermore, I compare cultures so as to see that we give different cultural responses to same social needs
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I am planning to conduct some experiments to study the effect of different types of conflict communication styles in an intercultural setting. I will have participants engage in a real or simulated dyad, in which the interaction partner uses different communication styles, to see the effect on the participant. Has something like this been done before?
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Hi Pinar,
There are lots of good ideas in the answers here.
I'd suggest that you take a look at the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology as a source of inspiration and to take you forward. This journal may be just what you need to give good grounding and great reference articles.
All the best with your study.
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Often 'Internationalisation' focuses on the international student experience, but how do the 'home' students experience diversity on campus? There is an opportunity for intercultural learning to occur, but is the opportunity taken? What facilitates or hinders intercultural learning between students of the 'host' country, and those coming from elsewhere?
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There is a need to establish exactly what is meant by 'internationalisation', whether this be of experience, of curricula and so forth. The concept remains slippery and ill-defined. So, I think first of all ensure you have a clear operational sense of what it is you are asking about. Internationalisation is not necessarily synonymous with diversity.
Ricardo makes a good point in stating that there is much to learn from Europe but this does not negate the value of international experiences at home or abroad, nor of learning about a diverse range of cultures and nationalities. I think, Ricardo, you are perhaps arguing from a particular discourse that you feel is in danger of being overlooked. I don't believe it is and think that wider AND deeper experiences can enhance scholarship and understanding (but it does need both).
In my university we are following the almost sector-wide trend towards internationalisation (and again find it ill-defined, complex and slippery). As for learning that is both intercultural and transformative - two points that again require separate debate although have overlaps for learning - we have found that international experience is second to none and that home experiences are considered more in the abstract - see the following:
Baba, I., Ashencaen Crabtree, S. and Parker, J., 2011. Future indicative, past imperfect: a cross cultural comparison of social work education in Malaysia and England. In: Stanley, S., ed. Social Work Education in Countries of the East: Issues and Challenges. New York: Nova, pp. 276-301
Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Parker, J., Azman, A., Masu’d, F. (2015) Typologies of learning in international student placements, Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development. Doi: 10.1080/02185385.2014.1003393
Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Parker, J., Azman, A., Masu’d, F (2014) Sociological examination of student learning in children’s services in Malaysia. Journal of Comparative Research in Anthropology & Sociology. 5, 1.
Parker, J. Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Azman, A., Carlo, D.P., Cutler, C. (2014) Problematising international placements as a site of intercultural learning European Journal of Social Work, advance access, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13691457.2014.925849
Parker, J., Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Chui, W.H., Kumagai, T., Baba, I., Azman, A., Haselbacher, C., Ashkanani, H.R. and Szto, P. (2012) WAVE: Working with adults who are vulnerable – A comparison of curricula, policies and constructions, Revista de Asistenţă Socială, anul XI, 3/2012, 1-18.
Parker, J., Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Baba, I., Carlo, D. P. and Azman, A., 2012. Liminality and learning: international placements as a rite of passage. Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development, 22:3, 146-158.
Ashencaen Crabtree, S., Parker, J., Azman, A. & Carlo, D. P. 2012. Epiphanies and learning in a postcolonial Malaysia context: A preliminary evaluation of international social work placements. International Social Work. Advance Access doi: 10.1177/0020872812448491
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Our planned exchange fell through, so we are waiting to find another class for 30 Japanese first year university students. We are using the smartphone app BAND (iOS & Android) to connect. We need a partner class ASAP. Thank you for reading!
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Dear Simeon,  
This could have been easy when I was managing the distance learning center but I need to introduce some of my colleagues to this however, our students are on vacation now and will be back late September.  I will also check with one of our senior secondary schools who are still in session the possibility of their joining.
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Does anyone know a study investigating this?
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 Berne's original ideas as set out in his weighty volume Transactional Analysis in Psychotherapy are not as simple or clear as one might assume. Any serious attempt at cross cultural comparison would do well to go back to the source before picking up the deviations. I agree with Ian that TA became too popular and populist too soon; on the other hand it developed a professional accredcitation system that fuelled the development of a perhaps over-elaborated scheme (eg forms of script analysis) that took on an almost cultish aspect of trying to explain everything in its own terms. This tended to discourage researchers who wanted to see more critical and reflexive accounts of TA in practice. The key questions seem to be whether the Freudian personality structure remains meaningful in post Freudian times and non- Freudian cultures and whether the communicative and representational dynamics in these cultures can be said to articulate the same social and personal anxiety defences. 
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I'm interested in Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) and the Latin American culture.  As I was searching for information, I came across Dimensional Accrual and Dissociation (DAD) Theory studied within the Latin American culture.  I have to do more research on DAD but would like to know in what capacity could these two theories be studied together?  Is anyone working on either theory and the Latin American culture?
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Is TalkBank.org still operational? What about authentic audio-visual recordings that can be used for English communication training?
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Hi Ivan
academic lectures involving students' talk, conference panels and  forums interviews, and radio dramas,
and radio news announcers could also be utilized to make the comparison  .
read STEVE TAUROZA and DESMOND ALLISON please.
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How can a teacher be able to get international students engaged in a class if they are a minority, especially if the course is deeply on a culture completely different from theirs? Has anybody tackled the relationship between teaching and anthropology? 
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Let it not be an assumption that international minority students are lacking something in their lives and need to be engaged only for them to 'catch up' with their home national counterparts. In fact, the question should rather be, how can we translate the rich experiences of international students into their new environment to help us--faculty and students learn from them? In fact, international students already possess many of the 21st century skills required for the job place which many of us don't possess. Some of the listed skills are, for example, cultural resilience, adaptability, cross-cultural communication, and critical analysis. It demands a lot of resilience to leave one's home; being in a foreign country demands adaptability; cross-cultural communication is what is a challenge to every international student; and, it takes critical analysis for the international student to navigate through life daily in a foreign country. So, now back to your answer. First, we can engage international students by respecting the skills that they possess and making them to know that we're willing to learn from them, that is, we're willing for them to engage us in learning because they have a lot that we don't have. Secondly, nobody learns from a stranger who does not respect your integrity and therefore it's left to us to stop being strangers to our international students, that is, we should let them know that we care for them and we respect their integrity. So, it's time for us to start learning from international students.
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I'm searching for papers, bibliography about intercural acitivities in which the stress is on similitarities and not on differences.
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Some critical researchers address the problem that intercultural education often focuses to much on cultural differences. Mecheril f.ex. presents different approaches to difference in social work: neglect of the other, recognition of the other (by emphasizing the necessity of identity) and the deconstruction of differences.
Mecheril, P. & Plößer, M. (2012). Neglect – recognition – deconstruction: Approaches to otherness in social work. In: International Social Work, Heft 55(6)/ 2012, S.794–808.
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I am looking for ideas on testing socialisng and intercultural awareness skills at tertiary level.
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Hi Mary
I address sociocultural testing under the aegis of acculturation in "Hearing a Different Drummer"
where I refer to "self analysis of progress in endogenous approaches" (Haverkort and Rist 2004) and "sociocultural adaption scales" (Ward and Kennedy 1999)
I hope these help
Dr John Studley
Haverkort, B. and S. Rist (2004) Towards co‐evolution of knowledge and sciences: no shortcut in integrating local and global knowledge. In: Proceedings of Compas Conference Bridging Scales and Epistemologies:Linking Local Knowledge with Global Science in Multi‐Scale Assessments. Alexandría, March 2004. 25p.
Ward, C. & Kennedy, A. (1999). The measurement of sociocultural adaptation.
International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 23. 659–677.
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We would like to de-construct the fans' comments and learn about the nature of these relationship
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Thank you Lars
this is so helpful
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Support your answer with arguments if yes how and if no how?
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I have always wondered why this idea of "third world countries" and "a third world culture" have become thought of as a homogenious intercontenential culture? When in-fact there are many cultures, diverse peoples, ideas, and landscapes.
Secondly from those who have used that term in my presence there is a sense of romanticism,   
As far as I can tell the term "third world" has two originans, one economic and one derogatory. So whenever I hear the term I always wonder in which context is the word used in.
Last, the word interculturalism. This word to I have the same questions as to the context the speaker is using it in. It appears to me that an idea of culture having not already been affected by other cultures, intermingling, and modernization is a naive. Could it be a hope by some that we have not exported the inhuman way we act toward ourselves and others as "first and second worlds"?
To answer the question directly, death and exploitation.
Douglas
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There is a research in Hungary to find out towards which of the following groups Hungarians have most prejudices:
Africans, Arabs, Chinese.
The distinctions was justified, because" in this way Hungarians distinguish foreigners", despite the fact, that "Chinese" group didn't included "Vietnamese" or that "Africans" and "Arabs" are overlapping (North Africa) and groups like Persians/Iranians and others are excluded (and there are other factors).
Due to this, following questions arise:
How we should address different cultural/ethnic/religious groups in the questionnaires? The politically correct way or the "people" ("field's") way?
What consequences would our questionnaire had if we choose " the field's" understanding? Don't you think that justifies prejudices and makes in-groups/out-groups?
What is the politically correct, right (?) way how we should describe/distinguish people with different shades of skin color in the scientific articles?
How can we, as researchers, be free from our own prejudice/ stereotypes? Is it possible?
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I am strongly agree with the answers/discussions of Prof.David Charles Wright-Carr, Prof. Luis Garzón & Prof.Vilemar Magalhaes.
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There are many kind of policies , Laws , Rights , Acts which are created to reduce and even eradicate Ethnic conflict and Ethnic problems in a country where there are a multicultural group living all together. But how the country helped in stabilising this peace and harmony for people to live together and prevent this Racial and Ethnic tensions among them ? 
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There are schools around the world that discourage critical thinking and teach young impressionable children demonstrably unfounded notions, some fostering hatred--even violence, and oppression--as essential life skills.  They seem to succeed, which would at least imply that school could be a place for children to learn critical thinking along with biological, historical and social realities, as a path toward a better world--or at least a safer world--for everyone.  
But it would have to become government policy to teach biological, historical and social reality in school.  And perhaps the time has come.
When I was little I didn't have to go to Bible camp, Hebrew school or memorize the Koran--I don't know that this was either a good or a bad thing.  But I know that in that I met my myth-as-reality quotient in public school, where I Iearned that the Father of all politicians fessed up to a hatchet-job rather than lie, and America was a religious, racial and ethnic plurality.  Certainly well-intentioned, but not true.
My parents taught me that my family had a direct line to what was right, and therefore good, and also that America was a religious, racial and ethnic pluralism.  Also well-intentioned, but also not true, and probably familiar to more than one of you.
When my daughter first introduced me to someone she might marry, heritage inevitably came up--but religion wasn't mentioned, so I asked.  The young man paused, possibly fearing this was the deal-breaker.  "My parents raised me to be a decent human being" he said.  He didn't turn out to be the one she married, but I'll never forget him because he reminded me of all that really matters. 
I think we might try to foster human decency by teaching biological, historical and social reality in public school.  Taking action against bullying is a good start--it is absolutely true that kids can be cruel, but the greater truth is, kids can also be kind--it all depends on what we teach them.  
I don't think kids are ever too young to learn that we approach human decency from different directions, but the goal is shared; that race is an irrational social construct, that different faiths are all legitimate ways to approach the sacred, that personal choice of faith is whatever makes each individual most comfortable, not a measure of human decency where anyone comes out on top.  Put differently, we could start by teaching a reality-based curricula, or as close as we can possibly get to it.  It may not be a perfect solution, but its a way that government could help reduce the mythology and pseudo-ethnography that is taught as reality (or goes unchallenged) in schools, perhaps relieving some of its negative social consequences.
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Has communication increased or decreased?
Is it better to have multi-cultural teams spread worldwide without physical interaction or international teams working in the same office?
Is communicating in English following strict intercultural rules (in order not to be in conflict with anybody) leading to better understanding and/or results?
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Is it better to have multi-cultural teams spread worldwide without physical interaction or international teams working in the same office?
We should not see this as an either/or question. Both can work depending on the project and the resources available. I co-ordinate European projects which are well funded so whilst much of the work is done virtually, the team has the opportunity to meet physically 2-3 times per year. This model works well for teams that are not very large and have the resources to travel. But I have also recently co-ordinated a project involving 18 countries which had no funding and all the work was/is being done virtually. I recruited my volunteer researchers very easily and they are all very enthusiastic and totally committed to the project. Thismodel has also worked extremely well. I now have around 50 people from 18 countries across the world, most of whom did not know each other before the project started, who have contributed to establishing an amazing team spirit!
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Pubblications, authors, blog, etc.
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Hi Simone,
The following abstract contains a brief overview of a few key/classic references on expression of emotion/attitude/opinion in discourse, operationalized as the speaker's use of evaluative devices.  This line of work, primarily in English, could conceivably be adapted quite readily for inter-cultural application, depending on the nature of your particular research question(s).
Olness, G. S., & Muñoz, M. (2011). Toward an expanded operationalization of the verbal expression of affective meanings. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 23, 217-218.
It's not this article per se that you should look at, but rather the key references cited within it, especially work by Labov and Martin.  You might also look at the following book:
Martin, J. R., & White, P. R. R. (2005). The language of evaluation: Appraisal in English. New York, NY: Palgrave MacMillan.
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I prefer "intercultural" to "cross-cultural" because it sound more multilateral. Perhaps "transcultural" is better. I suspect that some term codification has been established in someone's research.
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• Multicultural communication supposes the coexistence of several cultures.
• Intercultural communication suggests interactions between different cultures.
• Intercultural communication necessarily concerns situations of contact.
• Transcultural communication can be defined as communication which are valid across social groups, or which do not take into account cultural differences.
For more, see:
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A sketchy review of views among teachers of foreign or second language.
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Interacting with those of other cultures and having honest, open dialogue is a great way to demonstrate that, at our core, we are all alike. Regardless of how we dress, the way we prepare our food -- we all have more in common than we are different.
Invite students or adults of other cultures into the class for a workshop. Solve a problem together in a creative workshop setting. Give students the opportunity to ask constructive questions. Once the veil of difference is peeled back, all that's left are the similarities, and respect begins to blossom.
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In World Literature, my students read "The Romance of Antar" and loved it. I plan to use it as a standard heroic text, but I'd like to know more about Antar ibn Shaddad and the poems. The definitive translation is from the 1880s (retains the poetry) and there seems to be a lot of legend mixed with known facts about Antar, the Poems.
Aysha Bey (UAB)
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Dear Aysha,
There has been much speculation about whether they were taken down or not. Historical records have all asserted that the idols were removed, with no mention of the muallagat. Perhaps it would be inadequate to associate idolatory with the unique talent of poetry which was highly recognised and praised by the prophet itself as a faculty.
This is a fantastic site dedicated to Al muallagat
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Everything I can find is based on self-assessment, so I wonder if any other method exists such as an assessment centre. The topic spans two fields: cross-cultural communication and competency modeling.
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I think the reason why you found mostly self-assessment in the literature is that many people feel that that's the only way intercultural competence can be really assessed (as my colleague and I briefly summarised here: http://www.lcnau.org/pdfs/lcnau_2011_strambi_mrowahopkins.pdf). Having said that, you can use models that were developed for self-assessment (e.g. Byram's criteria for the development of the EU portfolio) as a basis to develop categories for qualitative analyses of students' artifacts. See, for example, http://llt.msu.edu/vol10num3/liaw/default.html.
Another example of a framework used to analyse students' diary entries is in an article by Tony Liddicoat (Liddicoat, A.J. 2006. Learning the culture of interpersonal relationships: Students’ understandings of personal address forms in French. Intercultural Pragmatics 3(1), pp. 55-88). Liddicoat's study focused on the acquisition of address forms in French. He looked for evidence of learners' progress from a completely ethnocentric view of address forms, through the identification and comprehension of linguistic and cultural differences, and an appreciation of the complexities of the French system, to arrive at a completely decentered attitude (in Byram’s terms, a “critical cultural awareness”).
Hope this helps. Please post back if you do find anything interesting :-)
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Intercultural communication is often defined as a skill. Yet, in order to be a successful in communicating - let's say across two cultures - doesn't one need to be culturally adapted to both contexts? Or in other words, instead of developing intercultural communication skilss, should trainers not address acculturation first?
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I am not a specialist in this field, but having worked 7 years for a Japanese company in Hungary and being very much interested in comparative cultural research I do have a (non-expert) opinon. My impression is that acculturation is a notion used for people living on the territory of another culture for a longer time. Inter-cultural communication skills are needed, however, for a much broader circle of people, e.g. for those working in joint ventures. (Hall has very good examples of cultural misunderstanind even for European-European companies using monochronic and polychronic timescale, let alone Asian-European cooperations). From the practical viewpoint one cannot send each coworker to spend years in another culture, nevertheless (I believe) that certain inter-cultural commincation skills may be taught to them to reduce the cultural shock and misunderstanding. The most important thing is, however, empathy and keen observation. That's why women are better in this respect than proud males ...
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I want to study the construction of image of nations in media.
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Yes it is.. We can observe the situation of image of Muslim Communities in the world. its the Western Media which is creating negative impact on the minds of the people around the world, about the Muslims. Muslims in the world have suffered because of the "Social Construction of reality" by the western media.
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Can we say that translation is part of our incorporated and objectified cultural capital?
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I have translated book-length philosophy texts from Spanish to English with the purpose of making such texts part of the Anglophone cultural capital. They are indeed objectified because they exist outside me the translator, yet within the Anglophone cultural context.
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Background to this question is this: In the last years I did a qualitative study about intercultural experiences of German Protestant missionaries. In analyzing the narratives of the missionaries I came to the conclusion that not formal, but informal learning has a huge impact on the effectiveness of missionaries inculturation. As a trained social scientist with little theological education I am open to any comment and from any disciplinary background. So far, my focus was on the cultural psychological issues regarding missionary assignements and feel that it is time to think outside the box. Many thanks in advance
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I just started to do research about developing English language learners' intercultural skills and competence. The point is to enable international students to build a good relationship with native speakers of English and also with other people in multicultural societies. However, as I am at the very beginning stage of the research, may be I am not really clear about the possibility of teaching intercultural skills and the methods. I would be happy if you share any experience or knowledge in this domain :)
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English has accepted words/terms from almost all languages of the world. Scientific discoveries published in languages other than English are not globally read and appreciated.
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If you want your paper to be read by many scientists from all over the world, you have to write it in English. I am an Estonian, if I would write my paper in Estonian, then who would read it? Our population is only 1.3 million... Of course, many other languages are more widely spoken than Estonian (Mandarin, Spanish, German, French, Russian,...) but still, many scientists don't speak these (or know a couple of words or phrases... not enough to understand a scientific article) and they most probably won't be interested in paying somebody to translate such articles to English or their own language.
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I am highly interested in your stories from your own teaching practice. Our lectures in universities, but also in schools and in the context of vocational training often have a highly international auditory. We all may have experienced that between students or students and instructors) conflicts occurred, which most likely have their reason in cultural differences, be it because of ignorance or a lack of acceptance/flexibility.
For my research I would like to collect as many such conflict descriptions as any possible - here I need your help! What would be needed as information for a required short-report (case study) is a rough description of the learning scenario (face to face, e-learning, group work, ...) in which the conflict occurred, the nationalities (cultural background; can also happen within one nation and between different sociocultural groups) of the related students/instructors, what exactly happened and how it happened (as far as understanding is possible, else monitoring/describing is enough) and, if possible, how the solution looked like.
In the long term, I would like to develop a recommender tool that helps instructors determining which aspects within a course or book should be adapted when it is to be implemented within a different cultural context. From our research, we know how such differences can look like (at least for some fields, see publications) but it is absolutely unclear yet, what level of difference actually leads to a conflict. By collecting enough descriptions of related conflicts, I hope to get a hint into the right directions (I need many reports in order to determine similarities). Educational situations in which such conflicts occur can be e.g., urban educational scenarios, student exchange, Internet-based international learning scenarios, culturally diverse classrooms, or whatever educational scenario, where learners from different cultures come together. The form of education also does not play any role (it maybe should not be elementary school, since first hints have been found, that attitudes of pupils below 12y are more determined through curiosity than through culture - however, this field is far to unexplored to take any conclusions).
Firstly, I would be very thankful, if the responses/reports could be descriptive and politically, as neutral as possible. Please try to understand yourself as observer.
Secondly, this thread is not designed as a discussion but as a reporting thread. I could however, imagine that the one or the other would prefer sending such reports in private ... you are welcome sending em an e-mail or sending it here, internally. It is possible that I contact you directly in order to ask some more specific/additional questions.
I am not really sure if RG is the right platform for such a call for reports, but I thought if I do not give it a try, I will never know.
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Thomas (and Manuela),
This is a very interesting and important topic, so here's my answer that arrives a bit late, sorry - but I hope you take time to get back.
I pretty much agree about the problematic terms "cultural difference" and "national culture(s)", or "dimensions of culture(s)" originating from realist-and-essentialist writers such as Hofstede and his followers, and I would replace them by "diversity", "life-world", "background" and "perspective(s)" although they are equally fluffy, perhaps. But I think it is okay to talk about e.g. institutional or generational cultures (including practice, values, and standards) within their own contexts, however blurred, negotiated, temporary and contested. Yet I do not know if replacing the term "culture" by "diversity" is any better, in case the same essentialism, colonialism and lack of understanding continues.
In my work as a lecturer and practitioner-researcher during a decade or so, I had quite a few conflicts that I experienced with my international student. Some of these cases - but not very many - I used for my autobiographical PhD study (published in Finnish). In retrospect, I think my general conclusion was that I was quite stressed out and even exhausted at times, during my classes, when encountering international students of various backgrounds. I felt I could not use my regular procedures and ways of thinking - I had to adapt and change, find something else.
On the other hand, I was (mostly) thrilled, excited and happy about the opportunity of becoming a "multicultural" teacher every day, in a continuos process. I felt I was a bit more of a teacher this way, having this identity, than I had been during my previous career. Doing my autobiographical study helped me a lot in this.
Some of the problematic things that I encountered in my classes during many years was "their" idea of my role as a teacher. Was I supposed to be their dad or something? Not al all! I had reaised all my kids and only liked play with my grandchildren in my freetime. So being a dad in a university class was against my basic conception of a teacher in the "Finnish" way.
I hated to hear them discuss the "strict" vs "relaxed" teaching styles - I thought it simplified everything. Also, some of the students' tendency to withdraw from in-class interactions, on the one hand, and some students' style to be overly active, on the other hand, upset me frequently; I never really got used to that because I hough they should change as well.
One more thing: being a "non-native" teacher of English was a sensitive issue to myself, so sometimes students coming from English-speaking countries were clever enough to use this against me.
If you need more details or discussions at all, please let me know.
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Is there any research, empirical data or case studies about Canadian and Quebecois work culture and their typical team processes or their ways of working together?
Are there any studies about "cross-Canadian" team work (particularly Quebecois working together with people from the rest of Canada) in any way? Or research about Canadian and Quebecois collaborating with Germans?
My aim is to analyse what implications may arise within global working groups consisting of Quebecois and Canadians, and what can go wrong when Canadian and German teams have to collaborate (as well as how to prevent or stem these problems).
I would appreciate very much if you would share your knowledge about Canadian, Quebecois, and German teamwork and collaboration (maybe also outcomes/effectiveness of their communication) in any sense, and I am grateful for every hint on where to find publications about this. Many thanks in advance!
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This is very interesting. I like this answer Patrick. I am a Québecoise who has been living in California for 6 years, and I would love to read more about this. Do you have articles and paper that specifically talks about this?
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Letters that were discussion between the two on intercultural communications
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I am in a very convenient position: I am only an E T Hall fan, but not an anthropologist. So I need not change my topic, which is materials science. Nevertheless for this money you could buy a full book. When my net salary will reach the level of the standard European or US salary, I will not bother buying an article for that money. But now, that my net income does not exceed 1000 EUR/month and I have duties towards my family, I cannot afford.
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More and more often, countries all over the world are fostering research. What can be done so that all researchers understand each other better? How can this help researchers work cooperatively and effectively in terms of communication?
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Jose, the question you raised could be a matter of a multilingual interdisciplinary project, the completion of which can give a sound answer to what we gain and what we lose when conducting and communicating research in English. I would eagerly participate in such a project, as I happened to think, study and write in Armenian, Russian and English and accumulated self-reflective observations. I also noticed that non-English researchers writing in English build up thought in a different way.
Sure there are researchers who have experienced this. Why not collect and study these data?
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What makes emotions so powerful in intercultural communication, or in any communication? How can emotions in intercultural encounters be recognised and studied?
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Part of the reason is to help us understand to which extent emotion recognition is influenced by social and cultural factors as opposed to "innate" ability. This could lead to insights regarding the nature of affect and emotion and its role as an evolutionary adaptation.
Take a look at these publications:
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In South Africa, many children are born in multilingual families, how do we then determine their first language for early education and even language intervention should they have a language impairmant.
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Well, I think the same, even for the familly comunication healthy. But, in our days, specially in big cities and urban towns the kids are almost day out of home, and, sometimes, at school, the main language is not the FL of the student, so, we must be very carefull to say wich is wich in language impairment. In my case, I have kids with Tagalo (Phillipines) as familly language, at school thay are learning in Portuguese language all day and all subjects, out of school they only hear cantonese(chinese). Even we know that they talk Tagalo at home, is the short time they talk and hear a language. So, wich language is the first one? Really hard to understand. And look, I'm talking about small kids of the kindergarten and elementary school.