Science topic

Integrative Medicine - Science topic

Integrative Medicine is the discipline concerned with using the combination of conventional (allopathic) medicine and alternative medicine to address the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of health and illness.
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Simple search in Google Scholar shows that since 1960-70 many articles in peer-reviewed journals have supported various desirable effects of Transcendental Meditation (TM) but some people here and there claim that the research has always bee. Funded by certain organizations and people who benefit from advertising TM and the published evidences are not so reliable. Is that really true?
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I am a doctor of integrative medicine and a clinical hypnotherapist. I would like to publish my research work. any advice is highly appreciative.
Thank you.
Dr. Ezzat Moghazy
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Check these:
Journal of Integrative Medicine (JIM)
Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine (JCIM)
Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine
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The Integrative Medicine is gaining popularity and acceptance as it consists of many healing therapies to treat many diseases. In mini form it is existing in India as Ayurved doctors always prescribes medicine, diet, yoga, meditation, mantra etc. but the present emerging IM is covering many existing therapies so domain is wider. There is need of a post-graduate course of general integrative medicine open for all medical graduates. As it advances the specialty integrative post graduate course may be introduced like integrative cardiology etc.
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please checkot my web site www.livingbrain.eu
and read about salutogenesis e.i. medicine of health = integrative or holistic medicine
jerzy
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- I'm looking for researchers in European countries.
(my internship program is an Erasmus program)
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First, you should have a plan for a targeted plant that could have some medicinal properties including: antimicrobial, antioxidant or anti cancer. You can examine the plant extract in vitro or in vivo. To extract the plant you should decide whether you need the volatile oil only or the who extract?. Accordingly you will make different doses and test the plant's properties as described in the protocols given.
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Since ayurveda explains the concept of "Aasthapak and Nishtapak" about oral transformation of drug, so the question arises for Ayurvedic views about pharmacokinetics for non oral routes.
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As far as i have understood, i can say that ADME is a concept learn't to understand the drug and its metabolites movement through out the body compartments (blood, liver, kidney, protein-bound, etc) and this concept being a universal concept for all the categories of drugs let it be allopathy, ayurvedic or homeopathic remains same.  This means, ADME can be determined for any category of drug similar to any allopathic drug provided the measurement tools say LC-MS, NMR-MS, LC-NMR-MS, etc are precisely accurate even in NM or sub-NM concentration to measure the least amount of drug or metabolite in any compartment. The ADME is so universal that not only drugs, even food material can be evaluated for their metabolites. Hope my answer satisfy your doubts.
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Here at the University of Bristol we are conducting a DH funded scoping study of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) for multimorbid patients with mental health and musculoskeletal problems in primary care in the UK.  By CAM we mean approaches where a practitioner is involved in providing a treatment complementary to conventional care, for example acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, Pilates, mindfulness etc.
We are looking for services in the UK where an integrated approach - CAM alongside conventional NHS treatment - is currently provided or has recently been provided. These services need to:
·         Be in the UK
·         Target patients with musculoskeletal and/or mental health issues
·         Provide the CAM through primary care e.g. GP referral to CAM, GP practising CAM
·         Offer CAM which is at least partially funded by the NHS or charitable funds etc i.e. the patient pays nothing/very little
We are interested in places where this is currently happening, but also where it has been attempted but been unsuccessful.
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In Maidstone there is the Blackthorn Trust which provides CAM therapies (anthroposophic medicine) and social and work rehabilitation therapy through craft work and work in a bakery and garden. They mainly work with people with chronic pain and mental illness. They have NHS funding. See the website below.
In greenwich there is a project that works along similar lines which is still in the set up stage and has just got or is in the process of getting NHS funding for patients who have failed with secondary care pain management services. They became a charity last year. It was founded by the same GP who founded Blackthorn. They work as part of the Greenwich PCT pain service.
Let me know if you need any further information or help on this.
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We are trying to set a goal for rate of follow-through for referrals from our behavioral medicine consultants, who are integrated in our primary care department (community outpatient) to on-going psychotherapy? Does anyone know of literature that suggests a baseline for how many patients that are referred for therapy actually follow through?
UPDATE 6/25: Note that the referral is actually to a different department. Patients would be getting referred from a primary care appointment in which they meet with a behavioral health consultant. The BH consultant will be referring the Pt. to on-going therapy with a different therapist altogether. What referral follow-through rate should we expect, based on the literature?
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I have a published study on this and I believe it is a similar format to what you are doing. I am a consultant within a primary care clinic where I receive referrals from PCPs. Most of these are a one time evaluation with referral to a behavioral health clinic for psychotherapy. About 85% of patients followed through with the referral from their PCP to me and of those I suggested to follow up with therapy, about 55% did. Here is the citation for the paper but feel free to contact me for a copy if needed:
Miller-Matero, L.R., Dubaybo, F., Ziadni, M., Feit, R., Kvamme, R., Eshelman, A., &Keimig, W. (2015). Embedding a psychologist into primary care increases access to behavioral health services. Journal of Primary Care and Community Health, 6, 100-104.
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Is infrared rays can be used after oil massage? If used what precautions should be taken?
what will be the duration and course?
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IRR for 45 mins will be too long as it can cause burns. Usually it is given for 10 mins, to the max 15 mins and it is very good combination after massage espicially in palliative care
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I am interested in furthering the agenda around integrative medicine in Asia Pacific and wondered if there is any documentation of policy approaches to this.
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You might want to review this article by a colleague. . 
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high frequency bio potentials are electrical frequencies on the body surface which are more than 1kiloHz which excludes biopotentials produced by ECG,EEG etc
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What is the publication on high frequency biopotentials?
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I want to set up a holistic health clinic for low-income or fixed income individuals. Setting up the clinic as a non-profit has many shortcomings and limitations, therefore I am looking for a financial model to subsidize discounted services.
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The concept of community acupuncture clinics seems to be gaining in popularity. These operate with a sliding scale, dependent on income. Patients are treated in one large room, rather than individual treatment rooms. I assume the consultation is done privately, but the larger treatment room allows the practitioner to treat several people at once and keeps overhead low. This type of set up could work for other therapies that don't require patients to disrobe such as shiatsu or acupressure, the difference being that one therapist could only work on one patient at a time. But the overhead of the clinic would still be lower and the sliding scale would allow access by fixed income individuals.
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Cupping therapy with drugs or drugs alone.
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Dear Samira,
Cupping therapy is good for many diseases and it is Sunnah. However one has to be very careful in this. Certified and recognized clinics should be approached for this. The relevant physicians should also be consulted. To my knowledge its an effective treatment for so many known and unknown diseases in human body. Do read about articles on this. Its called as Hijama also. Please visit Al-hudaI International website.
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Overt hostility sometimes arises between physicians and non-allopathic health providers, with caustic diatribes emanating from both sides of the divide – particularly relating to the scientific credibility of various interventions. In an era of evidence-based medicine, should modern clinical care be based on credible untainted research and favorable outcomes for patients and populations rather than what is considered conventional or alternative?
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Anything that is rigid doesn't last too long generally. Acceptance, modifications and adaptations are the pillars of innovation and success. Lots of time tested remedies for various conditions are present in alternate systems. Also there are certain theories beyond known in conventional medicine. They can form basis of further research for basis and validity. These will nothing but enrich the conventional healthcare and no wrongs with it.
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The reproductive function in female (represented by Artava and stanya ) are special functions in female. Apart from these certain Stri kara bhavas are mentioned in Ayurveda such as Klaibya, Bhirutvam, Avaisharadyam, Moha, Anavasthana, Shaithilya, Mardavam which are seen especially in female.
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It is shown that some techniques (yoga, meditation, tai-chi, relaxation, conscious breathing, etc.) improve immune system, cardiovascular performance, pain management, quality of life, and other aspects of well-being. It is reasonable that these changes would have positive outcome on cancer supression. Does anyone have experience, considerations or explanations on the mechanisms and efficiency of such interactions?
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I am not sure why I was sent this question. There are many who have far more experience than I in this area. One person that comes to mind is Prof. Patricia Carpenter of the Psychology Department at CMU in Pittsburgh..
That being said, my own 'intuitions' in this area are as follows:
I believe that the fundamental cause of many types of cancer is stress - both metabolic and psychological.. Techniques are now being developed by which we may quantify the health of a single cell. Quantities derived from our new understanding of dynamical systems (living systems are dynamical systems), are being applied such that we may now have an objective measure as to what it means to be healthy or diseased (see reference below).
One may argue that such approaches are limited to the metabolic domain and are not relevant to the psychological. However, recent theoretical work (and I include my own contribution) suggests the possibility that function and metabolism may actually be the same thing in ALL biological processes - including the brain. Such unified theories offer a means by which the psychological and the physiological may be more closely aligned. Although, perhaps, counter intuitive, such approaches greatly simplify the relationship between the emotional and the biological.
Within such a theoretical context, there is a necessary relationship between the metabolic state of the body and the metabolic state of the brain that equates to a 'logical sympathy'. The mind/body relationship becomes less of a dualistic problem and more of a complimentary dichotomy.
If these advances prove to be useful and relevant then it comes as no surprise that the stress relieving techniques that you have mentioned in your question would have a positive effect with respect to oncogenesis.
Davia, C.J (June 2006), "Life, Catalysis and Excitable Media: A Dynamic Systems Approach to Metabolism and Cognition", in Tuszynski, J.A, The Emerging Physics of Consciousness (The Frontiers Collection), Springer, pp. 255–292, ISBN 978-3540238904
Villorba, F; Van Piaggio, V.E (2010). "The role of mitochondria and mit-DNA in Oncogenesis". Quantum Biosystems 2 (1): 250–281.