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Gray literature vs. scientific literature
-What are the advantages and disadvantages of gray literature compared to scientific literature.
-What are the repositories that you know about gray literature.
-What is the importance of gray literature for developing countries
Gray literature is "materials and research produced by organizations outside of the traditional commercial or academic publishing and distribution channels. Common gray literature publication types include reports (annual, research, technical, project, etc.), working papers, government documents, white papers and evaluations"
Scientific literature "comprises scholarly publications that report original empirical and theoretical work in the natural and social sciences. Within an academic field, scientific literature is often referred to as the literature. Academic publishing is the process of contributing the results of one's research into the literature, which often requires a peer-review process".
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Hi,
The gray literature are reports, pre prints, and a lot of other informal materials. The publication process of gray literature is often faster than in formal journals, and therefore, it is preferred when authors would like to establish authorship to a discovery or an original paper of some sort. Gray literature receives citations, in many cases, so it is visible to the scientific community. Publishing in a formal journal, though, is considered more valuable for academic promotion, since, the paper goes through reviewers judgements. Comparing the two publication routes resembles comparing the formal and informal education.
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Hello everyone,
I am looking for links of scientific journals with dataset repositories.
Thank you for your attention and valuable support.
Regards,
Cecilia-Irene Loeza-Mejía
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Dear Cecilia-Irene Loeza-Mejía
I think you should have a look at the site «re3data: Registry of Research Data Repositories» (https://www.re3data.org).
There you will find the following search/browsing options: Browse by content type Browse by subject Browse by country
When you choose "Browse by content type", you will get "Raw data" or "Scientific and statistical data formats" (among others): https://www.re3data.org/browse/by-content-type/.
With best regards Anne-Katharina
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I'm interested in repositories like zenodo, figshare, etc., where open-access papers (previously published) can be uploaded in order to improve the visibility of papers. Thanks a lot for your suggestions!
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Agreed with Dr. Wolfgang R. Dick Precisely, ResearchGate and Academia.edu are commercial sites, whereas most open access repositories are non-profits. These academic social networking sites have each raised large amounts of initial funding: $17.8 million for Academia.edu, and $35 million for ResearchGate.
Nevertheless, there are two main routes to open access are: Self-archiving / 'green' open access – the author, or a representative, archives (deposits) the published article or the final peer-reviewed manuscript in an online repository before, at the same time as, or after publication.
Best Regards
Dr. Fatemeh Khozaei
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Please expound keeping in mind research data management
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In Mexico and in particular at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, we have worked data repositories for research with DSpace and we put both pure data and worked data, that is, both data for research and research data having good acceptance by users . In this sense, we think that institutional repositories are adequate to include all types of data.
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Some publishers (e.g. IEEE, etc.) allows to hold the full paper only!! on the institutions repository. Do we are able to share the link on the institution repository instead of full paper text file on the research gate?
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Yes I would say not all systems are great that way and it’s certainly a good idea to bring it up to RG though I suspect their interest is to have you upload full text. Personally I wouldn’t worry - if people want the paper, they will ask the author if the full text isn’t loaded/obvious link. Plus if they google it should find it in your IR anyway.
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Can anyone help me in finding what possible factors can lead to affect institutional repository usage and how???
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Hi,
I think that the same factors that are taken in account in creating the repository will be later counted as factor affecting its usage, namely, content management, submission, ingest, archiving, publishing, discovery, access, and preservation .
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We have some papers shared on institutional repository but we realized that Turnit-in is not detecting similarities from the papers.
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It is really interesting to know that plagiarized work can not be consider by turnit in. But turnitin should detect the similarities from the original work directly and this did not happen. Also notice that the documents are born digital.
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Here's an open-ended question relating to copyright, ethics, power relations in academia, and corpus linguistics:
What is the situation in your country/university with respect to the intellectual property rights of corpora/data collected and constituted by a PhD student during the preparation of their thesis?
All other considerations aside (i.e. suppose that the data is original, with no prior copyright holders, and that they have been duly collected with the consent of participants):
(1) Does the PhD student retain the intellectual property rights to such data? Or do they automatically become the intellectual property of the university, by means of an employment contract or another legal document (e.g. one that PhD students may be forced to sign in order to be authorised to defend their thesis)?
(2) What happens if the PhD student wishes to share/publish their data/corpora under an Open Access license (e.g. Creative Commons) after their defence or even before it? Do they need the permission of their supervisor, of a higher-level university body, of their funding agency, of all of the above? Has it ever happened in your university? Have there been cases where the researcher wanted to share data under an Open Access license and were prevented from doing so by another level of the hierarchy?
(3) If the data does become the intellectual property of the university, is there any obligation for the university afterwards (e.g. are they obliged to make them available through an institutional repository)? If the data becomes part of an institutional repository, does the PhD student have any say on the type of license under which they will be distributed? (for example, do they get to choose "non-commercial")?
(4) After the defence, is it possible for the university (or even an individual supervisor) to formally ask their former student (now Dr) to refrain from using the data/corpus they had collected during their thesis? Note that, in theory, if the corpus automatically becomes the intellectual property of the university, this is entirely possible. Do you know any cases of universities sending formal "cease and desist" letters against their former PhD students?
I would like to collect information about current practice and law in different countries with respect to this issue. For example, some countries limit these practices (considered an abusive utilisation of copyright); some Codes of Conduct in Dutch universities explicitly state that, unlike other productions, the copyright of a PhD thesis is retained by the PhD holder; in "business-friendly" Belgium, the issue is dealt under labour law (therefore a PhD student is just another employee and everything they produce belongs to their employer).
Researchers are becoming increasingly aware that the current situation is not really conducive to early-career researchers sharing their corpora under Open Access licenses.
Legal experts will provide data and analyses, as these matters can get complicated. But I would also like to hear some experiences and the opinions of corpus linguistics practitioners. Any pointer to your country's laws, university's code of conduct, case law, cases reported in the media, stories and anecdotes or even personal experiences (if you don't mind sharing them) are welcome.
Thank you very much for participating in the discussion and thank you for your help!
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Dear George.
Awareness of the concept Intellectual property right in Africa, specifically in Nigeria and presently Uganda is gaining momentum in the sence that before now plagiarism testing was overlooked, right now publications have to go through arrays of test to certify its authenticity or originality.
However have full right to your Phd work even after being declared authentic by various examining bodies of the particular school depends on the extant laws of the school, as each university or college have laws establishing them and also laws guiding the publication and publicizing of such research.
However, from my brief experience and based on advice which i have proffered in different occasions, it is expedient that schools hold on to the finished research for some number of years (Published via institutional repositories as a read only document), after which the research is released to its owner,
I have further opined that the researcher also MAY decide to allow the institution have full authority over the work.
These agreements should be in written form.
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I would like to publish one huge table as Supplementary resources to a forthcoming paper. The R package 'plotly' enables the creation of interactive tables which can be searched, filtered for results. See one good example from a personal website at:
I would like to publish such a table in a data repository, linked to the main paper manuscript. Usually such repositories take uploaded files . I'd like to find a science data repository which would enable the posting of the table directly, to any readers wishing to peruse the raw data.
Please, would anyone know of such an outlet or be able to recommend an elegant solution?
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now I see your point.
However scientific data repositories are designed to store raw data. They guarantee durability, versioning etc. but not manipulating that data. Even the preview functions of PDF or JPG are only additional features and every PDF reader will do it better. So the intention of such repositories is to store raw data that everybody can download and manipulate it locally in its own way.
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I am currently working on designing a retrieval system for harvesting contents from institutional repositories. However, because of the numerous issues with the IRs, I decided to simulate the IRs. Is it possible to develop the repository from the scratch simulating how Dspace works without using the software?
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Sure! that is what I did for my PhD work. You can create an IR if you know how to programme with languages such as HTML, CSS, Javascripts, PHP, MySQL. You must have a dedicated server to hold the database with internet connection.
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Generally, researchers put their scientific data in sites hosted by their institutions. When this option is not available, researchers share their data on public sites. Can you propose a good public scientific data archiving site that :
1. is free,
2. has long term availability,
3. with no pub adds,
4. has good reputation,
5. procures easy access to users (no registration, direct link, ... etc.)
6. preferably devoted to scientific data sharing.
Thanks in advance.   
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Hi Menouar,
You may want to look into Dryad Digital Repository, FigShare, or Zenodo. All three of these data repositories are recommended by high-profile journals such as Nature https://www.nature.com/sdata/policies/repositories#general
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Institutional Repository is for preservation of intellectual output of any organization. But building a new repository for any organization is not easy. I would like to know the various steps/procedures followed for setting up any new repository. My present organization is having more than 2 lakhs reports and many publications.
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Before creating an institutional repository, we must must consider several things. some of them are as follows:
1. Think what you want to store/upload- the content. creating a repository is nothing more than installing a software, but contents are the important components of the repository.  
2. selection of a software- there are a number of open source software, but may choose one that suited your requirement.
3. policies- One of the important steps in creating IR, is formulation of policies related to content creation, deposition and archiving.
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If given the option, would you publish your data exclusively in an institutional repository (e.g., associated with your university) or an external repository of your choice (i.e., not government mandated)?
Which would you prefer and why?
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Hi Racquel, I wonder why you would aim for exclusivity? If properly licensed, ie ideally CC0 or CC-BY, that would not matter. Moreover, a consideration will certainly be why the data is published in the first place (e.g. you'd like to submit a paper and the journal requires that the underlying data is published - a repository that is easy to use and immediately provides a DOI would certainly be a in a good position to be selected).  
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We intend to publicly publish a data set in the machine learning (ML) area, which consists of sensory data gathered in a technical process.
The first and most common possibility is the UCI ML repository (http://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/index.html). One drawback of this repository is that no persistent identifier like digital object identifier (DOI) is offered.
Do you know an alternative in the ML area offering the possibility publishing a data set publicly and persistently accessible? My research did not bring up any alternative.
Thanks a lot!
Best regards,
Uwe
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Hi Uwe,
Another option for you might be Zenodo.org. It is developed by CERN under the EU FP7 project OpenAIREplus. The portal allows to publish any kind of dataset with an upper limit of 2GB at the moment. According to the project, the limit might be extended to 10GB in the future. All uploads get a DOI.
It might be worth taking a look at it.
Cheers,
Henning
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Our university's institutional repository collects, "archives," and provides access to digital or digitized materials (or citations) created by our university's students, faculty, staff, departments, and administration.  The materials include text, visuals, audio, and video.  Would it be considered a kind of archive?  The intention is for the material to remain available into perpetuity.
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Generally I think the difference between a repository and an archive is one of emphasis. Both serve access and preservation functions, but repositories normally emphasize access, while archives normally emphasize preservation. At the institutional level it is entirely possible for one system to fulfill both the digital archive and repository functions, though there are a lot of decisions to be made about how best to do this.
In a lot of ways this is similar to the distinction made in some institutions between an institutional repository and a current research information system, repositories normally emphasize provision of access to the full-text of scholarly outputs, while CRIS systems normally emphasize providing comprehensive information about all scholarly output regardless of the availability of related files. Still, many institutions use one system to fulfill both functions.
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One of my research scholar is doing research on this subject, so, we want to know the Indian leather industry institutional repositories status
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The Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI) is a governmental organization dedicated to research, development, education and training in the Indian leather industry. Information regarding core areas such as leather processing, services from Shoe Design and Development Centre (SDDC), Centre for Leather Apparel Accessories Development (CLAD) etc. are provided. Details related to chemical or physical sciences like chemical lab, organic chemistry, polymer division etc can be obtained. Information on environmental technology, chemical engineering, engineering services etc. are also provided. Users can find details on regional extension centers like Ahmedabad, Jalandhar, Kanpur, etc. Information about events, job opportunities, Right to Information, archives, publications, technologies, tender, etc. are available too
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COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories) provides such a service
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Interoperability Between Institutional and Data Repositories -- a bit dated (2007) but still on target.
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Currently we are using Zotero Reference Manager to keep track of publications produced by our scientists. However, I feel Greenstone or DSpace would be better suited to house our repository. Most of our publications are published Open Access, though there are some from years gone by that are not OA and so only have links to the publisher's page. I would like to develop a collection that is :
a. easily accessible online
b.easily used for reference purposes
c. whose bibliographic details can be easily extracted and exported
Any ideas?
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I'd like to gather ideas to develop institutional repositories. What new services can librarians provide to researchers and what can they do to increase the visibility of these repositories?
Thanks for your help !
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A heavy-handed approach is to find a way to require it at the institutional level, for promotion, tenure, and funded research. But that's not going to happen any time soon at most institutions.
If we want researchers to use our repositories, we need to offer a value proposition that is stronger than "there will be a copy of your research preserved forever"--not much immediate gratification in that for many people. What things do researchers need to do? What motivates them? 
One thing researchers want to do is to become known--to be cited, to be contacted by the media as an expert, to have my grad students familiar with my work, etc. So that brings some ideas to mind:
  • make it easy to create and maintain publications lists from research groups that can be embedded in a group's research site
  • similarly, make it easy to embed a list of my publications in my own professional website. If I can only list publications that are in the repo, that's not as helpful as me being able to add citations for other publications, presentations, etc.
  • similarly, make it easy for me to create a vita
  • make it easier for me to do my annual faculty report
  • make it easier for me to reference my work when applying for grants
  • SEO
You get the idea. Help researchers do things that matter to them instead of trying to convince them to validate the existence of the IR and those who support it.
Beyond these things,
  • Make it easy to figure out what the IR is and what the value proposition is
  • Make it easy and pleasant to submit
  • Allow proxy submission, so I can hand it all off to a grad student
  • Vastly improve the user experience for both submission, management, and discovery
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Most repositories provide statistics on the number of views and/or downloads of papers.  Some, like those using the Digital Commons software as platform, also support altmetrics.  I am interested to know which subject repositories, offering this functionality, are preferred/used .
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In addition to the excellent examples which Stacey has provided, I would add that currently in Australia altmetrics is a very hot topic. And not just because Heather Piwowar (Impactstory)is doing a national speaking tour ;-) Many of our university libraries are discussing how to add value to our institutional repositories by providing statistics based on altmetrics. Some, such as Queensland University of Technology, provide these: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/46920/
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How can I approach the topics of institutional repositories and social media?
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This is a very open question but one approach might be understanding the differences in approaches between formal and informal knowledge repositories within an institution. Most institutional come with a considerable amount of governance that creates a high degree of consistency within the information architecture and content being organized. Social media has little or no governance but may still contain a lot of valuable information about what people are saying about a topic or institution. You might be able to query both sources of information for answers to questions but you would have to use different methodologies to design your inquiry and understand the semantic incompatibilities with the type of information you gather.
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What is your experience about quantitative and qualitative use of scientific social networks by graduated students, researchers, academics and staff in your university or institution ? Time spent ? What do they search ? What do they get ? What about respect of copyrights ? Are-they using more than one social networks ? Anything about usage, benefits or not of scientific social networking ? Any mesurable effect on the amount of publications in your institutional repository ? Do researchers deposit preferentially their published work on a social network instead of your institutional repository if you have one ?
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At Walden University, there is Facebook and YouTube used as social networks. For me, the time spent would be one hour per week at most. I search about my greatest passion, Neuropsychology. When you do a search you get hundreds of videos, then you can choose the video time depending on how much time you have to watch. An instructor has many times referred to a YouTube video.
Moreover, copyrights on Facebook are not known. Information on Facebook is not copywrited unless the pictures people post are. I do know that if I use information on YouTube I have to cite it correctly in my posts or reports. Everything used must be cited unless it is common knowledge.
Furthermore, when I said I was on Research Gate to one of instructors at my Residency she was not aware of it. Walden students have a selection of dissertations to reference. I have not used them. I use Google Scholar, and also the Handbooks and Encyclopedias. The published work in peer reviewed journals in the Walden Library are recommended.
Best Regards,
I hope this helped you.
Susan
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In physics, it has long been a tradition that papers uploaded to the arXiv preprint servers are citable, which is how they work around the long journal peer-review+publication times and can gather citations before publication date.arXiv identifiers are more prevalent than DOIs within physics. Other fields are not as uniform (pubmed are quite popular within the biomedical community, but only list articles post publication).
This however means you have to later "merge" the citations when/if the article is actually published, for arXiv this is easy as you can later fill in DOI and journal references. However, when you have a multitude of such repositories, and in particular institutional repositories with variable quality of availability and metadata entries, it gets much trickier.
Also there is the question of what is a "single unit of publication" - if I upload an 8 page preprint that I submitted, got rejected, then added 5 more pages and got accepted somewhere else - is that all the same unit? Which one of them did you cite?
Can also non-peer-reviewed documents, reports and white papers be published and cited in the same way? I think you should be able to - but with a clear indication of their provenance.
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There has been a question about recommending a software for a corporate's digital library and I am wondering about suggesting a repository or digital library.
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A repository and a digital library are 2 different things. A repository makes the intellectual output of an organisation (or multiple organisations or just one department) freely and openly available. A digital library on the other hand, is a gateway to electronic resources including but not limited to: an OPAC (Online Public Access Catalogue), ebooks, ejournals (usually subscription based), bibliographic databases (e.g. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science - depending on your subject areas) and citation management tools. It should also include access to online referencing and to a live librarian (real qualified person is good). I manage both a digital library and a repository so if you need more info, please contact me. It might be wise to start with a needs analysis of your clients.
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We are looking for something with social features and a good reporting module.
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I reccomend to you this book: How to Build a Digital Library (Second Edition) Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Author(s): Ian H. Witten, David Bainbridge and David M. Nichols
ISBN: 978-0-12-374857-7