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Insect Identification - Science topic

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Can anyone help me in identifying larvae based on Video clip and photographs?
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It is most likely a species of the family Yponomeutidae, perhaps of the genus Yponomeuta. Knowing the name of the host plant should be easy to ascertain the name of the specie.
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Besides "bees of the world" and discoverlife.org does anyone know of a bee genera or species key specific to Argentina or south America? I'm asking because occasionally both sources give me different results and sometimes I get bees that are apparently not in south America. This could be an error on my part but for some of the bees I'm pretty certain. For example "bees of the world" sent me to "Alocandrena" which is apparently only in Peru and discoverlife to "Panurgus" which is in the eastern hemisphere. I'm fairly confident that i followed the proper path for the "bees of the world". for discoverlife i'm not so sure because it can give you different results depending on when you hit "simplify".
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Hello Nervah; Perhaps part of the problem is that you have some undescribed species in your collections. It's exciting to consider that possibility. I have repeatedly had that happen in my study of ants of Southern California. Best regards, Jim Des Lauriers
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Found in Turkey on peony flower buds.
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Yes, is Tropinota squalida
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ID please? It was found in Bhutan in maize. Could it be Cryptanura spinaria ??
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Hello Thinley; Here is a reference that contains keys and illustrations to the families of Hymenoptera of the World.
Goulet, H and JT Huber 1993. Hymenoptera of the world: an identification guide to families. Research Branch Agriculture Canada Publ. 1894/E. 668 pp. Best regards, Jim Des Lauriers
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Could someone help me identify the insect in this picture?
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it's a bugs. But please take a photo with good lighting of the insect.
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Could someone help me identify the insect in this picture?
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These pictures are not clear enough to make Identification.
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One of my friends from Germany was curious to know if there are similar keys like those published by the Royal Entomological Society and other entomological groups in Australia. The only ones I know are usually targeted to a specific family and published in the form of individual research publications.
Are there any extensive and reliable keys for the different orders of Insects?
I can imagine that given the rich biodiversity in India in comparison to Europe it is very difficult to make keys like those which can pin point to the species level ID. However, if you know any then please list them here.
Thanks.
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Hello,
Below you can find a paper regarding to the study of insect fauna associated with tea gardens in India:
You may get help from the authors (e.g. Bulganin Mitra: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bulganin_Mitra/projects) of this publication and you may also refer to the references of this article.
Good luck, Elaheh
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I am working on mosquito classification and identification and to do this I use many identification keys, I need to improve my skills and accelrate my work so Ican finish my work quickly and accurately, to do that I need to reduce the altering between the Keys.
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Just to make sure you found this updated key for Anopheles:
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Dear researchers. I am Hamada Chakira, Dr in Agriculture entomology and pest control from Huazhong Agricultural University. I live in the Union of Comoros. The field of research is still not so popular here, so there are a lot to do and to publish. Despite my limited knowledge of insect identification, I would like to establish a data base of insects and spiders of Comoros. Of course this project will need many specialists. For example, with the valuable help of Pr Emilio Balletto, we have published a book " The butterfly of Comoro" in 2015. If any researcher is interested to another taxon he can contact me through this email. chakirahamada2013@hotmail.com
Sincerely.
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No. I am into Food Biotechnology/Fermentation
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All these moths (Family Erebidae) were photographed from Bhutan. About 140 species were photographed, of which around 120 has been identified. I am looking for a person who can help me to authenticate my identifications and suggest ID for the remaining unidentified species. (Unfortunately, all the moths are in photographs as the voucher collection in Bhutan is illegal)
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Pericyma cruegeri
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I have encountered a leafminer problem during my survey. It was a little bit different than other leafminers in size and shape of mines. The mine was looking like a blotch on leaves. After the emergence of adult, it was observed that it is a lepidopteran insect. I am enclosing herewith a photograph of insect. Is it a gracilariid or something else?
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Hello Rakesh:
Without the information of the host plant and locality it is not possible to identify up to species level, but by the morphological characteristics of the adult in the photo and by the behavior as a leafminer, this individual belongs to the Lyonetiidae family. The moths of the Lyonetiidae family are recognized by the tufts of scales on the head and by the fringes of hairs on the edge of the wings. Probably it belongs to Bedellia somnulentella, of cosmopolitan distribution and placed now in the family Bedelliidae but a better photograph is needed to confirm the identification.
Regards,
Luis Miguel Constantino
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Recent time I' m sorting insects by order and often I have some problems. And to easily solve them I need good insect identification guide to orders. So if you know some of them, please recommend to me.
Thank you in advance.
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For identification to orders, the best book is: Borror, Donald J., Dwight Moore DeLong, and Charles A. Triplehorn. An Introduction to the Study of Insects. Philadelphia: Saunders College Pub ( 7th edition)
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Hello,
I observed a Hydaticus sp. larvae in North Korea (predating on a tadpole) and I would like to be able to identify the species. Would anyone be able to help?
Best,
Amael
Identification, insect, diving beetle, entomology
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@ Dewanand Makhan ,
This is indeed very welcome! Thank you very much!
Amael
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Found in university campus, India
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Following
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one of my friends ask me to help him to identify this moth the common name or any related information the around was grape and pomegranate, and tomatoes.
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Following
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This  green metallic bug with red abdomen was found on Coffea arabica plants in Colombia. Need to know the family and species. Thanks.
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Obviously it's from Sphictyrtus sp. May be the species is Sphictyrtus chryseis. But for being confirmed there's need more salient diagnostic features.
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Dear researchers, Dr and Prof.
I'm currently working on the abundance and diversity of insects of MUST, Mbeya region, in Tanzania. Anyone please assist to identify the attached insects
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I confirme
3, 4 & 5 Coleoptera Tenebrionidae
I'am sure that
2 isn't a Dytiscidae and 4 isn't a Carabidae
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I am collecting the information re currently available online insect identification database or software. It is just part of another project based on database. I will soon share the project details.
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Dear Dr Shafagat Mahmudova thank you for sharing valuable information. It is quite useful and covers many technology aspects in agriculture. Quite interesting to read.
-Sapna.
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May someone help me in the identification of this Noctuoidea specimen caught in the Ivindo forest, Gabon, on March? I enclose adult and genitalia pictures. Thanks!
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These are  very clear photos, try this link it may help even you can see the references.
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Could somebody help me identifying these wasp please? It is from central Chile.
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This is a female wasp from the genus Pison [Crabronidae, Trypoxylini]. Unfortunately, the proposed angles do not allow to determine it to the species. 
It is necessary to see its head from the front, as well as the propodeum from above.
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It looks like Anopheles Arabiensis. But smaller and has white colour fungus like growths in the body (abdomen). They are bigger than the local mosquitoes. The habitat is a paddy field in a dry zone of Sri Lanka. But found them in the rainy season. 
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Dear Kapila,
The identification of the specimen is quite difficult due to the quality of the pictures. Did you sampled it in coastal zones?
I suggest you to use the MosKeyTool which is a new free key used for mosquitoe identification
I attach you a file about how to install it
Best regards
Carlos
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May someone help me in the identification of this specimen caught in Tuscany in June. Thanks!
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Felipe Gil-T, exactly identified the butterfly!!!!
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These Lady Bird Beetles were captured on Wheat Field of IAAS Agronomy Farm?
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thank u louis Miguel Constantino
but what is the correct name for the species given in first Picture?
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Seems like eggs but what it actually is??
This tiny water droplet like structure seems to be eggs that is spongy like when touched. This was abundant in okra field once in everywhere of the plant i.e. on leaf, stem, flower primordia, flower... Insect history of the plot is Jassids, horn hopper, White-spotted Leaf Beetle, etc...
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The Helicoverpa egg chorion, as well as the chorion of many other moths and butterflies, has a characteristic microsculture useful for a first identification of the macrotaxon. Taking plant samples with eggs from okra fields, putting them in a sufficiently damp environment and waiting for egg hatching can be the safest method to know what it is. Regards,
Rinaldo Nicoli
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This Psocoptera (Psocidae: Thyrsophorinae) in the genus Poecilopsocus sp. from Colombia may grow up to 1,4 cm in length. They live in small colonies beneath a gossamer blanket spun with silk from their labial glands.  
I think the species in the anexed photographs is the largest bark louse in the world. Does anyone know what the species is?
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Thank you André:
At least the species  P. iridescens agrees with the original description of Enderlein 1901. Zoologische Jahrbücher (Abteilung Systematik) 14:544
Best regards,
Luis Miguel
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Help me to identify insect found on my okra research plot. It is found to be roaming on the soil. But the exact nature of this insect is not known..
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The appropriate name for the "terminal cerci" of this beetle larva as well as other larvae of the same family and other beetle families is "urogomphi". Urogomphi are a pair of rigid or mobile, uni- or multiarticulate, variously shaped dorsal formations which can be found in the ninth abdominal segment of holometabolic larvae, and particularly in larvae of beetles (Coleoptera). We can find them in larvae of the following beetle families (but not necessarily in all species of each family): Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Sylphidae, Staphylinidae, Hydraenidae, Histeridae, Elateridae, Drilidae, Cleridae, Ostomatidae, Dermestidae, Nitidulidae, Cucujidae, Cryptophagidae, Colydiidae, Latridiidae, Endomychidae, Erotylidae, Mycetophagidae, Anthicidae, Tenebrionidae, and others. I confirm my hypothesis: the larva in the picture belongs to ground beetles (Carabidae). 
Regards,
Rinaldo Nicoli
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I found these  unusual insect eggs that resemble cream-chocolate biscuits on a coffee plant in Colombia. Unfortunately they were parasitized by wasps of the genus Telenomus so it was not possible to raise them until adult.
Thanks,
Luis Miguel
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Stink bug (Pentatomidae) eggs? In internet you can find photos of eggs of pentatomids rather similar (genus? species?). Cordially,
Rinaldo
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Dear all,
This moth was pictured some days ago resting on the lowest branches of an old spruce in a mountain area in northern part of Norway. The camouflage on its back was absolutely perfect compared to the lichen growing on the stem and branches.  Does anyone have a suggestion for a name?
 Regards,
Jostein Lorås
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I cannot say it for absolutely sure from this photo, but I think this is
Epinotia crenana (HÜBNER, [1817]); Tortricidae, Olethreutinae
Best,
Rudolf Ritt
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This beetle has been reared from one of the numerous larvae that a colleague of mine collected from bee corpses (Apis mellifera) found on a hive bottom board. Size: ca. 1.5mm. Location: NE Ukraine.
To my layman's eye, this looks like a Cryptophagus sp. (some species of which have been reported from bee hives), but I am not sure. So any help in its identification would be much appreciated. 
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I obtained three parasitoids from the same batch of eggs from a Reduviidae bug from Colombia possibly from the Platygastridae family. There are few published records of parasitoids in Reduviidae eggs. I would like to know if anyone knows what genus and species are? The yellow individual may be an hyperparasitoid. If you have published records  please let me know.
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Hi,
I think that you have specimens belong to Telenomus (Scelionidae, Platygastroidea), possibly T. polymorphus Costa Lima, 1943, but I  am not sure because is difficult to identify the species level using only the pictures.
Best regards,  Ovidiu 
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I found bark beetle, probably Hypothenemus eruditus Westwood, 1836 (Curculionidae: Scolytinae), but I can't find any identification key to confirm it.
If anyone has it I will be grateful for sharing.
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Thank you for answers! I hope I'll find everything what I need.
Best regards,
R. Witkowski
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Dear all;
I have recently found this insect near a lake. I want to recognize the species and the impacts on human.
Sincerely
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The insect is an adult chironomid (Diptera Nematocera Chironomidae). The family Chironomidae is very large and homogeneous, so it is not easy or not possible to recognize genera and species by a simple photograph. The antennal shape indicates that the specimen is a male. In this family, the larvae develop into water. As regards the impact on humans, chironomids, though resembling mosquitoes, are not blood-feeding insects and do not bite. Allergic phenomena (by contact, by inhalation) for humans have been reported in case of very abundant presence of adults (scams of many individuals emerging at the same time) in wetlands (brackish coastal areas, lakes, etc.). Regards,
Rinaldo Nicoli
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I am working to identify local drosophila species morphologically. For Identification, I have " Drosophila: A Guide to Species Identification and Use Book by Patrick M. O'Grady and T.A. Markow ". It's a nice and comprehensive book.
Can you provide names of some other books/articles/materials, that can be helpful for Drosophila identification?
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Khandaker:
You would find this link useful:
Best
Syed
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My workshop's external siding seems to attract various kinds of things that do at least some of their growing inside a case of twigs, stones, or other junk.  Some of them look like fine felt.  Yesterday one of the cases was abandoned but not too far from where it had been, I saw a creature that was about the color (orange) as the occupant of the case.  It looked like a big ant but with interesting patterns in its wings. I snapped picture after picture (It was running around).  When I was cropping them, I saw that it seemed to have a pair of flies or wasps probably mating underneath its wings.  I wonder if this is a case of parasitoid flies or wasps whose female will lay her eggs in the abdomen of the host.  Anything you can tell me will be so helpful!  The creature was about a 10 mm in length....Much larger than the ~6 mm case.
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If the insect in the first photo is a larva of a casebearer moth, not only the family Psychidae can be taken into account, but also other families of Lepidoptera, e.g.  Tineidae and Oecophoridae. The most typical cases of larval psychids are quite different from the one in the photograph. Tineids and oecophorids are generally small moths, so their larval cases can be only 5 mm in size even for a mature larva. Regards,
Rinaldo Nicoli
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I have a collection of wasps of the superfamilies Platygastroidea and Proctotrupoidea from various regions of Poland. The material is preserved in alcohol. Can anybody help with the identifications? I can mount the specimens if it is necessary.
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Hi Bogdan,
You see, proper mounting is critical for identifying tiny insects. I prefer to mount parasitoids by myself. However it would save a lot of time for me if you could provide dry mounted insects.
I can offer a compromise, will you mount only some insects from every series for brief identification and leave the rest of the series in alcohol in order to I could mount them personally if it is necessary.
Best regards,
Alexander
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This freshwater organism found in our lab. Having 3pairs of leg but appearance quite different then insect and so can't identity accurately. 
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As always, an indication of the size (length) of the specimen would be helpful. The insect in the photo (on the basis of the shape of head and abdomen, antennae, ecc.) reminds a juvenile stage, maybe the first instar, of a dragonfly (Odonata Anisoptera). I believe that this is the right identification. Regards,
Rinaldo Nicoli
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Here I have attached to genitalia photograph of 2 Loepa sp.
Location: Naga Hills, Manipur, NE India.
Date of collection: July 2016
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Dear Jatishwor:
Yes, It is Loepa katinka. The type locality of Loepa katinka is Assam, a state in northeastern India. Located south of the eastern Himalayas.  Your specimen is  from the Naga Hills  a district  of the Assam Province in northeastern India too.
According to Nässig & Treadaway (1988: 175)  the accepted type species of Loepa, Saturnia katinka Westwood, appeared to be based on a misidentification, and later (Nässig & Treadaway 1998: 389) noted that the accepted authorship of the genus, as Moore, 1860 in Horsfield & Moore, “1858–1859“, was incorrect. Nässig & Treadaway (1998) corrected the latter to Moore, 1859 but reserved resolving the apparent type species misidentification until a thorough literature study had been conducted and, if necessary, the case had been prepared for submission to the ICZN. 
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Need to confirm identification of the larvae in the soil (eastern china agricultural landscape). Adult trap data suggest a mix of two species (H. parallela and A. corpulenta) but need to confirm on laval populations. Cannot find any good key on the larvae.
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Dear Maarten van Helden
You may contact the researcher on the same project, they will help you and send the working identification key Pls. find the attached files
Hoping this will be helpful
Regards
Prof. Houda Kawas
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Am working on these three species and need to know the identification procedure for these. Both adult and larvae. Also, enlighten about instar stage identification. Thank you
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Hi Abdul, for larvae:
Anopheles are the easiest to identify. They don't have a siphon and stay paralell to the water surface.
Aedes and Culex are very similar, however. But looking at the siphon you'll notice that the ones from Culex are longer and have a lighter color; their body is also "hairy" compared to Aedes. Using a microscope, look at the morphology of the combs, they are very different.
For adults:
Now Aedes mosquitoes are the easiest to identify. They are black and have white patches.
Culex and Anopheles are yellow-ish, but you can identify them by observing their resting position. Anopheles mosquitoes have a ~45 degree angle, while Culex stay parallel to the surface. Microscopically, look for antena morphology.
To identify instars, just look at the size and the color of the larvae. First instar larvae are very small, with light gray color, while 4th instar larvae are very dark, and you can see their hair very clearly. Microscopically, look at the saddle, it gets bigger and darker with the instar, covering the anal segment almost entirely. 
After some time working with them you'll differentiate all the instars easily, it's just a matter of practice. :)
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I collected a tick specimen from a rescued Eastern Swamp Deer (Rucervus duvaucelii ranjitsinhi) in Kaziranga National Park, Assam during August, 2016. Can anyone help me with the identification based on few photographs of the same clicked under 4X magnified compound microscope? The photographs have been attached herewith.
Regards
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Thank you everyone for the inputs. I will definitely do the needful. Thank you once again.
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It's definitely Hyphydrus, but it is not possible to determine the species. H. signatus does not occur in Algeria and North Africa.
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An image from Java (Serang: Bulakan: Rawa lake National Park, 120-340m asl. 13.III.2011. author: Guido Bohne) found in Flickr shows a 'squid pygmy grasshopper' (Phaesticus mellerborgi, family Tetrigidae) standing on a leaf and having parasitoid hymenopteran (family Eulophidae, ID provided by @Doug Yanega) on its discus of the pronotum. 
First of all, I would like to know if anybody is has any information on identity of this tiny wasp (grasshopper is 10-14 mm in length without antennae). If not, I would lke to know if experts think that the tiny wasp is P. mellerborgi specific parasitoid?
Secondly, I would like to get any information on parasitoids of Tetrigidae, published and observed.
Some further information: Phaesticus mellerborgi is species living in peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Java (on Borneo there is P. insularis). Species incuded in this genus have nymphs that are squid-like in appearance, with coloration. The species live in wet habitats , on the ground, eating detritus algae and mosses.
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For Indonesian Tetrigidae, please contact Josef Tumbrinck, number 1 specialist on this region
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I am currently planning to measure the compound eye of dozens of closely related insect species and wanted to get some sense of the best metrics.  As a start, I had planned to count ommatidia.  I also wanted to generate a metric related to % of head the compound eye covers, and to comparatively measure the optic lobe relative to head size.  Any advice would be greatly appreciated!  Cheers!
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Hi Ian, 
 this is a very interesting article devoted to optomotor response of coffee berry borer
Best wishes, Ivan
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I am not sure whether this larva belongs to genus Fissimentum or Nilodosis based on its mid-cleft mentum. 
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Dear Viktor, thank you for answering my question. No, I found it at highland stream (400-500 m asl). The 3rd segment antenna is not annulated so it's definitely not Diamesinae. This specimen has been cleared using KOH and has been mounted too. The mandible has long apical tooth and 3 clumped inner teeth and broad seta subdentalis. What really caught my attention was the vmp has a circular shape without striae. 
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We are looking for an entomologist / taxonomist who is willing to identify this Phytomiptera species (Diptera: Tachinidae) that we encounter in the Bolivian Altiplano.
This Phytomiptera is an endemic parasitoid of Eurysacca quinoae (Gelechiidae). Eurysacca larvae cause damage in quinoa crop cultivation.
Since PROINPA is a Bolivian NGO, we are not able to pay you for this job. But of course the scientific credits if it turns out to be a new species are yours!
(Dead samples send upon request)
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HI Jenneke, do you still have the samples? There are a few Phytomyptera species reported for South America, Rasmussen et al. (2001) reports Phytomyptera sp. as parasitoid of Eurysacca in Peru. It probably is an undescribed species.
Best.
Juan Manuel
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We are looking for an entomologist / taxonomist who is willing to identify this Venturia species (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) that we encounter in the Bolivian Altiplano.
This Venturia is an endemic parasitoid of Eurysacca quinoae (Gelechiidae). Eurysacca larvae cause damage in quinoa crop cultivation.
Since PROINPA is a Bolivian NGO, we are not able to pay you for this job. But of course the scientific credits for discovering a new species are yours!
(Dead samples send upon request)
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Hi ,
Have a look for the keys identification linked below for this family may help you to get ID?
Good luck 
Ali 
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Please help me to identify this insect collected by one of my colleague. May be this is beetle. ??
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It is not a beetle, it seems to be an orthopteran. As a simple hypothesis, I suggest the tribe Callimenellini belonging to the family Tettigoniidae (Orthoptera Ensifera). Otherwise, another Ensifera. The photo shows only some features of the insect, other photos (e.g. in lateral vision) could be very useful, as well as knowledge of its length and the region where it was collected. Regards,
Rinaldo Nicoli
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this sample has been collected from vegetables farm, Hamadan, west of Iran.
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For identification, you need several sample, especially male sample.
Dear Rahim, 
I invite you to our team, together we can be more useful. 
We are working on tribe of Chilocorini, i finished works Morphology its and paper it is almost complete and now I  are doing works molecular.
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I am sampling insects in La Malinche, Talxcala, Mexico and need to identify to species some capies of Orthoptera for a ecology project. 
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Isaac:
Kindly see this link:
Best
Syed
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Recently I came across a Hyphydrus specimen from Slovakia, which I at first glance thought would be H. ovatus. Nevertheless there seem to be some discrepancies, mainly a distinct central suture on each elytra (similar to H. aubei), which doesnt fit to the H. ovatus characteristics, despite similar appearence (overall reddish colour, with no distinct colour patterns). Could it be H. anatolicus maybe?
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Hi
I agree with the researchers above said it seems Hyphydrus ovatus (Linnaeus, 1761) and see the reference below.
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Location: Kokan Region,Ratnagiri District,Maharashtra State, Country India.
Size of the individual was less than 1mm
habitat mango n cashew plantations
believed to b pest on mango flowering
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Hi Sagar:
Thrips species usually cannot be recognized without mounting specimens onto microscope slides. Take a look at this references about collecting and preparing thrips for study:
Good luck
Luis
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location: kokan region,Ratnagiri district,Maharashtra state,Country India
size was 1-2mm
habitat mango n cashew plantations
believed to b harmful for mango plantations 
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Hi Sagar,
It is seems to be  Chalcid Wasps and you can check the identification keys linked below for this super family.
Good luck,
Ali
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I believe that this species of subfamilies Epilachninae from Africa (Uganda)
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Your specimen is certainly an Epilachna sp. But proper identification is impossible on base of the photograph.
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We are looking for an entomologist / taxonomist who is willing to identify this Meteorus species (Braconidae) that we encounter in the Bolivian Altiplano.
This Meteorus is an endemic parasitoid of Eurysacca quinoae (Gelechiidae). Eurysacca larvae cause damage in quinoa crop cultivation.
Since PROINPA is a NGO, we are not able to pay you for this job. But of course the scientific credits for discovering a new species are yours!
(Dead samples send upon request)
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Confirmed by Helmuth Aguirre Fernandez! This is Meteorus eurysaccovorus.
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I was found it on stems of Sedum sp and in Pachyphytum (Crassulaceae), here in the NW of Michoacan state, Mexico. They produces several damage on plants.
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Hola Ignacio
El especialista en cerambicidos de Méxcio es el Dr. Roberto Terrón de la UAM-Xochimilco, su correo es roberto_ats@hotmail.com
Seguramente el te podrá orientar sobre el tema
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This Ichneumonid parasitoid has been found inside microlepidoptera pupae (Glyphipterix sp.)
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This might then be an undescribed species. The genus has not been revised in South America, and it is greatly diversified in tropical areas examined so far. There are about 20 species reported so far in the Neotropical area (most in Central America) but there are actually many more to be described. No one is reported to parasitize a Glyphipterix moth.
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I need the images of male genitals or morphological characters of Aphrophora exoleta for identification
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