Science topic

Information Literacy - Science topic

The ability to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, and use the needed information effectively.
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Dear peers, comments and ideas welcome. If you don't mind, hope you can also share your projects / papers on digital literacy or skills. We're looking to study this in 2021. Thanking all of you in advance :-)
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There is no digital literacy possible without advanced literacy and technical skills, i.e. tech-know-logical education and enlightenment operate as information selection system In the digitized cosmos of virtual reality. Am in line with
Jebunnesa Jeba and Áurea Gabriel , but I see digital literacy as tech-know-logical icing on the cake, with respect to advanced literacy and technical skills In physical reality.
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I'd love to see a rough sketch of how the task would go.
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  1. Give students raw data and ask them to write an argument or analysis based on the data.
  2. Have students explore and write about unfamiliar points of view or “what if” situations.
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"People often prefer (ask for) more information but might ignore their difficulty of understanding, using, and acting (appropriately) on this information."
Does anyone have literature/ experimental evidence on this? 
I know about the literature on information avoidance. I am looking more for evidence that people request (costly) information that they deem helpful but they would not request if they were aware that they would not use it because they would, e.g., misinterpret it.
Thanks in advance
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Dear Ligen Yu, thanks for the comment. I love Tao.
Information without understanding will cause mental constipation.
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I'm currently conducting research looking at the information needs of hospital patients. My research questions are:
a) what are patients' experiences of receiving information in acute hospital?
b) what are patients' early information needs?
I'm using Braun & Clarke's (2006; 2019) reflexive method of thematic analysis, which states that themes represent "patterns of meaning across a dataset", rather than being organised as answers to specific questions. While I have a number of themes that meet these criteria, I believe it would also be clinically relevant to have sections entitled "most useful sources of information", and "most important information topics". However I'm worried that these may be viewed as "under-developed themes". If anyone has any guidance on this it would be greatly appreciated.
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It feels like you are distinguishing between the interpretive themes you develop and the practical advice that you provide on "most useful sources of information", and "most important information topics". I agree that if you treated those two topics as themes they would indeed be "under developed," but that need not be the case if you first develop a set of interpretive themes, and then use those themes to organize and present the more practical information.
In some ways, this might be a distinction between what goes into your Results section (the themes) and what goes into your Discussion section (the practical implications of those themes).
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Today, media and information are omnipresent and no longer restricted to print and broadcast delivery, news and information are now accessible anywhere, at any time, to people around the globe. Media and information literacy begins with the creation of content, based on a collection of raw data. Media of all kinds, across all platforms, have become so integrated into modern life that their presence and influence are not always noticeable. I feel all universities should offer Media and Information Literacy course to their graduate students / PhD scholars to improve their research skills and enhance the overall quality of their research and presentation and publishing. I feel it should be part of the pre-PhD coursework so all students must undergo this course. I want your responses and also share your research results in this area.
Thanks & Regards,
Prof. CK Ramaiah
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Research studies are supporting in favor of facilitation of Media and Information Literacy courses...
Carlson, J., Fosmire, M., Miller, C. C., & Nelson, M. S. (2011). Determining data information literacy needs: A study of students and research faculty. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 11(2), 629-657.
Oyewo, A. E., & Umoh Uwem, S. (2016). Information Literacy, Research, Scholarship and Publication; Comparative of PhD Students in Nigerian and South African Universities.
Shenton, A. K. (2009). Information literacy and scholarly investigation: a British perspective. IFLA journal, 35(3), 226-231.
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Due to the spread of Coronavirus, what is the role of libraries as information centers? or what services, actions, and activities can libraries perform? Please share your experiences/comments.
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Providing informative leaflets and signposting to encourage handwashing and public health guidelines
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I would like to know what newspapers, journals or magazines are actually developing or offering any Media and Information Literacy services or tools. I'm trying to develop a section of media and information literacy in a peruvian newspaper and I would like to have some kind of model to base my work on. For that matter, I will be doing a little research by analysing those media outlets. Thanks everyone.
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The Hindu an English newspaper with over 130 years behind was the first one in India to appoint a Readers Editorin 2006 , an internal type of ombudsman to interact with readers of their queries and issues related to media. it is a kind of media literacy column and you can get it in the net.
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As researchers, do you use any abstracting (and/or indexing) databases (known also as A & I databases)? If so, when in your research, e.g. initial literature review? Also, was this type of database covered in your research sources training?
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Thank you Manjula
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Hello!
I'm looking for some conceptual literature and empirical studies regarding differences between information literacy and information empowerment. In particular, I'm interested in the organizational context, maybe with some cognitive vs. affective paradigm that set conceptual line/boundary between this two concepts.
I have to admit that databases search it did not bring satisfying results and I count on your expert knowledge.
Thank you in advance!
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Dear Marek Dance
I tried to answer your question based on a valid source.
I hope to help you.
I will offer you this article:
THE INTERNET, INFORMATION, AND EMPOWERMENT
Meanwhile, this person can help you:
according to Starkey (2003), empowerment is discussed with increasing regularity, yet remains a contested concept which is often not clearly defined. An explanation for this could be diverse origins. As a concept, empowerment has its roots in a range of traditions, including among others, the civil rights, anti-racist and women’s movements and consumerism. Thus, empowerment holds varying meanings in a range of contexts with different underpinning assumptions and ideologies. In order to establish a theoretical framework, this paper will outline two competing discourses identified by Croft and Beresford (1995): the consumerist model of empowerment and the liberational model of empowerment.
Empowerment and Information
Information underpins both buyer and supplier power in the marketplace. Keh and Park (1988) suggest that information allows access to more products and allows individuals to learn about manufacturers and distributors, competitive offerings and prices. Pitt et al (2002) note that information incompleteness and information asymmetries do not provide conditions where individuals feel they have all the information to act, in a sense rendering them powerless The power of information is manifest in the relationship between consumers and professionals (such as health care professionals or financial services professionals).
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I have recently completed an exhaustive assessment of information literacy competency of social science researchers on various variables.
Collaborator is required to further work on the concept.
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You are most welcome. Shortly I shall share some basic information of the project and we may further discuss to go ahead.
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Information Literacy Measurement.
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Rajesh Singh Sir, the above mentioned questionnaire will suit for the said proposition.
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Dear RG community,
I'm currently working on a literature review and I'm looking for information literacy conceptual frameworks and standards. I'm looking for contribution proposed in the scientific literature in information science (or related fields) or proposed by educational institutions or information professionals institutions (e.g SCONUL, ACRL...). I'm interested in any contributions that defines/describes the nature/scope/levels of competences/skills/knowledge/etc...that should be mastered by individuals to be "information literate". I'm also interested in any contribution from other fields (e.g media literacy, digital literacy...) if they are related in some ways with questions of human-information interaction. I'd like to discover contributions from any country if an english/french version is available.
Thanks in advance for your help,
Jerry Jacques
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My current research looks also into the relationship between information and knowledge. Thinking of the information pyramid. Data > Information > Knowledge > Wisdom. I'm searching for (fundamental or recent) literature that examines students behavior to transfer information to knowledge.
Any suggestions?
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I found the best definitions of 3 concepts in InfoSense, a book by noted mathematician Keith Devlin. In short: data=code, information=message and knowledge=action. He provides an example to demonstrate this: grey clouds=code, message=it will rain, action=bring an umbrella
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I''m currently involved in the preliminary research of a project in the higher education field. We see that students use a variety of media (i.e. blogs, Youtube, MOOCs) to access and assess information. Social media is now predominant when it comes to information and knowledge sharing. To understand the impact of these technological and digital changes on students' learning trajectories, we started to formulate questions that guide our research:
- What significant changes is the information landscape undergoing with respect to new types and forms of knowledge resources such as open educational resources?
- What has changed in the information load and the way students perceive this?
- How do students tend to acquire and process information in the changing information world and how do social- and other media influence this?
- What are current high profile (technical) developments, for example in artificial intelligence, and what impact do they have on the way information is provided and how can students learn to process this information??
I'am keen to here your (teaching) experiences and/or (academic) resources that might help to answer the above-mentioned questions.
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Jaro is right we must identify competencies and determine new ways to help students learn them. One way that I have had a lot of luck with is the use of virtual academic poster competitions for students. Through this medium the students are able to share their research with not only their fellow students at their university, but with other universities that are participating as well. It is a low cost, hi tech solution.
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Dear all,
I'm trying to scope the variety of different types of literacies included in scholarly discussions. Below, I have listed the ones I have found so far. If any of You have some additional examples I could add to the list (reference would be nice) I'd delighted to hear about those.
Thanks in adavance,
Pekka
Media literacy, computer literacy, critical literacy, information literacy, game literacy, social literacy, health literacy, physical literacy, emotional literacy, network analysis literacy, financial literacy, workplace literacy, functional literacy, visual literacy, digital literacy
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e-Literacies as a literacy category - see the attached pdf.
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I am conducting a study about the digital literacy and competency of Pakistani Library professionals due to this I need supportive research?  
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Dear Muhammad Youusuf Ali, concerning the approach to information there exist lots of suggestions as well as contexts that may deviate your focus. I wrote a series of papers (posted in RG) focusing on users and academic databases in order to improve, modify, change or confirm their information needs before publishing. Yes, this is a university context, not highschool or elementary levels. Good luck in your pursue!
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A digital badge is a visual representation that signifies a specific achievement with detailed metadata attached. A popular comparison relates digital badges to their precursors in videogames or to their analog Girl/Boy Scout counterparts. In this sense, completing tasks, being recognized for accomplishments, collecting badges, and cooperation or competition adds a game-based layer to this method of visually tracking progress. Using digital badges in higher education can map student learning to course outcomes, program requirements, or institution-wide curriculum initiatives (possibly accreditation). This is of significance to academic libraries for teaching information literacy and explicitly integrating it throughout the curriculum.
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Hello Angelle.
Badges can be seen as a commodity that the learner is sold within a social activity to ensure that there is a constant flow of knowledge, ideas and interaction. This idea enables the learner to make up our own sense of the world around us even in the virtual world. Learners can make sense of the conversation, de-code knowledge within multimedia artifacts and provides the basis for others to reside within a community in which leads to direct interaction with one and another.  
This transfer of knowledge within Connective Knowledge provides a notion within gamification for a natural way of providing formative and informative feedback to the learner while assisting with motivation and diligence. The community realm should be able to adjust while presenting feedback to the learners that is most useful and beneficial. Badges are a form of progress indicator , but there is a need to be, more focus on giving depth to learner’s feedback to enrich the teaching and learning experience. This enrichment of the teaching and learning within Connective Knowledge is significant because it allows the learner to analyses the different barriers to the production of knowledge, which arguable Remanence within the culture of the community and the society.
Hope that helps.. I have a lot of references that might help you.
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Acting as a librarian in a university library, one of the key issues is the acquisition by the users of informational competencies. We have discussed a lot the variety of concepts on the topic of literacy sometimes called, sometimes competence, or ability. We consider very important to reflect on the conceptual determinations, but we left some previous questions: how is the training of the librarian for such competence? There have been a didactic training to fulfill this educational facet of the librarian role? As the institution where I work, we are still in the initial process, I have need to know about the practices that have been developed in the libraries and how librarians have been related to continuing education.
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Thanks for sharing Ljubomir.
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Which NLP library among the following ones below is the most mature and should be used in a scaled project of text processing.
In my project I am designing a full infrastructure of unstructured text processing, and there are scenarios where none of the available libraries can be leveraged, therefore I am implementing my own solution, however, I want to make evaluation against the current state of the art NLP libraries. and I want to pick up the most mature ones.
  • OpenNLP
  • Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK)
  • Stanford NLP
  • Machine Learning for Language Toolkit (MALLET)
  • LingPipe
  • Freeling
  • TreeTagger
Thank you in advance.
Hassan.
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Well, complex question.
Depending on your requirements (research vs commercial, language coverage, tasks, scalability .... as the most relevant) I would recommend OpenNLP or Stanford.
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What kinds of competences a subject librarian should have?
What professional competences should librarians have in order to provide more professional, more comprehensive and efficient services for students and teachers in their learning, teaching and research? What skills and techniques should librarians master in order to keep pace with the rapid development of information technology, and to facilitate libraries’ smooth transition from the traditional self-access resources (of both paperbacks and e-resources) and study-space provider to knowledge service?
Maybe i ask the similar question with Thoriq Tri Prabowo , but we are really different
  1. could you share your opinions with me? 
  2. and could you introduce some other standards?
thank you very much
A means skill, or ability
B subject librarian maybe has other names, such as, business librarian, law librarian, Research Support Librarian, Teacher Librarian or others
C could you introduce some other standards? exclude
SLA 2003 “Competencies for Special Librarians for the 21st Century”
RLUK 2012 “Re-skilling for Research”
ALIA 2013 “Work Level guidelines for library and information services” \“Standards of professional excellence for teacher librarians”
OPM 1994 “Position Classification Standard for Librarian Series,GS-1410”
FLICC 2008 “Federal Librarian Competencies”
ALA 2009 “Core Competences of Librarianship”
CTC 2011 “Teacher Librarian Services Credential and Special Class Authorization in Information and Digital Literacy Program Standards”
ALA 2013 “Transforming Liaison Roles in Research Libraries”
CARL 2014 Core Competencies and academic librarians
OCLC WebJunction 2014 “Competency index for the library field”
thanks Michelle Kraft 
thanks Faizul Nisha 
RUSA Professional Competencies for Reference and User Services Librarians  http://www.ala.org/rusa/resources/guidelines/professional
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Hi Yanan,
I did edit a book on this topic published in 2006. May be a bit old now but the reference is:  Dale, P., Holland, M., & Matthews, M., (eds.) 2006. Subject Librarians: Engaging with the Learning and Teaching Environment. Aldershot UK: Ashgate.
There might be some full text here [ https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Subject_Librarians.html?id=ybt0ci_4esIC&redir_esc=y&hl=en ] and there are two chapters free online here [ http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/1461/ ] and here [  http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/196/ ]. It's a topic I haven't thought about for a while,  I will add an answer when I have a moment. BW Matt. 
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It seems that there are various opinions about the "secondary education curriculum and higher education courses in information literacy education is the ability to be fixed." What are positioned and how the curriculum in the area of everyone, thankfully and us teach you.
① native language recognized as "the ability to others can be a possible writing legible" in the operation capability of the do you think need how much? Does it not believed to be important because in the Internet community there is a selection from the typing and the pivot?
② to ask you about the part of the "computer literacy" that occupies a certain weight in the information literacy education. In the case of PC skills, do you captured with the ability to make full use of the keyboard, or, do you capture that it is the ability to select a tablet? Also, why is it that thinks so?
I, these will analyze how the guidelines of information literacy education in the region of you, want to know whether they are positioned in the developmental stage. I think that the literature also want to introduce, if possible.
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質問を理解することはぜんぜんできません。翻訳エンジンを使用しましたか?日本語と英語の語順があんまり異なっています。ですから,文章を小さな部分に分かれて,次に翻訳するほうがいいと思います。
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I am wondering how others use Bruce's informed learning approach to information literacy in their instructional work/programming. This could involve using one of the models that are part of informed learning, such as the 6 Frames of IL, or GeST Windows, or something more holistic. 
Bruce, C. (2008). Informed learning. Chicago: ALA.
Bruce, C. S., Edwards, S. L., & Lupton, M. (2006). Six frames for information literacy education: A conceptual framework for interpreting the relationships between theory and practice. ITALICS (Innovations in Teaching and Learning Information and Computer Science), 51(1), 1–18.
Lupton, M., & Bruce, C. S. (2010). Windows on information literacy worlds: Generic, situated and transformative perspectives. In A. Lloyd & S. Talja (Eds.), Practicing information literacy: Bringing theories of learning, practice and information literacy together (pp. 4–27). Wagga Wagga, N.S.W.,: Centre for Information Studies, Charles Sturt University.
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Hi '
It seems that a library or library systems are organizing their training according to actual needs rather than according to training theories. It could help a lot if the existence of informed learning models will be brought to their attention.
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Hi
Dear Sir/Madam
Attached questionnaire is provided to determine evaluating indicators of information literacy instruction models. Please help the researcher by investigate and judgment content and face validity of the indicators. Please determine the suggested indicators what extent assess information literacy models. If you think the suggested indicators should be corrected, please modified the indicators or suggestions related to the indicators mentioned in the description. I am appreciative for spending time, attention and accuracy for responding.
Best regards
M. Siamak
PhD candidate, Department of Knowledge and Information Science, Hamedan brench
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First of all you should clarify and understand the requirements of the problem for which information is sought.
What is known about the topic?
What information is needed?
Where can the information be found?
The second step is to identify sources of information and to find those resources.
Step three involves examining the resources that were found. The information must be determined to be useful or not useful in solving the problem.
It is in the fourth step this information which has been selected is organized and processed so that knowledge and solutions are developed. Examples of basic steps in this stage are:
Discriminating between fact and opinion
Basing comparisons on similar characteristics
Noticing various interpretations of data
Finding more information if needed
Organizing ideas and information logically
In step five the information or solution is presented to the appropriate audience in an appropriate format. A paper is written. A presentation is made. Drawings, illustrations, and graphs are presented.
The final step in the Information Literacy strategy involves the critical evaluation of the completion of the task or the new understanding of the concept. Was the problem solved? Was new knowledge found? What could have been done differently? What was done well?
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Sparrow et al (Science, 2011, v333, p776) suggest that Google has become a primary form of transactive memory. But I would argue that these information memory systems have always underpinned information literacy teaching and Google is just the latest popular manifestation of externalized transactive memory in action.
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Nick
Many thanks for this. 
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I have developed a questionnaire to assess healthy and unhealthy practices in Information literacy. For categorizing the data into three categories,  what term will be appropriate to express a condition that is neither healthy nor unhealthy( that sounds like indifferent)
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I think I would maybe use the phrase "does affect health"
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Following the recommendations made by UNESCO as steps before adapting the MIL curriculum for teachers, I will conduct a research to determine the level of implementation of the Media and Information Literacy in a Master of Teaching on Secondary and High School (A levels) in Spain. It is to identify the competence on MIL acquired by students through the Masters and also teachers attitudes, needs and wishes, as well as to analyze the contextual conditions. It would therefore be useful to know the different experiences of ‘MIL curriculum for teachers’ adaptation that have been carried out at other universities. Any information you can give me will be very welcome.
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Thank you very much for the information. I found the course in the second semester of the Master of Library Science. I would like to know the course program and the name of the guest teachers who teaches (not shown). In any case do you know of a course that is specifically programmed for the training of secondary school teachers?
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I am interested in knowing if anyone has applied or has come across any articles using this approach for information literacy or digital literacy sessions. It would be particularly interesting to know if the examples used other materials other than video or screencasts. I am interested in knowing about the advantages as well as disadvantages as I am thinking of applying the technique in a new post in an academic library.
Thank Carrie
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Yes, we've used it at University of Otago in a number of situations both for information literacy and digital literacy teaching in Oral Health (100 level), Medical Laboratory Science (200 level), and Pharmacy (undergraduate and post graduate level).
We use a variety of material, in house video or interactive content, externally sourced content, practice searches using our databases, online based quizzes that can require physically coming to the library to find material.
The advantages we've been alerted to through in house evaluations are that: students feel more prepared for class, they have a better understanding of concepts, they have time on their own to work at their own pace, and they can come to class with questions, they exhibit deeper understanding. In order to embed this in the programme without adding time to the students, we have negotiated reducing in class time to cover the pre -class learning (usually up to half an hour).
The major disadvantage is when students don't engage with the pre-class learning, come to class unprepared, and the same amount of work still needs to be completed in 2/3 of the time.
It also takes time to design and set up these learning packages and embed them in the LMS. We often use Adobe Captivate to build the content but do have a collection of learning objects that we reuse and tailor the content to fit around it. If grades or terms are to be applied this needs to be negotiated at an early stage. A small grade can increase motivation to participate for some students! 
I hope this helps.
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There are first studies and results on the impact of information literacy showing that teaching information literacy has got an measurable outcome. But what works in teaching information literacy? Which methods is effective or ineffective teaching a certain aspect of information literacy? Are there studies, working papers or research projects on getting an insight into the effectivety of the teaching methods for information literacy?
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Each single activity of every individual is bound to generate one or the other sort of information and the unprecedented creation and dissemination of information since long back is being rated as information explosion and rightly so, for the fact that people find it difficult to consume all the created relevant information in their concerned filed.
Information Literacy helps one to define one’s information needs, access, process and use the retrieved information strategically for attaining one’s personal, professional and educational goals. Individual perceptions of people come into play to judge the authenticity and reliability of information they are being provided or supplied with. 
 The authenticity of information is about
Availability or provision of the right kind of information
Free from false or misrepresentation of facts
Trustworthy
Supported by evidence
Vested with authority
Having a legal validity
Verifiable to establish its genuineness
Credible, Competent and Reliable
IL is about evaluating information and its sources critically and incorporating selected information into ones knowledge base and value system.
IL is about developing the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information. 
Information literacy empowers people in all walks of life to seek, evaluate, use and create information effectively to achieve their personal, social, occupational and educational goals. 
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I'm familiar with EAVI studies. Thanks.
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UNESCO (2013) Global Media and Information Literacy (MIL) Assessment Framework
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I want to begin an assessment program at the college to assess information literacy in baccalaureate program of nursing education. I am interested to hear what others have experienced using the Fresno Test.
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As Snejanka pointed out, SAILS developed by Kent State University researchers is a good example. Also Tilson (2010) indicated the Fresno Test is a validated instrument which can be used to evaluate information literacy along with skills. I suggest you Google for more for a wealth of information that is available on the web.
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Librarians work closely with faculty when they are researching. Should they get together more often to publish?
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Such cooperation should be more frequent, more intense.
Undoubtedly, this will benefit both sides, as well as those who will use the results of such research.
I think it's a matter of time when both sides - academics and librarians - will be fully maturated to such collaboration :)
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Thesis:
Critically thinking nurses provide safe, proficient, culturally sensitive care. Information Literacy/Competency is a requirement to the development of critical thinking skills. Nurses need to be information literate, in-order to be prepared to critically think in the fast paced clinical setting, for the provision of exceptional care.
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Thank you Caryl for the reply. The more I study and learn about Evidence-Based Practice the more I am convinced that a nurse (or for that matter any practitioner) cannot practice using evidence without having strong information literacy skills. Other health professionals enter the practice field with Master's or Doctorate level of education. This prepares them to implement evidence into practice using their information literacy skills that have been honed in the extended preparation to practice. As you have pointed out, nurses are so grounded in the intensive learning of the sciences, pharmacology, nursing care fundamentals, assessments, care of patients in the specialties, epidemiology, community health, management and prep for the state boards there is little time left to emphasize the importance of developing inquiry skills, information management (beyond the EMR), evaluation of research, comparisons of qualitative and quantitative research, and critical appraisal of practices. It is probably 3-5 years after graduation that nurses are ready to begin asking questions and evaluating practice. And we know that about 25% of graduates will have left the profession by then.
Possibly two things may happen if there was a greater emphasis on evaluating information literacy skills:
1. Improved Critical Thinking, so that less emphasis could be placed on practicing taking the NCLEX and more on developing problem evaluation/solving/reasoning skills; thereby resulting in better NCLEX pass rates
2. Graduates identify nursing as a profession with a unique scope of practice, met by no other professional group thereby lifting morale, courage and fortitude of new graduates to be active participants/contributors in a collaborative care team. Possibly these two outcomes from improved information literacy skills will spur the profession forward. The problems is making the connection.
As you may have found in your practice, it is difficult to get nursing faculty beyond seeing information literacy as either effective database searching, efficient computer skills or proficient use of citation. The result is that it is difficult to implement evaluation of the skill beyond those areas with the faculty. There needs to be a close collaboration.
I would suggest a review of A New Curriculum for Information Literacy as the place to start: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vY-V2givIiE
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E.g. SCONUL or ANCIL.
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Many concepts of information literacy focus on the lifelong learner, which implies learning at the workplace. A quite early programme funded by the EU, called SIBIS (Statistical Indicators Benchmarking the Information Society), focussed on Work and Skills, among others.
So, I agree with Peter and Matt on that the answer to your question is yes.
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From an information management point of view.
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Not really my area, but Wikipedia (which, I know, isn;t always the best!) has a good and very well referenced article, though not dealing in any depth with information management:
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Is your University teaching information literacy? How is it assessed? Methodology? ICT tools?
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Thanks for the answers.
I also find a paper that gives an overview of the methods currently applied for information literacy assessment: A. Walsh, « Information literacy assessment Where do we start? », Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, vol. 41, nᵒ 1, p. 19–28, 2009.
There is a large list of assessment types and resources available from: http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/infolitassessments.htm
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LIS professions are rapidly changing, so there exists a continuous demand for new skills and literacies. What skills, competences and qualifications should LIS students acquire during their studies? What are expectations of students and employers in relation to curriculum and programs, topics and classes, their qualifications and skills acquired?
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Hi Anna, I agree with Arjun, an ability to understand and use technology is now a prerequisite for a career in Library and Information/Knowledge Services. As a freshly graduated professional you will be in touch with the latest developments in technology, but specific skills like these will fade quickly, so an ability to keep up, keep in touch with developments and maintain overview is also important.
Basic management skills are also important. Project Management, the ability to put together a project proposal with appropriate costings, that kind of thing.
I would also add good communication skills, written and spoken. Can you write a report or plan an effective information skills session. Can you present an idea to a line manager. Could you present a paper to a meeting.
Collaborative working, developing and participating in networks, using social networking for work purposes are important, especially to develop the networks that are going to keep you up to date and engaged with developments in the profession, the further you progress in your career.
An entrepreneurial spirit, the ability to try and think new things is a useful attribute in times of change. In many areas of LIS work today, fortune favours the brave, those who are willing to put themselves forward, apply for funding grants, think of new projects and new approaches to problems.
All this and of course the the core Library and Information Skills are important.
BW Matt
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I'm going to submit a research article to a journal. One has an impact index (4.57) while another journal has an impact factor (0.785). So I am a little confused about the impact index and impact factor, can anyone suggest which one of the journals is preferred for submitting my research article?
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I found these définitions from Buela-Casal (2010, http://www.ugr.es/~aepc/articulo/scientific.pdf)
Journal impact factor: This is calculated by dividing the total number
of citations made in one year to the papers published in a journal during the
two previous years, by the number of papers published in the journal during
that same 2-year period. Usually, this indicator only refers to the journals included
in the Web of Sciences (Buela-Casal, 2003; Garfield, 2003).
Advantages: Without doubt the most used and best known indicator in all
fields of scientific research. Used for assessing researchers, journals and institutions
in the majority of countries in the world.
Journal impact index: The same as the impact factor, except that it
also takes into account journals not included in the Web of Science.
Advantages: It is very useful for assessing and classifying many journals
not included in the Web of Science. It is particularly useful for cataloguing
national journals. See, for example, IN-RECS (http://ec3.ugr.es/in-recs/).
Disadvantages: The same as those described for the impact factor.
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I'm interested in the way the children aged 0-3 learn to "read", or rather get in the contact with the book from the birth. Does anyone know the projects in your countries (besides Bookstart and all its worldwide branches) using emergency literacy?
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Thank you Elna, this is very helpful. I'm definitely interested in exploring emergent literacy concept, so I'll gladly check literature recommended by you.