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This question is inspired in the article of yesterday by John Horvat II https://www.returntoorder.org/2014/07/saint-thomas-say-immigration-2/?pkg=rtoe0886
In looking at the debate over immigration, it is almost automatically assumed that the Church’s position is one of unconditional charity toward those who enter the nation, legally or illegally.
However, is this the case? What does the Bible say about immigration? What do Church doctors and theologians say? Above all, what does the greatest of doctors, Saint Thomas Aquinas, say about immigration? Does his opinion offer some insights to the burning issues now shaking the nation and blurring the national borders?
Saint Thomas: “Man’s relations with foreigners are twofold: peaceful, and hostile: and in directing both kinds of relation the Law contained suitable precepts.”
Commentary: In making this affirmation, Saint Thomas affirms that not all immigrants are equal. Every nation has the right to decide which immigrants are beneficial, that is, “peaceful,” to the common good. As a matter of self-defense, the State can reject those criminal elements, traitors, enemies and others who it deems harmful or “hostile” to its citizens.
The second thing he affirms is that the manner of dealing with immigration is determined by law in the cases of both beneficial and “hostile” immigration. The State has the right and duty to apply its law.
Saint Thomas: “For the Jews were offered three opportunities of peaceful relations with foreigners. First, when foreigners passed through their land as travelers. Secondly, when they came to dwell in their land as newcomers. And in both these respects the Law made kind provision in its precepts: for it is written (Exodus 22:21): ’Thou shalt not molest a stranger [advenam]’; and again (Exodus 22:9): ’Thou shalt not molest a stranger [peregrino].’”
Commentary: Here Saint Thomas acknowledges the fact that others will want to come to visit or even stay in the land for some time. Such foreigners deserved to be treated with charity, respect and courtesy, which is due to any human of good will. In these cases, the law can and should protect foreigners from being badly treated or molested.
Saint Thomas: “Thirdly, when any foreigners wished to be admitted entirely to their fellowship and mode of worship. With regard to these a certain order was observed. For they were not at once admitted to citizenship: just as it was law with some nations that no one was deemed a citizen except after two or three generations, as the Philosopher says (Polit. iii, 1).”
Commentary: Saint Thomas recognizes that there will be those who will want to stay and become citizens of the lands they visit. However, he sets as the first condition for acceptance a desire to integrate fully into what would today be considered the culture and life of the nation.
A second condition is that the granting of citizenship would not be immediate. The integration process takes time. People need to adapt themselves to the nation. He quotes the philosopher Aristotle as saying this process was once deemed to take two or three generations. Saint Thomas himself does not give a time frame for this integration, but he does admit that it can take a long time.
Saint Thomas: “The reason for this was that if foreigners were allowed to meddle with the affairs of a nation as soon as they settled down in its midst, many dangers might occur, since the foreigners not yet having the common good firmly at heart might attempt something hurtful to the people.”
Commentary: The common sense of Saint Thomas is certainly not politically correct but it is logical. The theologian notes that living in a nation is a complex thing. It takes time to know the issues affecting the nation. Those familiar with the long history of their nation are in the best position to make the long-term decisions about its future. It is harmful and unjust to put the future of a place in the hands of those recently arrived, who, although through no fault of their own, have little idea of what is happening or has happened in the nation. Such a policy could lead to the destruction of the nation.
As an illustration of this point, Saint Thomas later notes that the Jewish people did not treat all nations equally since those nations closer to them were more quickly integrated into the population than those who were not as close. Some hostile peoples were not to be admitted at all into full fellowship due to their enmity toward the Jewish people.
Saint Thomas: “Nevertheless it was possible by dispensation for a man to be admitted to citizenship on account of some act of virtue: thus it is related (Judith 14:6) that Achior, the captain of the children of Ammon, ‘was joined to the people of Israel, with all the succession of his kindred.’”
Commentary: That is to say, the rules were not rigid. There were exceptions that were granted based on the circumstances. However, such exceptions were not arbitrary but always had in mind the common good. The example of Achior describes the citizenship bestowed upon the captain and his children for the good services rendered to the nation.
* * *
These are some of the thoughts of Saint Thomas Aquinas on the matter of immigration based on biblical principles. It is clear that immigration must have two things in mind: the first is the nation’s unity; and the second is the common good.
Immigration should have as its goal integration, not disintegration or segregation. The immigrant should not only desire to assume the benefits but the responsibilities of joining into the full fellowship of the nation. By becoming a citizen, a person becomes part of a broad family over the long term and not a shareholder in a joint stock company seeking only short-term self-interest.
Secondly, Saint Thomas teaches that immigration must have in mind the common good; it cannot destroy or overwhelm a nation.
This explains why so many Americans experience uneasiness caused by massive and disproportional immigration. Such policy artificially introduces a situation that destroys common points of unity and overwhelms the ability of a society to absorb new elements organically into a unified culture. The common good is no longer considered.
A proportional immigration has always been a healthy development in a society since it injects new life and qualities into a social body. But when it loses that proportion and undermines the purpose of the State, it threatens the well-being of the nation.
When this happens, the nation would do well to follow the advice of Saint Thomas Aquinas and biblical principles. The nation must practice justice and charity towards all, including foreigners, but it must above all safeguard the common good and its unity, without which no country can long endure.
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En tiempos de Santo Tomás de Aquino la gente viajaba pero no tanto como ahora y cuando se hacía era por motivos de trabajo o motivos serios. Actualmente la gente viaja para conocer, hacer turismo, intentar una vida mejor aunque muy raramente se logre todo lo que se busca.
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Hi, 
I am looking for few scholars to collaborate with me and my colleague, Dr. Zulema Suarez, on Islamophobia study in Eureapen countries ( France, UK ) and Canada and the USA. Are you interested?
We have already collected dada from the US and we need similar samples from UK, France, and Canada
If you are interested, please email me back asap.
Thanks.
Wahiba
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نعم على الرحب والسعة
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Dear colleagues,
Have you ever wished you were a citizen of another country other than your current one?
Please share your opinions.
Kind regards
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No. Because I love my country, Uzbekistan. Here is everything for me.
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Hi, I have 13 survey items with the response options YES and NO. For example, the respondent may indicates YES or NO when asked if they have a reliable method of transportation.
I would like to include the percentage of respondents who indicated YES across the 13 items using GGPLOT2's bar chart option. My code is pasted below. As of now, I am able to plot a single bar chart that delineates the number of respondents who responded YES across the 13 items (each of the items are represented in the x-axis; count of YES's is reported via the y-axis).
However, I would like the y-axis to reflect percentages if possible. Here is my R syntax (I also attached a text file showing the R syntax...formatting seems off when copying and pasting to this message box):
dat2 %>%
gather(factors, count, -dat.Record.ID) %>%
filter(count==1) %>%
ggplot(aes(factors)) + theme_minimal() + theme(axis.text.x = element_text(angle = 90, hjust=1)) +
scale_x_discrete(breaks=c("dat.LivingC.r","dat.Utility.r","dat.Pollut.r","dat.Lowinc.r",
"dat.Job.r","dat.Costnutfood.r","dat.Availnutfood.r","dat.Healthins.r",
"dat.Domvio.r","dat.Crime.r","dat.Transport.r","dat.Homeless.r","dat.Immigr.r"),
labels=c("Living Conditions", "Inability to Pay Utilities", "Poor Environmental Conditions",
"Low Household Income", "Guardian(s) Job Status", "Cost of Nutritional Food",
"Availability of Nutritional Food","Lack of Access to Health Insurance", "Domestic Violence",
"Crime Rate in Community", "Limited Access to Reliable Transportation", "Homelessness",
"Immigration Status"))+
geom_bar(fill="Black")
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Dear Dan,
as far as I understand you have a count data of the 'Yes' answers for all the 13 survey items. After divided the counts by 13, you can display them using
+ scale_y_continuous(labels = scales::percent)
HTH,
Ákos
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Recently, the president of the United States threatened to issue a tariff against Mexico if the government of Mexico doesn't help lower the number of illegal immigrants into the USA from Latin American countries. Do you think a tariff can be an effective government policy to persuade a border country to change their policy? Why or why not? Are there other real-world examples?
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Paul: Thank you for your responses to my question! As most of you mentioned, a tariff is usually a tool to protect domestic jobs, rather than a punitive measure to punish another country.
However, since the time when I posted this question, Mexico has actually had high level talks with the United States. As a result, Mexico has agreed to do more to help stop the flow of illegal immigrants. See below link:
So, maybe we should give President Trump some credit. His threat of tariffs worked. Thoughts?
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I am looking for articles on the subject of immigrants' length of stay in a country having an effect on them. As in becoming more/less like natives.
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I am interested to see what research says about immigrants becoming more and more similar to natives with time. Whether they assimilate more depending on the length of stay. If they for example possess the resident status if that makes them feel closer to the natives which might impact how they view immigrants.
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Discussions about how to deal with demographic ageing and shrinking are taking place in increasing numbers of countries, especially in East Asia and Europe. Japan is my focus. So, is large scale immigration a solution to the perceived problems of ageing and depopulation in developed countries, but particularly in Japan and East Asia?
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This is an interesting question, that I've just run across now. In the case of Japan, this is complicated by the meaning of being Japanese, which is not simply a matter of citizenship, but also an ethnic or racial identity. If I get Japanese citizenship, it is unlikely that anyone will actually see me as Japanese in Japan, although I have had friends in Japan state that they think this could change. Also, the decline in the Japanese population is not entirely viewed as a "problem". Many of my interlocutors in Japan have indicated that fewer people is a positive, not a negative. The problem lies in the transition from the current population of about 125 million to a projected population of about 45 million by the end of the century if nothing changes. Costs related to care of the elderly, and a variety of other issue, present daunting issues that are facing the government to relax, to some extent, immigration policies. This recent article of mine may be of some interest: http://bjwa.brown.edu/24-2/empty-houses-abandoned-graves-negative-population-growth-and-new-ideas-in-neo-rural-japan/
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Does climate change, such as global warming, lead to population moment from one place to another? I am beginning a paper exploring the link between climate change and immigration, using the case of Africa. I seek your advice on research resources that can be helpful, even if they are based on studies outside the African continent. Thank you in advance for your help.
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Kenneth M Towe
said "Do you remember the plans to stop the cooling?" but nobody does and he can only show a single talk of a possibility to do something published in a popular magazine from fake news land.
If there was a plan to actually make such insane geoengineering there should have been real government reports, approved policies and budgets and who can explain the absence of scientific publications.
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I would like to invite you to answer this question that interests me according to the opinion you have on this question.
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Dear Alejandro,
As Maria already pointed out in her answer to your question, it really depends on the situation you want to examine. However, I would point out an issue which is important in my opinion: the case of immigrants from non-democratic countries who move to democratic countries. Sociologist Piotr Sztompka put forward the concept of civilizational competence, and I think that this is crucial with regard to integration of migrants. Religious fundamentalism, refusal of cultural diversity, pre -modern attitudes (mistreatment of women and children, domestic violence), attitude toward rule of law principles etc. are issues that influence integration of migrants.
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Hi there,
I am trying to find some literature on the relation between consumption, identity and migration in order to improve a research proposal. So, I would like to ask, does anyone have any suggestions regarding the effects of migration on identity through consumption? Is there any suggestion or any research on that issue?
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I think the question is too broad and so it needs to be narrowed down or reworded! Both migration and consumption are big concepts and identity of an individual or a group of people can be changed and/or reconstructed when people migrate to another country! Dietary practice is just one aspect of identity, which can immensely be influenced by the movement of people from one place to another. Think about the diverse identities of diasporas in transnational world!
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USA Approved Permanent Immigration Using The EB-5 Investment Program. Family May Qualify.
The above is the ad that I mentioned in the question. What is your take on it in terms of the current situation in the USA?
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Thanks a lot for your reply.
Thus, giving the EB-5s a preferential treatment does not mean they'll do more for the USA than their less wealthy counterparts.
That's what is bothering me :)
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I would like to know whether migration is bad for the originating countries/regions, or has some positive implications that are mostly ignored in socio-economic studies.
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Dear Dr. David Boansi you have raised the world wide growing concern that has a very serious impact on economy, health, education, etc in the developing countries.Brain drain is defined as the migration of health personnel in search of the better standard of living and quality of life, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide ( Dodani and LaPorte, 2005).Yes you are right dear Dr. David Boansi . The majority of migration is from developing to developed countries.The main drivers of brain drain are:
  • Better standards of living and quality of life,
  • Higher salaries,
  • Access to advanced technology and
  • More stable political conditions in the developed countries attract talent from less developed areas.
So, addressing the aforementioned gaps can minimize brain drain from the developing countries.
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Which country is the best for immigration?
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Please which country is best for a young animal scientist to pursue his doctoral degree with high chances of job after study?
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Immigration or deportation is one of the most important life events with traumatic effects. Especially, if it causes losses such as injury and death. Will it overtake the traumatic effects that have happened as long as 70 years? What are the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in individuals over the years? Does the individual's well-being increased by improvement of psychological hardiness?
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Dear Cristina Dodson-Castillón,
Thank you for your response to the question. I will search the transgenerational trauma literature. Thank you again for your feedback and offer. I will write you
Mithat
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See my Book: Learning from My Mother's Voice: Family Legend and the Chinese American Immigration Experience. Can you develop your family legend by sharing your narrative as a tool to heal and bond among immigrant families?
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Yes...telling a story, your story gives you a voice, it is a humanizing element. It even moves the individual to higher cognition of events and own emotions and reduces stress. Telling your story moves personal events from narrow alleyways towards a social expression of experiences and thereby addresses issues of isolation, alienation etc
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I am interviewing politically active and conservative Christians in Norway to find out how they use Christian teachings and the Bible in order to formulate and justify attitudes and policies regarding immigration and particularly immigration of Muslims. Observing that there is a curvilinear relationship between church-involvement and prejudice going all the back to the research of Gordon Allport and others I want to understand if this association is relevant in the context I am investigating. 
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This is about feminism instead of race, but have you read Kristy Maddux's book, The Faithful Citizen: Popular Christian Media and Gendered Civic Identities?
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I am looking for research on adolescent immigrant students and their families' involvement in public education.
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Thank you.
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When responding to refugees and immigrants with strains on the response capacity
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(1)- economic fragility of host country, (2). depth of geopolitical instability in the host country, (3). Violent records of the person in new environment, (4). Notability and reputation of an international character (negatively).  
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I wasn't able to find the variable in the microdata provided by OECD for the survey in schools
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Thank you very much. I know the existence of those indexes, but in previous PISA editions, in the school survey, there was a variable named "proportion of immigrants in school", with some range of percentages as indicators. I don't find that variable in PISA 2015, and I would need it for a multilevel regression. Thanks a lot for all your answers.
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hello
i am a student working on illegal immigrants. i need data on illegal immigrants. how i can get this data
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For the US, you might wish to check the following sources.
The Pew Research Center regularly visits the topic of unauthorized immigration:
The Migration Policy Institute:
The Department of Homeland Security puts out an annual compendium of immigration data, which may be a year or two behind:
All statistics on this population are, of course, estimates. Good luck!
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Visa decisions on Illegal Maritime Arrivals/refugees are complex & complicated.Organizational culture of the DIBP may have an influence of their visa decisions.Therefore, measuring DIBP organizational culture is important to critically analyze DIBP decisions. 
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this also might be of interest for you if you are investigating the inner-organisational structures of DIBP ( text is written from a network perspective): http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/krack/documents/pubs/2012/2012PolInOrgs.pdf
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Hi,
I and my co-worker, would be travelling to India and back, from Mexico. We have stop over in USA , where we will have to change planes, etc. 
While going to India and returning, we would like to take with us geological rock samples (not soil) of no commercial value, such as obsidian, ignimbrite, basalts and mylonite.
I have done this several times in India and Europe with no problem, but what about USA? I have heard that the customs and immigration in USA is extraordinary.
Thanks for the advice.
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Amar,
As someone who ships considerable amounts of material internationally - including radioactive samples - there are few regulations one has to abide by. Both the 49 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) and IATA (International Air Transport Association) have no regulations that I know of related to rock samples.
As mentioned should you be questioned at Customs make sure that you tell any officer/official that your materials are geological rock specimens - emphasis on 'rock.' Do NOT identify them as soil samples. I would also mentioned that your samples are for 'research and/or scientific analysis'. Be prepared to give a basic overview of your work should they be curious.  And, as Kenneth Towe mentions above try not to be cute with your answers.
Best of luck.
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I am trying to find legal decisions relating to immigration detention in the US (specifically involving people seeking asylum). Is the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights the most promising place to look? If so, does anyone have any tips on easy ways to navigate the decision archives? 
Are there any key domestic decisions which refer to international human rights law?
On a similar note, what are the best/key NGO reports related to human rights/poor conditions in US immigration detention that have been published in recent years?
Many thanks! 
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My research is based on the lifestyle factors that affect African immigrants in the development of type 2 diabetes. I am trying to get articles to review before i start work on data collection and the rest. I have found very few papers among this population as most articles are either based on African-American or African-Caribbean which are not my population of interest. I also will like to know if this is a good research area. Thank you for any useful suggestions. 
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Africa is a big place, and we can't generalise. However, in my experience in central and eastern Africa, people put sugar in tea, but only had a few cups a day, and working people often had fizzy drinks at lunchtime, or when entertaining visitors. However meals were mostly  home-cooked and savoury, with often home grown vegetables. Here so much food is available ready prepared, and with sugar in most of it. So fructose consumption goes up as people adopt the habits of Westerners. Vitamin D goes down, with the lack of sunshine. Magnesium intake drops, as consumption of dried beans and fresh vegetables goes down. A more refined diet has less chromium. Artificial sweeteners also encourage diabetes. All these factors can contribute to type two diabetes.
It is very true that sugar consumption in the West needs to be curbed, but if it is replaced by artificial sweeteners, I suspect that matters will go from bad to worse.
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What are the benefits of estimation of the psychological profile of immigrants living for some time in a host country?
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Hi. I think to estimate the psychological status and well-being of immigrants, suddenly, it would be important to take into account  two levels of analysis: micro-analytical (the migrant subject) and macro-analytical (the structures in the host country).
Their level of satisfaction with the local integration structures, measured by the satisfaction with health and social services.
The opportunities in job mobility, the options of empowerment and development of their competencies, capabilities, economic authonomy, self-esteem.
Mental health (depressions, anxiety, lonelyness and other migratory troubles).
Relation withe their familiar, children, couple, the reunification, etc.
At the moment, this is my contribution. I hope it would be useful.
Best wishes,
Marisa
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I am trying to take a philosophical approach in trying to explain why immigrants are more entrepreneurial than indigenous South Africans. While I finding out that risk perception may have something to do with it, I am not convinced this explains the differences adequately. A more philosophical approach using authenticity is what I would like to explore.
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Thank you very much for the responses to my question on authenticity. They certainly gave me something to work on.
Regards
Pearson
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In particular I'm looking at the impacts that Russian architecture leave on harbin contemporary architecture and culture as well. And I am reading the book of difting" architecture and migrancy, any other books or theories discuss about the issues?
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There are a lot of good books about Russian architecture of the end of 19th and the beginning of 20th centuries in Russian. In English – see:
William C. Brumfield. The Origins of Modernism in Russian Architecture. University of California Press, 1991; Dmitry Shvidkovsky. Russian Architecture and the West. Yale University Press, 2007.
If I am not mistaken, A.J. Toynbee wrote about Russian heritage in Harbin: A.J. Toynbee. A Journey to China, or the Things which Are Seen. London, 1931
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I want to do research on the effect of international migration on wages and productivity in the construction industry in the Netherlands. My supervisor suggested a Granger causality test. I couldn't find specific data on the amount of labor immigrants in the construction industry, so my supervisor suggested to use the found data on immigrants with labor as a motive as a proxy variable. What do I need as input data for wages and productivity to make this model work? And how do I present this in an excel sheet or in stata?
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Dear Martijn van Ingen
I suggest, you collect the wage payroll of construction industry to proxy for wages (whereas you can calculate the average day wage per labor). With the productivity the best proxy is the output per person employed so that you have to collect the output of construction industry and the labor in this to measure.
I hope that helping
Canh
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My research topic is about the perceptions and experiences of immigrants in their integration in the labour market. Can anybody suggest any tools or standard questionnaires to measure perceptions and experiences?
I am looking forward to any suggestions on how to structure my thesis as I wanted to do quantitative research. Thanks
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Hi Geraldine,
Thank you very much for your suggestion. It gave me now another perspectives.
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Currently I am working on the portrayal of immigration and immigrants in US newspapers from the 1870s to the 1920s. As my prime source I use ProQuest Historical Newspapers. For each decades the search (I use keywords: immigration or immigrant) produces several thousands of texts. As I'm most interested in the discourse, using the method of discourse analysis and frame analysis. Therefore I concentrate on editorial articles, however, a lot of interesting information is also in news pieces. Therefore I wonder what sample size I should use to reduce the results to the size that I could work on. My research is qualitative, however, I want to make sure that the content analysis meets its requirements.
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Qualitative analysis does not use sampling methodology, as such, because it is not the goal to generalize. But as you point out, the data analysis must be manageable.
The concept you need to explore is "data saturation."   In other words, do you have enough individual texts to provide a clear picture of your subject matter?  
In my doctoral dissertation, I also did a content analysis of news stories (see attached), but my topic was more narrow and I ended up with a total of 84 stories for analysis and did not need to sample.
First I would consider whether you should delimit your study further.  I can imagine that there may have been great changes in how immigrants were portrayed in 1870 compared to 1920.  Do you need the entire 50-year range? Do you need the entire geography, which was much greater in 1920 than it was in 1870?  
Then figure out how to demonstrate data saturation.  Maybe select a sample of 100 and perform your analysis...and then select an additional 20, and see if they change the findings significantly (or whatever numbers fit your resources).
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In another thread on the issue of International Human Rights law that has proven very popular, I have noticed that the discussion has degenerated into a a quasi-vitriolic exchange between pro versus anti-immigration sentiments. My question is this: given the incendiary rhetoric, particularly in Europe, concerning immigration, is it possible, for purposes of formal academic analysis to separate the wider problem of immigration from the narrower, and more technical issue, of multi-culturalism? That is, to what extent is it possible to discuss and analyze the question of movements of peoples across borders (a universal phenomenon within World History) as a separate issue from the managerial, technocratic, bureaucratic and bio-power dimensions of the social engineering process known as multi-culturalism, which seems to be wholly unique to Western Europe, North America, and Australasia?
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I think that Canada and Australia wanted to avoid the empty concept in place in Britain and therefore their definitions and policies are much more developed, after all these are countries that needed migrants but they had to think well how to choose their citizens (and they implemented points-based systems for a reason - to evaluate human capital skills).
What is valid for cheap labour is also valid for international students or jobs in the US going to China and India. Some research papers have pointed out that there were excellent foreign students among terrorists in the UK and US. The same goes for some regulations in the US regarding aviation pilots because it is easy to start such a course, no matter one's status.
Multiculturalism is not as positive as it sounds but the receiving country is also responsible for security, selection and business (incl. universities) compliance with local and national laws. 
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In Poland an entry ban was also applied in asylum cases, accordingly, for a certain time. Fortunately this practice has now been abolished.
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The Directive says it applies 'without prejudice' to the qualification Directive. It is not clear what exactly that means and the qualification Directive does not mention entry bans. There is no CJEU case law on this point yet. The case law does say that the Returns Directive doesn't apply to asylum seekers, and it must follow that it doesn't apply to those who have protection in that Member State, since it only applies to third-country nationals whose status is not legal, whereas the qualification Directive gives people in need of protection the right to a residence permit. In my view the best interpretation is that the mere existence of an entry ban should not affect the assessment of an application for refugee status, because Article 31 of the Geneva Convention says that in principle refugees cannot be subject to penalties for irregular entry. The same provision of the Convention arguably means that if a person shows a genuine protection need, they cannot be subject to an entry ban and any ban which was imposed has to be repealed.
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I want to measure social and cultural integration of IDP's. Is there any scale to measure their level of integration in the society?
thanks
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William Dressler has developed the cultural consonance technique to do exactly that. It identifies people's definitions of a successful or fully socialized person in a given group, then measures how well individuals of the group conform to those definitions.
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Since my research is on the diasporic studies therefore I am focusing on how is gender playing a pivotal role in existence of an immigrant.
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Much depends on the sex/gender composition of specific diasporic communities.  For example, in Europe most emerging Syrian communities are made up of far more young men than older men or women, with few families.  By contrast the communities in Canada where I help resettle Syrian refugees is almost entirely made up of families and balanced by sex.  As a result, gender identity is  important in both contexts but interacts differently with social issues and populations.
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What has Led to the Resurgence of Migration from Developing to Developed Countries?
Is this a Modern form of Slavery in Disguise?
Who Caused What: The Enemy Within or Without?
Is this the Beginning of the End for the World?
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I agree with your opinion,Migrated men, women, young people, children and families may experience slavery conditions in a range of industries and situations such as:   Construction trades, Domestic work, Farm work, Factory work, forced marriage, Retail – green grocer, bakery, car wash, beauty therapy services, Sex services.
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what are the challenges immigrant families face when accessing autism services?
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An excellent resource might be researcher Marcela Mendoza who has done extensive work in areas of integration, cultural aspects, and sociological/anthropological perspectives.  (She is on Researchgate.)
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I am looking about immigrant entrepreneurship for theory building for Middle East and especially Syrian immigrant. Also any articles  about immigrant entrepreneurs, who are escaped from war.
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Hi,
Here's a few more, that might be of interest(starting point)
Schramm C. (2010). Expeditionary economics: spurring growth after conflict and disasters. Foreign Affairs. 89 (3):89-99.
Vansandt, C. and Sud, M. (2012). Poverty alleviation through partnerships: a road less travelled for business, governments, and entrepreneurs. Journal of Business Ethics.  110:321-332.
Kunt, A., Kapper, L. and Panos, G. (2009). Entrepreneurship in Post-conflict Transition. The role of Informality and Access to Finance. Policy Research Paper 4935. Washington DC:  The World Bank Development Research Group.
Lemmon, G. (2012). Entrepreneurship in post-conflict zones. New York: Council of Foreign Relations Working Paper.
Chowdhury, M. J. A (2011). The determinants of entrepreneurship in a conflict regions: evidence from the Chittagong hills tract in Bangladesh. Journal of Small Business and Entreprneurship. 24(2): 265-293.
Collier, P. and Duponchel, M. (2010). The economic legacy of civil war: firm level evidence
from Sierra Leone. UNU-WIDER Working Paper, 90:2010.
Let me know how it goes
Rob
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Immigration studies journals . 
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Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies by Springer
Migration Studies by Oxford Journals
Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies byTaylor and Francis
International Migration Review
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Following the norms and values of other cultures creates the issue of authenticity and genuineness in our discourse and behavior once we seek harmony and appropriacy to properly integrate in the other culture.
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Some great content here thank you, I think that to understand integration we must understand it as a term as it can be quite loaded with connotations of a melting pot thesis. But if you understand integration as I do: The ability to participate fully in economic, social, cultural and political activities while maintaining ones cultural identity. Then we can make progress and work on our harmonization strategies to take advantages of the opportunities inherent in getting to know other cultures, way of life and schools of thought. Of course respect and rules are important to harmonize the social reality but such rules must be dynamic and not rigid in order to react to the ever changing social dynamic of a globalized world. 
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Submit a response (500-800 words) to the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry (JBI) for inclusion in the 13(1) issue to be published in March 2016:
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Bioethics emerged in the 1960s as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry concerned with the moral, social and religious issues and more recently with the health and treatment. In pluralistic societies, where the flux of immigrant and refugee has grown, interaction between patients  from different ethnic backgrounds and health workers are becoming routine. Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health problem on a global scale. In Canada Few cases of XDR tuberculosis were imported. Screening and treatment of latent tuberculosis was incorporated several years ago.
Xiang case had surely a dormant bacilli in his lung and was not detected upon Visa emission. The cost of MDR TB treatment is more than 50 000 $ and this cost is up to 200K in case of XDR TB. Active and contagious Tb patient must rest and not allowed to leave by air. Positive AFB smear, mainly for MDR or XDR TB, must be isolated in separated and negative pressure room, until smear conversion to avoid transmission of resistant bacilli. In other hand, the hosting country must bear the cost. In ideal scenario, the temporary visitor/worker, like Xiang must suscribe to insurrance protection to cover his outcome loss upon invalidity. More importantly, most of developped contries must integrate a principle-based analytic framework to allow screening and efficient treatment of latent TB. The results of testing should not influence immigration outcome, but be used to mandate medical review and consideration of voluntary preventative treatment.
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I am interested in knowing what would have been like for an exiled woman - a widow (with legal agency) with a noble rank of Marquesa - to have lived in Puerto Rico between 1821 and 1850 - in relative poverty. Please suggest books and papers. 
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LATNET-L@LISTS.UFL.EDU   This list serve has access to American Counseling association members who also know Latin American history. They will know.
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Monocultural nationalism illustrated by the rise of populist anti immigrant sentiment and political rhetoric in some EU states has been fuelled by the recent economic downturn.
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Particularly I perceive this issue by the prism and lenses of constitutional pluralism. I agree with modern scholars who are indicated that pluralism is more suitable concept than multiculturalism to tackle all the contemporary challenges faced mankind globally. In the light of this thesis, I will offer you very comprehensive research paper published by Global Constitutionalism on 2013.
TURKULER ISIKSEL (2013). Global legal pluralism as fact and norm. Global
Constitutionalism, 2, pp 160-195 doi:10.1017/S2045381713000130
I deeply believe that this kind of perception of legal or constitutional ideas will help you to construe the robust framework for your paper and concretely to your answer.
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I am looking for statistics (official or unofficial) on the residence rights of EU citizens in Italy.
In particular, I am trying to find out the number of residence documents issued to EU citizens and family members in Italy, as well as numbers of EU citizens expelled from Italy. (This includes but is not limited to the expulsion of members of the Roma community).
I have already consulted ISTAT (only total EU resident numbers available) and sent information requests to the Ministero dell'Interno (no response). 
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Hi Marco, thanks for your kind offer to assist. I have sent you a message to your university email.
Hi Rudi, thanks for the links - I did not know about CESTIM, so this is very useful to know.
I plan to provide an overview of residence statistics in all Member States in the chapter 'Who does not belong here anymore? A statistical snapshot of Member States’ practices' in Herwig Verschueren (ed), Who belongs here? EU law and adjudication on the link between individuals and Member States, (Intersentia, forthcoming 2016)
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Sonya , thank you for the post bout how the tool works!
Banglab which produced the embedded Vimeo fed video within the article you first posted has other videos posted as well.  The "Dubliners" piece I found quite moving and have sent it to poets I know. Thank you for the post.
I have seen mostly the absence of technology bridging gaps for immigrant families in transit from the border to the interior.  However, I Skype with a group from a health training project in Peten, Guatemala in order to connect with trainers of acupuncture. (project at www.GUAMAP.net). It dramatically increased our ability to assess training goals at the end of week long training. It has also allowed for exchange on emergency aid to a stroke victim in the same area - in August, a month ago.
When we began in 1994, neither cell phones nor electricity was available, let alone the internet. Those changes happenned in one generation. The more recent phenomenon of satellite based internet and global internet cables have made the world possible for electronic devices which use microprocessors for localized and individualized applications. Indigenous communications often do not have access to such technology, but others do.
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I would like to use it to assess the participant´s acculturative attitudes in my study. But I am having problems finding it.
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Dear Srividya, can you provide me the Ward and Kennedy scale
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Looking for statistical information
  • Immigration London (last 20 years)
  • City government policies
  • Socio political analysis
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Immigration into England is a post WWII phenomenon.
Against would-be-educated leftists who like to say that Britain has seen many immigrant groups settling in, read Bryan Sykes's book, Saxons, Vikings, and Celts: The Genetic Roots of Britain (2006), where it is stated: "We are an ancient people, and though the Isles have been the target of invasion and opposed settlement from abroad ever since Julius Caesar first stepped on to the shingle shores of Kent, these have barely scratched the topsoil of our deep-rooted ancestry."
The strongest genetic signal, the substructure, is Celtic, followed by Anglo Saxon, and some Viking traces; even Roman "genes are very rare in the Isles". A recent study publish in Nature, "The Fine-scale Genetic Structure of the British Population," supports this book, observing that the genetic composition of Britain hasn't changed much since 600 AD.
One cannot compare the episodic migrations of genetically related people into England over many centuries with the current program of mass immigration from all over the world in the last few decades. What is transpiring in England today started in 1948 when the British Nationality Act affirmed the right of Commonwealth citizens (including those of newly independent Commonwealth countries like India) to settle in the United Kingdom. It was from this point on that non-white colonization started to increase steadily, so that by 2012 the proportion of white British had dropped from 87.5% of the population in 2001 to 80.5%. 
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I am trying to find out what primary school children know and think of the different types of families that exist today (i.e., single-parent families, reconstructed families, extended families, immigrant families, LGBT parent families, etc.)... Is there a validated test or questionnaire for this?
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Dear Nathalie,
I know of no widely validated measure, but here are some citations for studies I recently examined in completing a project myself:
Gilby, R. L., & Pederson, D., R. (1982). The development of the child’s concept of family. Canadian Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 14, 111-121.
Newman, J. L., Roberts, L. R., & Syré, C. R. (1993). Concepts of family among children and adolescents: Effect of cognitive level, gender, and family structure. Developmental Psychology, 29, 951-962.
Nixon, E., Greene, S., & Hogan, D. (2006). Concepts of family among children and young people in Ireland. The Irish Journal of Psychology, 27, 79-87.
I hope the information is helpful.
Sincerely,
Ryan
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What are the Migrant International laws that deal with the challenging migration crisis in Europe Presently?
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Oxford University Press has published a book Migrants at Work which focuses on the impact of migration, migration law and labour law; the editors are Cathryn Costello and Mark Freedland. The Human Rights of Migrants and Refugees in European Law is another publication which also examines international law on migration, human rights law  and refugee law in Europe. Humanitarian law may also apply in the current migration crisis in certain cases. For further details see www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/news
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I'm very interested to evaluate the impact of migration at cognitive, affect, and social conditions  
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You're welcome, Roberto. We seem to have a strong common interest. Please tell me more about your research. You could email me via RG.
Warmest regards from Los Angeles,
Stephen
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The "openness" or "closeness" of public institutions vis a vis the actions undertaken by the migrant/ethnic entrepreneurs to transform the city would either allow such transformation to take place authentically or not allow it to take place. In such context:
  • How does cultural distance between immigrants and natives determine that "openness" or "closeness"?
  • Would the following assertions always hold true: "the higher the cultural distance, the higher the control" and "the lower the cultural distance, the lower the control"?
Thanks for sharing your thoughts!
Ralph
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(1). Comparatively, the homeland of an immigrant and  a native, if it is a devloping or developed state, is an important element in the creation of the balance versus dominance, in majority. (2). The background of the entrepeneure's previous experiences in this vicinity is essential. (3). The educational level and the status of the both sides in understanding the condition of each other is helpful. (4). The specific era for each ethnicity or culture in being or not being accepted by the international communities, is another historic factor. (5). The economical gap between the immigrant and native could open another avenue of possiblities, especially if there is an educational difference exists in between.             
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I am currently working on 'ethnic/migrant entrepreneurship, ethnocultural diversity and innovation in cities'.
Within the process of the transformation of ethnic neighbourhoods into places of leisure, tourism and consumption (for example, Aytar and Rath, 2012; Hiebert, Rath and Vertovec, 2015; Rath, 2007), the commodification of ethnocultural diversity by ethnic/migrant entrepreneurs, amongst others, is crucial. However, I found no references on how such a diversity commodification takes part in the transformation of the - whole - city.
Thus, I would infer that the transformation of ethnic neighbourhoods is actually - a kind of "proxy" of - the transformation of the city itself. What you do think? Is that the only way ethnic/migrant entrepreneurship may contribute to the transformation of the city?
Thanks for sharing your thoughts!
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There's a projet in curse that studies simmilar questions for different european cities, it could worth to see their website: http://www.urbandivercities.eu/ 
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Prevailing Literature is about racial or voluntary inmigrants.
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Hola Camilo
mi trabajo habla directamente a lo que planteas. Cual es tu email que te mando un par de papers?
paolo
p.s. considera que estoy en el aeropuerto o sea que de pronto me demorare un poco en la respuesta
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Integrated Threat Theory (ITT) argues that when e.g. US citizens perceive Hispanic immigrants to compete for limited ressources (realisitc threat) or to undermine American values and change America's culture (symbolic threat), the perceived threat causes prejudice.
Stephan, W. G., & Renfro, C. L. (2002). The role of threat in intergroup relations. In D. M. Mackie & E. R. Smith (Eds.), From Prejudice to Intergroup Emotions: Differentiated Reactions to Social Groups (pp. 191–207). New York: Psychology Press.
Stephan, W. G., & Stephan, C. W. (2000). An integrated threat theory of prejudice. In S. Oskamp (Ed.), Reducing prejudice and discrimination (pp. 23–45). Mahwah, N.J.: Psychology Press.
While I really like the theory, I was wondering if noone ever tried to challenge the ITT or if anyone has ever questioned its additonal use beyond classical Social Identity Theory assumptions?
Could anyone refer me to a critical article?
Many thanks!
Silke
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I have. I tested ITT, Aversive Racism, and Ambivalent Amplification Theory is a paper titled "Reactions Toward the Stigmatized: Disjunctions in Affect and Cognition (2006) J of Applied Social Psychology. I used Platt's (1965) Method of Strong Inference by creating an experiment where each theory predicts a different outcome. ITT was not confirmed. I attached the paper.
Best of luck and let me know if there is anymore I can do!
Gregg
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We are having a hard time finding sources that describe what it was like to learn English in the United States historically. Particularly missing is the colonial period. 
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I would recommend reading Ruben Donato's "The Other Struggle for Equal Schools: Mexican Americans During the Civil Rights Era." It gives a pretty detailed account of schooling opportunities for Mexican immigrants and Mexican-American students, as well as the history of ESL and bilingual education programs.
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Does anyone know where I can find panel data in the form of (country X> country Y in the year T): the number of immigrants.
I am especially interested in migration processes in the EU.
Thank you in advance for your help
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Dear Liwiusz,
try the following links:
Eurostat: Migration and migrant population statistic. (On this website, you can find many main tables as screenshott. If you use the links below the tables furthermore, you can see the dataset in form of a table on the website of Eurostat) See: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Migration_and_migrant_population_statistics
Another way: You can visit the website of Eurostat database and choose between various cross tables. See: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/database
There's no direct link, you have to click in the following way:
Data Navigation Tree => Database by themes => Population and social conditions => Demography and migration => try Immigration and emigration.
There's also a possibility of downloading individual datasets or the complete database by using by using the bulk download facility. See: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/bulkdownload
Last not least: You can get access to microdata. See: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/microdata/overview
Good luck with your research project and kind regards, Detlef
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Migration defined as to-stay and work- extended cases may include visitors participating in a "second-home" scheme
Network effect defined and understood as existing ties mainly socio-cultural in nature. As in the waves of immigrants, historically-recorded between pairs of countries.
Policy-induced effects may include a more relaxed immigration ruling, favorable education incentives, health-case benefits etc.
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The network effect should be a function of the quantity of the migrant population in the country at the time. On the other hand, the policy-induced effects should jump at or around the moment of the policy introduction. So think about an event study (as in finance) to capture these policy introduction events. Think about event time rather than continuous time.
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Relating to architecture, what should be concerned? Architectural style, elements, details?
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Dear Ruoshu 
I think for answering this question , we need to know what kind of roles have immigrants architects in new country , beside the designs , legislation and construction methods effects on this issue , if we have a statistic about percent of architects that work in design fields, detail design or legislation we can answer better to this question , or
as case study we may consider famous architects that migrate to other countries , in this case the number of years that they have worked in their home country is a key issue, however we have example of Zaha Hadid who is originally from Iraq but worked so many years in England and the styles of her is not so related with the architecture of her home  country
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I am writing a PhD chapter about the workplace encounters between my research participants (Polish migrant women) and the local population in Barcelona. I realise the scarcity of materials about the workplace encounters. I am also interested in how the structure of the workplaces influences everyday interaction at work.
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Hi Alina, 
These related publications might help:
Creticos, P., Schutz, J., Beeler, A., Ball. E. (2006) The Integration of Immigrants in the Workplace. Chicago: Institute for Work and the Economy.
Valenta, M. (2008) “The workplace as an arena for identity affirmation and social integration of immigrants”, Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 9(2), Art. 14 (May).
Hashim, I., Mohd-Zaharima, N., Khodarahimi, S. (2012) “Factors Predicting Inter-Ethnic Friendships at the Workplace”, Interpersona, 6(2): 191-199.
Best, 
Dan
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the particular case has to do with immigration figures.  I want to use actual immigration flows as a proxy for immigration policies of counties by adjusting the figures for other known push and pull factors that influence migration.  This is
done in the trade literature and I am wondering if anyone knows of any pieces discussing this practice.
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Suppose the unknown policy intention is X (e.g. planned number of places in public  hospitals) . You measure Y policy outcomes (actual number of place  conditional to Z controls, plus errors U.  Can you conclude Y=X? If this is your question, the answer is in general  NO.  Because you cannot factor out U. But if you get an excellent fit, hence U is very small, you may use a 'revealed preference' argument, with due caution. For example in coast-benefit analysis you may try to make inference on welfare weigths of governments from tax data (see my book Applied Welfare Economics, 2014), there is a chapter on this.
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Botswana immigration law does not allow reasons to be given to non citizens whose applications for permits to stay in the country are rejected? Is this common practice? And is it good for attracting foreign investment?
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In France, the administration is obliged by law to justify many of its decisions. The law doesn't apply to decisions taken by consular authorities abroad, but in cases like family reunification, people having a work permit etc., even consular decisions should be justified. Decisions taken within the country about stay permits are always motivated and subject to appeal.
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Is there a country that links (today or in the past) its immigration, naturalization or citizenship policy to a certain religious affiliation?
In Israel this connection is obvious, so I wonder whether there are any parallels. 
Thanks!
Netanel Fisher
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Hi Netanel,
This is an interesting question, but yet again that depends if you  are referring to the written or the unwritten law.
For instance, those countries which offer citizenship for refugees - ie Ireland, Australia etc - can provide you with citizenship if you state that the country which you were living discriminates your religion.
There is also another view on this, some countries may not simply provide you with citizenship whether by naturalization or marriage if you are following one of their stated or official religions (ie Christianity, Islam, Judaism). This is typical in South East Asia and the Middle East.
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I'm searching for articles or any papers that use this theory.
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I think you should be more precise. Do you refer to social assimilation?
Labour Market assimilation?
or Educational Assimilation?
Anyway, there is a good quick reviw ofthe most important articles and of the more recent ones on the first part of the fololowing article
Timothy j. Hatton, 2014, The Economics of international migration: A short History of the debate" Labour Economics, 30, pp 43-50.
Also
 De Palo, D., Faini R., Venturini A, 2006, The social assimilation of immigrants, IZA or CEPR working paper.
Luthra R. and T. Soehl, 2014, Who assimilates? statistical artefacts and intergenerational mobility in immigrant families, Working paper no. 2014-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research
I hope these papers can help!
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Dear all,
I am conducting some research on how poverty rates for European youth have changed over time. I essentially measure increases/decreases in youth poverty and which groups have been affected by such changes. One of my findings is that in western Europe the gap between migrants and non-migrants increases over time: while in the mid-1990s the risk of poverty for young migrants and non-migrants was quite similar, by the mid-2000s young migrants were much more likely to be poor. 
While I have been studying poverty for a while my knowledge of research on poverty and migration is fairly limited, so I ask:
Which literature would you recommend for me to get a grasp of factors that explain poverty among young migrants in western Europe? Is there any literature that has dealt with change over time?
I have found some literature that explains how migrants have been particularly affected by the recession, but not much from the earlier period (1990s to 2000s).
Any suggestions will be much appreciated
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One potential factor is the increasing legal restrictions on access to Social Protection for migrants (for instance, the NRPF rule in the UK, and the recent restrictions in access to rented housing and access to healthcare in the 2014 Immigration Act).
Weber, F (2012) "Borderline Justice: The Fight for Refugee and Migrant Rights" (Pluto) is useful in discussing the growth in legal restrictions on the welfare rights of migrants to the UK from a lawyers perspective. On young people specifically, I've think  Bloch et al (2014) "Sans Papiers: The social and economic lives of undocumented migrants" (Pluto) is also really helpful.
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Specifically the role of planning and policy in international migration issues especially on the receiving countries of immigrants especially developing ones. Any key articles?
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I have a few working papers about these issues. I am looking at the United States primarily. I would look at the work on immigrant and ethnic enclaves and how that fits into broader urban theories about land rent, succession, spatial assimilation, gentrification and right to the city. In the US, immigrant integration has been coordinated at the Federal level by the State Department, Homeland Security, and Health and Human Services. Urban Development is mostly the US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, but also Commerce, Transportation, Treasury and more. In the past five years, efforts to link the two issues has been getting a great deal of attention. 
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(Whether immigrants should get benefits and why/why not for example.) I expected there would be some (particularly given how much is known quantitatively through things like the British Social Attitude Survey and the topicality of this issue) but I am coming up empty on google scholar. (This may partly be a problem of rather "generic" search terms like attitude, welfare, immigrants and so on.)
Thanks.
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Dear Edmund,
try the following links: (There are mainly quantitave studies, but nobody can do quantitative research before collecting experience in qualitative research; so there's a great chance for you, to find what you are looking for)
Projekt "Einstellungen zum Wohlfahrtsstaat im europäischen Vergleich" (see: http://eswf.uni-koeln.de/forschung/ewv/)
Projekt "Wohlfahrtsstaatliche Maßnahmen und Einstellungen der Bürger" (see: http://eswf.uni-koeln.de/forschung/wme/index.html)
Working papers and publications:
Thorsten Heien (2000b): Attitudes Towards the Welfare State in Europe: Starting Point or Obstacle on the Road to a Social Union? Paper presented at the ECSR-Workshop "Comparative Social Justice Research", Oxford, United Kingdom, September 13-14, 2000. EWV-Arbeitspapier Nr. 2. (see attachment below)
Hans-Jürgen Andreß und Thorsten Heien (1998): Explaining attitudes towards the welfare state: Problems of a current research project. Paper for the Conference "Welfare States at the Crossroads". WME-Arbeitspapier Nr. 3. (see attachment below)
Hans-Jürgen Andreß und Thorsten Heien (1999a): Explaining Public Attitudes towards the German Welfare State using Structural Equation Models. Paper presented at the "Conference on Recent Trends and Methods of Social Stratification Research", Potsdam, Germany, April 30, May 1-2, 1999. WME-Arbeitspapier Nr. 7. (see attachment below)
Hans-Jürgen Andreß und Thorsten Heien (1999b): What determines people's attitudes towards the welfare state? A cross-cultural comparison using multiple-group structural equation models. Paper presented at the Conference "Large Scale Data Analysis", Cologne, Germany, May 25-28, 1999. WME-Arbeitspapier Nr. 8. (see attachment below)
Thorsten Heien und Dirk Hofäcker (1999a): How do welfare regimes influence attitudes? A comparison of five European countries and the United States 1985-1996. Paper presented at the ECSR-Workshop "Causes and Consequences of Socio-Economic and Political Attitudes in Eastern and Western Europe", Mannheim, Germany (October 7-8, 1999). WME-Arbeitspapier Nr. 9. (see attachment below)
Hans-Jürgen Andreß und Thorsten Heien (2000): Four Worlds of Welfare State Attitudes? A Comparison of Germany, Norway, and the United States. to appear in: European Sociological Review 17, no. 4 (December 2001). download under: http://esr.oxfordjournals.org/content/17/4/337.abstract
See also:
Morten Blekesaune and Jill Quadagno (2003): Public Attitudes toward Welfare State Policies. A Comparative Analysis of 24 Nations. Dowload under:
Kohl, Jürgen (2013): Hohe Akzeptanz des Wohlfahrtsstaates trotz kritischer Leistungsbewertung: Wohlfahrtsregime und Einstellungen zum Wohlfahrtsstaat im europäischen Vergleich. Download under:
Kind regards and good luck Detlef
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I am studying these enterprises as an attempt to understand how theoretically, these enterprises, conceptualised as occurring in developing society, differ from those occurring in western/developed ones. First, I want to contribute to the growing immigrant entrepreneurial literature, and also interrogate it. On the flip side of it, the study is also a contribution to south-south migration which is often difficult to find in the migration literature.
One key objective is to examine Nigerian migrants' propensity to self employment, but also I want to explore how their activities serve as continuity, or discontinuity/break to those pursued by their fore bearers in Accra. Of course issues about operational strategies and profiling will also be explored.
I will be interested in suggestions that point to appropriate methodological strategies including sampling, data collection instruments and analyses.
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The experience in Bolivia for studying informal migrant enterprises is not about "country to country" migrants, but "rural-urban" migrants. For applied methodology you must see the four books of ALBÓ, GREAVES y SANDOVAL: Chuquiago la cara aymara de La Paz. On that work they have also applied an oral-statistical methodology taking live an economical biographies from the migrants itselves for mesuring the time for having economical succes on self-employement, after the migration step and passing by different jobs before.
Best regards
Hugo C. Boero
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I am looking for an instrument to measure acculturative stress among Iranian immigrant couples who at least one of the couples is post-graduate student in Malaysia. It should be included all aspects of this risk factor, such as the death or illness of family members in absence of them in Iran, financial problems, academic problems, religious freedom problems, health problems, weather problem (such as the danger of Dangi), job problem, and problems with training the children in a strange environment/culture. Although I already found some, they don't sound to be suitable for my research. Would you please give me some help? Anyone knows any acculturative stress scale?
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A number of years ago, I had published,   Acculturative Stress Scale for International Students which was published in the Psychological Reports. This scale was used by several authors to conduct research studies on immigrants, theses, and dissertations.  I am attaching an original copy of this scale for your review and use. I hope you would find it useful.  Here is a reference to the original article,
Sandhu, D.S., & Asrabadi, B.R. (1994). Development of an acculturative stress scale for        international students: Preliminary findings. Psychological Reports, 75, 435-448.
Interestingly, my co-author, Dr. Badiollah R. Asrabadi was from Iran who became Dean of the College of Education.
Best of luck!  Daya Singh Sandhu
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I am looking for book or journal resources on the USA social history, specifically how immigration policy and vaccination/medical exams for immigration process have changed over time. I am interested in state politics and specific archival data documenting these shifts. Any information is much appreciated!
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President Barack Obama, in view of Congressional inaction on immigration policy, said that he would act independently of Congress to formulate and implement such a policy. He suddenly changed his mind and announced today that he would hold off acting until after November, when Congressional elections take place.  His fellow democrats do not want his immigration policy to interfere with their being elected.  You can find this information in any newspaper articles on U.S. national news of today.
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Could someone conceptualize the Decent Work framework with reference to the situation of developing countries like India whose comparative advantage in the global market lies in their cheap and depressed wages and labour conditions? I seek to understand this from the perspective of labour rights in developing countries for immigrants.
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Decent Work was a framework adopted by the ILO in the early 2000s. It looks for providing work with dignity to people. However, i often feel that the approach towards decent work in the developing countries in jobs like you mentioned limits it to earning two square meals a day. we need to broaden the framework and include newer goals that allows people to earn their livelihood as humans, not as a replacement for  costlier technology that we cant or wont afford. 
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I am conducting a research on the influence that the migrant experience has on increasing the risk of migrant farmworkers' children developing adulthood depression
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Depression and disability in seasonal and migrant Hispanic agricultural workers. Mazzoni, Sara E.; Boiko, Patricia E.; Katon, Wayne J.; Russo, Joan. General Hospital Psychiatry 29.5 (Sep-Oct 2007): 450-453
Objective: To examine the relationship between depression and disability in seasonal and migrant Hispanic agricultural workers. Methods: A total of 315 adult Hispanic agricultural workers living in northwest farmworker housing were interviewed to diagnose major and minor depression and assess disability. Statistical analysis determined demographic and clinical factors significantly related to a diagnosis of depression and examined the association between depression and disability. Results: The rate of major depression was 3.2% (n=10) and of minor depression, 6.3% (n=20). The sole demographic factor significantly associated with depression was female gender (P<.02). Controlling for gender, regression analysis demonstrated increased disability in those diagnosed with major and/or minor depression (P<.001). Those diagnosed with depression had a significantly higher mean total disability score [20.6 (95% CI 16.8-24.4) vs. 6.8 (95% CI 5.6-8.0)] than those without such diagnosis. Nondepressed subjects were significantly more likely (39% vs. 3%) to be completely free of functional impairment than those with depression (P<.001). Conclusions: This study confirms the known association between depression and disability and extends it to the seasonal and migrant Hispanic farmworker population. The severity of disability found in the depressed group was such that it could affect performance of agricultural work compared with that found in the nondepressed group.
In this paper the following methods were used: Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders Patient Health Questionnaire, World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II, Medical Outcomes Study
This paper may give you inspiration and you can choose other measures of depression and anxiety and the like.
 
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According to art. 3.8 of the directive 2008/115 "voluntary departure" means compliance with the obligation to return within the time-limit fixed for that purpose in the return decision. Is it right to use this notion interchangeably with the notion "voluntary return"?
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I have heard "departure" used far more often than "return" because "return" implies that the migrant is going back to their home country, which might not always be the case. "Departure" is ultimately what the state is requiring the migrant to do, regardless of where the migrant departs to.
There is also the issue of how voluntary departure works in practice. Often times there are significant pressures put on migrants to take the option of leaving voluntarily, so much so that it is hardly voluntary. I recently heard an advocate refer to "voluntary deportation" to describe how coerced these choices often are. Of course there are legal and procedural differences between voluntary departure and deportation, but from the migrant's perspective their may be few differences in the experience.
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Carrier sanctions
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Regulating Immigration Control: Carrier Sanctions in the Netherlands.
By: Scholten, Sophie; Minderhoud, Paul. European Journal of Migration & Law, Apr2008, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p123-147, 25p
pdf available on EBSCO
Member State Responsibility for Migration Control within Third States -- Externalisation Revisited.
By: Mc Namara, Frank. European Journal of Migration & Law, 2013, Vol. 15 Issue 3, p319-335, 17p
on EBSC is only abstract
Regards,
Agnieszka Parol
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This topic becomes increasingly important especially for Germany's rural areas. I would like to develop strategies based on the framework of institutional economy.
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...and here we are again... This paper is already accepted for publication, but not yet published.