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Students should evaluate the aesthetics (e.g. "this room is beautiful") of a working space / room and what they think would be their performance (e.g. "I'm very productive in this room") in this room, based on a picture (which they see in a survey).
How to measure the subjective aesthetics and the subjective performance (of a Person) in it?
Which are the relevant and up to date publications and thoughts on the topic?
Best,
Simon
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Hi Simon, you are pursuing a very exciting question. I'm not quite clear what exactly you mean by: measuring a subjective aesthetic of a workspace or the subjective performance of a person in a space? Are you concerned with an intraphsyciic evaluation or an intersubjective measurement?
Interesting could be perhaps the concept of interconnection and fusion of sensory perception in space. This can be explicated with the term (Media) Synaesthetics.
Media Synaesthetics is concerned with both theoretically reflected and fictionalized synaesthesia, with intermodal constellations, inclusions and disjunctions of the senses. Perceptual theories of aisthesis and (syn-)aesthetics have been stimulated to reformulate their concepts and terms precisely through their engagement with the arts and art forms. The artistic imagination, the creative imagination, has always used synaesthetic dispositions by using the media of technical images and sounds, but also the 'old' media of writing, painting and stage performance for a synaesthetic ars combinatoria.
The concept of media synaesthetics is designed to mark the medial couplings of the senses, that is: contours of a physiological media aesthetics. It is therefore no coincidence that the focus of the volume is on the orders of the visible, in particular the interrelations of image and sound - as a contribution to the "image anthropology" (Hans Belting), which is currently being elaborated on an interdisciplinary basis.
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I have packaged the new Caltech test set annotations provided by Shanshan Zhang in https://www.mpi-inf.mpg.de/departments/computer-vision-and-machine-learning/research/people-detection-pose-estimation-and-tracking/how-far-are-we-from-solving-pedestrian-detection/ to .vbb file format to use the evaluation code provided in http://www.vision.caltech.edu/Image_Datasets/CaltechPedestrians/,but I can't reproduce the same results reported in this paper " Towards Reaching Human Performance in Pedestrian Detection" .
How we evaluate models on Caltech test using the new annotations?
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The Waveform Model of Vowel Perception and Production (WMV, 2009) has achieved human performance multiple times. Below is a short list of achievements so you can suggest next steps.
1) WMV explains vowel perception, production, and perceptual errors (2009).
2) Presented human performance on the Hillenbrand et al. (1995) dataset at an Acoustical Society of America conference (ASA, 2011).
3) Presented human performance on the Peterson and Barney (1952) dataset at an ASA conference in 2014.
4) Achieved human performance on streaming speech (currently being prepared for publication).
5) Recent work has been focused on identifying concussions from h-vowel-d productions (preliminary results presented at an ASA conference in 2014).
As the only working model of cognition that has been successfully introduced into algorithms and achieved human performance on the most cited datasets in the literature, what additional points of validation should be next?
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In most of AI research the goal is to to achieve higher than human performance on a single objective,
I believe that in many cases we oversimplify the complexity of human objectives, and therefore I think we should maybe step off improving human performance.
but rather focus on understanding human objectives first by observing humans in the form of imitation learning while still exploring.
In the attachment I added description of the approach I believe could enforce more human like behavior.
However I would like advice on how I could formulate a simple imitation learning environment to show a prove of concept.
One idea of mine was to build a gridworld simulating a traffic light scenario, while the agent is only rewarded for crossing the street, we still want it to respect the traffic rules.
Kind regards
Jasper Busschers master student AI
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There are many research in the literature about virtual reality in wayfinding research. Some of them reported that HMDs increase the presence but affect spatial navigation task negatively compared to traditional desktop system. Others reported that HMDs increase presence and provides better spatial navigation performance. However, the technology they used are very poor in terms of resolution, field of view etc. I could not find any research conducted a wayfinding experiment by Oculus Rift. I'm curious about that using Oculus Rift in wayfinding research gives coherent results with real environments or not?
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Interesting Ozge Kumoglu Suzer
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I'm trying to find a reflective questionnaire for non-financial performance.
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I plan to design a research with pre-test post-test design with study performance as the dependent variable.
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Motivation and The Candle Problem
by Rhoads on August 13, 2013 in Motivation
Our world continues to move faster and is increasing in complexity. So what’s the best way to motivate people to think creatively and solve complex problems in a shorter amount of time? Let’s take a look at a study that examines this question.
“The Candle Problem” was conducted by Professor Duncker in 1945. Individuals are led into a room that has a table sitting against the wall. On it is a box of thumbtacks, some matches, and a candle. They are asked to attach a lit candle to the wall in a way that the wax won’t drip onto the table and to do this as fast as they can.
Many who attempted the test tried creative methods but were unsuccessful. Some took a tack and tried to pin the candle to the wall…but that wouldn’t work.
Others lit a match and melted the wax on the side of the candle and then tried to stick it to the wall …but, that wouldn’t work either.
Some, figured out that the real solution was to empty the box of tacks then tack it to the wall and place the lit candle in it.
Professor Duncker realized that people have difficulty in solving a problem when one element has a fixed function that must be altered. In this case, the problem solver has to be able to realize that the box is not just a container for the tacks, but that it can also be used to hold the candle on the wall.
To demonstrate this point, he repeated The Candle Problem again with new participants, but this time he placed the tacks next to the empty box. This time the problem solvers could see that the box’s function was not directly tied to holding the thumbtacks. As a result, virtually all the participants were able to solve the problem with relative ease.
The Candle Problem becomes even more intriguing when you add a monetary reward to the task which is exactly what a professor of psychology, Sam Glucksberg did in 1962.
Glucksberg took a set of new participants and split them into two groups. He told the first group that “the person to complete the problem the fastest will receive $150, and if you are in the top 25% of fastest times you’ll receive $40 (values adjusted for 2013 value).” To the other group he did not offer a monetary reward, but still asked them to solve the problem as fast as they could.
Then he split those groups up and half of each group faced the problem with the tacks placed outside of the box, and the other half faced the problem in the more complex way with the tacks placed in the box.
You’d expect that those who were given the incentive of money would solve the problem faster and in fact that is true when the tacks were out of the box. More of the participants in the group that was incentivized by money solved the problem and with faster times than the other group.
However this was not the case when the problem was given in the more complex way with the tacks placed inside of the box. In this case, those who were not incented by money performed better than those who were offered money.
Glucksberg found that adding the variable of competition for a monetary reward creates levels of stress that shuts down the creative thinking and problem solving areas of the brain.
This finding can have huge implications on the reward model that many organizations use today. Many organizations use an “if – then” motivation model, meaning if you do this, then you get that. While directly tying financial incentives in an “if – then” format to simple tasks can be effective, tying financial incentives in this format to complex tasks that require creative thinking will actually have a negative impact on performance.
This viewpoint was popularized by Daniel Pink in his book Drive where he unpacks the concept of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. The main premise of his book is that you when you hire people to do complex and creative work, you need to motivate them with autonomy, mastery, and purpose rather than the carrot of a financial reward. Pink is clear to point out that money is still very important…however for this type of work, organizations should pay their employees very well and not tie it directly to the result of their creative work because that would only decrease their performance.
So if you lead a team or are trying to figure out how to motivate people to do something, think about the type of task that is being completed and if it complex and requires creative thinking, understand that using money as a reward for performance on this type of work will actually decrease the quality of the work you are trying to incite.
Sources:
Drive, by Daniel Pink
The Cornell Daily Sun, “Solve this Problem, Receive $20”, by Steven Zhang
The Candle Problem – Wikipedia
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Dear @Şeyda Bostancı To me, motivation equals to inspiration plus directed action towards the aim. If anybody is accustomed to disclosing his aim before others, research has revealed that the person gradually loses his motivation towards his aim.
Best regards, AKC
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AI has already surpassed human performance in areas where AI was implemented. You'd question when AI will outperform human INTELLIGENCE? The answer is: Once Artificial General Intelligence AGI has been achieved.
Check out our forthcoming publication for more insights:
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Dear Researchers and Professors,
Trust you are good.
I'm a researcher at School of Computing at Dublin Institute of Technology and currently working on Human Mental Workload under Dr. Luca Longo (www.luca.longo.eu).  My research includes the use of Machine Learning in conjunction to the NASA-TLX and its features.   For this purpose, I have started to contact all the scholars who have done research with the NASA-TLX and collected primary data.  My goal is to collect as many datasets as possible from different researchers to build a data-driven model that considers a multitude of human tasks. I was wondering whether you can share with me your data. I am aware of new GDPR regulation for data protection and privacy and to stick with it, I am not interested in the names of the participants of your dataset, but only in their answers.
It would be of great help if you could provide us the following: 1. Dataset (anonymous containing only the NASA-TLX answers) 2. Which task/s humans performed during the experiment? (perhaps you have already published a paper which we will cite) 3. What was the task performance measure/s used (time/number of errors/etc..)?
I thank you in advance for your kind availability and I am sorry if I have caused any inconvenience. I hope you can help us with this challenging research activity. I look forward to hearing from you.
Raunak Renge and Dr. Luca Longo School of Computing College of Science and Health Dublin Institute of Technology
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Dr. Renge,
I am interested to share ours data related with NASA and the own NASA TLX data. I need before contact you to talk about our intentions and if your group can help us too.
I hope your answer.
Best regards
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I was thinking about what would be truly impossible problems in machine learning, even with unlimited data. I quickly taught of the well known halting problem, which is known to be impossible to decide.
However humans are in many cases able to decide the problem by analyzing code. While my initial instincts are that machine learning could never fully solve the problem, would it be reasonable to believe that it would be possible to improve on human performance?
After all any program can be converted to a turing machine which is a grammar. A sort of compiler can be used to build a meaning representation, which could then be used to train a machine learning application.
And could working on such problems allow us to study better models that incorporate some sort of reasoning capability?
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May not be possible I feel
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I understand that external factors like smell and colour of a room can affect the mood or performance of a person. But to what level is the effect ? Is there any quantitative measure of its influence.
Has anyone did a real life testing ?
Thank you
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Actually there are studies regarding the effect of conditioning place preference (CPP) via disparate environmental ques such as texture of a room, a redolent odor (natural pheromones for instance for certain animals or artificial fragrances such as a preferred food) or temperature, etc.
The underlying neurobiological and cognitive mechanisms of place conditioning or fear conditioning are plexiform and complicated. The perception of ques (visual or olfactory stimuli for example) becomes associated with the memory of an event (fear, reward,...) and becomes consolidated if repeated or if the intensity of the stimuli is significant. The model animals or rodents for example remembers (retrieval of the episodic or associative memory mostly in the hippocampal CA1 and DG) the good (rewarding) or bad (punishing) memory, and this would affect the decision-making via the strong connection and projection between hippocampus and cortical regions (e.g. PFC).
We have done a research in which we performed CPP by reward from drug-seeking and dependency:
Study on odor-conditioned rodent models:
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The curves of learning examine the quantitative changes in human performance during the acquisition of a certain skill can be expressed in the improvement of performance as a result of learning processes (through methods and methods of learning), when the learner attempts to access many of the correct learning of skill, these attempts can be expressed in A learning curve is a functional relationship between an independent variable (the type of practice and its amount, usually represented by the number of attempts) and another variable is the performance, the type of performance to be learned. Most learning curves show changes in the rate of improvement.
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I recommend the answer given by Houda Kawas. Best regards.
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Does our level of performance depend solely on these factors? Or are there other factors? 
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?=Random Factor (call it luck, if you will)
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The performance qualifier is described as what an individual does in his or her
current environment. Since the current environment always includes the overall
societal context, performance can also be understood as "involvement in a life
situation" or "the lived experience" of people in their actual context.
The capacity qualifier describes an individual’s ability to execute a task or an
action. This construct indicates the highest probable level of functioning of a
person in a given domain at a given moment, and to assess the capacity it is said that one would need to have a “standardized environment". But again, it has been mentioned that the capacity qualifier assumes a 'naked person' assessment, that is, the person's capacity without personal assistance or the use of assistive devices.
So what is measured in actual life situations, capacity or performance?
Eg: A patient walks 10 meters in 5 minutes using an AFO and walks 10 meters in 15 minutes without an AFO. What in this case is capacity and performance?
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Hello Shankar,
I would like to give my opinion too. I am a physiotherapist and I am writing a paper about differences among performance and capacity (applied for older people).
I think that for conduct a treatment and to evaluate patient's evolution, it is extremely necessary using capacity instruments. On the other hand, we can aggregate a subjective perspective (that can improve our treatment for patient's specific objectives), using instruments that evaluate self-reported performance and QOL of our patients.
There aren't a perfect recipe, we need to innovate every day and work in the best way to promote good rehabilitation experiences for them.
And another important point: not always capacity will be better than performance!! It is not a rule!!
Best Regards,
Etienne Duim
University of São Paulo
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I want to explore and measure terrorism impact on employees performance. What theories are related to terrorism and stress?  
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There is definitely a direct relationship between terrorism and work performance. Freedom from fear and freedom from hunger are the two constituent elements that determine the concept oh human security. This is universal. The employer may provide you freedom from hunger but he can not guarantee freedom from fear or  terrorism which is unpredictable and fleeting. This is most likely to cause stress . State of uncertainty would cause stress of highest order. This is a big challenge in this age of globalization and state of anarchy that is inherently part of international order or relations. Employee motivation would drastically fall. Routine institutional motivation instruments are likely to fail. So it should be tackled at the inter-civilization level, inter-state levels, inter-state level and intra-society level. 
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What framework or approach could be used by customers in order to evaluate the consulting assignment
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This is a really difficult question on how to measure the performance of a project in general. On this topic there in no concensus since there are hudreds of project metrics.
From all the metrics, closer to customer perspective are those related to project success such as
  • Benefits achieved
  • Value achieved
  • Goals/milestones achieved
  • Stakeholder satisfaction
  • User satisfaction
There is a very good book dedicated to PM metric,
Project Management Metrics, KPIs and Dashboards by H. Kerzner, John Willey and sons. It worths taking a look.
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We are looking for a way to assess "muscle damage" without an invasive method. Since muscle damaging protocols lead to increased biomarkers (e.g. CK, CRP,...), we need a method to proof that the impact of our exercise protocol induces a real local muscle damage, without taking blood samples. 
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what about the use of ultrasonography?
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Is there any scale to measure the performance of employees as well as the performance of the management in the organization. Is there any way or mean to measure the performance? performance and the efficiency are the same thing? any relation or co relation among performance, efficiency and effectiveness? honesty is performance or just ethics ? more amount of work responsibilities lead to more number of failures and less work burden having less chances of failures , so performance of person with more responsibilities is measured on which parameters?
How annual confidential reports (ACRs) of employees in public sectors could be replaced with performance appraisal system or any other innovative system that can replace ACR system?how and why its more appropriate / relevant? 
The top management in any organization are the key persons and they are the leaders .But  public sector's top management is not gauged and their performance is not  measured , no policy exits to monitor or control the performance of top management....its so strange as top management are the real leaders but there is no control over them....
I want to get all of you to please contribute with personal experience in this performance management system innovations and reforms ....
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Umer -
Having worked for nearly 37 years for the US Federal Govt in statistics and related applications,  I can tell you that one of the worst problems has been the pressure by the public and by some in 'upper management' to be 'more like private industry.'  I have seen many dedicated public servants doing very good work with little reward, while private industry might do any stupid and/or greedy thing to get ahead of their competitors this quarter, no matter the consequences later.  Before I retired last August, I worked in a US statistical agency where the head of the Office of Energy Statistics was formerly at Enron, and had repeatedly insisted we were not a statistical agency!  (I don't know that anyone knew what he meant by that.)  Obviously, no one should copy Enron! 
As for the goals of the organization, few managers seemed to understand them. But W. Edwards Deming found equally out-of-touch management in private industry, which seems as bad or worse now.
Regarding employee performance, everyone wants to say it is objective, rather than subjective, but that cannot be so.  The more complicated a performance rating system is made, in an attempt to make it more objective, the more opportunities there likely are to exploit the system. In places I worked where organizational goals were understood and striven to be accomplished most, the performance goals for each person were basically a formality.  We then did whatever creative things we could do to handle the challenges. However, by the time I retired, we were given more specific instructions and told that our ratings would be based just on those 'standards,' given at the beginning of the year. Handling any new problem that arose would not count. What kind of an approach is that!
Any large organization,  public or private, will have issues with which they may deal, not found in smaller organizations. But large organizations are often needed to solve certain problems or accomplish certain goals.  The key is both good managers and good employees, though in a scientific organization, I think management should be given less power, as a big problem is their lack of competence for decision making. To measure performance,  you have to understand what is good work and what is not good work.  Managers often lack the expertise to know. (Consider the work of W. Edwards Deming as evidence of the 'tip of the iceberg.') 
So performance goals should be made simple, just as a statistical model should not be 'overfit.'  One needs to be flexible and innovative.  A performance system should encourage this, not discourage it. Everyone should understand goals, and do what is necessary. More knowledgeable, less autocratic management would be extremely helpful.
Jim 
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The HRA is an approach widely used in the past for the assessment of the human factor in the safety of the nuclear plants. In your opinion, opportunely changed the models to evaluate it, is it possible to focus this method on the assessment of the stress in the production environment, using for example methods such as the system dynamics or others?
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I think that should be possible. There are probably already good adaptions for mantainance work in nuclear prower plants that has more similarities to "classical production" than the control room team operators work you probably have in mind.
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I have difficulties on finding research articles that tells about the relationship or impact of managerial/management expertise on org. performance. I hope someone can help me on this.
Thanks in advance and God Bless..
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Can you suggest good scales and questionnaires that measure academic performance or success with university students? 
And is there also a corresponding scale that measures performance or success in a workplace? 
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Most of, if not all, the administrations of universities will describe their academic performance as "great" & their students as "fantastic" but it is hard for scientific persons to "buy these goods". The academic performance & success of university students can be measured by "external" neutral sources. A typical university functions as teaching-research site with various percentages of the 2 activities & with eventual output of graduates in the production line. The qualities of these "human products" can be detected in the workplaces to which they have moved. Very simple easily-phrased "clever" questionnaires can be directed to the employers & few staff mates will throw the light upon the students to reflect the status of the university from which they have come. Also, the standing of the graduate students in interviews, pre-work tests, and postgraduate studies can also be part of its evaluation. In my opinion, it is one of the duties of the ministry of education to form independent committees to assess the universities regularly by following up the suggested measurements.
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What equipments do you suggest for the motor behavior or human performance LAB? (for psychological, motor control and learning and biomechanical factors).
Is there any other equipment(s) more valid than the Vienna test systems?
Would you separate your suggestion with each group?
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Dr. Mahdi, 
If you do have a huge grant to finance your laboratory facilities, you may want to consider a dynamometer (Biodex.or Cybex). Although the equipment is expensive, it will allow an objective assessment of neuromuscular parameters.
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I am working on flying and fatigue management of the crew members, in order to improve our fatigue countermeasures.
I’m looking for different military and civilian aviation regulations that are used in several countries to compare with our French regulations, and different tools that can be used to evaluate the fatigue of pilots and other crew members, before a flight in order to know if it's safe to let them fly, and after the flight. These tools must be quite easy and not too long, in order to have a good involvement of the crew members.
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I am strongly agree with the answers/discussions of Prof. Cyril Robert Latimer, Prof.Peter B. Walker & Prof.Thierry Carmoi.
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Writing assignment.
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Christopher Bergland. (2014). Chronic Stress Can Damage Brain Structure and Connectivity
Chronic stress and high levels of cortisol create long-lasting brain changes.
Published on February 12, 2014 in The Athlete's Way
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I need to do an experiment on auditory sustained attention task performance.
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You could use some of the software available, such as E-Prime (pstnet.com), or other experimental psychology software for stimulus presentation and data collection.
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Organizations require people with attributes like : ability to get along with people, intellectual ability, ability to perform under stress, and ability to foresee & be proactive.
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Thanks Tiia. I have gone trough Dr. Goleman's comments, which appeared in November 2011 regarding misinterpretation of EQ concept. I stand corrected on over emphasis on EQ which was erroneously interpreted by many people after Dr. Goleman's conceptual publication " Emotional Intelligence " in 1995.