Science topic

Human Factors Psychology - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Human Factors Psychology, and find Human Factors Psychology experts.
Questions related to Human Factors Psychology
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
1 answer
I require OFER for the study related to fatigue assessment
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi,
There is a link and you can write to the authors:
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
6 answers
Alternative to reaction time measurement using PVT-192 Psychomotor vigilance task monitor.
Relevant answer
Answer
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
4 answers
Please suggest me some journals for usability studies, especially for non human computer interactive products like water bottle, sanitizer container etc.
Thank You
Relevant answer
Answer
There is actually a journal called "Journal of Usability Studies".
Other journals that might be useful:
Applied Ergonomics
Ergonomics in Design
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
6 answers
I am interested in exploring the degree to which the typical distractions encountered in offices (e.g. overhearing irrelevant conversations, distractions in visual field) interfere with the typical types of tasks performed in those offices. In other words, I want to be able to predict how much the performance of Task A (primary work activity) will be disrupted by the concurrent performance of Task B (attending to, and trying to ignore, an irrelevant distractor).
I have previously come across Wickens' Multiple Resource Theory and its use as a computational model to predict dual task interference (e.g. Wickens, 2008), and found it to be a very useful framework for describing which cognitive resources are used for which tasks. However, I have only ever seen this applied in contexts such as interface design in visual tasks (e.g. designing cockpits for pilots). Is anyone aware of the application of this theory in more traditional workplace design?
Alternatively, is anyone aware of any other useful frameworks which might help me to predict how a particular type of 'knowledge work' will be disrupted by the presence of a distractor?
Relevant answer
Answer
Nadine Sarter at the University of Michigan has done extensive work in interruption management as well as multimodal displays which you may find useful.
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
1 answer
Stack Overflow advertises several official (https://stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask) and de facto standard guidelines (http://tinyurl.com/stack-hints) for writing good questions -- that is, questions that have greater chances to be resolved.
We built a statistical model to empirically validate this question-writing netiquette. The last step we're missing in our research is: What does the SO community think of these recommendations?
If you ever used Stack Overflow before, please help us find out by taking this very short survey: https://goo.gl/EzS3eN
Thanks for your contribution! 
EFFORT
The time to completion for the survey is about 5 minutes only (before June 21, 2017).
INTENT
This is a purely academic research project with no commercial interests. We will openly publish the results so everyone can benefit from them, but will anonymize everything before doing so; your responses will be handled confidentially. Please, note that you are not obligated to participate in the survey. If at some point during the survey you want to stop, you are free to do so without any negative consequences. Incomplete survey data will not be used.
A NOTE ON PRIVACY
This survey is anonymous. The record of your survey responses does not contain any identifying information about you, unless a specific survey question explicitly asked for it.
Relevant answer
Answer
The survey is no longer accepting responses.
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
3 answers
  • For example applying breaks
  • Preparatory behavior involved in it
  • role of automaticity and readiness
Relevant answer
Answer
If I understand the nature of your question, it seems possible that these automated actions are occurring essentially neurologically identically to the automated, and automatic, actions of walking.  As both involve movement and spacial adjustments maybe the brain at some point in the development of driving expertise starts treating them the same.  It would be worth a look anyway.
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
3 answers
I'm currently dealing with questions regarding the ergonomics of grass trimmers.
The analyis of hand-arm vibration seems to be well investigated.
Did anybody looked at the grip strength or muscular activity while using such machines in order to quantify fatigue? Thanks for any input on that.
Relevant answer
Answer
I recommend these articles of Prof. J. Malchaire (he is on the site of RG):
- J. Malchaire, A. Piette, T. Belem, Lundstrom R. (2001), Neurological and Functional Effects of Short Term Exposure to Hand-Arm Vibration, Appendix H3E to Final Report EC Biomed II concerted action BMH4-CT98-3291
- Malchaire J., Piette A., Cock N. (2001) Associations Between Hand-Arm Musculoskeletal And Sensorineural Complaints And Biomechanical And Vibration Work Constraints. The Annals Of Occupational Hygiene. 45, 6, 479-491.
- Cock N., Piette A., Malchaire J. (2000) Can A Battery Of Functional And Sensory Tests Corroborate The Sensorineural Complaints Of Subjects Working With Vibrating Tools? International Archives Of Occupational And Environmental Health 73, 5, 316-323.
- J. Malchaire, A. Piette and I. MullierI, VIBRATION EXPOSURE ON FORK-LIFT TRUCKS; Ann. occup. Hyf., Vol. 40. No. 1, pp. 79-91, 1996
 hope this papers will help you.
Good reading
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
6 answers
Hi. My name is Farzad Naghdali and I am a PhD student in Trinity College Dublin researching the field of Human Factors Engineering in the Process Industry. Currently I am conducting a survey aiming to collect information from industrial practitioners with respect to available standards and guidelines for Human Factors Engineering, with a particular focus on the design stage. I am looking for industrial practitioners in the process industry with experience of design projects where human factors were considered in the project to complete the survey. It is an online survey and will take less than 5 minutes to complete. Participation is voluntary and anonymous. Ethical approval for the survey has been obtained from the School of Psychology in Trinity College Dublin.
If you can spare a few minutes, I would really appreciate your input to the survey using the link below. I would also appreciate if you could share this link with any of your colleagues or contacts that you think are suitable participants.
Thank you.
Farzad.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello,
I have a background in in HCI / ergonomics but currently work as a researcher, not in industry. Please feel fee to contact me if you are interested in that particular target group as well.
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
1 answer
Human error frameworks are frequently used across a wide range of applications to drive design changes and the creation of regulatory measures. Despite the impact that human error framework studies can have, the field lacks a standardized method of training and proof of proficiency within human error frameworks.
Researchers at Oregon State University are performing a study to understand the current practices of researchers when training for the application of human error frameworks.
Research Study Title: Industry Survey of Training Methods for Human Error Frameworks
Principal Investigator: Dr. Ken Funk
Co-Investigator: Dr. Mei Lien
Student Researcher: Katarina Morowsky
Estimated Time to Complete: 10 – 30 minutes
If you wish to participate within the survey, please use the following link: http://oregonstate.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_etbYLnMwhdzNv2B
If you have questions about the study please contact Katarina Morowsky at (removed by admin)
Relevant answer
Answer
Sure, I can gladly support them in this investigation .
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
15 answers
It is possible to have a non-visual task that is cognitive, but I was wondering whether it was possible to have a task that was visual but not cognitive? Is this even possible?
It's likely that all tasks are, to some extent, cognitive. In that case, what are the some of the least cognitively demanding visual tasks?
Relevant answer
Answer
Depends on what you view as "cognitive", of course, but if it means processes that are 1. "controlled" (require executive attention, not highly automatic), 2. subject to visual short term memory/working memory capacity limitations and 3. relatively slow, then I would suggest that "pre-attentive" visual feature pop-out in a Treisman-type visual search task is a prime example of "non-cognitive" visual processing. 
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
3 answers
Hi all,
I'm in the early stages of analysing some observational data (using think aloud) for my doctorate. I'm investigating how clinical staff use image guided radiotherapy technology to make clinical decisions.
Essentially, the process involves reviewing a 3D image prior to radiotherapy treatment to determine if the treatment should be delivered on that day. Unlike other clinical reasoning scenarios there are often quite a few factors to consider but only two outcomes; treat or don't. If the answer is don't treat a decision is then taken on treatment modification (this is beyond the scope of my study).
Early analysis points towards them making fast decisions in the first few seconds and then checking the images in more detail to confirm their decisions. How quickly they come to this seems to have some link around experience and the department they work in.
This fits quite well with the dual-process model, but doesn't fit with models around diagnosis where there are a large number of outcomes/possibilities.
Does anyone have any thoughts or suggestions around this in the medical field and others? I was thinking it was similar to some scenarios in aviation where a pilot may have a number of options to consider on approach (wind speed and direct, diversion options), but essentially only has 2 outcomes: Land or go around.
Any thoughts would be really appreciated. I’ve just downloaded “Thinking, fast and slow” by Daniel Kahneman, so that’s some bedtime reading this week, but some thoughts on primary lit would be appreciated too.
Kind regards
Mark
Relevant answer
Answer
Thanks Peter, I'll drop her an email now
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
6 answers
I will be conducting a Delphi method study to ascertain the 20% most important factors from a list of about 50 factors from an existing model (HFACS, Supervisory and Organisational layers). As the respondents are all remote I want to run this via an online survey.
I have found an online Delphi package (http://armstrong.wharton.upenn.edu/delphi2/) which allows respondents to rank factors for importance. However, each rank can only appear once which means the user might scroll up and down the list trying to determine what is the next rank to be used, or when something else comes up, re-order the ranks which would be time consuming, increasing the risk of drop-outs.
I want to make the survey relatively quick to complete to maximise uptake but also want to make sure that I get the correct answers. The first pass of factors would come from an existing model rather than use free-text to determine the key themes as is the standard Delphi method.
Another method might be to use a Likert-type scale to determine the initial order of the factors and then get respondents to rank the output in the Delphi package. As the initial order should be the 'average', there shouldn't be too many changes when the first ranking takes place. However, re-ordering may introduce other biases!
Has any had experience of conducting such an online survey without using bespoke software? Or recommendations for Delphi software other than the one linked above?
Relevant answer
Answer
You can also review other software in the following links:
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
5 answers
I am a human factors PhD and trying to find an avenue to ask general human factors career type questions. But I can't seem to find anything.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Michael,
there are large numbers of Human Factors special interest groups on LinkedIn, many of which are member-sourced from international conferences and associations (although I might add that my experience is that they vary greatly in member engagement). I have had quite a few good conversations on HF/E subjects though.
I might add that depending on whether you're seeking HF career opportunities or general discussions, it might be good to join a mix of geographically local and international groupings, suited to your area of expertise and your career intentions.
Here's a list of them, if you want to scout around:
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES)
International Ergonomics Association (IEA)
Association of Canadian Ergonomists - ACE Atlantic Region
Belgian Ergonomics Society (BES)
Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors
Ergonomists Without Borders
Ergoweb Community
FEES
Green Ergonomics Special Interest Group
Human Factors
Human Factors professionals
International Ergonomics Association (IEA)
Irish Ergonomics Society (IES)
Macroergonomics
Nordic Working Life Research
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
3 answers
I am conducting a survey on Arousal pattern of people, for that I have chosen Thayer Activation Scale (AD ACL). Now I am facing the problem f its scoring and interpretation. Please help!
Relevant answer
Answer
Thank you so much Peter for your advice. I will surely contact Dr. Thayer.
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
2 answers
Dear all,
I have a question concerning the conflict model of decision making (Janis & Mann, 1976). The model suggests that stress is an important factor in understanding the decision making process. The level of stress depends e.g. on expected risks in the current and anticipated course of action as well as on time pressure. If there's an optimal stress level then vigilance as the decision making pattern will result. Vigilance is then assumed to be associated with e.g. a careful evaluation of risks and chances of different course of actions. Now, my question: According to the model, the evaluation of risks (and chances) determines first the stress level (see above) but is second also a result of the stress level. Why does the evaluation of risks appear twice in the model? I don't get it. Has anyone an idea? Am I wrong? I'm thankful for any advice.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Sonja,
Altough the work of Janis and Mann (1976) is quite seminal, modern neurobiological research on stress and decisionmaking rely more on unconscious processes rather than cognitive.
Peer
ref:
Payne, J. W., Samper, A., Bettman, J. R., & Luce, M. F., Boundary Conditions on Unconscious Thought in Complex Decision Making. Psychological Science, 2008. 19(11): p. 1118-1123
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
5 answers
I'm writing a report on a study where i am both researcher and participant.Thus, I am in need in several prior researches. Any information would be appreciated.
Relevant answer
Answer
There are a lot of researches on this topic.
I would suggest to start checking the work of the main authors in the field: Stephen and Rachel Kaplan, Hartig, Staats, Roger Ulrich, Korpela
Have a nice work!
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
7 answers
Can you please give me another related theoretical framework that should I consider?
Relevant answer
Answer
Pardon me for butting in here. I must, however, take issue with Andrew Rae's statement that risk homeostasis posits a constant level of risk. Risk homeostasis is not an outcome, let alone a constant outcome (reflecting a "natural risk set-point, a misconception widely spread by Wikipedia and related websites, as well a by others). On the contrary, risk homeostasis is a process linking outcome to a target outcome. The target level of risk is that level of risk that allows the operator (driver) to maximize the overall benefit of risk taking (time gain, economic benefit, excitement, competition, etc.)  The target varies, just as core body temperature that  is low in the early morning and high in fever, yet both low and high temperatures being homeostatically controlled. And just as the target varies, so does the outcome. The target level of accident risk is low in periods of an economic slowdown, and when operators are promised a bonus (incentive) for remaining accident-free. So risk homeostasis drives behavioural compensation (behavioural adaptation). It follows that the art of accident reduction (per capita, not per km driven) depends on the art of reducing the accepted level of risk in the driver population. The same holds for people at work. For more information you may check the website <riskhomeostasis.org>. Best regards, Gerald Wilde (wildeg@queensu.ca).
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
4 answers
I am trying to capture the reasons why incidents happen to divers using a validated human factors model. I have been doing this research outside of formal academia for a while, so am relatively well known across parts of the industry and have a level of credibility within parts of the population.
However, I recognise that the best way of getting a broad sample across the population would be to use the organisations involved in the industry to promote the survey on my behalf, but they do not appear to actively support my work.
As such, I have had to promote the survey myself through a number of social media outlets (forums, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and hard copy magazines and their webpages) asking for responses through an anonymous survey. I also know that I have had 1st and 2nd level network contacts promote the survey on my behalf because of who I am and the work I have done in the past.
However, there is a concern that I might be biasing my results by using self-promotion and those who know me may also introduce biases by selecting their population to promote to.
Fundamentally the community is sceptical of higher organisations introducing more regulation or legislation for what is a recreational activity, but because of the work I have been doing in the past, I have a level of trust as I do not believe that legislation is the answer, rather more personal responsibility. Crucially, I believe that if I used an independent data collection company there would be fewer responses (and would likely cost more than I can afford as I am self-funding this 5 yr research programme).
With all of the above in mind, I am trying to find evidence to defend my position: whilst the number of responses may be influenced because I am a credible researcher and have a positive reputation within the community, the specific answers as to why incidents have occurred will not be influenced.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Gareth,
What I think is that there is not a perfect recruitment method. Participants will be always influenced by something, such as money (if you pay them), length and type of survey and of course the researcher. If your sample is big enough, these influence should be minimized. Of course, be sure that the participant do not know your hypotheses, because they can answer accordingly. 
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
3 answers
I am working on small scale industries. Specifically the unorganised sector to find out the discomfort levels and risk factors for MSDs. I may also use RULA and REBA.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Syed
The VAS can be used. Tips are given below,
 For the assessment of overall discomfort rating a ten point psychophysical rating scale ( 0 = no discomfort, 10 extreme discomfort) may be used, which is an adaptation of Corlett and Bishop (1976) technique. Prior to the assessment of postural discomfort the subject should be anchored to the psychophysical rating scale. This anchoring may be carried on tread mill at forward speeds which are likely to be obtained during the test under actual field conditions. A scale of 70 cm length should be fabricated having 0 to 10 digits marked on it equidistantly. A movable pointer should be provided to indicate the rating. Trial of 2 h duration should be conducted and at the end of 2 h trial period the subject should be asked to indicate his overall discomfort rating on the scale.
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
7 answers
Currently only  looking at  measures of team mental workload. (no physiological or primary/secondary task measures)
The focus will be on the distributed team - the master, pilot, tugmasters and port control. . 
Looking for measure that would be fairly easy to use in simulator and real world studies of workload involved in ship navigation.  
The aim is to be able to measure changes to workload if, for example, a procedure is changed, new device is introduced, crewing levels change. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Have you read Cognition in the Wild by Ed Hutchins? Great book if you're studying the human factors of ship navigation.
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
6 answers
I am looking for examples of real-world tasks (e.g. jobs, situations, etc.) where habitual motor responses are a factor, for good or for bad.
For example, a situation where a simple motor task or response is performed many times in rapid succession, until it becomes 'automatic', and then when there is eventually a need to withhold from performing this task/response it is difficult to do so.
Any help would be much appreciated.
Relevant answer
Answer
If you learn to drive using a stick shift, you are very likely to hit the brake pedal when manoeuvering with an automatic, e.g. at  a car park. (You need to make sure your "clutch foot" keeps away from the pedals - this may take some effort at first).
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
8 answers
Starting next month I'm asked to evaluate a new pilot line in automobile production. Its all about break design. So when should workers take breaks and how long should they be? Is there any benefit in more short breaks? Do more breaks enhance the worklife?
To answer those questions we plan on using questionaires and measurement methods. What questionaire should we use? For measurements we planned on heart-rate before an after the break and maybe cortisol-values in the morning and in the evening compared to a control group?
Relevant answer
Answer
You might look at the SAFTE model http://www.ibrinc.org/index.php?id=112
and the fatigue avoidance scheduling tool. 
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
4 answers
I am shortly going to be constructing a survey whose responses will be based on the output of a Delphi Study (what are the most important supervisory or organisational factors within the HFACS model which influence negative performance at the user level).
The main output of the survey will be to determine why professionals (instructors or instructor trainers) with a supervisory or organisational role commit violations (routine, operational or organisational induced) within their role. By including specific examples of what happened and showing why, the outputs will identify those areas which organisations need to target to improve safety at the user end.
There are obvious biases that are likely to bubble to the surface, not to mention sampling bias, especially considering that safety culture will influence uptake. However, I am concerned about how to make sure that I get truthful answers from the respondents as without truthful responses, the study will be flawed.
I have some references concerning Social Desirability Scales (Fisher, 1993; Uziel, 2010; De Jong et al, 2010) but any personal experiences would be gratefully received.
Any examples of how to address the ethics of potentially compromising professional integrity would also be welcome, although the survey will be totally anonymous and I will not be able to track who the individuals are - which should go some way to alleviate concerns.
Relevant answer
Answer
This is a common difficulty in survey-based research. Two tactics have been in use for a while, and have been found to be successful to a degree:
Tactic #1 is to project the respondent's decision (which may be awkward, embarrasing, or in this case threaten professional integrity) onto a 'third party' in the same position. So instead of asking "Have you ever (done this under these circumstances)?", you can ask either: "Have you ever heard of a colleague (doing this under these circumstances)?" OR "Do you believe that any of your colleagues (do this under these circumstances)?". The Michigan Centre for Survey Research found that this removes the respondent from the "hot seat", and allows a more objective response.
Tactic #2 involves a softening-up approach that places the topic later in the Q'aire such that this topic is tackled when some relaxing of the R's defenses has taken place, and in a live-voice or face-to-face interview especially, some degree of 'trust' or rapport may have been achieved. Then the Q is approached by means of several 'lead-in' Qs to soften up the R's defences even further. Thus a first Q might ask "Do you believe practitioners are often tempted to (do this) even though it is unethical?" The next Q will ask "Have you ever been tempted to (do this)?" Then: "At that time, did you actually envision yourself (doing this)?", and finally: "And on that occasion, did you actually (do this)?"
Of course neither tactic guarantees that the R will completely reveal the truth, but it does improve the chance of getting closer to the truth than suddenly hitting the R over the head with a threatening item. After all, nothing is guaranteed in a Q'aire beyond eliciting whatever responses the respondent decides to give you at that time.
................................/ts
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
5 answers
I am interested to know whether: 1, you have heard of the social science approach known as facet theory, 2, have you used facet theory, 3, if you have used facet theory then how have you used this?
Relevant answer
Answer
The reason I suggested making contact with David Canter was that he was probably the most enthusiastic advocate and user of facet theory in environmental psychology. However, that was in the 1980s and 1990s. I am not so sure that it is used much now. David might know
  • asked a question related to Human Factors Psychology
Question
3 answers
Root cause analysis (RCA) is a common approach to adverse event investigation in hospitals. Small teams of clinicians and managers invest many hours in making sense of serious adverse events in their facility. Yet the final report produced as the main output of an RCA may be limited in its capture of the team's view and when fed back to the clinical area where an event took place, the event described in the RCA report is unrecognisable.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Bryce I have just done a critical analysis on 87 babies being born in poor condition or death. Some thoughts for you. One of the key findings is that the report is always done in retrospect of course, There are several things here: one is that the outcome is already known, so the questions are geared for hindsight bias to be prevalent; two that there has been time for the HCP (sometimes weeks or months in some of the obstetric cases) before an RCA is completed and therefore there is no control about intercommunication with other members of the team or cognitive distortion; three depends on the culture of the organisation, is it blame and shame looking for a scapegoat or is it learning from events; four because the event has already happened and actions are taken, yet another checklist is often put into place until there are checklists for checklists in some extremes; five I have found in this very in-depth and lengthy analysis that the conclusions always seem to be: more training, time of day, busy workload and poor communication are the key causes (consistent over a period of 10 years). So with all the extra training, communication practices etc that are put into place, adverse events are still not partialed out. Another key finding was that the investigation is often very top down and that brings with it often a lot of extraneous variables in the feedback processes.
It goes without saying that the way things are worded are key here and how the information is gathered whether it is at a formal meeting or informal chat and by whom.
Cheers
Sharon