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Human Ecology and Ecodynamics - Science topic

Past and present interaction between climate, climate change, culture and society
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The headline just appeared :
"ScienceDaily: Space & Time News
A break from the buzz: Bees go silent during total solar eclipse
Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT
In an unprecedented study of a solar eclipse's influence on bee behavior, researchers organized citizen scientists and elementary school classrooms to set up acoustic monitoring stations to listen in on bees' buzzing -- or lack thereof -- as the August 2017 total solar eclipse passed over North America. The results were clear and consistent at locations across the United States: Bees stopped flying during the period of total solar eclipse. "
This observation would seem to suggest that as global warming has progressed, and still does, then increasing days of cloud cover will reduce bee activity. Also that other pollinating insects may be involved and negatively impact on the human food chain. Not to mention arthropod food species predated by nesting birds. Intra-arthropod food chains may also likely be affected negatively.
These effects, if they occur, would seem most likely to be experienced during early growth seasons when cold and warm humid air masses will most frequently collide over areas of food production, and will have increased in the past 150 years and will continue to do so. Their effects upon human food supply will become immense as our global capacity to produce food drops below the global demand for it, and will proceed exponentially to a cube function due to the volumetric characteristic of increasing humidity.
Qu: Are there any bee studies which support the above proposition in relation to annual cloud cover variation bees, pollination, their population and related food yields?
The observation referred to in the headline was perhaps simplistic, in that it might lead some to imagine that it is the loss of radiation visible to the human eye which translates into suppressed appian activity, or that of other insects too. It is well established that the sense of sight, and capacity to navigate and find food, of different insects species involves a wider range of ranges of frequencies than humans rely upon. Since many parts of the emf spectrum may be selectively absorbed by atmospheric pollutant gases, vapours and aerosols the distribution of which are also likely to experience, though to us invisibly so, local variations just as does cloud cover then the true complexity and perhaps previously unsuspected breadth and depth of the negative potential of the real problem can be fully appreciated.
The consequence of this fact leads one to a generalisation of the proposal above to include all key species, species by species, and a generalisation of the question to include studies of all important pollinators.. flies, wasps and so on in relation to all possible human, and natural, atmospheric pollutants, constituents and chemically interacting derivative products.
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Thank you for this straightforward explanation. Though a full solar eclipse does simulate night-time for a period of time, 20 minutes or so. Cooler air temperatures are tolerated to some extent and are ameliorated by ground radiation, higher humidity also raises the thermal capacity of the air. It is not my field, and it would seem that the 'experiment' over North America was predominantly a stunt to encourage school science. I wonder if that can justify bad science? Rob
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Instead of living within the annual interest that biophysical wealth of Nature gives us, we are using up our natural capital. We are taking more resources than Nature/Earth can provide and  throwing more wastes and pollutants than that Nature can metabolize and assimilate. What are the impacts? What future is waiting for us? What should we do for restoring our ecological balance sheet?
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Dear Dr Kumar
There is no doubt today that a major dimension of the present multidimensional crisis, which extends to the economic, political, cultural and general social level, is the ecological crisis.  The upsetting of ecological systems, the widespread pollution, the threat to renewable resources, as well as the running out of non-renewable resources and, in general, the rapid downgrading of the environment and the quality of life have made the ecological implications of economic growth manifestly apparent in the past  years.
By contrast to the focus on wild places, relatively little attention has been paid to the built environment, although this is the one in which most people spend most of their time.Ecosystem destruction is already happening.
Humans destroy ecosystems. Our lifestyle creates pollution and we overuse our natural resources. Today,  We build roads, hunt animals, cut down trees destroying forests and just litter the planet . We waste resources that are not infinite and will soon run out, if we continue our practice.
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There is likely to be high level of disturbance towards lowlands as a result of proximity to populated areas and even across the elevational gradient there can be disturbance associated with grazing, roads, firewood collections, shifting cultivation etc. So, how to take all these anthropogenic factors into considerations while looking at spatial patterns of richness?
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What is the striking features  of the Anthropocene of North East India 
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Protected areas are used for a wide range of tourism and leisure activities, some of which focus on nature, while for others they provide a setting for recreational and sporting activities. Adventure racing events, e.g. trail running and orienteering, are increasing in popularity, and occurring with great frequency.
The literature on adventure racing has focused on the sociology of sport, health and nutrition of participants. There is limited information about the nature and extent of its biophysical and socio-cultural impacts.
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Luis, estou com minha orientada lendo e pensando em sua pergunta. Ela está iniciando a parte de campo do projeto dela. Em nosso caso ela vai trabalhar com os organizadores das provas e com os atletas. 
Pensando em off road entendo que as possibilidades de estudar os impactos são mais importantes pois os efeitos podem ser mais danosos. Como estou escrevendo em português seria melhor usar email. (teresa.magro@usp.br). Não temos uma resposta direta mas creio ser interessante conversarmos para ver o que cada um está fazendo. É mais fácil para mim escrever em portugues.
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I am doing doing a research on the composting of organic municipal waste (agricultural waste, roadside grass, wood chips etc) and I'm aiming to find out how to optimize the composting process, increase the nutrient value of compost by using nutrient rich waste streams (poultry/animal manure ashes from incineration process) or any other method to either produce a higher value compost or make the composting process more efficient.
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Fernando: I would suggest that you investigate the use of black soldier fly larvae (Hermetia illucens) in the composting of organic waste. I believe they are already being used on a fairly large scale (with pig manure) in Asia. Here in the US they use the "co-product from breweries, ethanol production, and pre-consumer food waste as a feedstock" for the fly larvae and the larvae, in turn, are dried and used as animal feed. The frass of the larvae itself can also be used as a natural, animal-safe fertilizer. See: http://www.enviroflight.net/.