Science topic

Hoof and Claw - Science topic

Highly keratinized processes that are sharp and curved, or flat with pointed margins. They are found especially at the end of the limbs in certain animals.
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Dear colleagues,
I'm an applied enotmologist employed at the State Office for Health and Social Affairs Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, N-Germany. One of the services we offer is to determine arthropods suspected to be pest species or parasites etc, collected by private persons or pest management professionals etc.
From time to time we receive Bethylidae too, in most cases people got stung before ...
The last speciemen were send a few days ago. It is a brown, wingless female, claws are simple without a basal hook, antenna 12-segmented. Regarding the keys available to me (Perkins 1976, Peeters et al. 2004, Azevedo et al. 2018, Sellenschlo 2019) it should be a Cepalonomia sp., probably C. gallicola? But the distal antennal segments aren't black – is this really a characteristic of C. gallicola? Unfortunately I'm not familiar with Bethylidae.
As far as I could find out C. gallicola is not recorded for Germany jet, so may my id is wrong.
So please have a look to the attached pictures, hopefully they are detailed enough to clarify the species. Please let me know if you should need other details/views ... if necessary I'll send the speciemen to one of you. (the cuticular surface was still a bit wet due to a storage in glycerine, before I've taken the pictures)
Thanks a lot for any comments or suggestions,
Kai
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Dear Kai,
this is indeed a female of the Cephalonomia gallicola aggregate, and probably of the nominate species that Ashmead (1887) described from Florida. It is a warehouse species with a global distribution. Specimens found outdoors in southern Europe however may form a separate taxon.
Van Emden (1931) found specimens instored malt in Halle and described the species as Cephalonomia caesarorum. Later he corrected the name into C. quadridentata Duchaussoy, which has been synonymised with C. gallicola. So the species is known from Germany and probably present in several entomological collections, where Anobiidae are its hosts. The colour of the antennae is variable and appears to be related to the size of the specimens. Study of the males can probably give some interesting clues.
With regards, Jeroen de Rond
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Dear tardigradologist, Could help me if this photo could be considered as an abnormality of claws in Milnesium?. I've 15 specimens and only two present this formation.
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Dear Gisela
Have you already done measurements? They are few specimens, but if there's an evident difference in measures (mainly pt's) you probably can think in a different species... Though I think is just abnormal... A really beatiful abnormality :) nice photo
Regards!
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Some of the Cambrian claws or tooth-like fossils are not well mineralized, but there are always black substances at their ends. What does the existence of such black matter mean? What does it stand for? Is it possible to conclude that the claws or teeth are very hard according to their existence?
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The tips of the claws of extant arthropods are often black due to the chelation of transition metals that cross link proteins. This also happens in other hard non-biomineralised proteinaceous structures like polychaete jaws. If you could detect the presence of trace metals in these claws you might be able to make a case that they were hardened structures. Some papers below.
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We have moved the horses of Paddock Sanctuary to different land over the last 4 years, dependent on the forage provided altered if the horses had mild laminitis, ie blood in the white line, and hoof heat. This current land we rent, is high in rye grasses, clovers, buttercups, chickweed, plantain ribwort, nettles. We have found by restricting the horses onto track systems and minimal grass, but ad lib non rye-grass hay forage, laminitic episodes reduced.
It will be interesting to see if you have included pasture findings as part of owner identifying issues.
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We tried meadow hay, but they are on ad lib hay and it vanished quite quickly. Mixed seeded hay takes them longer to eat. Well done with your laminitic. I think track systems for laminitics are a way forwards.
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Could anyone explain or direct me to relevant literature explaining why there is an absence of dew claws in the species. I've always been under the impression that dew claws played a role in increasing traction and reducing torsion on the rest of the foot and leg during locomotion, and am curious as to why this isn't the case in this instance, assuming that to be true.
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I wonder if it is just that the dew claw is simply a vestigial remnant of the evolution to a simplified, faster digitigrade gait. It has no function any longer and is simply lost in many wild canids and other fast running species.