Science topic

Historical Research - Science topic

Explore the latest questions and answers in Historical Research, and find Historical Research experts.
Questions related to Historical Research
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
4 answers
. What are the scientific foundations and methods that can be applied gradually and in the future in order to develop the mechanisms of historical research?
Relevant answer
Answer
سؤال مهم جاداً ..ويمكن اختزال الجواب عليه بالقول:
((أن النتاج الحضاري الذي تركته الفتوحات الإسلامية في شبه الجزيرة الإيربية هو الذي يحدد قيمة تلك الفتوحات
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
10 answers
Innovative methods in Historical research
Relevant answer
Answer
Academic, scientific, professional History is nowadays the set of social sciences studying the past. The epistemological changes in History are not coming from methods but systematic enlargement of sources, objects, and problems. We don't research History anymore, only relying on past public and private written documents, but we recall oral sources, iconographies, ethnographies, and several other materials. We are much more concerned about gender, minorities, marginal groups, workers, peasants, and all the social groups silenced by traditional historiography. We have been making a significant effort to fight ethnocentric, eurocentric, and all the diverse centric, essentialist and nationalist ideological perspectives of History. Nowadays, there is also a growing scientific investment towards global subjects, transcultural domains, and connective History. Since historiography was primarily dominated by national History, it is still the main framework of most Ph.D. theses, and global, connective, or transcultural studies are rare.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
4 answers
What are the scientific foundations and methods that can be applied gradually and in the future in order to develop the mechanisms of historical research?
Relevant answer
Answer
Foundations of scientific methods are experimental research with proper data and techniques.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
11 answers
Modern methods in Historical Research
Relevant answer
Answer
There is no method in science, there are several for each discipline, principles are principles and tools are tools, the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy hasn't entry for methodology, instead of this it is “scientific method” to draw documents in a particular direction, where you pull it there conveniently; there should be distinguished between scientific practice and scientific standards, principles, tools or ways to do it (methodology), certainly digital tools as impelling behavior in the way (method) that we are expected to behave; arguing against a “naturalistic” theory of empirical methods we depend on practice and experiments in order to be able to the assumption of knowledge and its “cognitive” standards leading to a more effective achievements, so to reach the reconsideration of the methodological rules to which scientist subscribe…
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
16 answers
Scientific methods in Historical research
Relevant answer
Answer
Nowadays, history (or historiography) is the set of social sciences studying the past. Therefore, historiography uses the methods of social sciences along with several techniques to fix, rebuild and transcribe historical sources, from written documents to oral testimonies, from heritage to archaeological vestiges, from iconography to literature and countless other remains from past civilizations and societies. It is key to differentiate history (historiography) from memory and even historical memory since these are very diverse cultural processes. In fact, memory realms as the names of our streets, squares, public statues, or national holidays are normally related to processes of nation-building and national commemoration, while historiography is the scientific conceptualization of the past, civilizational, social, economic, politic or cultural past. In consequence, historiography doesn't stress any moral, cultural, religious, or national values, but otherwise rebuilds and explains past processes. Historiography is not a moral "discipline" but a human and social science that, as anthropology, sociology, and others, describes and explains through conceptualization that is validate or invalidate throughout inter-subjective critical review and debate.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
10 answers
Research method
Relevant answer
Answer
The main problem and challenge is anachronism: using our contemporary values to research the past.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
6 answers
I'm researching concepts  as an operational tool, trying to use Deleuze-Guattari ideas. The objective is to use them in concrete historical research. 
Relevant answer
Answer
Hello Francisco,
I must agree with the answer up above that D&G refuse to consider subjectivity as a static whole, it is in constant production and becoming. You can look at What is ecosophy? by Guattari, the first chapter of Anti-Oedipus, section 11 of Gary Genosko's Guattari Reader, Ian Buchanan's introduction to his A Guide to Anti-Oedipus and Brian Massumi's extensive commentary to get a better grasp of their conception of subjectivity. But it is never clear-cut.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
6 answers
When investigating past events and in the case of more than one ("competing") explanation being given to understand a historical event, is it valid to apply Occam´s Razor? In the sense, not of choosing the simpler explanation (which I think is an erroneous interpretation of the use of the Razor), but of choosing the simpler explanation given that it explains equally well the outcome than more complicated, competing hypotheses.
For example, if historical subject "X" promotes event "E" to happen and two explanations compete:
1) "X" wanted "E" to happen
2) "X" did not want "E" to happen, but was somehow forced to make it happen.
And no final proof is available to choose between both explanations.
Can we reject 2) based on Occam´s principle?
Thanks a lot!
Relevant answer
Answer
I would argue that explanation in history is much more complicated. Basically, your argument is somehow similar to the rational choice approach in political science, while causal explanation in history must take into account contingency as well as path dependence. Usually, causal explanations in history are more complicated than previously thought. Explaining the behaviour of voters is generally less complicated than explaining events in a distant past.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
4 answers
Will you please share with me your ideas how to conduct a historical study on marketing research during the last 10 yeas and is there a similar study which can inspire me and what are the evolutions that marketing research knew during last decade ?
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
12 answers
I am looking for some literature that you can share with me regarding historical research design.
Relevant answer
In general terms, it is necessary to gather the scientific literature on the topic to be explored, placing emphasis on the terms occupational therapy and contemporary history of the Philippines, then an analysis of that literature should be made to establish limits and scope of your own research.
From this analysis you can determine the sources (field work, documentary research, interviews, etc.) and design your research project.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
9 answers
I am conducting a historical research about water management in Iran, and I need to know about these methods in order to better manage my work.
Relevant answer
Answer
The main scietific methods for conducting a historical review research: Historical Research Methods include-- carry out field work for data, draw up a proposal, then the reaerch itself and in writing do interpretation/explanation, ensure objectivity, source criticism and referencing.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
6 answers
Dear readers, I'm doing historical research (17th and 18th century) on the development of wine taste. Adding SO2 to wine was a very much used practise for different reasons. I would like to know what exactly happens with the yeast when you add SO2 during the fermentation stade of wine.
Relevant answer
Answer
This is not really a question for an historian to answer. You need to look at the standard enological literature for an answer to that question. Nothing very specialised but rather the manuals used for teaching Oenology 101 if you see what I mean. Other problem being how did your Dutch create the SO2 they "put in their wine"? The Roman practice was to burn sulphur strips in a container and then let the wine splash into the container so that it mixed with the sulphur fumes. When I was a wine producer I tried this technique which called for melting sulphur and putting a piece of cloth in it so it got impregnated. then it was set alight and suspended in the cask producing an acrid smoke. The practice was called "stoppinare" in Italian and was used more to prevent wooden barrels from acetifying when there was no wine in them but of course pouring wine in caused a certain amount of SO2 to combine with the same. In actual fact this method was an imprecise and difficult way to dose the results that seems to have been known thanks to empirical observation and can also be observed in medieval Italian wine treatises.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
20 answers
I am going to do a historical research in CDA on the role of language on staff's avoiding doing their responsibility. What is theoretical framework to do that? How can I collect date doing data. Thanks a million in advance. 
Relevant answer
Answer
I think such kind of work relates to a field study as identifying people avoiding doing their responsibility is somehow fuzzy. On what criteria can you pass a judgement on whether X is avoiding her/his responsibility or not? I could not get the point of doing an "historical" research, why historical?  
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
7 answers
"Transnational history”, an exploration into, in David Thelen´s words, “how people and ideas and institutions and cultures moved above, below, through and around, as well as within the nation-state” (David THELEN, "The Nation and Beyond: Transnational Perspectives on United States History", Journal of American History 86:3 (Dec. 1999), 967): I toy with an idea that the experience of the WWII governments-in-exile contains some elements of the "definition" above.
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Maria,
in mysterious ways I came back to this question today and I would like to ask you for some reading recommendations on Spanish government-in-exile. I have failed to find out much about its whereabouts during the Second World War and after. Feel free to recommend literature in Spanish if you do not know contributions in other major languages. Thanks!
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
5 answers
I have a list of 8 treatises starting from Bernard de Rosier (1436) to Conrad Bruno (1548). I am aware of later ones like de Vera, Mothe le Vayer, Wicquefort and Callieres but would like a comprehensive list. Thanks for any help.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
11 answers
I suppose that some speculation about the rat introduction and their infestation in the ships in XV-XVI Century  are published?
Crosby books dont talk about the topic.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hola Rafael:
Quizás en:
Pérez-Mallaína, P. E. (1992). Los hombres del Océano: vida cotidiana de los tripulantes de las flotas de Indias, siglo XVI. Diputación de Sevilla.
encuentres algo. Este mismo autor tiene algunos trabajos relacionados. Quizá te interese contactar con él:
Salud y mucha suerte.
Roberto
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
3 answers
I'm looking for sources that discuss American Indian student involvement.
Relevant answer
Answer
Some primary sources may be found on Calisphere (photos): http://calisphere.cdlib.org/item/4fb28b83090fe6eb91d938928fd62368/
Although there are no online items, the San Francisco Public Library has a substantial collection on the event:
Good luck in your research!
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
1 answer
I am looking for collaborators to study use of chemical history aspects in graduate chemical area courses.
Relevant answer
Answer
Yes ;that would help to transform our eduction systems
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
10 answers
I am studying the ways that Japanese and American history spoke of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. I read Japanese fairly well, but I'm struggling to find a large number of Japanese authors to talk about the atomic bombs. I wonder if someone in the group would have indications of books, authors and other types of sources that can help me.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi, I recommend a look at 原爆文献大事典 (2004). It meticulously lists works in Japanese related to the atomic bombs, from 1945 to 2002.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
8 answers
Does anyone know about any scholarly research on the Austrian Novara expedition, particularly in relation to art? Thanks very much in advance!
Relevant answer
Answer
Dear Jeffrey, 
I have been through all the materials you told me about within the last two weeks. It has been most helpful! Too bad there are no scholarly papers as such to use for my PhD. However, I found two references that you may find interesting: 
Irmline Veit-Brause, "The European Dimensions of the Austrian Novara Expedition," in Johann Pall Arnason, Natalie J. Doyle, editors, Domains and Divisions of European History (Liverpool, Liverpool University Press, 2010)
Veit-Brause, Irmline 2006, Sciences and commerce : the Novara Expedition to the Australasian Pacific 1857-1859, in Georg-Forster-Studien XI, Berlin Verlag A. Spitz, Berlin, Germany, pp. 373-406.
I cannot gain access to the last one, though. 
I will let you know whether I find out more!
Thanks a million again!
Sara 
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
1 answer
I'm travelling to the Russian military archive in Podol'sk soon and would be very grateful if anybody could give me any information on sources that might be there for Operation Kreml (the German plan to deceive the Soviets into thinking that the summer offensive would be directed at Moscow).
Relevant answer
Answer
Too recent for my area of expertise.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
3 answers
Doing research paper on how Rocky IV reflected cold war sentiments and the film's effects on public opinion regarding the cold war. Need this info for context.
Relevant answer
Answer
Well, first of all Rocky IV is a pretty dumb movie. I hope you got in for free. I'm a senior with my final semester coming up. I'm also a senior, 64 years old, a boomer. Those were Pres. Reagan's years in office, served two terms and got the bums rush out of office because of the Iran-Contra Affair. He was guilty but a very slippery politician. At that moment in history, America was bluffing the Soviets with very legal diplomatic B.S.
It was called Stars Wars,. It was driving the Russians into bankruptcy, along with their war with Afganistan. America backed the Afganis, costing the Russians too much in lives and rubles. Reagan's Star Wars put-on, a fake pile of lies making the US's abilities with technical weaponry seem almost magical, because it wasn't true. America drove in the final nails in Communist Russia's coffin. Their economic policies broke up the power of the communists. Reagan met with Michail Gorbachev for four summits. He finally signed a treaty marking the backing up, and slowing down of the worlds nuclear weapons. Reagan sold Americans a policy of economic spending and something called Reaganomics, more B'S. In his last meeting with the Russians, in Iceland I believe, The Russian diplomats thought Ronnie Reagan had gone nuts. The Russians came to do some real changing of nuclear  weaponry. Appearently he just kept on spitting out the old Rhetorical message over and over again.
No, Rocky IV didn't scare me at all. 
When I was five years old in 1955 , sitting all alone in front of our new black and white TV, the announcer, Walter Cronkite had me running around in circles when he showed the newest in A-bombs. The Hydrogen bomb. That still fucks me up. Don't reprint that. I was also in the Vietnam war. I'm a history major, could have graduated 3 semesters ago, but fell in love with English. Want to write a few things down before I leave. That's a lie, I'm not leaving. Changing shapes when the Singularity arrives. War is my specialty. You can thank Ronnie for bringing back major penalties for marijuana. People liked him, I didn't . I don't think he ever had an original thought. Sorry for going off on you. Sterling O'Hickey  
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
13 answers
I am interested especially those articles that could go further into the research methodology of historical floods.
Relevant answer
Answer
Hi Hrvoje,
in my profile i have differents papers of this topic.
Shortly, we publish a new paper focused on the methodology of historical floods from a point of view interdisciplinary (ie historical, hydraulic, hydrological and Meteorological).
Jordi
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
5 answers
Does the space where someone lives affect the way he/she understands and narrates his/her life?
Relevant answer
Answer
I just finished a review of a book that explores the marginalization of young men in a city in the country of Georgia. Martin Demant Frederiksen delves into both the temporal and spacial/architectural experiences of this group. Here is the citation for the book: Young Men, Time, and Boredom in the Republic of Georgia. Frederiksen, Martin Demant. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. 2013. x+200 pp., ISBN: 978-1439909188.
Frederiksen cites another work on the experience of space in an urban setting: Tim Edensor's book, "Industrial Ruins: Space, Aesthetics and Materiality"
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
44 answers
Written and iconographic sources might be from Portugal, Brazil, Spain, Africa, or others.
Relevant answer
Answer
I don't know if it can be useful, but in original classical tradition mermaids were creatures half woman and half bird, only later associated with snakes and then fish, then in some way similar to the figure of Quetazlcoatl. In addition, although I do not know associations between the Virgin of Guadalupe and the mermaids, those relating the Virgin of Copacabana are well known (http://cdigital.uv.mx/bitstream/123456789/1877/1/199076P125.pdf).
Another element to consider is that already in Europe the figure of the Virgin condense a set of pre-existing elements of the female deities (Isis, but also others) and that coming to America it found new meanings not always associated with those that have evolved in Europe, where the mermaids, in the Middle Ages, had become a symbol of lust, but also, especially among northern seaside communities, has been used to illustrate the two natures of Christ.
Another interesting thing is that ancient Aztecs believed that water was the domain of a goddess called Chalchiuhtlicue. Today they represent her as a woman with long hair and a fish tail like a mermaid.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
26 answers
The digital humanities have created a lot of buzz in recent years. They change the way we do research, communicate with each other, and share our findings. Working mostly with Arabic source texts, computerized text analysis is still a bit tricky and has often created more problems for me than it solved. More than that I have become aware of and come to treasure the format of the academic podcast.
There are a number of podcasts with usually a very high quality, as far as my knowledge goes at least. To name just a few:
It is great how these formats offer an introduction to general as well as specialist issues. However, apart from their educational and entertainment value, is it possible, yet, to make use of such formats in our work as well? To speak frankly, is it possible to rely one's research argument on statements from a podcast?
I ask this question specifically with respect to historical research questions and with regard to the podcast as a new form of secondary literature, not as source material for media or social studies.
What do you think? Can we integrate such audio presentations in the same way as we refer to talks and lectures given 'in the real world'?
Relevant answer
Answer
I do agree with both my forerunners. Technically it is even easier as to quote a lot of other web-based contents as it presents information in linear form, so that you can quote it exactly by running time minute/second (and of course all relevant information on the website you got it from). As to the reliability of the contents packaged within the podcasts in question, this should be judged the same way as every other source - if used as a primary source, does it apply to your research questions, is it indicative of broader trends, does it capture unique attributes of what you want to get into, etc.; if used as secondary source, check the persons involved, where, how and why it got published, any interested parties, and so on. There is no basic problem arising from the 'digitality' of the format. Would you ask the same question about, say, a BBC radio feature? Just because it's on the net it's not out of science. This seems to be a kind of categorical anxiety of many who shy away from web-based content (no offense meant!), that there is some mysterious essential difference between 'the web' and 'the real world' which invalidates the contents of each one for serious use in the other. This is just not the case. The world wide web is just another part of our real world, nothing more, nothing less; it is here, it won't go away, we have to find ways to deal with it as well as with the other parts of the real world we are longer used to, for example, as in the present case, radio.
  • asked a question related to Historical Research
Question
4 answers
These directions are two distinct trends or the same?
Relevant answer
Answer
I am unsure as to what you mean by directions of digital history? Are you referring to the ways in which historians use technology to display/publish history? The history of computing is a distinct field like the history of technology. - computing history would be a sub-topic under the history of technology. Whereas digital history is the task of using today's technology to publish history in any topic. My school has a digital history M.A. Program where we not only learned about the ways in which to utilize technology to allow history to reach a broader audience but maintain its scholarliness (not really a word but could not think of another) but also the history of digital history. We discussed the newspaper, books, computers, the Internet, films, documentary, and of course historiography. It was a great program. Let me know if any of this helps or if you can clarify perhaps I can give you a more accurate answer.
Michelle white