Historical Anthropology
Science topic

Historical Anthropology - Science topic

History of Anthropology, "the most scientific of the humanities, and the most humanistic of the social sciences."
Questions related to Historical Anthropology
asked a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
Interesting post on Savage Minds regarding Jared Diamond's contributions to anthropology and our understanding of humanity...
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
73 answers
I am looking for comparative cases of societies that live primarily on the products of horticulture AND fishing, from any region and any time period, anthropological, archaeological or historical. I know that such a subsistence pattern is somewhat rare, but I would like to know more about those rare cases.
Thanks!
My idea is a little tricky, maybe? The Australian aborigines are not supposed to have had horticulture, but formerly fishing in the paleolakes and hunted. On the other hand the Yam (Dioscorea alata) originating from Papua Newguinee  must have been planted in Australia as otherwise it could not have come and spread there in the middle or late holocene?
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
21 answers
In many countries, reading is reportedly declining, we read less and less books, which is reportedly related to the development of information media on the Internet. Perhaps the development of social media also contributes to the declining readability of books.
I have a favor to ask:
Please enter the title of the book on literature you read last time?
The autobiography of Ingmar Bergman ”The Magic Lantern”. To get to know intimately the great Swedish filmmaker in his 100 anniversary of his birth. Highly recommended for film lovers
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
27 answers
If i apply the ethnography as my principal method.
Dear Yngrid, in the last decades, history (or historiography) became mainly the set of social sciences researching the past, thus mobilizing methods from the social sciences. Ethnographic methods are quite common in cultural history, but the main difference with anthropology still is time, the past. Therefore, historical anthropology (it is correct to say anthropological history) will use ethnographic methods to research the cultural, symbolic, religious, ritual, etc. past of societies, communities and groups, while a social anthropological approach will be a research in the present of a society, community group searching for societal, sociability, social mobility and other social subjects from the cultural perspectives and practices usually researched by anthropology. An anthropological historiography approach will focus on processes from a long-term perspective while social anthropological research will focus on contemporary settings, contexts and social reproduction.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
3 answers
the data and books are extinct on the website can you help me 
engrjaffarkhan@gmail.com send me at this mail
the course outline is ::::
35. Title of the Course: Architecture & Town Planning
Credit Hours: 3 + 0 = 3
Specific Objectives of course: To understand ancient and modern form of living. To impart knowledge related to planning and development of inhabitant areas. Course Outline: Architecture: Historical Development. General introduction to history of architecture; Emergence / Development of Islamic Architecture. Geographical, climatic, religious, social and historical influences. Architectural beauty. Qualities: Strength, vitality, grace, breadth and scale. Factors: Proportion, colour and balance. Use of Materials: Stone, wood, metals, concrete, composites, ceramics. General Treatment to Plan of Buildings: Walls and their construction; Openings and their position, character and shape; Roofs and their development and employment; Columns and their position, form and decoration; Moulding and their form decoration; Ornament as applied to any buildings. Town Planning: Definitions; Trends in Urban growth; Objectives of town planning; Modern planning in Pakistan and abroad. Preliminary Studies: Study of natural resources, economic resources, legal and administrative problems, civic surveys and preparation of relevant maps. Land Use Patterns: Various theories of land use pattern. Location of Parks and recreation facilities, public and semi-public buildings, civic centers, commercial centers, local shopping centers, public schools, industry & residential areas. Street Patterns: Lay out of street, road crossing & lighting; Community planning. City Extensions: Sub Urban development, Neighborhood Units, Satellite Towns and Garden City Urban Planning: Issues related to inner city urban design and emergence / upgradation of squatter settlements. Recommended Books: Dan Cruickshank, Sir Banister Fletcher's A History of Architecture, Architectural Press; 20 edition (September 25, 1996) Leonard Benevolo; Origins of Modern Town Planning, M.I.T. Press, 15-Aug-1971 Sir Rymond Unwin, Town Planning in Practice, FQ Legacy Books (December 31, 2010)
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
5 answers
The object is ~23mm in diameter and weighs 7.3g. It doesn't react to a magnet. It has a stippled surface and was recovered from a housing complex at the Hellenistic site of Jebel Khalid in Syria. Dated around 3rd century BCE. Unfortunately, I cannot analyse it chemically, as it's now lost. Grateful for any suggestions!
Sometimes ferric oxide collects on the exterior of abandoned in ground insect nests. Any organic materials decompose, leaving thin hollow ferric oxide orbs.
asked a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
I would like to know more about your research with the aim of studying the possibility of sharing information, papers, and perhaps in the future, to develop research together.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
8 answers
Currently, physical differences between east Africa and west Africa.
For a start, a critical race theoretic perspective would cast doubt on the underlying premise of the question itself. Critical race theory starts from the foundation that race is a social construct, and is not underpinned by any consistent biological differences. In other words, since both 'black' and 'African' are socio-political, historically-rooted and cultural constructs, physical/biological differences are unlikely to be statistically consistent. CRT would be more focused on the socially constructed and ideologically productive character of 'West African black men' vs. 'East African black men'. Would anyone like to point to contradictory paradigms or evidence?
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
2 answers
The cancer risk from barbecuing, however, seems to be real, but there must be a difference in applying the heat. With charcoal you have reductive conditions and with wood and an open burning fire (visible flames) there is a lot of oxygen available.
Dear Michael,
many thanks für your estimation. I think it is similar to the situation of reducing fat and accelerate consuming sugar.
With best regard
Michael
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
6 answers
I'm using Ulf Hannerz's Cultural complexity (1992) as first source. Hannerz quotes the works of Poddar; Sinha; Sarkar; Sastri; Kopf; Nag; Mukhopadhyay; all in the period 1969-1979. Anybody is aware of other important or more recent studies? Thank you
Dear Francesco, I share with you the very few materials that I have in archive on your topic, thus modestly hoping that they can be helpful. I remember several decades ago that my professor of History of India used to talk on the "Bengali" (as he label it) Renaissance as a kind of personal heroic movement cored on Rabindranath Tagore that I read with surprise. Then, he compared the movement with the Italian Renaissance. It was beautiful and enthusiastic, but today would be probably regarded as too "Eurocentric" to say the least.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
3 answers
I'm actually studying glass ampoules and others glasses to understand the chronology of a leprosy hospital in Brazil.
 Rhuan,
I would suggest looking on-line at the U.S. and International patent offices. This can be difficult, but it will give you specifications and dates when patented for specific ampules/vials. Also, here is a link to the U.S. Patent Office page on types of ampules. A company that I used to work for did archaeological work at the Carville leprosy hospital in Louisiana in the 1990s. I do not know if the report has information on ampule history. I do not have a copy of the report, but I will see if I can find one. Good luck.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
23 answers
I need any precedence research which use Symbolic Interactionism as an approach in methods or as paradigm, especially in cultural-spatial field.. Or any of its implementation in research. Thank you for anyone who shared aby info of it.
I found a book (downloadable) related to symbolic interactionism here: Symbolic Interactionism and Cultural Studies: http://book4you.org/book/1104299/bad741
Best,
Hiep
A researcher
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
115 answers
I am most interested in hearing from men who wear ties their primary motivation for doing so. What made YOU decide to wear a tie the first time you decided you must? What was YOUR primary reason? Please be brave and honest ("painfully" truthful ... even if it was only because your mother or wife commanded you to do it ... as it was in my own case)!
"It is only shallow people who do not judge by appearances. The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible." ~~~ Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891; Oxford University Press reprint, 1998:18)
"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.” ~~~ Antoine de Saint-Exupery [quotation kindly supplied by Andras Bozsik]
A researcher
To be traditional, show conformity. Look more distinguished. Inspire confidence. In certain occupations/positions/occasions a must. A President at a State of the Union without one? Not going to happen. A father at the wedding of his son or daughter? Good idea. Diplomats? Almost always. Also, men continue to wear one because they believe that it gives them an air of intelligence and authority greater than they would otherwise have. Besides, as mentioned here already, its professional - and many women, believe it or not - like it.
O.K. so you have been told you have an aneurysm in your brain which can burst and need a neurosurgeon. So you are sitting in this guy’s office and he walks in, not with surgical scrubs, not with a jacket and a tie or just a dress shirt and a tie……but with a short-sleeved Hawaiian shirt. The only problem is that you are not in Hawaii. Now, does this neurosurgeon’s garb inspire confidence? Do you feel lucky.............
“Most respondents were correct by stating that the cravat is the forefather of the present day tie. Men continue to wear one because they believe that it gives them an air of intelligence and authority far greater than they actually have. If a tie gets you the job, it says a lot about the people who hired you.”
                                                       -Jim Reilly Hamilton, Hamilton Canada
A researcher
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
3 answers
We are trying to analyze the changing "recognition" of the Norwegian merchant war sailors during/after war.
The philosophy of recognition is a interdisciplinary field of knowledge and we are looking for studies within a historical perspective. 
A researcher
I am not sure if it is philosophical if "interdisciplinary" and "historical" co-exist.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
1 answer
Managing Historic Fabric with Regeneration Approach.
DOWN TO EARTH SOCIOLOGY INTRODUCTORY READINGS,  BY JAMES M HENSLIN, 9TH EDITION. I GOT MY COPY AT BORDERS BOOKSTORE 
IBSN# 11D 3498113 122209
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
11 answers
I am aware of part of Borget’s drawings published in his book 'La Chine et les chinois, dessins exécutés d’après nature par Auguste Borget et lithographies à deux teintes para Eugène Ciceri' (Paris, 1842). I have already collected all his drawings for the volume of Emile Daurand Forgues, "La Chine ouverte; aventures d'un fan-kouei dans le pays de Tsin, par Old Nick Ouvrage illustré par Auguste Borget" (Paris, 1845). I also know Borget’s paintings in the museums of Macau, Hong Kong and Singapore. However, it seems that is "Chinese" drawings and watercolors exist in other museums as probably in several private collections. In fact, his famous close friend, Balzac, refers to Borget’s works on China that he presented in several Paris “salons” and his generous gifts of drawings and watercolors to several leading French figures at the time. I am trying to gather as many as possible copies of Borget’s drawing and watercolors, mainly made in Canton and Macau between between 1838 and 1840. Thus, any clue, reference, collection, auction, web source, picture will be most welcome and a generous contribution to my research.
Dear Yoshio Kusaba,
Many thanks for the pictures since I didn't know one of them which means that Borget works on China were quiet important in epochal Europe, precisely prior and during the first Opium War.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
32 answers
I am analysing the impact of migration on Namibian families, however I realise that in the academia there is not much clarity (or at least it is not clear to me) between the concepts of family and households which in many cases are considered as one. I am under thte idea that particularly in an African context the difference still exist. Any suggestion is welcome 
Thanks Jan
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
3 answers
Historians
Inge,
You are welcome. I forgot to mention why I noted the new loading scheme. Apparently prior to the 1850s they were stowing the cattle throughout the hold. This is suggested by the "new method", which reduced stress on the cattle by placing them nearer the centerline of the ship, thus reducing the pendulum-like swaying in rough seas. Also, I did not mention that the larger livestock was placed in movement-limiting pens in order to prevent them from congregation on one side of the ship and thus creating a dangerous weight shift.
I will continue to look into this because it directly relates to some of my research. Additionally, I was highly disappointed just recently at purchasing a recommended book by Alfred W. Crosby (1986) entitled Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900. While the book goes into the colonial release of livestock into the New World and other locations, it does not specifically talk about these new frontiers shipping livestock back to Europe, which was what I was hoping. It also did not say how livestock was transported to new locations. Nonetheless, you might want to see if it is available in your university library.
JAG
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
21 answers
I am writing a dissertation on reconstructing memory of post confilict situation of inidgenous communities in northern Uganda. I want to explore in this dissertation  on why the indigenous communities draw symbols of the myth in memory and reconciliation process.
Nelson,
I am not classically trained, but symbolism in western thought, Mircea Eliade especially is insightful.  The suggestions made by Ivo Carneiro de Sousa and your comment that the myth is "acted in rituals and [p]oltics" may need some dissection; such separation might reflect what its "function[al]" , as Estibaliz suggests, within the social reality of the northern Ugandan tribe and the associated myth that now finds some current political expression. 
For example a mid 19th Century forced migration of five indigenous nations or tribes in the US might be used in the current context of witnessing other contemporary indigenous migrations; such witnessing may lead to further recall or ritualization of a more ancient migration myth (originating from the same region) for the same peoples as a reinforcement of identity for survival, even if the current political conflict, in the US or back in the context of Uganda, is settled favorable or disfavorably for folks those involved in the US or in N. Uganda. 
Another example is the annual dances in Guatemala in which indigenous Maya dress up as Spanish courtesans and soldiers and perform a ritualized dance  recalling the attempts at conquest of their own peoples, despite the fact that they are still present and recalling the events from that time.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
8 answers
I am searching publications about the construction of the nationalistic imagined community in cataluña and the role of the language in this construction.
Hi Klaus,
I think it can be useful a paper titled "Landscape and national identity in Catalonia", written by Joan Nogué and Joan Vicente, published in Political Geography (vol. 23, issue 2, pp. 113-132). It provides a very interesting perspective about the question, connecting historical facts with landscape and cultural meanings.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
4 answers
I am interested in case studies as well as literature dealing with the topic on a more general level...we just started a research based on archive materials (census, surveys) and are looking for some inspiration and exchange...
Thank you SO much to all of you! Actually there is a special problem in specific regions of Hungary (that Slovakia was a part of at that time) in this period, leading almost to extinction of the population of several villages, some authors call it a "Kuriosität in den Anallen der Demographie" (Ildiko Vasary). In my opinion this specific one-child system is not to be considered as a part of the classical demographic transition in Europe, that´s why it is so interesting. I also think in this case foremost the anthropological theories and comparison with other parts of the world might be suitable. In any case, the literature and hints you all suggested will be definitely very useful, thank you!
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
12 answers
See above. 
If there is an orang-australopith hypothesis (Jeffrey Schwartz?), it's wrong according to anatomical evidence (see e.g. my Hum.Evol.papers).
Sivapith, Lufengpith, Gigantopith & probably Ankarapith are probably pongid (Asian great apes), but australopiths are hominid (African great apes-humans), although both groups (pongis // hominids) probably partly evolved in parallel, e.g. African // Asian apes got longer arms & hands, longer iliac blades, larger canine teeth.
Whereas both hominids (incl. ausralopiths) & pongids (in //) generally became more apelike, one hominid branch (Homo) took a very different evolutionary direction, evolving much large brains, external noses, much longer legs etc. (probably during the Pleistocene, when archaic Homo dispersed intercontinentally along African & Eurasian coasts & rivers, see file attached).
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
70 answers
Because environment was becoming colder and ecology turning to grasslands unfavorable for the later hominoids and hominids
I am happy that my question has provoked good reasoning and it is nice that we are  opening up our hidden viewpoints without biases since most scholars remained polarized.
During 22-27 June 2014 I attended the Tautavel palaeoanthropology conference organized by Prof Henry de Lumley during which I raised the question of Sehlanthropus to Prof M. Brunett- the founder. He with his popular open laud voice rejected all other the views on this genus and regarded it a definite  'hominid'. If it is so, where the common ancestor of Pan and Australopithecus if the latter has evolved in African continent. Then I raised the question of the LCA, but he avoided the answer.
John Grehan  with Jeffery Schwartz has been the champion of the Pongo-hominid closest  ancestry rather the Pan-hominid. I also arrived on similar conclusions in my publications of 1985, 1988, 1990, 2007, etc. although not referred by these renowned palaeoanthropologists. However, this view is diametrically opposite to the popular view and scholars of African schools have not even entertained this thought.
But, John has raised another interesting point that Australopithecus has had no African ancestry. Then where?
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
4 answers
Particularly with regard to humans migrating out of Africa and perhaps transporting useful plants with them which then establish elsewhere along early routes. It seems that there is a global similarity between plants at the Family and Genus level which are associated closely with archaeological sites world-wide. Could this be due to anthropogenic transport, not necessarily with intent? For instance, seeds eaten in food remaining within the gut, or carried as food (possibly dried), and deposited at a new site where the germinated plant establishes, grows, then is moved along further after becoming productive much later?
The Polynesians deliberately took crop plants with them and dispersed these across the islands of the Pacific Ocean. An article on this can be found here: http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/29/11/1226.full.pdf. This was a very deliberate act and quite late in human migration history. This was probably not unique in human history and did happened on other continents much earlier, probably as early as the advent of agriculture, if not earlier.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
4 answers
Historic places and public memorials are designed to make the nation visible, to embody this feeling of belonging to the same social group. As they are an invitation to public history, they celebrate a sort of civic covenant. Have you had the same impression the last you visited such a place?
Avebury, a Neolithic henge monument containing three stone circles, around the village of Avebury, Wiltshire, in southwest England. It is less known, but larger and more impressive than Stonehenge, which has become very tourist orientated. Archaeology is my husband's area of expertise, not mine, but he has shown and explained to me some very inspiring reminders of our past.
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
2 answers
I am interested in the fashion that the UN is infiltrating the governments of many of the world’s nation states and engaging millions of people in conversations about climate change, social justice, climate justice etc. The vehicles for this invasion are the UN approved Non Government Organisations (NGOs) many of which are, IMHO, already mature autonomous, autopoietic, systems.
If you have read my material you will recollect that I am not addressing the humans involved but their conversations. Prominent actors are the utterances of such well-established institutions as WHO, FOE, WWF and others who employ and disseminate narratives about the evils wrought by humans on other humans (exploitation) and on nature, (depletion of resources and carbon emissions that supposedly are condemning the planet to a heat death) and who dismiss the concept of the individual and assert that of the collective.
These conversations are now on a scale comparable to that of the Church in Mediaeval Europe.
I would welcome opinions about this conjecture.
Thank you. I worry about Agenda 21 New conversations emerged from the Rio Wolrd Conference both top-down (Heads of States) and bottom-up (NGOs recognised by the UN). This seems to be a self-exciting loop - statesmen seeking to green-wash their images and NGOs seeking snd getting political power. A worrying combination!
answered a question related to Historical Anthropology
Question
11 answers
After initial review of an article, the review team asked to strengthened the theoretical background of historical and anthropological development of Rohingya community in Myanmar.
I am a bit confused ! Who has generous advice to offer?
It depends on whether you wish to carry out a full grounded theory research analysis or an analysis followed by biographical evidence. If you want to follow the first case scenario, then one must follow the transformative paradigm ideally by carrying out interviews and carrying out an intense analysis of the text of the interviews in this case using in vivo coding. This has to be bolstered within the paradigm of constructivist/interpretativist paradigm which implies a mixed research methodology exercise within the sphere of qualitative ethnographic research.
The other option will be to follow the constructivist/interpretaivist paradigm and analyse transcriped first-hand accounts in which case one has to fit them within a context. In this case the accounts have to be studied within the overarching cultural milieu within which a community resides and thrives. One will have to define specific behavioural patterns and how these fit in within the legal culture, and customs of the studied community. It is important however, that in this case the us and them approach be used so as to carry out a comparative cultural analysis. I am of the opinion that one must consider the theories of research analysis discussed and used in the field of legal anthropology. Good luck!