Science topic

Hispanic Americans - Science topic

Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.
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Feeding practices include pressure to eat, food as reward, and restriction
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The following RG link is also very useful:
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My main independent variable is a dichotomous, moderator is the Race variable (Hispanics, Non-Hispanic Black, Non-Hispanic Asian and Non-Hispanic White (ref)) and outcome is also a dichotomous. I have created the race categories into dummy variable except the reference group. I am doing an adjusted logistic model and added the interaction term using SAS. Should I include all the interaction terms (independent*Hispanics independent*Non-Hispanic Black independent*Non-Hispanic Aaian) in one model or in 3 different models? My result is significant for Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Black. How should I interpret this?
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Your race variable is multi-categorical. To include it in a single model as suggested by David L Morgan, it should be represented with k - 1 variables through dummy coding, where k is the number of categories or levels. For guidance on the procedure and interpretation, you could refer to chapter 10 of Hayes’ (2018) book, referenced below.
Hayes, A. F. (2018). Introduction to mediation, moderation, and conditional process analysis: A regression-based approach (2nd ed.). The Guilford Press. https://www.guilford.com/books/Introduction-to-Mediation-Moderation-and-Conditional-Process-Analysis/Andrew-Hayes/9781462534654
Good luck,
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Hi All,
In the past I have always coded so that I have Non-Hispanic Black, Non-Hispanic White, then South Asian, Native American, etc. However, I find more and more people respond as both Hispanic and South Asian, Native American, etc. My dataset is small (n=33) so I wasn't sure if it I should code as 2 or more races or if they should be counted independently as South Asian and Latinx. If you have code in SPSS that you could share that would be also appreciated!
Nahima
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If Pieterse is correct (and I believe that he is) then cultural and ethnic hybridity will increase as immigrants in vast urban centers intermarry.
For example, one of the young men in my study (Gryskiewicz 2020) has an Austrian father and an Ethiopian mother. The young man self identified as Ethiopian American. Another young man has a Nigerian father and Romanian mother. He refused to choose an Ethic racial identity (ERI) because he was discriminated by Europeans and Africans. He would only identify by brith city saying, “I was born in Vienna”.
Moving forward, I wonder if Pieterse’s term Cultural Mélange would work as a classification to indicate people from mixed backgrounds?
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Somos parte de la Sociedad Lationo-Americana de Ecología Humana. Estamos intentando encontrar expertos que trabajan en esta área para unirse a nuestro grupo. Envianos un e-mail.
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Hola!
Soy parte de SOSOET (Sociedad Chilena de Socioecología y Etnoecología) donde hay muchas personas trabajando en la interacción humano-naturaleza. Puedes contactarnos a traves del mail coordinacion.sosoet@gmail.com
Saludos!
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In collecting demographic variables, I do not need a specific scale? correct?
I can make my own stuff such as: marital status (Married, Single, Divorced, Widow, Domestic relationship), occupation (Full-time, part-time, unemployed), race (White, Hispanic or Latino, Black or African American, Native American, American Indian, Asian / Pacific Islander, Other), gender (Male, Female, other), caregivers' relationship to the recipient (Daughter, Son, Spouse, Daughter/Son in law, Other), Caregiver’s age (18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, over 55), overall health (Poor, Reasonable, Good, or Excellent), years of providing care (1-3, 4-6, over 6), number of children under 18 years old (0-1, 2-3, 4-5, over 5).
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Thank you so much for your help! I will try to revise the list and make it more concise.
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I am interested in connecting with others engaged in documenting your work on this Census which is the first time it has ever been online. i work mainly with Florida immigrants and my preliminary work on our project points to a great deal of resistance to participating. Other research shows that Latino children are the largest undercounted group. This is not good for funding prevention programming and/or educational interventions. What are your experiences?
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No idea brother
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Assume you have a categorical variable such as race (1= Black 2=white 3= Hispanic 4= others) and a dependable variable income. suppose I want to know how education affects income based on one's race, and I am only interested in knowing how education interacts with two races, and not the other race categories. Is it okay if I created binary variables such as race1 race2 race3 race4, and compare for example race2 compared to race1, with only an interaction of race2 * education as in 1 below ( race one as a reference category) without doing the same for the other categories? Or do all other categories need interactions too (as in equation 2) even though my interest is only race1 and race2-education variable interaction?
1. Y = race2 race3 race4 education race2* education
as opposed to :
2. Y = race2 race3 race4 education race2* education race3*education race3* education
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Thank you so much John. I'll do the Lr test and see what works best.
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We are looking for manuscripts measuring 4-compartment body composition in African-American and Hispanic-American youth and adults. What about other races/ethnicities outside of the United States?
We performed a systematic review and only identified about 175 articles across ALL races and ethnicities, and are surprised there aren't more. We are a little worried that we haven't found them all.
Can we get some help?
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Bingo, I don't think there is much out there, but it could be my own ignorance. Thanks Matt Schubert!
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I have a list of 19 questions that I can provide. I am conducting a qualitative descriptive study - and have incorporated the Hoover-Dempsey & Sandler Parental Model (2005)
My research questions are as follows:
R1. How do Latino parents of elementary students describe their experiences with the IEP collaborations and process?
R2. How do Latino parents of elementary students describe their role during the development of the IEP collaborations and process?
R3. How do Latino parents describe the factors necessary for active, meaningful, parent participation during the IEP collaborations and process?
R4. How do Latino parents describe obstacles to meaningful, active, parent participation during the IEP collaborations and process?
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Mark D Soucy - Thank you very much, I have sent you the questions via email.
I appreciate any feedback you may have.
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America's educational system is in crisis. According to the research, 47% of high school students in America's 50 largest cities drop out of high school before graduation. Of the remainder, 20% leave high school with a fifth grade reading, writing, and math competency or lower!
Twelve years ago I had suggested that American colleges and universities needed to provide more opportunities for Hispanics, Native Americans, and People of Color to earn doctoral degrees in business. Although 53% of doctoral candidates in business were minorities at that time, very few of those doctoral candidates were American-born minorities. The attached paper documents that a hybrid doctoral program in business schools could be implemented that would be profit generating while enabling students to continue to work full-time.
Why have American colleges and universities failed to address this important social policy issue -- especially when we are now in a knowledge-, wisdom-, and information-based economy and so many of those who drop out of high school desperately need role models? In today's difficult financial times, why are business schools not seeing this type of revenue generating opportunity as both financially wise and socially important?
CC
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I agree with your views, Cam. It's a vicious circle for HBCUs because they face two difficult challenges: lack of robust funding and inability to recruit the best students.
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I am finish my first book draft o the subject... Enjoyed Becoming Bicultural... great help!
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No, I do not have that right now. Thanks for the tip. I'm really looking forward to your book! In America pluridity is much bigger than in Germany - so your book can certainly help a lot. Thank you for your help.
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I have considered the doleta.gov for my study, but it is not Hispanic specific. Therefore, the variables for questions will cover all migrant workers, although the Hispanic makes 80% of the total migrant farmworkers. Any idea? can I still use the same data from the doleta, or look for new dataset for Hispanic migrant farmworkers?
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Dear Judith Faustin-gabriel,
In my opinion, look for a new dataset for Hispanic migrant farmworkers?
Best regards,
Nikola
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Geneticists have made risk assessments of developing Alzheimer's by age, gender, and APOE genotype. Christensen et al. (2008), in "Incorporating ethnicity into genetic risk assessment for Alzheimer disease" have further refined the assessment by ethnicity but only between African American and White. Has anyone also incorporated Hispanic/Latino ethnicity into a risk assessment by APOE genotype?
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Hi Etienne!
Here you have many references about studies on ApoE4 in Latin America.
Hope you find it useful!
Best
Josefina
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I am not a speaker of Spanish, but I teach media and am wondering about the dialect or accent of Spanish used in Spanish language media across the United States.
Is it based on the version of Spanish spoken in the region where the media outlet exists? Is there an overall preferred accent (like Midwest English is the preferred American English accent)?
What form of Spanish should a "Spanish Media" academic program in the US teach?
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I would doubt there to be one "preferred" dialect or "accent" because the hispanic population in the U.S. is incredibly diverse. The image that I attached to my reply is from the webpage whose link is separated below and shows origin statistics from hispanics in the US.
With regard to these statistics, even percentages like 3% need to be taken seriously because of the sheer volume of Spanish speakers in the U.S. (52,000,000 as of 2014, meaning Mexico is the only other country in the world with more Spanish speakers; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_where_Spanish_is_an_official_language).
There is likely to be a diversity of national origins and dialects within Spanish-speaking media outlets that is fairly representative of the nation at large. I say this, however, with one caveat. Some regions have many more people from certain origins. For example, most Cubans are in Florida, there is a high concentration of Puerto Ricans in New York, and there tend to be higher concentrations of Central Americans in large cities or near the gulf coast (https://collagegroup.com/2015/04/14/differences-spanish-dialects/). This could--and this is only conjecture--make it so that although Mexican-origin hispanics make up about 64% of all U.S. hispanics, there may be a percentage of Mexicans working in media outlets incongruent with this 64%. I say this because most media outlets are in larger cities, so I would semi-confidently venture such to be the case in places like New York and Florida, at the very least.
Why do I bring this up? I brought it up in order to highlight the diversity of origin/heritage in U.S. hispanics as well as other factors that could make Spanish-speaking media reporters even more diverse than a simple across the board look at the U.S. as a whole would seem to suggest.
With all of this in mind, however, and despite the origin/heritage of any given reporter, there most likely exists--and is currently evolving/being defined or led by big media players such as Univision as Mahmood pointed out--a sort of standard Spanish that reporters will gravitate to just like there is a very particular way for English-speaking reporters to talk.
All in all, I really doubt there is a "preferred accent or dialect" for Spanish language media beyond a striving for a the most neutral and universally intelligible dialect a reporter can muster.
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Michael Cole
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Dear OA,
I am not exactly clear about what the real content of your question. Which/what is the topic that you are interested in?
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Dear Dariuze,
We have the project to go in Colombia this year...
And for me it is interest to know if you canhave any material from  volcan Fuego & volcan Santiaguito ?
Both very active in 2016 ? 
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Dear colleagues,
I supposed you find many  species with different characters & you described many new species... I think in the zone of volcan's activity the microevolution can be more present.
Marpha
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There has been plenty of research regarding the plain facts and statistics asked in the question, but I have yet to encounter any information regarding the underlying reasons for these prevailing statistics and facts. Sure, one could gather that an underlying fear of racial minorities, especially those living in poverty, makes their crimes seem worse than other minorities — but does research exist to corroborate these statements on people's popular opinion?
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Good question, You have several ways to look at this.
First of all, let's look at the issue of race & crime. Just focusing on Criminal Homicides, blacks commit roughly the same number (actually a bit higher) of criminal homicides as whites (FBI-Crimes in the US). That in itself demonstrates how easy it for the skewed perception in your question.
The issue here (and in the other index crimes) is how does a minority match and surpass the majority in criminal events? You cannot ignore the influence of gangs and the gang culture in this issue. Minorities are extremely over represented in gangs and gang activity. That's not saying whites aren't in gangs, they are, but not at the same rate as blacks and hispanics. Most of the juvi tried as adult crimes are Murder, Robbery, Felony Battery, Habitual Felon and Sexual Assault. 4/5 of those are acts heavily used in gang activity.  
Of course Plea agreements are always on the table and can allso have an effect. Money (attorneys) and cultural aspects (levels of cooperation) can be used to lower/raise the chances of adult charges. 
I have not run into any consistant source to separate the gang activity charges from the regular population. The Justice Dept (Bureau of Justice Statistics) and the FBI give access to their reports/research which could help you in this issue. Numerous sources (like the Suntimes in Chicago and the Baltimore Sun in Baltimore) have homicide trackers which can give you snapshots of those jurisdictions.
Unfortunately this topic gets extremely political very fast. You are going to have to work hard to avoid that.
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I am looking for information on the quality of high school education of the LRGV, specifically with teaching the Hispanic culture. I hope to find information such as evaluations done in schools. I would really appreciate the help. Thank you!
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Dear Elizabeth,
Teaching the Hispanic culture as you know is not part of NCLB and therefore I do not think that there will be any studies on this particular issue except in critical literature. I would look into the works of Richard Delgado (U. Alabama),  Glenaba Martinez (U. New Mexico), and also Nancy Lopez, (U. New Mexico). 
Below is a final report on education in general of the LRGV and in there you will find some data on Hispanic education.
I hope this helps.
Douglas
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We are studying the origins of the literature during the colonial period or better called Viceroyalty of New Spain, but we are discussing which of the texts are better to produce an identity of the habitants of the region.
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Throughout the colonial period, this region was inhabited by an ethnically diverse population, so several kinds of identity may be found in the literatures of New Spain. The indigenous peoples of much of this territory had an ancient literary tradition combining oral traditions with systems of visual notation, ranging from pure semasiography (the recording of ideas with a complex system of visual signs, straddling the fuzzy border between western categories of "art" and "writing") to mixed systems combining semasiographs with glottographs (in which linguistic units like morphemes and syllables are represented). This tradition continued throughout much of the colonial period, gradually loosing ground to alphabetic texts (in native languages, Castillian or Latin), in many of which we may find robust expressions of native identity, along with adaptations of western literary genres. Most of these texts existed only in manuscript form during the colonial period, some in conventual libraries where they were read and copied, others in native communal archives, where they were used to construct collective identities and as instruments in legal struggles. Many were published in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. For an overview of the native literatures of New Spain, see the appropriate volumes of the Handbook of Middle American Indians, including the more recent supplementary volumes. I have posted some studies on my ResearchGate page that relate to your question, especially regarding native literary traditions.
Literature produced by Europeans in New Spain and their criollo descendents is another story, interwoven with the latter. Some of the more famous texts have been mentioned on this thread. For early examples, see México en 1554 and Crónica de la Nueva España by the Spanish scholar Francisco Cervantes de Salazar, who came to New Spain to head the Royal University. By the mid-18th century many texts exhibit a strong sense of criollo identity, traditionally considered as a precursor of Mexican nationalism; see, for example, Bernabé Navarro B., Cultura mexicana moderna en el siglo XVIII (Mexico: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 1983).
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I am searching for a self-report inventory to measure the Latino cultural value of simpatia. This value has been defined in the literature as emphasizing positive behaviors (e.g., friendliness, politeness, respect of others) in agreeable situations, and de-emphasizing negative behaviors in conflictual circumstances. Implicit in this definition is an avoidance of conflict.
I have some degree of fluency in Spanish, so I am also open to receiving information about Spanish language articles and measures.
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¿Is this a "Latino" value, or is it a universal cultural value, shared by people everywhere who like to have a good time as they live out their lives?
I have met "personas simpáticas" (substitute an equivalent phrase in any other language here) just about everywhere I have managed to wander over the last half century or so.