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Heteroptera - Science topic

Heteroptera is a suborder of HEMIPTERA, called true bugs, characterized by the possession of two pairs of wings. It includes the medically important families CIMICIDAE and REDUVIIDAE. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
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For most Heteroptera ethyl acetate is a good killing agent. It doesn't damage the insect and keep it relaxed for easy pin or glue. In the case of Miridae ethyl acetate sometimes dry and shrink the last antennal segment. Is there any good alternative killing method for Miridae which keeps them relaxed for pinning but doesn't leave damage?
Thanks,
Assaf
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A jar with torn up laurel leaves makes a good killing method for most insects but I can't say for certain it will have no effect on the last antennal segment of Miridae. Put about 1 cm of torn laurel leaves Prunus laurocerasus in the jar with a cm of tissue paper on top and fit an air-tight lid. The laurel gives off cyanide. Laurel bushes vary in how effective their leaves are. If you can't smell marzipan after half an hour, it probably isn't giving off much cyanide. As well as killing, the specimens will be relaxed and can be stored like this long term. You just need to change the laurel when it is exhausted. I don't think Portuguese laurel Prunus lusitanica has the same property.
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Specimen presented on the photo comes from Cape Verde. I suspect Thyanta sp.? Is it correct?
Best regards
Grzegorz
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Hi again.
OK, thanks for the response. I'm not an entomologist but an ornithologist and amateur botanist. I don't know well the invertebrates of the Cape Verdes...
Best regards rom the Canaries.
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Hi,
I notice that oppose to many other Heteroptera, Sciocoris move their antenna fidgetly. I assume it related to an antennal sensory organ. Does anyone know why does it do that and if I can expect to fine any unique structure on its antenna compare to antenna of other Heteroptera which doesn't act like that?
See example to antennal movement in attached movie.
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Dear Assaf Nir
This effect is also observed in other insects.
I can assume that this is related:
1. When the insect is frightened: by chemical irritants or in case of danger to life.
2. It is possible that an individual examines a new stop using antennas.
Regards, Sergey
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I found an Hereoptera male and looking for its female in the field. Is there a specific method to lure and capture true bug females through keeping its male in the trap? What is the cue for luring specific sex in Heteropteran insects? Any specific trap designed for it?
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There is an article, but it is in Russian
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Hi colleagues
I need the reference: Maldonado Capriles, J. (1990). Systematic catalogue of the Reduviidae of the world (Insecta: Heteroptera). Caribbean Journal of Science.
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Thanks, regards
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I'm not looking for the original descriptions but some updated revision, at least at regional level.
Thanks a lot.
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Hi Dimitri!
thanks for answering.
I hoped some work had escaped me, but you confirm me the poor situation I knew!
Cheers
Franco
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It looks like an Europiella alpina at the head, antennes and legs, but the membrane reminds me of Macrotylus or something similar.
It can be found in Lucena, Córdoba, South of Spain.
Photo reference:
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@luisvivas It should be Badezorus signaticornis. Best regards, Barış Çerçi
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Please help with ID.
18.06.2017 Ukraine · Kharkiv prov. (49°51'28.31"N 36°49'09.00"E).
I guess it is Tingis (Tingis) grisea Germar, 1835.
The bug has been swept from Artemisia, Linum, Helichrysum, Eryngium, etc. on sands.
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Many thanks!
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Hi,
I am looking for a publication showing parameres of Nysius thymi and Nysius ericae. In Pericart 1998 (Faune de France), I found only drawings of genital orifice. Do you know about some works showing it?
Best regards
Grzegorz
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Thanks Boris :)
Best regards
Grzegorz
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Hello,
I am looking for a good ID key for nymphs of North American Pentatomidae. I found great keys for adults and even eggs, but nothing really satisfying regarding nymphal instars. Could you suggest good papers and/or websites or attach any related key to your answer?
I really appreciate any help you can provide!
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See
Herbert et al.  Field Guide to Stink Bugs of Agricultural Importance in the United States and
Paiero et al. 2013- Stink bugs of Ontario (Can Journ Arthropod Identif),
both free on the Internet.
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Can anyone send me specimens of Graphosoma lineatum lineatum (Linnaeus 1758) collected in North Africa (Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco)? 
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Dear Paride,
I was in 1998 in Marokko but did not find Graphosoma. Did you already contact Christian Schmidt in Dresden (christian.schmidt@senckenberg.de). He is the curator for the large collection of Reinhard Remane (Heteroptera and Auchenorrhyncha), who was many times in North Africa.
Best regards
Wolfgang
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In literature, are there on butterfly larval web true bugs that performed both coprophagy on larval droppings and predation of caterpillars? in different stage of life cycle?
Please, give me some suggestions/papers.
Thank you for your attention,
Manuela
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Dear Manuela,
There is also a paper for a shift in the host spectrum of hosts of th einvasive insect in Europe, Corythuca ciliata. There is an inscect normally feeding on plane trees by sucking the leaves and/or the fresh bark. Workers have found it drinking the blood of many people (by DNA analysis of the blood found by crushing many insects). I quote the passage from th etext of Tallamy et al. [Journal of Chemical Ecology (1999) 25:1987-1997] [.. .Mafra-Neto and Jolivet (1994) report seven species of lace
bugs (Tingidae) and plant bugs (Miridae), and one luperine chrysomelid beetle,
Diabrotica angulicollis, eating the cantharidin-rich hemolymph oozing from the
joints of disturbed Epicauta aterrima, a large meloid beetle from Brazil...].
Another recent paper:
JAMA Dermatol. 2015;151(8):909-910. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.0577
Dermatosis Caused by Blood-Sucking Corythucha Ciliata
Arezki Izri, MD, PhD1,2,3; Valérie Andriantsoanirina, PhD1,2; Olivier Chosidow, MD, PhD4,5; Rémy Durand, PharmD, PhD
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By the end of winter, I'm interested in comparing the species diversity and density of 3-4 sites. The areas are all riparian, so the ground is not all the time flat.
For the moment I have planed the following design:
  • 3 samples per site (near water, 2 m and 4 m from water)
  • each sample in a plastic bag
  • hand searching in the lab (it's time consuming but seems to be more efficient in collecting the bugs from the samples) 
I'm still thinking on sample size (in many papers is usually one square meter) and how to choose the sampling site in order to be objective.
Suggestions / comments / or any other collecting protocol are gladly welcome. 
Thank you!
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Hello Ioan:
There are two standard sampling leaf litter methodologies used in comparing species diversity and density of soil arthropods. You can use Winkler  bags. Winkler samples are an efficient method of sampling leaf litter arthropods. The method involves sifting bulk samples of leaf litter and rotten wood by agitating them vigorously in a bag above a coarse mesh screen. Litter arthropods are concentrated in the finer "siftate" that passes through the screen. Arthropods are then extracted from the siftate by a passive extraction method, in which the siftate is placed in thin mesh sacks and then suspended and enclosed within an outer cloth "Winkler bag." The Winkler bag tapers to a cup of ethanol. After loading the sample the Winkler bag is closed at the top and suspended in a sheltered location. Arthopods fall from the litter and accumulate in the ethanol, and the sample is taken off after 3 days.  You can collect along a 100 m transect containing 25 quadrats (25 x 25 cm)  at 5 m spacing in a parcel.
The second and most efficient method to collect soil arthropods are the Berlese funnels. Berlese funnels are used for extracting small arthropods (bugs, soil mites, collembola, coleoptera, ants etc.) from soil and litter samples. They work on the principle that insects and other arthropods that normally live in soil and litter will respond negatively to light. Therefore, a light source is used to force the arthropods to move downward, where they will fall into a funnel and then into a container of ethanol.
Soil and litter samples are first collected in a natural habitat, usually in a forested area. The samples may be sifted first so as to maximize the amount collected. You can collect  leaf litter along a 100 m linear transect in 25 quadrats (25 x 25 cm) at 5 m spacing. Keep the leaf litter  samples separated inside plastic bags for each quadrat and locality. Then in the lab put the samples inside the Berlese funnels during 3 days with a  25 watt light bulb  to force down the arthropods into ethanol containers.
Good luck
Luis Miguel
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I am looking for a possibility of distinguish these two true-bugs species in larval stage. Maybe someone knows some papers about this issue.
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Thanks Xikun.
Vincent, thanks for the link to french forum. It is very interesting discussion and shows how complicated is this problem. But I believe it could be solved :)
Best regards. 
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Can anyone tell me what this pair of bristles found associated with every spiracle in the kudzu bug are? A pair is always found near the spiracle and the "crater" around the base of the bristle almost looks like another spiracle.
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I strongly believe these are trichobothria. They are basically mechanosensory hairs, like the other contributors mentioned, but with a special function - they respond to air movements (mostly quite finely tuned to certain frequencies) and are thus hearing organs. For Pentatomoidea (where kudzu bug, as all Plataspididae, belongs to), the number and position of the abdominal trichoibothria is an important systematic character.
Best,
Viktor
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I have been wondering about the function of the ventral spine displayed by acanthosomatid bugs. Have there been studies on this topic? Thanks!
Frank
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No there are no studies on it!
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I'm looking for key on the families written above, any kind of help is welcome!
Thank you in advance,
Peter
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Dear Pete,
attached you`ll find the first paper.
Best wishes,
Ralf
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Working on the spread of Lygaeus creticus (Heteroptera) I suggested that the median of the highway, which is made ​​up of oleander, has transferred this species from southern to northern Italy. It seems that even windage operated by heavy goods vehicles has a significant impact. I'm checking out the possibility that this hypothesis is applicable to other species of insects and am looking for references in Literature.
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There is literature available where different stochastic spatial models of spread are compared that base on different hypothesised dispersal models (e.g. stratified dispersal model vs. diffusion model). The stratified model has the idea that wind and human transportation influences dispersal and invasion and can predict the field situation quite well.
Papers would be e.g.
Gilbert, M., Fielding, N., Evans, H.F. & Grégoire, J.-C. (2003b) Spatial patterns of invading Dendroctonus micans (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) populations in the United Kingdom. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 33, 712–725.
Gilbert, M., Grégoire, J.-C., Freise, J. F. and Heitland, W. (2004), Long-distance dispersal and human population density allow the prediction of invasive patterns in the horse chestnut leafminer Cameraria ohridella. Journal of Animal Ecology, 73: 459–468. doi: 10.1111/j.0021-8790.2004.00820.x
As far as I know food plants directly at the highways were not involved here but at least in some distance available (in a distance e.g. Cameraria can manage).
The paper:
Hulme, P. E. (2009), Trade, transport and trouble: managing invasive species pathways in an era of globalization. Journal of Applied Ecology, 46: 10–18. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2008.01600.x
gives a short discussion on human transportation and influences of such corridors and additional references.
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I'm studying some series of specimens belonging to this genus, from Asia and Africa: so I need keys and descriptions to classify these bugs harmful to crops.
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Try those:
Ahmad, I. & Zaidi, R.H. (1989) A revision of the genus Halyomorpha Mayr (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae: Pentatominae: Carpocorini) from Indo-Pakistan subcontinent with description of a new species from Potohar region of Pakistan and their cladistic analysis. Proceedings of the Pakistan Congress of Zoology, 9, 237–253.
Lee W, Kang J, Jung C, Hoelmer K, Lee S, Lee S. 2009. Complete mitochondrial genome of brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), and phylogenetic relationships of hemipteran suborders. Mol. Cells 28:155–65
Zaidi, Raees Hussain, 1987. Aspects Of Morphology And Taxonomy Of Aeliine Stal And Carpocorini Stal (Pentatomidaepentatominae) Of Indo-Pakistan Subcontinent With Their Caladistic Analysis
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Found on Quercus ilex. Site in Madrid, Center of Iberian Peninsula. Can anyone confirm?
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we must study NEW keys for photographic identification of Heteroptera. That's the way!
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It's found on Salsola oppositifolia. Site in Murcia, Southeast of Spain. I think it's possible to be Phylini tribe.
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Thanks!!!
I see that reference:
Glaucopterum deserticola güntheri (sic) Carapezza, 2002
Familia Miridae
LOCALIDAD TIPO: Cabo de Gata, Almería, sobre Salsola vermiculata L.
MATERIAL TIPO: holotipo y 22 paratipos en la colección del autor.
DISTRIBUCIÓN: conocida sólo de la localidad tipo.
REFERENCIA: Carapezza, A., 2002. Miridae from Andalucia: new taxa
and new Spanish records (Hemiptera Heteroptera). Il Naturalista
Siciliano, 26(3-4): 205-212.
Photo references: