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Health Information Management - Science topic

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It is glaring that Medical Data collection in healthcare allows health systems to create holistic views of patients, personalize treatments, advance treatment methods, improve communication between doctors and patients, and enhance health outcomes.
Inconsistent medical data have grave effects on proper planning of health care system. How can the problems of inconsistency in medical data be tackled, in various health institutions?
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The question becomes the degree to which national economies are affected by disease burdens when the nature of that burden is unclear because of different standards of reportage. Similarly, if you mean data on supply--for instance ventilators or certain medications--if unreliable the limits of those records will result in a lack of resources at treatment sites. The effect on the economy in the first will involve the cost of unanticipated disease incidence or the expansion of diseases (for example in epidemic cases) that might have been anticipated, with better records, and thus better prepared for. Similarly, if it's about supply of equipments or pharmaceuticals the shortages that result from inconsistent records will mean either higher costs for emergency purchase or higher mortality/morbidity in the absence of necessary equipment or pharmaceuticals. If the numbers are sufficient--for instance provision of vaccines, or undercounting of those with critical conditions requiring extensive medication, the effect may be broadly economic as well as clnical.
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The rate at which health information managers are being shabbily treated among health care system in the developing world health care system, has created a lot of low esteem personality among health care workers.
Health Information Managers plays vital roles in the development of healthcare system, and are meant to be given equal recognition as their counterparts.
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As far as I conceive this question, it's for front line health workers who work in the health department. Their job profile is also to collect information/data in the community whose health is at stake. If they are illtreated then the quality of data will be poor and that effects planning and to imparting health services . So , it's essentially important to take care of these managers and in turn the quality information will be available in such settings.
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What model do you recommend for the Acceptance of Hospital Intelligence Management System (HIMS) Technology? (Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), Extension of TAM (ETAM), Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT)) and etc?
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I agree with Jorge Tavares
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I'm looking for a good quality, WoS or Scopus journals that took a relatively short time for acceptance and publication in the field of health informatics and multidisciplinary journals as well.
Thanks in advance
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Dear Dr. Mehri,
Regarding the features you need, the journal of Acta Medica Informatica seems to be a good choice. You can find it here: https://actainformmed.org/
Good luck
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I am looking for different theories related to Health Information Management. Kindly send me some,
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Here is a starting point. I will be happy to upload specific paper on TOE.
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Position of DHIS in data management for research
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I realize this is an old question, but since there are some followers to it I just want to point out that there is a project on RG with lots of references to DHIS2:
Most of our research concerns the implementation and use of DHIS2, so there should be a lot of relevant articles there to help answer the original question, or any question you would have around DHIS2.
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If some one knows about the procedure for transition from one standards to another, this we are asking regarding clinical laboratory standards.
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The transition from one set of standards to a new set of standard follows the same principles every time. The standards organisations may publish guidance documents on the subject, if they don't for your particular standards, then you only need to follow the principles set-out in other examples. For example ISO, BSI and Australian Standards publish these; https://www.iso.org/iso/iso_9001_-_moving_from_2008_to_2015.pdf, https://www.bsigroup.com/LocalFiles/es-ES/.../ISO-9001-transition-guide.pdf  & https://www.saiglobal.com/en-au/quality_management_9001/transition_to_quality_management_systems_iso_9001_2015/ respectfully which provide very similar material. There is a bit of work to do, firstly there needs to be unconditional support from management and those responsible for paying the bills. Then you need to decide on a plan/timeframe (be realistic unless there is a deadline by which they MUST be implemented) to achieve the new standards, remember this may change as you get a better understanding of the differences between standards. That is where the unconditional support of management is very important. Now it is time to sit down and going through both standards in detail to find similarities and differences. There will be some items which map directly from one standard to another, of-course there will be completely new items and possibly even items which are no longer required.
Have a read through the links I provided and hopefully they will make sense and help you with your task.
Cheers
Lindsay
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There is a number of the formulas for calculation of the cost-effectiveness of the projects, novel treatment modalities, surgery, drugs etc.
But how to calculate the cost-effectiveness of the diagnostic questionnaire?
How to retrieve the cost of analyses from the countries with the system of Health insurance? Should I take into account interests of the insurance companies? 
Thank you all in advance for your answers.
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Diagnostic tools present a complex challenge in cost-effectiveness analyses.  In general, before you can start, you need to understand the value of the information provided by the new diagnostic tool, in terms of how it changes treatment decisions and outcomes.   Specifically:
  • What is the current process of care?
  • At what point in the process is the new diagnostic information utilized?
  • For how many -- and which -- patients is the tool expected to yield information that differs from the previous information or assumption?
  • Among those patients, what proportion will have a change in care as a result of the new information?
  • How exactly will treatment change?
  • How does the effectiveness of the new treatment (including major or costly side effects) differ from the effectiveness of the treatment the patient would otherwise have received (including major or costly side effects)?
Once you have modeled how your diagnostic tool changes treatment paths and outcomes -- and for whom -- you can apply costs/utilities in accordance with your analytical objectives.  It's a challenge, but if you walk though the logic you will see quickly that the value of a diagnostic tool is often governed by the effectiveness of the treatments that might be applied as a result of the new information. 
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This is a question that no Nurse or Regulatory Inspector has ever been able to answer in spite of the fact that the use of probability for single event management is a complete nonsense.
The responses to date to this question are best described as varying degrees of hostility, declarations that it is integral to evidenced based care practice and emphatic disinterest in addressing this gross misuse of probability.
This silliness would be laughable if the reality of this practice was not so serious for patient care and the vast waste of organisational resources that it is responsible for.
Worryingly, this misuse of probability is being enshrined in Regulatory Standards e.g. the Health Information Quality Authority in Ireland requires care providers to use assessment formats so that the probability of each resident / patient in regard to falls can be predicted and measures put in place to prevent and or reduce the chance of a fall happening.
I am not an expert, my competency in statistics is limited to three years of Economic and Social statistics as minors within my BSc Joint Honours majors of Sociology and Social & Economic History but that is sufficient to understand these basic principles:
PROBABILITY: the following are gross misuses:
a) Trying to predict 'when' - especially low-occurrence high impact events
b) Using the past to manage / predict a future
This misuse of probability is exacerbated by a demonstrable lack  of understanding of the difference between an INDICATOR and a MEASURE. 
In 2013 N.I.C.E. issued guidance that nurses should not use assessment tools that purport to measure (e.g. High, Medium, Low Risk) patient's probability of experiencing an event (in this case falls); guidance that is equally valid for hospitals and care homes.
Yet the daily norm for thousands of nurses in Public (e.g. NHS) organisations and Private care homes is spending huge amounts of time at a desk completing predictive assessments rather than in hands-on patient care.
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Thank you Sanden for taking the time to submit a contribution.
Perhaps clarification is needed about this issue that concerns me i.e. the use by nurses of what are called predictive assessments in which the goal is to PREVENT a fall falling by working though a format that ascribes a risk / probability value that is typically identified as a patient as being at low, medium or high risk of falling.
There are many straightforward hazard elimination and passive impact provision measures that will mitigate harm to patients from the falls; an outcome that cannot be achieved by the use of predictive assessments.  
These references, one of many credible sources, provide good background about the issue concerning predictive falls assessment tools:
  • UK's National Institute for Health & Care Excellence (N.I.C.E.) guidance  reference 1.2.1.1 in June 2013: Do not use fall risk prediction tools to predict inpatients' risk of falling in hospital (This guidance is equally applicable to long term care facilities like nursing homes).
  • This link http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/content/37/3/248.long will take you to Professor Oliver and his team's research which provides extensive clarification about the transparent lack of veracity of all predictive fall assessment tools and the misleading outcomes that they can cause.
It is not possible to use probability for single event management i.e. in this case preventing a fall by predicting who will fall and when. However and in spite of the obvious uselessness of predictive falls assessment tools, nurses across the UK and Ireland spend vast amounts of their time off-the-floor away from patients completing predict assessments.
The obvious risk statement and associated real-time helpful interventions are ignored:
  • Everyone (staff and patients) in a hospital can fall for all sorts of reasons
  • Therefore, fall safety interventions should involve a combination of
  • Trip and Fall Hazard elimination where possible
  • Person Specific Hazard Identification and Risk Response Strategy
  • Situation Specific location / environmental hazard assessment and risk management strategy e.g. there may well be a number of differing risk response protocols in Intensive Care to those in an Ambulatory Day Ward in regard to a Fire.
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I would like to clarify the meaning of information quality among the professionals of the field.
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Dear Prof. Oliveria,
First of all, I'm not a professional. But I think Information Quality Research has been very widely done and it depends on dimensions of particular data that's being processed or analyzed. Maybe this article sheds more light
regards
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A 65-year-old male patient presents with right sided weakness of one day duration. He is diabetic on oral hypoglycemic agents. On examination, his BP is 150/90 mm Hg; pulse 104/minute and his right upper and lower limbs are weak III/V. reflexes are normal with up-going right planter reflex. Brain CT showed ischemic stroke. He is a tourist and wishes to travel back home as soon as possible.
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Is there any method for assessment of learning environment in hospital for non clinical purposes like health information management,etc?
health information management technician have mentor ship in hospital. it is in medical category but non clinical.
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I spoke with my peer here who teaches this subject in our University.  She agreed with Stella's answer, tho says the learning environment is not always a hospital, but it is always involved in healthcare.  The site supervisor evaluates the student - and the student provides feedback on the site.
Hope this helps --- there doesn't seem to be any standard ---so perhaps that is an opportunity for you to develop one!!
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I am wondering about any UK hospital's process mining techniques like discovery, conformance, and/or enhancement to study their processes.
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I suggest you interrogate the Health Foundation (based in the United Kingdom) website-
A lot of effort has been put into quality and safety activities within NHS hospitals this last decade and one of the drivers have been the various well publicized incidents involving breaches of accepted standards of care within some of the hospitals.
This kind of question sometimes generated discussion when posted via Twitter.
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I am looking for a survey paper related to mobile health security and privacy. If someone happened to read some survey papers related to this topic, please recommend them to me:) Any survey paper related to this field is OK. This is appreciated, thank you!   
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This published paper in Journal of Medical Systems could be helpful:
Title: Privacy and Security in Mobile Health Apps: A Review and Recommendations
Link:
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Health Literacy is defined as the ability to read and unerstand basic medical
and health information. According to several sources more than one third of the population in North America  has no health / medical literacy. The outcomes are estimated  at more than 100 bilion USD for the health care sector with additional
negative cosequences like : innability to understand inform concern documents,
innability to access and use adequate and proper health/medical info on the net
etc. The next generation should aquire this through school teaching programes
- What you dear fellows think about ?
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This is an interesting conversation about health literacy. I personally feel much of the responsibility for educating patients falls on the health care providers. There are many excellent tools to raise awareness of the issues and I though I would share a few here. Pfizer, the pharmaceutical company, has been a huge advocate for Clear Health Communication for years and I applaud their efforts. They have a new tool, A Health Literacy Assessment Tool for Patient Care and Research called the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) available in English & Spanish. It helps providers assess what the patient knows, and then using some of their clear health communication skills (in the link provided) we as health professionals can work to better communicate and get feedback on what the patient understands about their illness and any treatment options we are recommending.
The American Medical Association has a really powerful video on health literacy in America. Watch it to really see what we are missing by not looking for health literacy, it's been around for a while, but wow. (Every time I watch it I am moved by the impact of health literacy on patients.) We should never assume anything, plain language is important and it is not the patient's responsibility to tell us they "don't get it", because they will not. Providers need to think about this issue and I am glad it is being discussed here. There are great resources out there.
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Are there any documented advantages/disadvantages of using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (modified for diabetes) for research with young adults rather than the IPQ R-Diabetes?
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I am keen to know if the brief IPQ has been utilized with Cranial diabetes insipidus. Cranial Diabetes, as you would be aware is idiopathic. however the brain producing little or no anti-durect hormone can be the result of head injuries, pituitary tumours or nerosurgery or haemochromatosis and sarcoidosis, infections TB genetic defects(rarely), a variety of kidney conditions, inherited genetic disorders. given that conditions such as haemochromatosis often go undetected there may be individuals undiagnosed with cranial diabetes.
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Is the definition of Service Level Agreements, especially the definition of Quality of Service criterias and metrics a task of the strategic or the operational information management?
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Lots of good thinking here, and, agree with Deborah's response as well -
I would also like to add that, the definition of the SLAs is probably an ideal place for a 'functional collaboration' between the strategic *and* operational information management teams, as well as key business stakeholders (including operational and strategy).
In this conversation - if it is facilitated in a successful manner - both sides of the information management team will gain a deeper appreciation of each other's mandate, key goals and purposes -
As well as an enhanced understanding of how they might better align with the key organizational and strategic goals overall.
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I am working on using ESB to integrate the health data sources, but need to know if there has been any existing system in this regards? What is the impact and is any organization working on this?
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Does anyone have experience in validating a questionnaire-based classification tool? I have undertaken content validation already but am struggling with how to test it for criterion-related and contruct validity. This is a classification system for models of care and there is no existing tool to validate it against nor are there any repeated measures within the questionnaire. Aside from using a test and retest to check for repeatability against a known model of care and having many people classify the same model to check for reproducibility, I am not sure how else to validate it. If anyone can provide some suggestions or good references I would really appreciate it.
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I suggest one way to validate a model or a classification system with a number of hypothesis within which questionnaire can be used to validated. Other approaches include simulation and experimental data. You might find this useful IEEE article http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=608984&tag=1
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The aim is to describe the surgery intervention in a formal - mathematical way in order to make computer optimization of the procedure to reduce the traumatic effect and the surgery time.
Few thoughts...
Let's consider the surgery for the tumor excision (cutting out).
Most obviously, the first parameters for formalization is the space coordinates within the human body. And in case of operation, we need to have an entry point and a path (set of points) for the surgical instrument (knife) to be moved along in order to reach the tumor location. Also we need to have a set of points to describe the surface of the tumor to be cut out.
At the same time, there are should be description of the critical area for the knife to be avoided during the surgery.
Would like to hear your thoughts regarding the surgery formalization.
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I don't have any particular insights, but it seems like the problem you are trying to tackle may be too large. It may behoove you to narrow your focus, such as creating a mathematical model to balance visibility of a particular area invasiveness. This certainly is not a simple problem, but seems it could easily be a factor in your grander model. I can appreciate wishing to hash out what factors might come into play though so you can tackle each piece individually. I would imagine even given a suggested incision it would ultimately be more a factor of the surgeon's skill level and even preference. Don't let this discourage you from trying to inform them.
As you can probably tell though, I have no expertise in the field. So weigh my considerations accordingly.