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In order to visualize the vessels of cadaver, i'm using colored latex. After filling the vessels latex remains fluid. During the dissection, fluid latex sometimes comes out of the cut vessels. How to harden the colored latex? 
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Dear Sedat,
latex-milk contains some amounts of ammoniac. Thus you should use/add some acetic acid for neutralising the ammoniac, either immediately before injection or later on by immersion. For leakages we use concentrated/pure acetic acid on a swab.
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Any specifics related to the numerous variations found? Particularly on the side of the Hemi and Accessory Hemi azygos vein.
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This is a comprehensive review
The azygos vein pathway: an overview from anatomical
variations to pathological changes
Piciucchi S, Barone D, Sanna S, Dubini A, Goodman LR, Oboldi D, Bertocco M, Ciccotosto C, Gavelli G, Carloni A, Poletti V.
Insights Imaging. 2014 Oct;5(5):619-28.
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is identification of complicated appendicitis still an unexplored part in our journey of managing appendicitis or there are some variables that we have finally found out? kindly give references for what you say. Thanks.
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A common severe abdominal pain can often be associated with a dysfunction of the sacroiliac joint.  This is Baer's SI point.  This can occur on either side.  It is on a line from the ASIS to the umbilicus, two inches from the umbilicus.  Not to be confused with the appendicitis point which is two inches from the ASIS.  I saw a patient with a 4 year history of abdominal pain and LBP.  She had both ovaries removed and still had symptoms.  I did a manual posterior innominate correction and she was free of pain in both the low back and abdomen.  She was a little miffed about the unnecessary loss of her ovaries.
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Have you noticed that, in Human cultures, qualitative leaps strictly relate to times when human dissection is performed?
I think, of course, of the Egyptian and ancient Greek culture, or the Renaissance times, in which Art in general, and Medical knowledge in particular, evolved in parallel with the improvements of anatomical techniques and cadaveric preservation.
Can anyone help me find more absolute facts and arguments to proceed with our quest to maintain the habit of human dissection in Modern medical curricula?
Thank you for your kind collaboration, even if you disagree... 
«(...) 
And you, who say that it would be better to watch an anatomist at work than to see these drawings, you would be right, if it were possible to observe all the things which are demonstrated in such drawings in a single figure, in which you, with all your cleverness will not see nor obtain knowledge of more than a few veins, to obtain a true and perfect knowledge of which I have dissected more than ten human bodies, destroying all the other members, and removing the very minutest particles of the flesh by which these veins are surrounded, without causing them to bleed, excepting the insensible bleeding of the capillary veins; and one single body would not last long, since it was necessary to proceed with several bodies by degrees, until I came to an end and had a complete knowledge; this I repeated twice, to learn the differences. »
LEONARDO DA VINCI - Notebooks - On Anatomy
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... suddenly, I got the feeling that others might be afraid to post the 13th comment to our interesting quest, at the time at which I count 213 views of the extremely interesting comments, to the question Iproposed.
In fact , as I have noticed, supersticion and human Anatomy are also entangled, since the beginning of times (probably because both relate closely to the human mind. ) I have often wondered why we only count 12 pairs of cranial nerves, whereas the VIIth and VIIth bis are in fact different nerves.  and the count should raise to XIII... (that's how strange the human mind could get!
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Formalin is quite harmful and irritating. Plastination is too expensive.
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Dear Maria,
Thank you for quoting my work.
In reference to the above issue, I should remark and emphasize a few more topics:
Our 15 years experience with these conservation methods are still under improvement.
In our next work, we will present reference to the experimental use of several embalming techniques, with conservation times between one or one and half year, up to five years.
Our best results were obtained during our first years of experimentation, when we developed our perfusion pump in straight collaboration with CEFITEC and the Department of Physics of the Faculty of Technological Sciences of our University.
The development of this perfusion pump allows complete vascular perfusion in closed circuit with perfect control of debits and capillary perfusion, with pulsed impregnation of tissues, simulating the cardiac rhythms.
The specimens we use, both for undergraduate dissections (over a period of six weeks of manipulations), as for post graduation courses and surgical training sessions, bear great quality and endurance, as you can check from this Prezzi presentation in attachment http://prezi.com/qk-muuogpev7/eaca-lisbon-dissection-room-june2013/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy
The materials we use for current conservation, consisting of a modified mixture of Theil, are quite inexpensive and easy to purchase, and, most of all, less toxic than Formaldehyde, for the staff. (Should I remind that Formaldehyde is one of the few -9- well-documented cancerigenic materials still in the market)
 
All the best,
João
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Good day.  I am interested on how one can accurately measure the Q-angle on cadavers, if this is even possible.  Also, if possible, state the name of the article that supports this notion.  
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Hi Williem,
Ask your friendly anatomy lab technicians if you can get access prior to embalming. We do this regularly in my lab. We could probably provide additional data from our cadavers if you are interested. The landmarks are also bone so should be ok to find on our cadavers. Let me know if you need help.
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Can anyone please help in providing different techniques for dissection of the Nodal arteries in order to determine their origin.
I am currently doing it according to the attached article but I have seen that the procedure doesn't work on every specimen.
If you have experience in these type of dissections please elaborate on your technique.
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IN HUMAN HEART
the atrial branches of the right coronary artery are sometimes described as anterior, lateral (right or marginal) and posterior groups, they are usually small single vessels 1mm in diameter. The right anterior and lateral branches are occasionally double, very rarely triple, and mainly supply the right atrium. The posterior branch is usually single and supplies the right and left atria. The artery of the sinoatrial node is an atrial branch, distributed largely to the myocardium of both atria, mainly the right. Its origin is variable: it comes from the circumflex branch of the left coronary in 35%. However, more commonly it arises from the anterior atrial branch of the right coronary artery, less often from its right lateral part, least often from its posterior atrioventricular part. This ‘nodal' artery thus usually passes back in the groove between the right auricular appendage and aorta. Whatever its origin, it usually branches around the base of the superior vena cava, typically as an arterial loop from which small branches supply the right atrium. A large ‘ramus cristae terminalis' traverses the sinu-atrial node .it would seem more appropriate to name this branch the ‘nodal artery', as most of the currently named vessel actually supplies the atria and serves as the ‘main atrial branch'
nodal artery usually identified by its course -- described above
REFER : GRAY'S ANATOMY 40 th edition vascular supply and lymphatic drainage of heart (Fig. 56.18A–C);
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It is important to identify "small" anomalies
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There is also an 'International Journal of Anatomical Variations', which has the aim to continue the 'Encyclopedia of Human Anatomic Variation' by Ron Bergman. It is dedicated to human anatomical variation.